GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Henk on June 01, 2008, 12:25:41 PM

Title: Philip Glass
Post by: Henk on June 01, 2008, 12:25:41 PM
Saw he has no thread yet, only threads about particular works of him.
I love the cd's released on Naxos, Symphony 2,3 and The Light / Heroes Sympony, but I'm less impressed by some his more older/well-known works.

I'm curious about recently released cd's. These are:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/514uSSd6LgL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/415-sCePn4L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51q-NUcfHML._SL500_AA240_.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/419BuDufNtL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

The sound samples sound very well.
Anybody some recommendations?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: M forever on June 01, 2008, 01:37:32 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/514uSSd6LgL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Looks very interesting. I played in the US premiere of Glass' cello concerto in San Diego last year. Wendy Sutter was the soloist and Glass came to the final rehearsals and the performances. There is a film about that on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IxWK29i-UI with interviews with Glass, Sutter and our conductor Stephen Schick and the complete performance.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Lethevich on June 03, 2008, 08:50:40 AM
The only Glass I've found myself really enjoying is the early-ish work Another Look At Harmony, Part 4 (which IIRC now has two recorded performances). Some of his later stuff can be "okay" as easy listening, but not interesting, and some of his early stuff repeats too much to maintain interest, but ALAH4 is both very minimal (and long - 50 to 60 mins) but this is countered by its amazing shifting choral textures, and when in the right mood I find it impossible to interrupt a listen of this piece.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mozart on June 03, 2008, 08:54:11 AM
I heard bits of that work on the radio, ALAH4, and it was almost like brainwash. It was silly but I sat there without a thought and the music just kept going and going with its weirdness...I want to hear it again
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: 71 dB on June 03, 2008, 11:28:12 AM
Glass' Violin Concerto is very good, I like it a lot (Takuo Yuasa/Naxos).  0:)

Glass also made interesting collaboration with Mark Moore (one of the best DJs in the world and the "godfather" of British acid house scene) in late 80's. That's how I was introduced to this composer in the first place, long before I got into classical music.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: greg on June 03, 2008, 11:36:02 AM
Animals in Love?

Quote
I love the cd's released on Naxos, Symphony 2,3
me, too, definitely my favorite Glass. Doesn't get annoying either, very alienlike and fun music.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: 71 dB on June 03, 2008, 11:44:02 AM
I love the cd's released on Naxos, Symphony 2,3

I'll give a spin to that disc.  ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: mn dave on June 03, 2008, 11:45:02 AM
Glass is half empty.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: mozartsneighbor on June 03, 2008, 01:09:45 PM
I am not crazy about Glass's music usually, but I enjoyed this cd:
(http://www.philipglass.com/images/recordings/kronos-performs-philip-glass.jpg)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 04, 2008, 04:14:30 AM
Glass's Violin Concerto is one of my favorite minimalist works. I own this one, a rather upscale version (the Naxos recording, according to most reviews I've read, is as good or better):

(http://photos.imageevent.com/sgtrock/gm2/GlSchDoh.jpg)


I played in the US premiere of Glass' cello concerto in San Diego last year.

M, is that you sharing the principal's stand?

Sarge
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: greg on June 04, 2008, 05:53:36 AM
Looks very interesting. I played in the US premiere of Glass' cello concerto in San Diego last year. Wendy Sutter was the soloist and Glass came to the final rehearsals and the performances. There is a film about that on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IxWK29i-UI with interviews with Glass, Sutter and our conductor Stephen Schick and the complete performance.
wow, nice to listen to that one!
i'm trying to find M here, except for now i can only find a faraway shot that looks like him.... maybe they'll zoom in? (in the middle of it right now)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: greg on June 04, 2008, 05:59:16 AM
Is this M right here? (second farthest to the right)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on June 04, 2008, 08:54:03 AM
My favorite Glassian moment is the slow movement of Symphony No 3. Has an almost hypnotic effect on me; in the past it has convinced me that maybe Pachelbel's Kanon would have been cooler if Philip Glass had written it.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: M forever on June 04, 2008, 03:22:58 PM
M, is that you sharing the principal's stand?

Yes.

Is this M right here? (second farthest to the right)

No. M is not in that shot. The first desk was further over to the right (or rather, the front of the stage) and when they shot the bass section, most of the time they selected that angle with the other three desks, maybe they thought it looked more "impressive" because there were more players in the shot, or maybe because they felt me and my stand partner were not beautiful enough  ;D
Well, she is a quite a good looking lady, I guess, so it must just have been me they didn't want to film  :P
Generally, the UCSD TV guys (probably students from some "media" classes) and whoever directed and edited this don't really seem to have a clear idea of how to film an orchestra. They almost exclusively cut to the bass section when we played slow, quiet stuff. But there is also some real "action" stuff in there which of course looks much more interesting, especially when it comes to the basses where dynamic music directly translates into dynamic movement (or rather, the other way around...).
At the beginning of the second movement, we had the main theme, but they filmed the horns which had just accompanying figures  ::) You can't really hear that so well on youtube either, but in the DVD I have, you can actually hear us much better (and, of course, not just us basses, the whole orchestra sounds much better than here on youtube).
But you aren't missing much visually here. M looked like shit that weekend, seriously. I had been through 3 straight months of very brutal non-stop stress at work, lots of difficult and complicated projects which my company really fucked up, bad planning, bad scheduling, lots of mistakes, a lot of stupid shit and nerve terror. So the night before the concert, or rather in the early morning hours, after weeks of battling with myself, I had emailed them my notice which meant not just giving up that particular job, it also meant that I would have to pack my stuff and go back to Europe since my work visa was tied to that job. It also meant giving up everything I had built up there over 5 years, friends, and the La Jolla Symphony which was "just" a hobby for me but had still become important for me. Especially since I had spent 4 years training the bass section and they had very drastically improved and that concert was the first with our new music director Stephen Schick who is very cool and very competent, and with him, the future looks very bright for this orchestra...
All that was really hard to give up - but I have very strong principles, so I didn't have a choice...from my point of view  :(
So this concert turned into my farewell concert and watching the video actually makes me really sad  :'(

Anyway, there are a few places in which I am in the frame, from a merciful distance  ;D , like around 36:00:

(http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/3676/ljsglassky6.jpg)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: greg on June 04, 2008, 06:25:54 PM

No. M is not in that shot. The first desk was further over to the right (or rather, the front of the stage) and when they shot the bass section, most of the time they selected that angle with the other three desks, maybe they thought it looked more "impressive" because there were more players in the shot, or maybe because they felt me and my stand partner were not beautiful enough  ;D
Well, she is a quite a good looking lady, I guess, so it must just have been me they didn't want to film  :P
maybe they just didn't know what they were doing?  ;D


Generally, the UCSD TV guys (probably students from some "media" classes) and whoever directed and edited this don't really seem to have a clear idea of how to film an orchestra. They almost exclusively cut to the bass section when we played slow, quiet stuff. But there is also some real "action" stuff in there which of course looks much more interesting, especially when it comes to the basses where dynamic music directly translates into dynamic movement (or rather, the other way around...).
what i've always wondered is how they pull off stuff like the snare drum shot.... how they get so close! Is it just a simple zoom in from a camera directly above? I guess that's what it would be, the only thing i can think of.....


At the beginning of the second movement, we had the main theme, but they filmed the horns which had just accompanying figures  ::) You can't really hear that so well on youtube either, but in the DVD I have, you can actually hear us much better (and, of course, not just us basses, the whole orchestra sounds much better than here on youtube).
yeah, i noticed the sound quality wasn't great on this video..... especially the beginning, it sounded like a wall of mud.....  i'm almost straining to hear the notes. I think part of it may have to do with the actual writing for your bass section. It almost sounds like bass lines too close together, though i'd have to see the score.....


But you aren't missing much visually here. M looked like shit that weekend, seriously. I had been through 3 straight months of very brutal non-stop stress at work, lots of difficult and complicated projects which my company really fucked up, bad planning, bad scheduling, lots of mistakes, a lot of stupid shit and nerve terror. So the night before the concert, or rather in the early morning hours, after weeks of battling with myself, I had emailed them my notice which meant not just giving up that particular job, it also meant that I would have to pack my stuff and go back to Europe since my work visa was tied to that job. It also meant giving up everything I had built up there over 5 years, friends, and the La Jolla Symphony which was "just" a hobby for me but had still become important for me. Especially since I had spent 4 years training the bass section and they had very drastically improved and that concert was the first with our new music director Stephen Schick who is very cool and very competent, and with him, the future looks very bright for this orchestra...
All that was really hard to give up - but I have very strong principles, so I didn't have a choice...from my point of view  :(
So this concert turned into my farewell concert and watching the video actually makes me really sad  :'(
so...... did you go back to Europe or are you going back? this was from 2/2008, it says.....
could you at least get in an orchestra in Europe?
what was the other job you had? 


Anyway, there are a few places in which I am in the frame, from a merciful distance  ;D , like around 36:00:

(http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/3676/ljsglassky6.jpg)
really cool to see you in action!  :D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: uffeviking on June 04, 2008, 08:11:23 PM
I have saved better ones:

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: greg on June 05, 2008, 05:35:15 AM
last one is the best!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: kristopaivinen on June 05, 2008, 06:47:19 AM
I've never got past the perceived monotonousness of Glass' music. I find it to be the most predictable music in the world, and I don't see how that's a good thing.

I would like to ask admirers of Glass music:
Would you call Glass a genius?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: M forever on June 05, 2008, 07:19:37 AM
Would you call Glass a genius?

When I met him during the final rehearsals for the cello concerto, I called him "Philip".


last one is the best!

The last one was taken in August 3 years ago in Seattle, during the NorthWest Mahler Festival. We played Mahler 2. Two other members of the LJS were there, too, my standpartner Chris (4th from left) and Bill (2nd from right) who had asked us to come. He had lived in Seattle before moving to Southern California so he had participated in that festival for many years. Next year, the LJS will also play Mahler 2 - we already talked about me coming over and reinforcing them for that. I hope that will work out scheduling wise.

