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I don't think I can agree. "Much of what transpires" is the ordinary business of life. Probably, life has never been this good for so many people. That's transpiring also on the planet, notwithstanding the glaring misery. Science is just a method I think. Our most reliable method. Religion, the faith in Donald, is something else. It's not something anybody seriously relies on as they rely on airplanes or penicillin.
I know that some of my friends on the left have always said there's no difference between Ds and Rs. There's some connection between this and conspiracy theories but I'm not sure what it is.   

It might not be the bleeding obvious but once considering it as a reasonable hypothesis, government meddling in the private lives of citizens with "science" as an excuse, becomes not so wacky. You asked me to mention a few areas. After sending the post, I thought of climate change and regulations that have to do health. As science is not a monolith there are differing opinions but those the government decides on. become law. Global warming has practically become unassailable dogma. You have to "believe"!

For those who don't want vaccinations, or pay outrageous taxes on cigarettes, food labelled as to calories or whatnot as though anyone really reads them, meddling in school lunches, there aere probably many more examples but free choice has been stripped away little by little from them. The worst though has to do with reproduction, not a function of government, unless it is the Brave New World where human beings are engineered by the State. One should remember that phony science having to do with race was allied to a government that culminated in the mass murder under National Socialism.

There is hardly any opting out, whether an employer should provide birth control and why the heck should that be mandated by the government unless they are up to their ears in controlling the population, abortion being the issue that cannot be wiped clean from blatant government meddling. Why should they want to kill off some people, yet replace them with immigrants who either have nothing to do with the culture but are hell bent on destroying it. As this already happened in Europe, indeed there is more than the whiff of a conspiracy. Nat'l Socialism was not destroyed, Communism was not really defeated, these ideologies to makeover human beings just went underground and are rearing their head again in different disguises.

To sum up, I believe THIS is the reason the D's are not essentially different from the R's. Maybe the means are dissimilar but the results are the same. War is yet another means of skimming off the population, the best part. It also costs money, a humongous amount. Think of the Bushes and that GW voted for Hillary Clinton. That says everything.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Last post by vandermolen on Today at 10:52:49 PM »
I seriously doubt that Hindemith was a influence. I mean RVW wasn’t exactly smitten with the Germans the best to my memory. I seem to recall he had some negative things to say about Mahler. But this doesn’t bother me nor should it bother anyone else, there are a lot of composers who say negative things about other composers all through history.
I have a feeling that I read somewhere that VW liked Hindemith's music but I might be quite wrong about this.
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The Diner / Re: Where's Wally?
« Last post by zamyrabyrd on Today at 10:39:34 PM »
Here she is:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/uIOifQrFtmU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/uIOifQrFtmU</a>
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Que on Today at 10:37:21 PM »
Morning listening - after the Cantiones Sacrae switching back to the Psalms set:


Fourth Book of Psalms (1621)

Q
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Casella's Symphony no. 2:



Head-banging stuff! This piece is the polar opposite of what comes to most people's minds when they think of Italian music - it's big, dark, loud, and Mahlerian. Derivative, maybe, but powerful and highly enjoyable nonetheless. The second movement was actually my favorite of the four - a whirling, stomping scherzo that is suffused with supercharged Russian energy.

A pretty nice symphony, but not a favorite of mine from Casella. The Sinfonia (Symphony No. 3), his last symphony, is my favorite with an absolute heart-rendering slow movement, Andante molto moderato quasi adagio. This particular movement, for me, is one of the best things he has composed. The Alun Francis recording is the one to own. Noseda totally misses the point in this slow movement and rushes through some key moments that should have been treated more delicately.
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Opera and Vocal / Re: La Clemenza Di Tito
« Last post by Marc on Today at 10:30:02 PM »
[...]
Any recommendations on recordings?

As usual, I'm particularly interested in HIP performances....

(But I won't neglect any recommendations of Golden Oldies with stellar singing....)


Thanks!  :)

Q

I've always been very happy with the HIP/PI-recording in Brilliant's Mozart Edition: Jed Wentz conducting Musica ad Rhenum.
Gardiner and Jacobs have done fine jobs with this piece, too.

Non-HIP favourites: Istvan Kertész and Colin Davis.

'Semi-HIP': Harnonknoei & Orchester der Oper Zürich.

That'll keep you busy for a while. :)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by kyjo on Today at 10:25:52 PM »
Casella's Symphony no. 2:



Head-banging stuff! This piece is the polar opposite of what comes to most people's minds when they think of Italian music - it's big, dark, loud, and Mahlerian. Derivative, maybe, but powerful and highly enjoyable nonetheless. The second movement was actually my favorite of the four - a whirling, stomping scherzo that is suffused with supercharged Russian energy. Casella would later go on to develop a more personal style, as exemplified by his wonderful Third Symphony.
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The 8th:

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Opera and Vocal / Re: RIP Dimitri Hovorostovsky
« Last post by Marc on Today at 10:19:46 PM »
Sad indeed.

Beautiful warm voice.

RIP Dmitri.
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Prokofiev, piano sonatas 5 and 7, Chiu.

Prokofiev seems at his happiest the more he seeks to mock/shock those within earshot, including the performer. Fortunately Chiu is gifted with his own brand of mischievousness which is aligned as a perfect reverse converse, reversed, to the whimsies of Prokofiev. The resulting give-and-go between pianist and composer induces a bag-full of Prokofievian fun. I have a feeling Prokofiev couldn't be prouder. 



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