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The Diner / Re: Worst looking CD/LP artwork
« Last post by Alek Hidell on Today at 03:49:02 PM »
Underneath the crap there's a bad photo. Those shadows - particularly around the eye and corner of the mouth - don't need to be there.

One Weird Trick

A quick look at a higher res version shows catchlights in the eyes from a window and so we're indoors. And indoors means more than one wall. Walls usually join at right angles. They're good for standing a subject with their back to the wall near the corner and using the second wall (out of frame) to act as a reflector and bounce back some light as fill. The size and close distance means that reflected light will be soft and flattering.
The advanced method is to place your subject with their back to the wall behind a door. The door then becomes a moveable reflector and as you adjust how much the door is open/closed you change the coverage and ratio of your impromptu lighting scheme.
Of course, even if that shot had been lit using those (or another competent) method someone would probably still 'edit' it in post to look like that.

*Genuflects at NikF's photographic acumen*
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by NikF on Today at 03:45:00 PM »
Brahms: Piano Concerto No.1 In D Minor, Op.15 - Pollini/Thielemann/Staatskapelle Dresden.

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The Diner / Re: Worst looking CD/LP artwork
« Last post by NikF on Today at 03:43:25 PM »
How about this one? Looks like a hostage photo.


Underneath the crap there's a bad photo. Those shadows - particularly around the eye and corner of the mouth - don't need to be there.

One Weird Trick

A quick look at a higher res version shows catchlights in the eyes from a window and so we're indoors. And indoors means more than one wall. Walls usually join at right angles. They're good for standing a subject with their back to the wall near the corner and using the second wall (out of frame) to act as a reflector and bounce back some light as fill. The size and close distance means that reflected light will be soft and flattering.
The advanced method is to place your subject with their back to the wall behind a door. The door then becomes a moveable reflector and as you adjust how much the door is open/closed you change the coverage and ratio of your impromptu lighting scheme.
Of course, even if that shot had been lit using those (or another competent) method someone would probably still 'edit' it in post to look like that.

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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Madiel on Today at 03:13:43 PM »
Das Paradies und die Peri

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The Diner / Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Last post by Daverz on Today at 03:13:17 PM »

Interesting for what it attempts. Maybe flawed but still worth the time.

Really enjoyed this one.  Of relevance to GMG is pianist Maria Yudina as a historical character (Olga Kurylenko is a bit too gorgeous for the part, but oh well...)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Daverz on Today at 02:54:10 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/tPk0OuYiWDw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/tPk0OuYiWDw</a>

Looks like a young Jack Nicholson.

No. 90 is one of my favorite Haydn symphonies.  Will have to save this for later.

Thread duty:

Bruckner Symphony No. 9: Giulini/Concertgebeow from 1/22/1978, from the RCO anthology volume 4:   



I was alerted to this recording by a comment in a dismissive review of a Jansons recording by James North in Fanfare:

"I’ve been struck by a fascinating stereo record­ing: Carlo Maria Giulini and the Concertgebouw, January 22 1978, issued in an RCO LIVE 14-CD set: Anthology of the Concertgebouw Orchestra, 1970–1980. Despite almost Celibidache-like tempos (64:52 compared to Walter’s 50:56), Giulini’s performance teems with life; there is none of the heaviness that mars so many Bruckner Ninths (Simone Young, Fanfare 39:4). The first and third move­ments do not always hold together but contain some surpassingly beautiful passages; the scherzo bristles with crisp ferocity. The orchestra plays with unmatched color and panache, and the sound is gorgeous—yet another indication that the Grote Zaal of the Concertgebouw sounded better before the 1988 restoration than afterwards. (Either the hall cannot take fortissimos as well as it once did, or the orchestra is playing them at ever louder levels.)"

This is quite a change from his earlier review of the RCO Anthology set:

"Giulini’s Bruckner Ninth is a disappointment; his very slow tempos seem to throw the players off track. Horns struggle to maintain tone even in the opening phrase. The opening Feierlich, Misterioso is solemn but lacks mystery; the Scherzo is fine, and the Finale meanders."





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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by kyjo on Today at 02:50:32 PM »
It depends what you call American music. Around 1950, there were basically 3 home grown sources of music that coexisted, mingled and mixed happily in the US: from the folk (often negro) roots to the jazz (black or white) or the academe reared (local or foreign, like the Nadia Boulanger crowd). Before and during WWII a wave of european émigrés settled in the US, a surprisingly large number of them in Hollywood. The latter group was the most recent and, one would think, the least naturally suited to contribute to an « american » idiom, but through the movie studios they did in fact shape what was to become the signature Hollywood sound: composers like Franz Waxman, Max Steiner, Dimitri Tiomkin, Victor Young, Richard Hageman, Korngold, Rosza, they toiled (litterally) along with local boys Bernard Herrmann, Alfred Newman, Hugo Friedhofer. Although each had his own personality, they collectively shaped american film music.

It’s precisely what europeans, like Braga Santos, fed a generous and steady diet of american films in the 1940s, 1950s
 came to regard as « american music ».

Sorry, I should’ve been more specific. I was simply referring to that signature “American” sound that was developed by Copland in his “populist” phase and replicated by some of the film score composers you mention. There was, of course, a wide variety of stylistic trends going on in America at the time.
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The Diner / Re: Worst looking CD/LP artwork
« Last post by Peter Power Pop on Today at 02:21:36 PM »
How about this one? Looks like a hostage photo.


It's not the most flattering photo of Claudio I've ever seen.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Last post by TheGSMoeller on Today at 01:52:07 PM »
I just heard DSCH's orchestration of Tahiti Trot today. Pretty amazing stuff that he orchestrated the thing in about 45 minutes and it is just SO Shostakovich like: the piccolo, e-flat clarinet, xylophone, muted trumpet all having a grand old time.

Yes! It's great. Not sure which performance you heard, but Chailly's Jazz Album includes the Tahiti Trot, and the rest of the album is full of DSCH's colorful instrumentation.

Just purchased this live performance from Mravinsky/Leningrad Phil of the 10th Symphony. Anyone familiar with it?




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The Diner / Re: Non-Classical Music Listening Thread!
« Last post by George on Today at 01:28:41 PM »
Yes, it is important to be patient and to give these things time to fully reveal themselves.

Yes, I am learning that.

Now:

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