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: 71 dB on June 05, 2008, 07:59:31 AM
When I met him during the final rehearsals for the cello concerto, I called him "Philip".

Let me guess, Philip called you a genius?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: M forever on June 05, 2008, 10:18:18 AM
Let me guess, Philip called you a genius?

No. Why would he? I am obviously not a genius. I just play the bass very well. But I can't hear "multi-dimensional vibrational fields" like a real genius can. ;)

I thanked him for writing so much fun stuff for the basses into the concerto, and he was apparently satisfied with how we played. At first he said that the opening (which is pretty much for solo cello and bass section alone) should only be moderately loud (I think it said mf), but then he said, you guys sound so good, you can play much louder if you want  :D And we did. On the DVD recording, that can be heard very well. If I have time, I will rip the audio track and upload it.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on June 05, 2008, 02:00:17 PM
No. Why would he? I am obviously not a genius. I just play the bass very well. But I can't hear "multi-dimensional vibrational fields" like a real genius can. ;)
My father is a noise-and-vibration engineer. Perhaps I should ask him about these fields...  ;)

At first he said that the opening (which is pretty much for solo cello and bass section alone) should only be moderately loud (I think it said mf), but then he said, you guys sound so good, you can play much louder if you want  :D
Hey, that's awesome!  :D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Henk on June 05, 2008, 02:24:33 PM
Same here. I can't stomach the repetitive nature of it myself, it's like he's beating the listener over the head with the same thing over and over again, trying to force it into your memory banks and make you remember it via that repetition. I find it quite boring with a low listening mileage.

Did you try S. 3 and 4?


I would like to ask admirers of Glass music:
Would you call Glass a genius?

I would reckon Glass probably as the greatest living composer. Glass's music is accessible for a large audiance, and I think that counts for him. It's rich music, has an alienlike sound, it's music of this time and not conventional music. And the most important, I feel Glass his work is really about something.

Henk
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on June 05, 2008, 02:25:39 PM
I would reckon Glass probably as the greatest living composer.

Henk
Not John "Star Wars" Williams?  :P
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: gomro on June 05, 2008, 05:32:35 PM
I've never got past the perceived monotonousness of Glass' music. I find it to be the most predictable music in the world, and I don't see how that's a good thing.

I would like to ask admirers of Glass music:
Would you call Glass a genius?

Oh, he's a genius, all right.  And -- like another genius, a guy called Mozart -- he's way too prolific, so all his stuff starts sounding the same. But at his best, again like Mozart, Glass is transcendent.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Henk on June 06, 2008, 02:57:07 AM
If I was abducted by aliens and they played stuff that sounded like Philip Glass I'd demand a refund.
It's soooo unstrange, unmagical ... earthbound.

I really like it, you just don't like minimalism maybe? But who are favourite still living composers then, James?

Henk
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: 71 dB on June 06, 2008, 03:50:51 AM
I would reckon Glass probably as the greatest living composer.

I wouldn't say that but he is the man in the field of minimalism.  ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: karlhenning on June 06, 2008, 03:56:36 AM
I wouldn't say that but he is the man in the field of minimalism.  ;)

Oh, I don't know;  Adams and Reich have done work to rival Glass's.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Henk on June 06, 2008, 03:56:59 AM
I wouldn't say that but he is the man in the field of minimalism.  ;)

Ok, agree.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: greg on June 06, 2008, 05:53:21 AM
Oh, I don't know;  Adams and Reich have done work to rival Glass's.
0:)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on June 06, 2008, 02:50:58 PM
Might I recommend Uncyclopedia's article on Philip Glass? (http://uncyclopedia.org/wiki/Philip_Glass) It's written in what they perceive to be the style of his music.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Novi on June 07, 2008, 06:37:36 AM
Has anyone seen or know much about Glass's opera, Waiting for the Barbarians?

I notice that it's getting its UK premiere at the Barbican this week. I have to admit that I'm not familiar at all with Glass's work, but am interested primarily because I really like the Coetzee novel on which the opera is based.

Some details:
http://www.philipglass.com/html/compositions/waiting-for-the-barbarians.html
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: greg on June 07, 2008, 06:44:24 AM
Might I recommend Uncyclopedia's article on Philip Glass? (http://uncyclopedia.org/wiki/Philip_Glass) It's written in what they perceive to be the style of his music.

I just saw this part of the article:

Quote
Two lovers sat on a on a on a park bench, their parts bench bench bench touching each other, holding genitals in the moonlight in the moonlight in the moonlight.
LOL!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: DavidRoss on June 07, 2008, 06:52:29 AM
Glass' Violin Concerto is very good, I like it a lot (Takuo Yuasa/Naxos).

Will wonders never cease?  I'm not sure you've ever said anything I agreed with before now.  The VC is my favorite Glass work.  I wish there were a more satisfying performance on record.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: M forever on June 07, 2008, 08:53:24 AM
Have you heard Kremer/WP/Dohnányi (on DG)?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: DavidRoss on June 07, 2008, 09:38:12 AM
Not yet. This is the recording Sarge has.  Have you?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: M forever on June 07, 2008, 10:23:44 AM
I have it, in the original edition coupled with the Schnittke Concerto Grosso No.5. It is outstanding in every respect. Kremer really "plays" the solo part and inflects it with lots of nuances which illuminate the music's inner life which interesting because in this piece, nothing really "happens". The music is basically static, it doesn't develop, but it "lives" and that recording brings that out very well. The playing of the orchestra is both very accented and rhythmically alert and (not surprisingly) full bodied and rich. My only (slight) criticism would be that the recording of the orchestra could be maybe a shade or two clearer. On the other hand what comes across very well is the timpani and percussion, their playing really brings out the rhythmical undercurrent of the music (in that context, I remember that that Hurwitz idiot always writes that they can't play percussion properly in Vienna because they play some instruments while sitting down, and he as a former hobby percussionist knows that that can not be done). Also, when the complex "noodling" structures of Glass' music are played really together and in tune by the entire string section (it often isn't because a lot of the time, part of the string section just somehow messes through them), the resultant sound is huge and that is obviously the case here, so when I say they could maybe have captured the orchestra a little better, I may be wrong. In any case, the sound of the orchestra in this music is pretty overwhelming and Kremer's exquisite playing floats on top of that, so what more could one ask for?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 09, 2008, 08:23:59 AM
David, I agree with M. I'm very satisfied with this performance. The only reason I mentioned the Naxos (which I haven't heard) is to suggest an alternative recording for those on a budget (I think even anti-minimalists should hear this concerto: it's quite haunting). But the DG recording has Dohnányi, Vienna, and Kremer...what's not to like?

Sarge
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: wppwah on August 20, 2010, 09:18:10 PM
For those of you who liked Glass' violin concerto (which apparently seems to be all that some people like of him), Glass has written a second one recently, subtitled The American Four Seasons. You can hear it for the next few days at the PT website (http://performancetoday.publicradio.org/?month=8&day=20&year=2010) under HOUR 2 [Listen], at around 19 minutes into the program. It's just what you'd expect out of Glass... still worth a listen if you're into that kind of thing, I guess. Has some pretty obvious Vivaldi influences.

EDIT: Thanks DavidRoss, link is fixed now. :)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: DavidRoss on August 21, 2010, 04:35:58 AM
For those of you who liked Glass' violin concerto (which apparently seems to be all that some people like of him), Glass has written a second one recently, subtitled The American Four Seasons. You can hear it for the next few days at the PT website (http://"http://performancetoday.publicradio.org/?month=8&day=20&year=2010") under HOUR 2 [Listen], at around 19 minutes into the program. It's just what you'd expect out of Glass... still worth a listen if you're into that kind of thing, I guess. Has some pretty obvious Vivaldi influences.
The link didn't work but I presumed, correctly, that it's the Performance Today website.  It was written for Robert McDuffie (who has also recorded Glass's first VC).  Go to the website, turn the archives selector back to Aug 20, and bingo!

By the way, a couple of years ago, following Mike and Sarge's recommendation, I picked up the Kremer and it's as described. 
Listening now to Glass's seasons via PT streamer and so far, barely into the first movement, I'm enjoying it quite a bit.
Title: The Making of the Representative for Planet 8
Post by: Rinaldo on January 25, 2011, 10:34:44 AM
Anybody here familiar with The Making of the Representative for Planet 8 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Making_of_the_Representative_for_Planet_8_(opera))? I've just recently learned about the existence of this opera and its topic sounds intriguing. It was never oficially recorded but presumably, there exists a bootleg recording taped from the radio broadcast – here's a (rather hilarious, this guy is priceless) proof (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9LwH4oLBSQ)!

If anyone could shed more light on this enigmatic work (or provide a hint on where to obtain it), I would be most grateful.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on January 25, 2011, 01:22:22 PM
Philip Glass :o??? :o

I'mmm...mmmelting!!!!!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Guido on July 24, 2011, 09:23:26 AM
Echorus: Glass' greatest work? Surely his most moving and lovely.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 24, 2011, 09:44:05 AM
Composers like Philip Glass really should stop composing. At this juncture, he's merely a parody of himself.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Israfel the Black on July 25, 2011, 09:57:35 AM
Composers like Philip Glass really should stop composing. At this juncture, he's merely a parody of himself.

This strikes me as a bit uninformed. Each year he sounds less and less like "himself." His sound as a composer has changed considerably, for better or for worse. Maybe for worse, but not in the sense that would qualify the claim that he's parodying his own work and image, since he's distanced himself from a lot of the minimalist schtick for which he's been so famously caricatured as embodying.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 25, 2011, 10:56:30 AM
This strikes me as a bit uninformed. Each year he sounds less and less like "himself." His sound as a composer has changed considerably, for better or for worse. Maybe for worse, but not in the sense that would qualify the claim that he's parodying his own work and image, since he's distanced himself from a lot of the minimalist schtick for which he's been so famously caricatured as embodying.

 :D

My opinion isn't uninformed perhaps you simply can't accept that my opinion is different than yours?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Israfel the Black on July 25, 2011, 11:24:21 AM
:D

My opinion isn't uninformed perhaps you simply can't accept that my opinion is different than yours?

