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The Diner / Re: Non-Classical Music Listening Thread!
« Last post by Sergeant Rock on Today at 04:49:09 PM »
When I was about 14 - 16 years old I've been to dozens and dozens of gigs (and still have the scars to prove it 8)

I've got a few scars too. Those mosh pits were brutal. I usually ended up bloodied. At the Kennedys' concert, my first punk experience, not knowing what to expect, I was positioned dead center, a short way from the stage, when the band took the stage and the music exploded. I felt like a ball in a pinball machine  ;D  But I soon got the hang of it, enjoyed the physical contact.

When I was about 14 - 16 years old I've been to dozens and dozens of gigs...One of the most fun and carefree periods that I can remember  ;D ;D

That was, for me, 1982-83. But I was a geezer then, 33, 34 :D  Saw these great bands:

Joan Jett and the Blackhearts
Deutsch Amerikanische Freundschaft
Jethro Tull
Black Flag
Minutemen
Dead Kennedys
Charged G.B.H.
UK Subs
Gun Club
Bad Brains
Black Sabbath
Mother's Finest
and a half dozen German hardcore bands

Sarge
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This is easily one of the most interesting and enchanting recordings that I've heard in a long time. The instrument was first conceived by Leonardo da Vinci, but apparently he never made one. Over the centuries a few similar instruments were made, but they never caught on. The player on this recording made his own!  Basically, one plays it like a normal keyboard, but it bows the strings instead of striking them, and it sustains the sound for as long as the pedal is held down. The result sounds like a viol ensemble with slight organ overtones due to the sustain capabilities. For more info, go to http://www.violaorganista.com/en/home/



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The Diner / Morton Feldman's treatment of Bunita Marcus
« Last post by k a rl h e nn i ng on Today at 04:15:49 PM »
Thank you, David.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

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The Diner / Re: Morton Feldman's treatment of Bunita Marcus
« Last post by Mahlerian on Today at 04:14:03 PM »
I spent about 45 minutes today talking with Bunita Marcus.  We first went over the standard group of questions I ask all the composers I interview in about 30-35 minutes, and then at the end I brought up the article and Italian interview.

Okay, there was no confusion, she did feel that Feldman crossed the boundary from mentor/colleague into inappropriate and unwanted romantic advances.  But what I got from her description was that it wasn't "sexual abuse" so much as his desire to have a relationship that she did not want, and him not desisting when she repeatedly asked him to.  In fact, several other musicians also asked him to back off as well.  She is very bitter because it caused trouble in her marriage, which ended in divorce.  I can't help but feel that there is more to the story, but I did not press her since the whole thing felt sordid.

The business about him appropriating her music and passing it off as his own, was a bit more complicated.  She does feel that she was not credited with her creative work, and because he was the "star" on the NY scene it was assumed that she could not have influenced him.  She described a complex set of emotions leading to his "stealing" as part of his romantic obsession, i.e. him trying to "woo" her with music and part of that writing music which he thought would appeal to her, including some rather crude artistic thievery.  An example of the "highest form of flattery" ... that went too far.

It is an unfortunate set of events - and I do feel that the article sensationalized the facts - but there they are.  I did not ask about the specific comments posted under her name. 

I feel I must apologize to the forum since I took such a firm stance of doubting the facts. 

None of this will appear in my interview/profile of Marcus when I publish our conversation.

The real tragedy is that her music was overlooked and a big part of her motivation for telling this story is about  getting credit for her work.

Thanks for your honesty and tact in the interview.  The clarification is much appreciated.
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The Diner / Re: Morton Feldman's treatment of Bunita Marcus
« Last post by milk on Today at 04:08:29 PM »
I spent about 45 minutes today talking with Bunita Marcus.  We first went over the standard group of questions I ask all the composers I interview in about 30-35 minutes, and then at the end I brought up the article and Italian interview.

Okay, there was no confusion, she did feel that Feldman crossed the boundary from mentor/colleague into inappropriate and unwanted romantic advances.  But what I got from her description was that it wasn't "sexual abuse" so much as his desire to have a relationship that she did not want, and him not desisting when she repeatedly asked him to.  In fact, several other musicians also asked him to back off as well.  She is very bitter because it caused trouble in her marriage, which ended in divorce.  I can't help but feel that there is more to the story, but I did not press her since the whole thing felt sordid.

The business about him appropriating her music and passing it off as his own, was a bit more complicated.  She does feel that she was not credited with her creative work, and because he was the "star" on the NY scene it was assumed that she could not have influenced him.  She described a complex set of emotions leading to his "stealing" as part of his romantic obsession, i.e. him trying to "woo" her with music and part of that writing music which he thought would appeal to her, including some rather crude artistic thievery.  An example of the "highest form of flattery" ... that went too far.

It is an unfortunate set of events - and I do feel that the article sensationalized the facts - but there they are.  I did not ask about the specific comments posted under her name. 

I feel I must apologize to the forum since I took such a firm stance of doubting the facts. 

None of this will appear in my interview/profile of Marcus when I publish our conversation.

The real tragedy is that her music was overlooked and a big part of her motivation for telling this story is about  getting credit for her work.
Thank you for updating us and for your work on this. I think everyone really appreciates it. 
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Do you also think that the gamba sonatas work better for the balances with an organ?

I can see that Jochen Brusch - Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen play 1019 - I'm curious to hear the recording just because of Mikkelsen, but I can't find it for sale anywhere - if anyone sees it at an affordable price, please let me know.



Of course





.

There is a peculiar recording of the viola da gamba sonatas with Pietr Wisperwel who plays a cello piccolo with the harpsichord part shared by a keyboard (fortepiano, harpsichord, organ) and a cello playing the bass line. Makes the interaction of the viola da gamba part and the bass line more prominent.



I like it. I also like the version of BWV1027 for two flutes and continuo. Cello and Piano is also interesting (Argerich and Maisky, for instance).

I think I will seek out a version with organ, since I tend to think the harpsichord is too light for the roll it plays in this music.
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The Diner / Re: Brexit Negotiations.
« Last post by Mr. Minnow on Today at 03:57:45 PM »
So, you vote to leave the EU to get rid of all these EU immigrants...

And before you know it, you need non-EU immigrants to replace them:


Leading Brexiter admits supply of labour from EU27 falling so ‘we’ll need to look further afield’


Well, that's just freaking hilarious.....  :D


Q


Even that will be spun as somehow the EU's fault.
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The Diner / Re: One Word Posts
« Last post by aligreto on Today at 03:32:39 PM »
cryptography
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by aligreto on Today at 03:29:23 PM »
Gorecki: Good Night....





I really like the opening movement with its simple and dark tones of the alto flute and its minimal accompaniment. I like how the tone and dynamics are both augmented and then revert to the opening status. I find the tone change from the dark and foreboding to the poignant quite beguiling in the second movement and this is wonderfully achieved with the same instrumentation. Basically the same themes and tones are used in the final movement but I really like how Upshaw’s haunting vocal line blends in with the music.
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The Diner / Re: Your Top 5 Favorite Rock Albums Of All-Time
« Last post by Pat B on Today at 03:00:34 PM »
A big problem I have with a lot of rock music is fadeouts, which nearly always seem like a lazy, rude and uncaring way to end a piece.

+1. I don’t mind too much with individual songs, but for an album, having a bunch of songs that fade out is a big minus.

EDIT: but apparently not big enough to keep Loaded out of my top 5. :-[
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