I can certainty accept an opinion different from my own, but it takes good reasoning for it to be any kind of opinion that one might respect. It's not clear how you intend to justify the claim that Glass is merely "parodying" himself these days, especially in light of the fact that he has distanced himself from his earlier stylings. In this case, the dispute isn't a matter of opinion, but a matter of fact.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 25, 2011, 12:18:14 PM
I can certainty accept an opinion different from my own, but it takes good reasoning for it to be any kind of opinion that one might respect. It's not clear how you intend to justify the claim that Glass is merely "parodying" himself these days, especially in light of the fact that he has distanced himself from his earlier stylings. In this case, the dispute isn't a matter of opinion, but a matter of fact.

It really doesn't matter what I say, you'll continue to defend Glass no matter what anyone else says, right?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Israfel the Black on July 25, 2011, 04:25:53 PM
It really doesn't matter what I say, you'll continue to defend Glass no matter what anyone else says, right?

Nope. If you want to say, "Glass sucks" or "I hate Glass" you're perfectly entitled, and I couldn't be bothered. But, indeed, if I feel so inclined, I'll defend him against claims I take to be flatly unwarranted and without any basis, or those that are just plain silly. To say Glass needs to retire and that he's a self-parody occurs to me as falling more into the latter category, at least ostensibly. Some matters aren't mere gut-reaction, but pretend to have a basis in fact and reason. I am more interested in those claims.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 25, 2011, 04:29:44 PM
Nope. If you want to say, "Glass sucks" or "I hate Glass" you're perfectly entitled, and I couldn't be bothered. But, indeed, if I feel so inclined, I'll defend him against claims I take to be flatly unwarranted and without any basis, or those that are just plain silly. To say Glass needs to retire and that he's a self-parody occurs to me as falling more into the latter category, at least ostensibly. Some matters aren't mere gut-reaction, but pretend to have a basis in fact and reason. I am more interested in those claims.

Like I said, it wouldn't matter what negative thing I said about Glass, you'll be right there defending him to the end just like you've done in the above quote, which, for those who are observant, will say is a defensive statement made to look objective or reasonable. In other words, you've masked the true intent of your comment with a statement that is deceptive.

If you like a composer, then it shouldn't matter to you what others think about him. Glass is a hack and always will be in my opinion.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: AllegroVivace on July 25, 2011, 04:49:37 PM
Nope. If you want to say, "Glass sucks" or "I hate Glass" you're perfectly entitled, and I couldn't be bothered. But, indeed, if I feel so inclined, I'll defend him against claims I take to be flatly unwarranted and without any basis, or those that are just plain silly. To say Glass needs to retire and that he's a self-parody occurs to me as falling more into the latter category, at least ostensibly. Some matters aren't mere gut-reaction, but pretend to have a basis in fact and reason. I am more interested in those claims.

It doesn't really take an intimate knowledge of all of Glass's works to know that he indeed does indulge excessively on a few of his own stylistic characteristics.  I happen to like Glass's music a lot. Some of his compositions (Symphony No. 8, 4, Violin Concerto) are among my favorite contemporary works. But I wouldn't hesitate saying that Glass repeats himself too much, often to the point of ridiculing himself in the most childish way.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Israfel the Black on July 25, 2011, 04:55:15 PM
Like I said, it wouldn't matter what negative thing I said about Glass, you'll be right there defending him to the end just like you've done in the above quote, which, for those who are observant, will say is a defensive statement made to look objective or reasonable. In other words, you've masked the true intent of your comment with a statement that is deceptive.

My last response is not evidence for a defense. You asked me whether I would defend him "come what may" and I set out some conditions under which I would and wouldn't. I feel now as though it were a trap and it didn't really matter what I thought after all! The mistake here is you assume my presence in this thread must necessarily mean I'm an ardent Glass supporter, defending him against any and all negative claims simply because I found your initial comment a bit hyperbolic and unsubstantiated. But this is simply jumping to a hasty conclusion on your part. There's nothing in what I said that should really warrant such a strong assumption. I like some work by Glass, but I am as quick to criticize him as I am to defend him.

If you like a composer, then it shouldn't matter to you what others think about him. Glass is a hack and always will be in my opinion.

But as I said, some opinions are grounded in truth and have a basis to challenge. Whether or not you "like" Glass isn't necessarily a concern. For example, you can say President Obama is a self-parodying hack and should retire, and if I were to say, "What's your reasoning?" it would be improper to say, "I can say whatever I want about Obama because I hate Obama and that's that." It doesn't follow. Perhaps you think this is all smoke and mirrors of an argument claiming objectivity and amounts to nothing more than an unqualified defense of Glass, and that's fine, but I am confident that there's a meaningful distinction here, and given the above, I am clearly not defending him "no matter what" you say.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Israfel the Black on July 25, 2011, 05:00:28 PM
It doesn't really take an intimate knowledge of all of Glass's works to know that he indeed does indulge excessively on a few of his own stylistic characteristics.  I happen to like Glass's music a lot. Some of his compositions (Symphony No. 8, 4, Violin Concerto) are among my favorite contemporary works. But I wouldn't hesitate saying that Glass repeats himself too much, often to the point of ridiculing himself in the most childish way.

This is a mostly fair point, but if it's the only point here, then as much could've been said about any single piece of Glass' alone. I took the initial point to be addressing his overall career or oeuvre. And if you look at his whole career, Glass has produce some marvelous pieces even in his later years. As you say, you favor one of his later works (Symphony No. 8,). But if we are to heed Mirror Image's suggestion, Glass should've retired because he's nothing more than a parody of himself. I don't think that's right. I think it's better to say that he has excessive indulgences, and that hurts him as a composer, but he has done some interesting things in his later career to distance himself from some of his earlier stylings, even if it remains present.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: AllegroVivace on July 25, 2011, 05:11:10 PM
This is a mostly fair point, but if it's the only point here, then as much could've been said about any single piece of Glass' alone. I took the initial point to be addressing his overall career or oeuvre. And if you look at his whole career, Glass has produce some marvelous pieces even in his later years. As you say, you favor one of his later works (Symphony No. 8,). But if we are to heed Mirror Image's suggestion, Glass should've retired because he's nothing more than a parody of himself. I don't think that's right. I think it's better to say that he has excessive indulgences, and that hurts him as a composer, but he has done some interesting things in his later career to distance himself from some of his earlier stylings, even if it remains present.

No, I can't agree with Mirror Image on Glass's early retirement. I couldn't be without his Symphony No. 8. On the other hand, I couldn't sit through his recent documentary (it's on Netflix). He goes on and on about some quasi-religious white noise that's absolutely impossible to watch if you have any regard for science and intellectual honesty. So, maybe he can retire from public speaking.

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 25, 2011, 05:13:16 PM
My last response is not evidence for a defense. You asked me whether I would defend him "come what may" and I set out some conditions under which I would and wouldn't. I feel now as though it were a trap and it didn't really matter what I thought after all! The mistake here is you assume my presence in this thread must necessarily mean I'm an ardent Glass supporter, defending him against any and all negative claims simply because I found your initial comment a bit hyperbolic and unsubstantiated. But this is simply jumping to a hasty conclusion on your part. There's nothing in what I said that should really warrant such a strong assumption. I like some work by Glass, but I am as quick to criticize him as I am to defend him.

But as I said, some opinions are grounded in truth and have a basis to challenge. Whether or not you "like" Glass isn't necessarily a concern. For example, you can say President Obama is a self-parodying hack and should retire, and if I were to say, "What's your reasoning?" it would be improper to say, "I can say whatever I want about Obama because I hate Obama and that's that." It doesn't follow. Perhaps you think this is all smoke and mirrors of an argument claiming objectivity and amounts to nothing more than an unqualified defense of Glass, and that's fine, but I am confident that there's a meaningful distinction here, and given the above, I am clearly not defending him "no matter what" you say.

The bottomline is very simple: I don't like Glass and you like (some) of his music. Whether you agree with my opinion or not isn't going to change the outcome is it? Is there a work by Glass that you feel I should hear? A work that will change my opinion? Because I've heard music from Einstein on the Beach to his Symphony No. 3. I haven't been keeping up with what he has been doing lately because I have a feeling of what I'll be getting: go nowhere, undramatic, unemotional, repetition for it's own sake, and the same basic approach to rhythm he's had for years.

Can you alter my opinion? Can you suggest a work that will make my jaw drop? Everything I've heard from the man has proven to be a waste of time as he, which has been mentioned already, relies too heavily on the eccentricities of his own style in order to make some kind of "artistic" statement, but the reality is he's, again, only parodying himself now.

Minimalism is a dead-end street I think. Adams, Andriessen, Reich, Part, etc. have all exhausted their styles. What had to be done is for them to find new avenues, which they all have successfully been able to do except for Reich who hasn't done anything really interesting since Music for 18 Musicians.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: AllegroVivace on July 25, 2011, 05:18:03 PM
Is there a work by Glass that you feel I should hear? A work that will change my opinion?

If I may, I'd like to suggest you listen to his Symphony No. 8. The works you said you've already heard are lame to me as well, and I wouldn't give Glass the light of day if that's all he'd composed.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 25, 2011, 05:29:32 PM
If I may, I'd like to suggest you listen to his Symphony No. 8. The works you said you've already heard are lame to me as well, and I wouldn't give Glass the light of day if that's all he'd composed.

Thanks I'll try his Symphony No. 8.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: AllegroVivace on July 25, 2011, 05:33:02 PM
Thanks I'll try his Symphony No. 8.

If that doesn't resonate, I guarantee the second movement of his violin concerto will mean something to you.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 25, 2011, 05:34:23 PM
If that doesn't resonate, I guarantee the second movement of his violin concerto will mean something to you.

Yes, I've heard good things about his Violin Concerto. I'll check these out.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: eyeresist on July 25, 2011, 07:25:45 PM
Yes, get the Naxos disc of the violin concerto. I'm not a great Glass fan, but it's a fine disc.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on July 25, 2011, 07:52:55 PM
If I may, I'd like to suggest you listen to his Symphony No. 8.

I second that about Symphony No. 8, a great piece.
I've been listening to Glass for many years now, even saw him and his ensemble play live in front of a large screen showing Koyaanisqatsi, an amazing experience.
Many of his works do sound identical, such as music from The Truman Show soundtrack is exactly the same as from Tirol Concerto for piano & orchestra, and I can understand the argument that arises from those who are negatively critical in their judgment.
But there is a quality of his music that has always inspired me, there definitely is a Philip Glass sound that comes with each of his pieces and I guess I'm attracted to that sound.
When I encourage others to listen to his music, I say to not be contained to a specific decade or genre (film music, concerto, chamber), his music has developed over the years.


Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Israfel the Black on July 26, 2011, 10:59:16 AM
The bottomline is very simple: I don't like Glass and you like (some) of his music. Whether you agree with my opinion or not isn't going to change the outcome is it?

My only issue was that you seemed to be saying something more than just whether or not you liked Glass.

Is there a work by Glass that you feel I should hear? A work that will change my opinion? Because I've heard music from Einstein on the Beach to his Symphony No. 3. I haven't been keeping up with what he has been doing lately because I have a feeling of what I'll be getting: go nowhere, undramatic, unemotional, repetition for it's own sake, and the same basic approach to rhythm he's had for years.

Obviously I echo the Violin Concerto. Not sure how anyone can listen to that second movement and not hear something of charm and elegance, but you never know. The jury is out. I personally would recommend Glass' film music. Assuming you don't already have any pre-decided stance against film music, then you will find that Glass is a true master of the medium. Film is good for Glass because it requires him to abandon the taxing repetitions and needless atonality of some of his absolute music to thus make something rather accessible. He's forced to work with a theme, and these themes I think tame his aesthetic rather nicely, revealing the power that rhythm, cadence, and layers of harmony can have for compelling themes and melodies, much in the tradition of Schubert and Beethoven (Glass cites them both as principal influences). As such, I'd recommend his score for Koyannisqatsi (considered a canonical classic of the medium) - particulary the 'Pruit Igoe' movement, which was later used again in the film Watchmen -  along with the score for The Hours, the 1939 Dracula, and more recently, The Illusionist. There are a lot of gems to be found in his film work.

Now, none of these pieces may make your jaw drop, but at least it might reveal Glass to be a capable composer when he wants to be, and when given the right venue. Or not - who knows?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: AllegroVivace on July 26, 2011, 04:45:56 PM
Not sure how anyone can listen to that second movement and not hear something of charm and elegance

That's one of the most charming movements I've heard in any concerto. Unfortunately, the other two movements don't take you anywhere near the profound feeling you get from the second movement. I wish he wrote it as a single work, some kind of a fantasy for violin and orchestra.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 26, 2011, 04:52:34 PM
That's one of the most charming movements I've heard in any concerto. Unfortunately, the other two movements don't take you anywhere near the profound feeling you get from the second movement. I wish he wrote it as a single work, some kind of a fantasy for violin and orchestra.

I've got a $1 credit from Amazon for an Mp3 download. Maybe I should use it just on that movement? Sounds like a good idea...
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 26, 2011, 05:46:44 PM
Okay, I just listened to the slow movement to Glass' Violin Concerto on YouTube and I'm not very impressed. I think my biggest problem is there's nothing harmonically interesting about his music for me. Rhythmically it's not interesting either. He continues to rely on the same old tricks over and over again. There's no kind of motivic development that I enjoy in composers such as Bartok, Stravinsky, Ravel, Koechlin, etc.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: AllegroVivace on July 26, 2011, 07:16:03 PM
Okay, I just listened to the slow movement to Glass' Violin Concerto on YouTube and I'm not very impressed. I think my biggest problem is there's nothing harmonically interesting about his music for me. Rhythmically it's not interesting either. He continues to rely on the same old tricks over and over again. There's no kind of motivic development that I enjoy in composers such as Bartok, Stravinsky, Ravel, Koechlin, etc.

This is it for your Glass experience. I don't think you have to listen to any other work by this composer. He simply isn't your "cup of tea" and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that.

You are right, though. There's nothing "harmonically interesting" in that music. It just happens that some of our ears get pleasure out of it. It's hard to explain what it is that we like about it. It's repetitive, narrow in scope, somewhat shallow in depth... but somehow the sounds make it to your heart.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 26, 2011, 07:25:09 PM
This is it for your Glass experience. I don't think you have to listen to any other work by this composer. He simply isn't your "cup of tea" and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that.

You are right, though. There's nothing "harmonically interesting" in that music. It just happens that some of our ears get pleasure out of it. It's hard to explain what it is that we like about it. It's repetitive, narrow in scope, somewhat shallow in depth... but somehow the sounds make it to your heart.

Yeah, I just don't think I have the ears for Glass's music. More power to those that do. In Minimalism, I like Adams, Gorecki, and Pärt.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Luke on July 26, 2011, 09:05:53 PM
To be precise, there is something literally interesting in Glass's harmony, otherwise his music wouldn't function at all. He repeats small harmonic cells expressed using various rhythmic types and gestural shapes - that's 'what he does.' The 'Glass sound' comes from the fact that those small cells always have something of interest in them, some quirky chord change or at least something to latch onto. If it was just I Ic IV V then the music would never have appealed to anyone at all. Just sayin', I'm not a passionate Glassist though at his best he can be very good.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on July 26, 2011, 09:08:50 PM
To be precise, there is something literally interesting in Glass's harmony, otherwise his music wouldn't function at all. He repeats small harmonic cells expressed using various rhythmic types and gestural shapes - that's 'what he does.' The 'Glass sound' comes from the fact that those small cells always have something of interest in them, some quirky chord change or at least something to latch onto. If it was just I Ic IV V then the music would never have appealed to anyone at all. Just sayin', I'm not a passionate Glassist though at his best he can be very good.

When it comes to my own personal musical tastes, I find him harmonically uninteresting. That's all I'm saying. We can just agree to disagree about this.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on September 27, 2011, 08:53:53 AM
Cue the lynching.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Robert on September 27, 2011, 09:08:56 AM
I happen to be pro Glass.  He has a particular sound that is very identifiable which works for me.   I also enjoy his movie scores like The Hours, Thin Blue Line, Dracula. Nothing wrong with his String Quartets. Symphonies 2 3 4.  You can go to www.grooveshark.com.  A very large assortment of his music is available. 
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on September 27, 2011, 12:58:39 PM
I never have liked Glass's music, but I'm also not one of these people who despises him. I like his contemporaries like Reich and Adams much better, but both of these composers are so uneven like Glass is reputedly criticized as being.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 27, 2011, 01:22:13 PM
I never have liked Glass's music, but I'm also not one of these people who despises him. I like his contemporaries like Reich and Adams much better, but both of these composers are so uneven like Glass is reputedly criticized as being.

I would have to say that Glass is more consistent with his compositions than the others, which might be why I have a stronger attraction to Glass. He has definitely found a style that is very much his own and doesn't stray too far from it, although his music has developed and became more melodic over the decades, but is always still closely related.


Also, MI, since your avatar was Koechlin when I joined GMG, that is how I always vision you looking like, it makes your comments so serious. Stick with the Koechlin.  ;D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on September 27, 2011, 01:38:09 PM
Also, MI, since your avatar was Koechlin when I joined GMG, that is how I always vision you looking like, it makes your comments so serious. Stick with the Koechlin.  ;D

You got it, Greg! :D I actually got this picture from the Koechlin Facebook group page. It may end up being my permanent avatar.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on September 28, 2011, 12:53:19 AM
I like Glass, I like some of his works (Akhnaten, -qatsi trilogy, the Bowie symphonies..) A LOT but I would be very cautious about putting him alongside the greats.

He's both underrated and overrated at the same time, IMO. Underrated by classical aficionados, who perceive him as shallow & monotonous (which he often is), overrated by art snobs & people who bought The Hours soundtrack (which I find unbearably dull, btw) and believe it's the pinnacle of contemporary classical music (not that I'm implying jhns is one of them).
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: DavidRoss on September 28, 2011, 05:11:37 AM
It is not a sin to be successful, even if you are a musician.
Amen.

However, if you are successful, in virtually any field of endeavor, you may expect to be the target of barbs hurled by small-minded, envious narcissists.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Coco on September 28, 2011, 06:22:21 AM
Count me as a Glass agnostic. He's undoubtedly original, but is this in itself a virtue? The pieces I know by him are trance-inducing — but wouldn't any repeated sound after an extended time have the same effect? The later works I've heard self-consciously mix pop styles and classical like the Bowie pieces — and...?

I will mention that I haven't heard a great deal of his music, but no one has quite sold it to me. It seems that most of the Glass fans I know are usually pop fans and not really interested in classical music.

So DavidR or someone else — what should I hear that would convince someone like me of Glass's greatness?

The quality of his music is great and he is able to reach out to the audience, unlike other composers who reject us with their ugly noises.

Strawman. Plenty of modern music is easy to understand intuitively — even Hollywood movie soundtracks are ripping off Penderecki and Messiaen. This idea of composers purposely alienating their audience seems stuck in the 1950s when this became a concern. Since the explosion of the culture industry the tastes of the public have been degraded considerably, and anyone who wants to court the fickle tastes of this audience does so at the peril of their art becoming quickly forgotten by everyone but music historians.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 28, 2011, 06:29:58 AM


So DavidR or someone else — what should I hear that would convince someone like me of Glass's greatness?


Repetition, repeated arpeggios, etc..is going to be present in almost every Glass piece, but his compositions of late have been more melodic, here are a few recordings that I really enjoy, and that explore many different aspects of Glass's repertoire from World Music (Orion) to Concerto and Chamber.




Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Muzition on September 28, 2011, 10:54:03 AM
Has anyone here heard Glass's "Concerto Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra"?
(if you'd like to listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvIuzUF1fWs , http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4wmG6mNUPs , http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-F1mJC2v3o )
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on September 28, 2011, 03:47:06 PM
The pieces I know by him are trance-inducing — but wouldn't any repeated sound after an extended time have the same effect?

Ask that to yourself the next time you hear a car alarm go off!

(although Steve Reich's City Life shows even a car alarm can be very musical)

Quote
It seems that most of the Glass fans I know are usually pop fans and not really interested in classical music.

True. He's easily approachable and has gorgeous, memorable tunes (yeah yeah, hard not to memorize a melodic line if you hear it 3821 times). I've been listening to Glass for years before I started to dabble with classical music.

Quote
So DavidR or someone else — what should I hear that would convince someone like me of Glass's greatness?

http://www.youtube.com/v/WNtUC7oddNk

But I don't think it can "convince" anyone. You either enjoy Glass' musical language or you don't.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on September 28, 2011, 04:37:55 PM
I heard this one work by Glass that...I heard this one work by Glass that....I heard this one work by Glass that....

Repetition isn't so much the problem, but what you do with the repetition and how to make it more easily digestible and not so downright irritating is the challenge. Glass I think has failed where Reich has succeeded. One careful listen to Reich's Music for 18 Musicians will reveal someone who has mastered the art of repetition. With Glass it just all sounds so clunky. While Glass has certainly gone in many more directions than Reich, musically I think Reich's work is stronger and more consistent because Reich has continued to pursue an approach that has worked well for him. Is that approach limited? Absolutely, but the problem I have with Glass has more to do with him trying to apply principles that he formulated so many years ago into something that doesn't work for the music he composed. As much as I dislike Glass, I think his earlier work gave way to more interesting style by continuing to experiment with the simplest means.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: DavidRoss on September 28, 2011, 06:33:34 PM
So DavidR or someone else — what should I hear that would convince someone like me of Glass's greatness?
But I don't think it can "convince" anyone. You either enjoy Glass' musical language or you don't.
Maybe he isn't exactly great....

I don't know what you are like, Coco.  I do know that I can't convince anyone of anything if he isn't willing to be convinced.  Are you willing? 

I've found that what doesn't appeal to me at one stage of life might appeal to me more later after I've had whatever life experience is required for me to appreciate it.  Perhaps it's being snowbound much of the winter in a cabin in the mountains, listening to the crackle of split oak burning in the woodstove, hearing the ssschhulllsch-ssschhulllsch-ssschuhulllsh of a deer breaking a trail through waist-deep crusted snow, the steady drip of melting ice, the muffled crash of snow sliding off the roof...or maybe it's the mind working subconsciously to make some rhythmic sense from the cacaphony of a factory floor with various presses and stampers and grinders and polishers contributing to the din...the sound of breaking waves, of falling rain and wind in the trees, the swish of cars passing by on rain-soaked streets, the quickening breath of a lover's sighs and gasps, the beating of a human heart, and the purr of a contented cat.

My first exposure to Glass's music was via the film Koyaanisqatsi nearly thirty years ago at the old Aquarius cinema in Palo Alto.  I loved it.  A couple of years later I spotted an album of music by Glass and bought it.  Glassworks.  I may still have it around but haven't listened to it in years.  I liked it well enough then, however, to go see Glass and his ensemble play at Davies Hall.  The concert was terrific.  Occasionally I hear something by him that I like--the piece posted by Rinaldo from Akhnaten, for instance--but seldom enough to buy it.  I do like the first violin concerto very much, however, and find that it stands up to relatively frequent hearings better than most of his stuff.  And I think he is an extraordinary film composer.  If there is "greatness" in him, that's where I might seek it.  The Illusionist stands out in memory as particularly good. (Note--I've neither seen The Hours nor heard the soundtrack for it.)

As for "greatness" ... some apply the word as liberally as Hollywood uses the word "star."  If every Tom, Dick, and Harry who ever penned a tune is "great," then how do we distinguish the likes of Beethoven from the "trendy today, forgotten tomorrow" mediocrities whose corpses litter the history of art?  "Super duper extra jumbo great with a cherry on top?"
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: eyeresist on September 28, 2011, 06:40:10 PM
So DavidR or someone else — what should I hear that would convince someone like me of Glass's greatness?

Someone in another thread recently mentioned the 3rd symphony and the violin concerto. For me also these are his best works ("best" being of course a relative term). I don't really know his film music; I think I listened to one CD once and found the sound so compressed as to make listening physically uncomfortable.
 
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Coco on September 28, 2011, 07:11:24 PM
I don't know what you are like, Coco.  I do know that I can't convince anyone of anything if he isn't willing to be convinced.  Are you willing?

I am (I think) how I try my best to present myself here — always curious, exacting, and not overly serious.

I've found that what doesn't appeal to me at one stage of life might appeal to me more later after I've had whatever life experience is required for me to appreciate it.


I've found this to be true as well. Just a year ago I had almost no interest in Bruckner — now I'd probably count him among my top 10. What broke him for me? No idea — one of the mysteries of music that I live for.

I do like the first violin concerto very much, however, and find that it stands up to relatively frequent hearings better than most of his stuff.

Thanks, I'll seek it out.

As for "greatness" ... some apply the word as liberally as Hollywood uses the word "star."  If every Tom, Dick, and Harry who ever penned a tune is "great," then how do we distinguish the likes of Beethoven from the "trendy today, forgotten tomorrow" mediocrities whose corpses litter the history of art?  "Super duper extra jumbo great with a cherry on top?"

I find it easier to apply the word "great" to the compositions rather than the person — and apply it to the composer only when I've become acquainted with the depth of their oeuvre.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on January 31, 2012, 07:15:53 AM
Happy Birthday, Mr. Glass.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on January 31, 2012, 08:09:18 AM
I pulled out the 'Kronos Play Glass' cd.

Taken as a 'one off', there is nothing here but pure joyous listening. If I didn't 'know' Glass, I'd think he's the Greatest from the evidence of this cd. As a whole, it is just an utterly satisfying hour of aural wallpaper.

I had always gone straight for the SQ 5, the first up on the cd. This piece starts off the way you might want an SQ to start off(mysterious intro), but then settles into a fairly regular Glass-pattern. I believe the five sections play right through,... doesn't anyone else think this piece is...at LEAST 'ok'??? I find it soothing and relaxing,... in the best way.

SQ 4 is an elegy. It is in three, more substantial, movements, and though I didn't take to it immediately, I'm starting to like this one better than SQ 5, because it's not as obvious. There is a bit more harmonic complexity (ok,... more for Glass) than the other which ultimately makes it a more satisfactory experience than SQ 5.

SQ 2, 'Company', is almost the ubiquitous Glass piece. Given its short length, it dovetails right into SQ 3, 'Mishima' (soundtrack to0 the film), which completes the album. These two shorter works work very well with the two longer works to form, what I think, is a 'perfect' album. Kronos's finest hour?

I haaave to believe that everyone on this Forum has had a copy of this (like Gorecki) at some point. What do you think of it TODAY? (and I mean, right NOW!) I've always loved this cd, though I generally CAN'T STAND Glass.

I say it's Great Stuff. ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on January 31, 2012, 08:57:54 AM
I pulled out the 'Kronos Play Glass' cd.

Taken as a 'one off', there is nothing here but pure joyous listening. If I didn't 'know' Glass, I'd think he's the Greatest from the evidence of this cd. As a whole, it is just an utterly satisfying hour of aural wallpaper.

I had always gone straight for the SQ 5, the first up on the cd. This piece starts off the way you might want an SQ to start off(mysterious intro), but then settles into a fairly regular Glass-pattern. I believe the five sections play right through,... doesn't anyone else think this piece is...at LEAST 'ok'??? I find it soothing and relaxing,... in the best way.

SQ 4 is an elegy. It is in three, more substantial, movements, and though I didn't take to it immediately, I'm starting to like this one better than SQ 5, because it's not as obvious. There is a bit more harmonic complexity (ok,... more for Glass) than the other which ultimately makes it a more satisfactory experience than SQ 5.

SQ 2, 'Company', is almost the ubiquitous Glass piece. Given its short length, it dovetails right into SQ 3, 'Mishima' (soundtrack to0 the film), which completes the album. These two shorter works work very well with the two longer works to form, what I think, is a 'perfect' album. Kronos's finest hour?

I haaave to believe that everyone on this Forum has had a copy of this (like Gorecki) at some point. What do you think of it TODAY? (and I mean, right NOW!) I've always loved this cd, though I generally CAN'T STAND Glass.

I say it's Great Stuff. ;)


Great write up, and I agree, this is always a great go-to disc of Glass' music. Music written within the years 83-91 which is a great period of his career for exploring different forms and mediums, for example Company and Mishima being inspired from other sources.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: DavidW on January 31, 2012, 08:59:28 AM
I bought his 9th symphony today will post my thoughts once I've put in some serious listening. :)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on January 31, 2012, 09:01:46 AM
I bought his 9th symphony today will post my thoughts once I've put in some serious listening. :)

I heard the First movement on NPR's Performance Today just earlier...was impressed.  ;D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on January 31, 2012, 09:02:10 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/r34abqPim8k

Glass: Overture to Belle et la Bete
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: DavidW on January 31, 2012, 01:16:57 PM
I heard the First movement on NPR's Performance Today just earlier...was impressed.  ;D

I agree and it gets better!  This symphony is amazing. :)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 01, 2012, 08:03:45 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/JthxVHkRT9Y&feature=related


Glass: Mad Rush

One of the first pieces I heard from Glass years ago, still one of his greatest.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jlaurson on July 18, 2012, 10:46:39 AM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-fc8UDN4_2Sg/UAcDE7V3lhI/AAAAAAAAC_g/QTqHAdk6gso/s1600/philip_glass_poem_jfl_jpg.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2007/01/it-took-me-some-time-to-appreciate.html
 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2007/01/it-took-me-some-time-to-appreciate.html)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on July 18, 2012, 11:19:57 AM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-fc8UDN4_2Sg/UAcDE7V3lhI/AAAAAAAAC_g/QTqHAdk6gso/s1600/philip_glass_poem_jfl_jpg.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2007/01/it-took-me-some-time-to-appreciate.html
 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2007/01/it-took-me-some-time-to-appreciate.html)

As a life long fan of Glass, I must say...I love this!  ;D

Of course around the time of his birthday there were many tweets along the lines of... "Happy Birthday, Happy Birthday, Happy Birthday Mr. Glass, Happy Birthday Mr. Glass, Happy Birthday..."
And the geek I am might have partaken in the lameness.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on July 18, 2012, 08:45:22 PM
Now that we've opened that can of worms..

Steve Reich and Phil Glass are moving a couch up the stairs. Phil: "You're getting ahead of me." Steve: "You always say that."
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: vandermolen on July 19, 2012, 03:00:17 AM
I like the score to the film ('movie' to you lot in the USA) Kundun - powerful and moving, especially the final sequence.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jlaurson on July 19, 2012, 03:11:40 AM
Now that we've opened that can of worms..

Steve Reich and Phil Glass are moving a couch up the stairs. Phil: "You're getting ahead of me." Steve: "You always say that."

I'd like to point out that the above "poem", although not as good/sophisticated as it could be, isn't really a joke. It's a humorous appreciation of what Glass actually does, rather than mindless repetition.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on July 19, 2012, 06:31:40 AM
I'd like to point out that the above "poem", although not as good/sophisticated as it could be, isn't really a joke. It's a humorous appreciation of what Glass actually does, rather than mindless repetition.

Fear not, I did not perceive it as a joke and found it quite good, actually.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on July 19, 2012, 08:10:08 AM
Nooooo,... it's the Philip Glass Thread! :o,... I'm mmmmelting :'(, mmmelting :'(,...
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on January 13, 2013, 03:07:25 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/510eglLAo7L._SL550_AA350_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tFR3JVxJL._SL550_AA350_.jpg)


Dueling new releases (only months apart) of Philip Glass performed on Harp. Who has the edge? Here's Sacchi in recital....

http://www.youtube.com/v/UQ8rY0TtsYM


...but Meijer created a music video!!!

http://www.youtube.com/v/_54NQciqofU


Make it a clean fight, ladies, no hitting below the belt.  ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on January 13, 2013, 06:54:01 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/510eglLAo7L._SL550_AA350_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tFR3JVxJL._SL550_AA350_.jpg)


Dueling new releases (only months apart) of Philip Glass performed on Harp. Who has the edge? Here's Sacchi in recital....

http://www.youtube.com/v/UQ8rY0TtsYM


...but Meijer created a music video!!!

http://www.youtube.com/v/_54NQciqofU


Make it a clean fight, ladies, no hitting below the belt.  ;)

I was going to kvetch, but PG on harp doesn't sound too offensive.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 15, 2013, 09:38:24 AM
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Cato on January 15, 2013, 09:44:35 AM
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.

How repetitious are they?   ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on January 15, 2013, 09:46:12 AM
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.

I hope you bring a barf bag along with you. ;) :D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 15, 2013, 09:47:43 AM
How repetitious are they?   ;)

Potentially, more. I think I've sung one of the three with the choir, and Paul has us sing each phrase just twice.
Title: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on January 15, 2013, 10:11:36 AM
I hope you bring a barf bag along with you. ;) :D

Good point, the flu is going around.
Title: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on January 15, 2013, 10:12:46 AM
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.

Could you list the pieces, Karl? Thank you!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 04, 2013, 05:52:02 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/510eglLAo7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

"The Poet Acts" on harp is now one of my top 3-4 favorite pieces by Glass.

My posting this here in the composer's thread is not directly to suggest any revision, mind you Brian : )

http://www.youtube.com/v/KZEq3Ro7mXU
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 07, 2013, 08:26:30 PM

Philip Glass: Orion
Philip Glass Ensemble - featuring Eleftheria Arvanitaki, Mark Atkins, Ashley MacIsaac, Wu Man, Gaurav Mazumdar, Foday Musa Suso, UAKTI and conductor Michael Riesman

Glass was commissioned by the Cultural Olympiad to compose a piece for the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece. The movements of the piece are collaborations with musicians and composers from Australia, China, Canada, The Gambia, Brazil, India and finally Greece. Each movement utilizes the style and instruments from its country it's representing. The final movement, Greece, along with its Greek influence, is a summation of all the previous movements. I am posting the final two movements, India and Greece, for your listening pleasure. I truly find this to be one of Glass' most successful compositions of the past 10-15 years and completely captured the essence of each country's character. Movement India is almost a direct descendant of Glass' earlier collaborations with Ravi Shankar, a driving rhythm filled with fabulous sitar playing (checkout the sitar's display of rockin-out at 6:53), an array of percussion and wordless voices. Greece is pure bliss, hints of folk, new-age, pop and classical. Each soloist from the previous movements are given another moment to shine, but it's the final minutes when all the countries, all the musicians are unified in what sounds like the world performing together with the one singular purpose.

http://www.youtube.com/v/2temha_w78I  http://www.youtube.com/v/94PY45nCvPA
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Octave on March 20, 2013, 11:59:14 AM
[Overlong post, please skip at your pleasure.  I just ask, again, for best recommendations for the violin concerto, Symphony No. 3, and string quartets.  I mention some personal favorites.  I carp a little.  I wonder about John Coltrane and if he has a lot to answer for, poor brilliant obsessive fellow.]

Now listening to AKHNATEN; I'm alternating between agitated annoyance ('is this orchestration?') and happier excitement ('Dude!'); it's a typical Glass experience for me, except perhaps for a chunk of the earlier (pre-80s?) music, which I almost always like right away and really like after 30 minutes or more.  I do wish that he'd chosen another lifelong (?) fixation than the Coltrane arpeggios....good grief, of all the textures to be selected for iterative immortality.  A reaching back into a happy youth or a eureka moment?  His ratatouille?

I've just spent some time going through this thread, but I'd still like to risk redundancy by asking for a few recommendations for some next steps with Glass; two pressing interests (afaik) are the VIOLIN CONCERTO and SYMPHONY NO. 3 'HOURS': the former because I bumped into it employed as (what else?) the soundtrack to a film (LA MOUSTACHE), and was interested in several aspects of it, including a fretful high flute that it seems was recycled in the FOG OF WAR music and probably elsewhere.  I wanted to ask again if there was a preferable recording of the violin concerto?  At the bottom of page 2 of this thread, 'M forever' strongly praised the Kremer/Dohnányi/DG, which I was thinking of getting in its DG 20-21 reissue (w/Rorem and Bernstein) to avoid overlap with the Schnittke CG#5, which I have elsewhere; but no comparison was made with other performances, just an assertion of Kremer's contribution and the sound of the orchestra generally.  I am more attracted to the couplings on the Naxos disc (orchestral COMPANY etc) or yet another performance with the John Adams violin concerto in tow; but the quality of the violin concerto is my main interest.  Anyway, opinions would be welcomed!

The other interest was in SYMPHONY NO. 3, at least based on not really knowing any of his other symphonies and having heard several favorable accounts and some samples of the third.  Again the main thing is the performances, though I see a choice in coupings: various little pieces (Davies/Stuttgart), the Second Sympony (Alsop/Bournemouth), or the orchestral HOURS (Manson/Manitoba, the brand-new one on Orange Mountain).

I am also thinking of getting a 2cd of string quartet music by the catchily named and interesting group Brooklyn Rider, a couple of whose recordings I have liked. 

Any other recommendations would also be appreciated.  GSM-Greg recommended four items together at the bottom of page 4 which I might try out (ORION and the CONCERTO PROJECT VOL. 2 among them).  My favored points of reference are MUSIC WITH CHANGING PARTS (the 'original' in its Nonesuch reissue and also the new recording by Icebreaker), MUSIC IN TWELVE PARTS (most recently in its live recording), and some of the early 'hardcore' keyboard music.  My experiences with so much of the later music have been really hit or miss, but I think there's a chance I'll keep trying pieces out at least occasionally for as long as I continue to listen to music.  I am well ready for his music to stop showing up in motion pictures, though; it works too well.  Routinization is just the worst possible thing that could happen to music designed to fascinate.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 20, 2013, 02:12:38 PM

 I am more attracted to the couplings on the Naxos disc (orchestral COMPANY etc) or yet another performance with the John Adams violin concerto in tow; but the quality of the violin concerto is my main interest. 

The other interest was in SYMPHONY NO. 3, at least based on not really knowing any of his other symphonies and having heard several favorable accounts and some samples of the third.  Again the main thing is the performances, though I see a choice in coupings: various little pieces (Davies/Stuttgart), the Second Sympony (Alsop/Bournemouth), or the orchestral HOURS (Manson/Manitoba, the brand-new one on Orange Mountain).

I am also thinking of getting a 2cd of string quartet music by the catchily named and interesting group Brooklyn Rider, a couple of whose recordings I have liked. 

Any other recommendations would also be appreciated.  GSM-Greg recommended four items together at the bottom of page 4 which I might try out (ORION and the CONCERTO PROJECT VOL. 2 among them).  My favored points of reference are MUSIC WITH CHANGING PARTS (the 'original' in its Nonesuch reissue and also the new recording by Icebreaker), MUSIC IN TWELVE PARTS (most recently in its live recording), and some of the early 'hardcore' keyboard music.  My experiences with so much of the later music have been really hit or miss, but I think there's a chance I'll keep trying pieces out at least occasionally for as long as I continue to listen to music.  I am well ready for his music to stop showing up in motion pictures, though; it works too well.  Routinization is just the worst possible thing that could happen to music designed to fascinate.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51p3rluK6pL._SL500_AA300__.jpg)

Because of exactly what you said, the additional pieces are excellent, and it's inexpensive. But great performance all around.



(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CXqtW8BJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/613hhFCFuSL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Again, excellent couplings and performance. Glass has 9 numbered symphonies, and the 3rd is up there with the best. Typical Glass style written for a chamber string ensemble, every line is clear and defined. In fact, much of Glass' best works are for chamber groups or solo instrument. If you enjoy the 3rd I would suggest 8th or 9th, other purely orchestral works. If you feel ready to venture out a bit give the 5th a spin, it's a huge piece that utilizes a larger orchestra with choir and soloists.  Back to the disc of the 3rd with Davies/Stuggart. It has wonderful companions to the symphony, The Civil Wars is a fascinating piece, it blurs the line between orchestral work, opera and performance piece. This recording features a few of the interludes from The Civil Wars, and as far as I know only the fifth Act "The Rome Section" has been recorded otherwise. But it's great music, plus if you get the entire recorded fifth Act you can hear Laurie Anderson's spoken contribution, it's an amazing collaboration.

I just recently purchased the 3rd with the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, it has better sound quality than the Nonesuch release without question. And the new pseudo-piano concerto from "The Hours" material is lovely.



(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/86/61/8f87a2c008a055ca86347010.L._AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51GTRHFBP7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

For some earlier pieces, Dancepieces and Songs from Liquid Days have always been a few favorites. Liquid Days may be a turn off at first listen because they are Glass' attempt at creating pure songs. Dancepieces features five tracks from In the Upper Room (Choreographed by Twyla Tharp), the fifth track, Dance IX has long been my choice for a Philip Glass' anthem.



(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61KmmqHpkBL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/411DNCRDX1L._SL500_AA300__.jpg)

Orion is a must for Glass' fans. It demonstrates his successful ability to merge with other cultural sounds. And Uakti's (Brazilian instrumental group) disc performing Glass' music is a great example of how universal his sound is. Uakti creates such a mesmerizing tone, using unique percussive instruments and winds, it's also quite relaxing.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Octave on March 20, 2013, 02:41:18 PM
My thanks for the recommendations, Greg....very helpful!  Another item I'm interested in, which I forgot to mention, is EARLY VOICE with the epic earlier piece "Another Look at Harmony Part IV" [sic?]; at least one person at GMG recommended this disc highly, and based on a sample I think it will be right up my alley.

I also see that Orange Mountain issued the complete ballet IN THE UPPER ROOM as its own somewhat short disc, but a new (?) recordings with all acoustic instruments, no synthesizers; that sounds interesting to me. 

I also have vague memories of liking DANCES 1-5 a lot, but unless it's been reissued somewhere, it seems to be OOP and a bit more expensive than I'd like it to be.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/511CaXoVHvL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I'm also curious about ITAIPU, in case you know it; I've just heard it shortlisted as a favorite by a couple friends.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 20, 2013, 03:04:50 PM

I also see that Orange Mountain issued the complete ballet IN THE UPPER ROOM as its own somewhat short disc, but a new (?) recordings with all acoustic instruments, no synthesizers; that sounds interesting to me. 


They are good regardless of how they are performed. I prefer the synthesizer/acoustic hybrid myself.

Dance IX: This is the performance from the Dancepieces album. My personal "Glass Anthem"

http://www.youtube.com/v/wPdLu8GQprE


I'm also curious about ITAIPU, in case you know it; I've just heard it shortlisted as a favorite by a couple friends.


Glass: Itaipu - a very dramatic work.

http://www.youtube.com/v/ZNsVwBv_jcw
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on March 21, 2013, 04:46:23 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61KmmqHpkBL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/411DNCRDX1L._SL500_AA300__.jpg)

Orion is a must for Glass' fans. It demonstrates his successful ability to merge with other cultural sounds. And Uakti's (Brazilian instrumental group) disc performing Glass' music is a great example of how universal his sound is. Uakti creates such a mesmerizing tone, using unique percussive instruments and winds, it's also quite relaxing.

Funny, I never warmed to Orion. It sounds like a cheap "best of" of Glass' tricks to me. Uakti on the other hand is simply beautiful and indeed very relaxing, without sounding like a new age CD that jumped out of a bargain bin.

As for Akhnaten, that one I deeply love. The music truly made an impact on me back when I first heard it and it still counts among my favourites across all genres. Satyagraha is beautiful as well (I wish the recent MET production will get a proper HD release) and well worth giving a shot, Octave. I hate the term "life-affirming" but with Satyagraha, I can almost feel Gandhi's humanism resonate through the music.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Octave on March 21, 2013, 05:10:33 AM
@Rinaldo: I already owned AKHNATEN before I read your namechecking of it elsewhere at GMG, but I had not listened to it (perils/advantages of glut), so thanks to you I finally heard it for the first time yesterday.  IIRC you champion Act II Scene ~4 "Hymn" as a highlight, and I liked it too.  I was not following the movements very closely while I listened, but another really striking passage for me was, iirc, the closing movement of the first disc, "Akhnaten and Nefertiti" with some beautiful singing.  If SATYAGRAHA is this good, I'm certain I'll be getting a copy soon.  Same with EINSTEIN (Tomato/Sony), regardless of my carping above or in the Listening thread....I will definitely try it again with my mind as open as I manage.

I think I saw a recent release of an even longer (than the Sony edition) edition of EINSTEIN, a 1984 live recording, ~217 minutes (quite a bit longer than the Tomato recording from 1979), only available as a OMM mp3 release via Itunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/philip-glass-einstein-on-beach/id559017137 (https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/philip-glass-einstein-on-beach/id559017137)
I'm sure this old new to the Glassophiles, but I'd be curious to know how different it sounds.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on March 21, 2013, 06:40:57 AM
Nooooo,... it's the Philip Glass Thread! :o,... I'm mmmmelting :'(, mmmelting :'(,...
aaaaaahhhhhhhhh put it back.... PUT IT BACK!!!!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: kyjo on August 19, 2013, 07:44:12 PM
Reposted from the "other" Glass thread:

Though I think Glass is overhyped and I don't listen to his music with much regularity, I enjoy a few of his works when I'm in the mood: Symphonies 2, 3, 8 and 9, Violin Concerto, Concerto for Sax Quartet, Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra and Cello Concerto no. 1. I'm eager to hear his recent (2011) Symphony no. 10, as I have enjoyed his previous two works in the form quite a bit. They seem to have an almost Brucknerian grandiosity combined with, of course, the usual Glass trademarks. My favorite Glass work, though, is his Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra, which is a rhythmically exhilarating piece that makes me wonder why composers don't write more timpani concertos. What are everyone's favorite Glass works?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Pat B on August 19, 2013, 09:46:06 PM
Though I think Glass is overhyped and I don't listen to his music with much regularity, I enjoy a few of his works when I'm in the mood: Symphonies 2, 3, 8 and 9, Violin Concerto, Concerto for Sax Quartet, Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra and Cello Concerto no. 1. I'm eager to hear his recent (2011) Symphony no. 10, as I have enjoyed his previous two works in the form quite a bit. They seem to have an almost Brucknerian grandiosity combined with, of course, the usual Glass trademarks. My favorite Glass work, though, is his Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra, which is a rhythmically exhilarating piece that makes me wonder why composers don't write more timpani concertos. What are everyone's favorite Glass works?

Einstein on the Beach is good, but in the first recording it is too long. I know the second recording is shorter, but I'm also an analog synth snob. ;)

I really like the 1st Violin Concerto (I have McDuffie). I listened to Symphonies 2 and 3 (Alsop) today for the first time. They will probably join my list.

But I think my favorites are the String Quartets (I have Kronos), especially 2 and 5. Their first recording of 2 was my introduction to Glass.

I have yet to hear the other symphonies -- 8 seems to be especially popular -- and the concerto for sax quartet.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on August 20, 2013, 02:44:57 PM
Favourite works? One of them is still ringing in my ears: Music in Twelve Parts, which was performed a few days ago here in Czech Republic. Amazing experience.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 22, 2013, 02:40:48 PM
Philip Glass has re-teamed with filmmaker Godfrey Reggio, the new film is titled VISITORS. Here is the trailer.


http://www.youtube.com/v/s3w8cNgWtMI
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on August 22, 2013, 07:11:40 PM
Philip Glass has re-teamed with filmmaker Godfrey Reggio, the new film is titled VISITORS. Here is the trailer.


http://www.youtube.com/v/s3w8cNgWtMI

Where's that bottle of sleeping pills and vodka?!?! Where's the shotgun?!?!

That almost made me angry. Not a great feat in itself, but this DID IT!! If I made a film it would look like trayvonn
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 23, 2013, 02:25:45 AM
Where's that bottle of sleeping pills and vodka?!?! Where's the shotgun?!?!

That almost made me angry. Not a great feat in itself, but this DID IT!! If I made a film it would look like trayvonn

Cool. I'll be sure to post more on this thread later, since you enjoying visiting so much.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 23, 2013, 04:29:38 AM
My posting this here in the composer's thread is not directly to suggest any revision, mind you Brian : )

http://www.youtube.com/v/KZEq3Ro7mXU

Had anyone heard these choruses before?  How do you feel this performance compares?  Do not spare my feelings   ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 23, 2013, 04:30:33 AM
Sacrée vache, 908 views! That'll never happen to any Henningmusick.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 23, 2013, 04:49:31 AM
Had anyone heard these choruses before?  How do you feel this performance compares?  Do not spare my feelings   ;)

I listened to these when you first posted them, Karl. And Ive only heard one other performance and it was on disc, so with audio aside the performance is very comparable, in fact I enjoy the treatment of the intro from your group over my recorded disc.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: pencils on August 23, 2013, 05:06:50 AM
Cool. I'll be sure to post more on this thread later, since you enjoying visiting so much.

 :D ;D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 23, 2013, 05:10:10 AM
Thanks, Greg! Paul had worked with those pieces a number of times before the occasion of this concert.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on August 23, 2013, 06:23:50 AM
Thanks, Greg! Paul had worked with those pieces a number of times before the occasion of this concert.

Is that you behind the conductor?!?!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 23, 2013, 08:22:13 AM
I'm fourth from the right (stage left, i.e.)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Pat B on August 24, 2013, 06:40:19 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/ch-R1aIM-C0
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: snyprrr on August 25, 2013, 06:30:40 AM
I'm fourth from the right (stage left, i.e.)

ok, you're much better looking than the guy behind the conductor!! whew
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Willow Pattern on January 29, 2014, 02:09:08 AM
Ive been enjoying this set a lot the last few days:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71uI7lrelCL._SL1429_.jpg)

Never heard of Jeroen Van Veen before I got this recording - hes certainly a very sensitive and accomplished player and I cant find fault with him on this release.
The recorded sound is very good - Ideally I would have liked a little more reverb but certainly the Piano sounds excellent.
There are a few recordings of Glass's Piano Music available but this one seems to be the most comprehensive.
Heres a tracklisting:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81MvsqSAVJL._SL1500_.jpg)

I downloaded the complete set for $10 from ZDigital for anyone whos interested in going that route. Otherwise it costs about $20 US to buy the CD set itself.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: 7/4 on January 29, 2014, 06:42:35 AM
Ive been enjoying this set a lot the last few days:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71uI7lrelCL._SL1429_.jpg)

I downloaded the complete set for $10 from ZDigital for anyone whos interested in going that route. Otherwise it costs about $20 US to buy the CD set itself.

I'd like to get this, added it to my want list. Solo piano seems almost perfect for Glass music.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Willow Pattern on January 29, 2014, 11:52:10 PM
I'd like to get this, added it to my want list. Solo piano seems almost perfect for Glass music.

Good stuff! - indeed this is a nice way to enjoy Glass's music :D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 19, 2014, 06:31:56 PM
John Adams on Philip Glass

http://www.youtube.com/v/_x_X7oxMvh0
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 19, 2014, 06:36:59 PM
Philip Glass: Open The Kingdom from Songs From Liquid Days
Lyrics by David Byrne
Vocals by Douglas Perry

Been a favorite of mine from Glass for many, many years...

http://www.youtube.com/v/vcl5DLlYAeE
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 19, 2014, 06:41:28 PM
I've never got past the perceived monotonousness of Glass' music. I find it to be the most predictable music in the world, and I don't see how that's a good thing.

I would like to ask admirers of Glass music:
Would you call Glass a genius?

Yes. Unlike many here I like the earlier, not the same as earliest, stuff more. In recent years I find him, ahem, repeating himself, and less interesting. But in the late 70s80s, brilliant.

Minimalists en masse but particularly Nyman, Glass, Adams, and to a lesser extent Reich and ten Holt are  my faves from the past 40 years.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 19, 2014, 06:45:25 PM
Yes. Unlike many here I like the earlier, not the same as earliest, stuff more. In recent years I find him, ahem, repeating himself, and less interesting. But in the late 70s80s, brilliant.

Minimalists en masse but particularly Nyman, Glass, Adams, and to a lesser extent Reich and ten Holt are  my faves from the past 40 years.

Nice to see Nyman's name mentioned, for the past few years here on GMG I was beginning to think I was the only admirer of his music. Ever since I saw The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover I've been hooked on Nyman.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 19, 2014, 06:46:17 PM
Philip Glass: Open The Kingdom from Songs From Liquid Days
Lyrics by David Byrne
Vocals by Douglas Perry

Been a favorite of mine from Glass for many, many years...

http://www.youtube.com/v/vcl5DLlYAeE

I bought this when it first came out. I hated the first time I heard it, but knew I had to hear it again, just had to. I hated it the second time. I probably hated the first 4 or 5 times. Then it clicked and I've never looked back.  my friends and my ex-wife could not believe that I liked this. 
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on February 19, 2014, 06:49:01 PM
Yes. Unlike many here I like the earlier, not the same as earliest, stuff more. In recent years I find him, ahem, repeating himself, and less interesting. But in the late 70s80s, brilliant.

Minimalists en masse but particularly Nyman, Glass, Adams, and to a lesser extent Reich and ten Holt are  my faves from the past 40 years.

I think all of the Minimalists are one-trick ponies. It's just that some of them have been milking it for far too long now like Glass and Reich for example. It almost reminds of me of someone who just won't acknowledge the fact that their 13 year old dog, who is deathly ill, needs to be put down. I think Minimalism in general is a dead-end street and, while some good works have popped up here and there, it's just not enough for me to continue to plunk down money to hear something that's been rehashed over and over again, but there are people out there that continue to support these composers, which is fine, not everyone enjoys the same things of course, but I think this whole movement has worn out it's welcome.

All IMHO of course.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 19, 2014, 06:51:19 PM

Nice to see Nyman's name mentioned, for the past few years here on GMG I was beginning to think I was the only admirer of his music. Ever since I saw The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover I've been hooked on Nyman.

I got you pipped. I saw that because it had Nyman music.

The Gramophone called Nyman not even a composer. That would be enough to endear him to me! Back when I took their Bach reviews seriously: whatever they disliked I bought. "Pedantic" would send me rushing to the store.

I don't want to start a blood feud here but Nyman is a genius.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 19, 2014, 06:52:13 PM
I dedicate this dead-end track to John  ;)

http://www.youtube.com/v/kxeI31M3KIc
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 19, 2014, 06:53:05 PM
I think all of the Minimalists are one-trick ponies. It's just that some of them have been milking it for far too long now like Glass and Reich for example. It almost reminds of me of someone who just won't acknowledge the fact that their 13 year old dog, who is deathly ill, needs to be put down. I think Minimalism in general is a dead-end street and, while some good works have popped up here and there, it's just not enough for me to continue to plunk down money to hear something that's been rehashed over and over again, but there are people out there that continue to support these composers, which is fine, not everyone enjoys the same things of course, but I think this whole movement has worn out it's welcome.

All IMHO of course.

Pistols at dawn, John, pistols at dawn.

 ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 19, 2014, 06:53:36 PM
I don't want to start a blood feud here but Nyman is a genius.

I think two fans of Nyman is enough reason to start his own thread, I've been waiting years to have some discussion on his music. 
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on February 19, 2014, 06:54:53 PM
Pistols at dawn, John, pistols at dawn.

 ;)

 :P
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on February 19, 2014, 06:56:00 PM
I dedicate this dead-end track to John  ;)

http://www.youtube.com/v/kxeI31M3KIc

I knew I should've wore my ear plugs. ;)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on February 19, 2014, 07:05:14 PM
Next month there will be a new CD of Philip Glass duets for organ and didgeridoo. Now, I like Glass, but organ and didgeridoo sounds... intolerable  ;D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: amw on February 19, 2014, 07:10:40 PM
I've sampled a few of Glass's works—Music in 12 Parts, the Dances, some of the piano music, his film score for that Beauty and the Beast thing. It sounded to me like 70s art rock, just without the rock. Or the art. Or being necessarily composed in the 70s. And then dragged out for an unnecessarily long time. Considering that all except the last are supposed to be from his "good period" I think I will leave him to his admirers.

I don't like any kind of groove- or beat-based stuff (drumkits, drum machines etc), I suppose that is part of the appeal of him and Nyman and Reich and Adams et al though. It is the music of our time, much more so than anything I listen to, however recent its date of creation.

Next month there will be a new CD of Philip Glass duets for organ and didgeridoo. Now, I like Glass, but organ and didgeridoo sounds... intolerable  ;D

That sounds more like a La Monte Young album. >.>
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 19, 2014, 07:13:41 PM
...I think I will leave him to his admirers.

We appreciate your kindness.  :)


Next month there will be a new CD of Philip Glass duets for organ and didgeridoo. Now, I like Glass, but organ and didgeridoo sounds... intolerable  ;D

Not even style points?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on February 19, 2014, 07:16:06 PM
I've sampled a few of Glass's works—Music in 12 Parts, the Dances, some of the piano music, his film score for that Beauty and the Beast thing. It sounded to me like 70s art rock, just without the rock. Or the art. Or being necessarily composed in the 70s. And then dragged out for an unnecessarily long time. Considering that all except the last are supposed to be from his "good period" I think I will leave him to his admirers.

I don't like any kind of groove- or beat-based stuff (drumkits, drum machines etc), I suppose that is part of the appeal of him and Nyman and Reich and Adams et al though. It is the music of our time, much more so than anything I listen to, however recent its date of creation.


Just give me some Stravinsky, Bartok, or Ravel and I'll die a happy man. 8)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 19, 2014, 07:33:10 PM
MI: One trick pony.

As Churchill put it, Some trick. Some pony.

The trick is counterpoint. Minimalists invented a new kind of counterpoint. That really is some trick.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Mirror Image on February 19, 2014, 08:07:34 PM
MI: One trick pony.

As Churchill put it, Some trick. Some pony.

The trick is counterpoint. Minimalists invented a new kind of counterpoint. That really is some trick.

Yeah, I mean it's a nice trick, but you can only get so much mileage out of it before you repeat yourself. Plus, whether the Minimalists invented a new type of counterpoint doesn't really mean that much to me. Like I said, it started off to be an interesting idea, but I think by end of the '70s that was about all that could be done with it. Of course, I don't really consider someone like Adams a true Minimalist in the sense that a work like Harmonielehre contained too much harmonic development to be considered a piece of strict Minimalism.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on February 21, 2014, 04:00:19 PM
I think two fans of Nyman is enough reason to start his own thread, I've been waiting years to have some discussion on his music.

There already is one. (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,9965.20.html)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 21, 2014, 04:10:54 PM
There already is one. (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,9965.20.html)

Hey Rinaldo,
Another Nyman thread was just created, this one didn't turn up in my initial search. Perhaps a moderator could combine them. Thanks!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 21, 2014, 05:44:50 PM
Hey Rinaldo,
Another Nyman thread was just created, this one didn't turn up in my initial search. Perhaps a moderator could combine them. Thanks!
Repeating Nyman threads ...
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: petrarch on February 22, 2014, 12:34:57 PM
Yeah, I mean it's a nice trick, but you can only get so much mileage out of it before you repeat yourself.

You can get plenty of mileage out of it... In much the same way C major hasn't been exhausted.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 22, 2014, 02:18:27 PM
Next month there will be a new CD of Philip Glass duets for organ and didgeridoo. Now, I like Glass, but organ and didgeridoo sounds... intolerable  ;D
Actually it sounds like the start of a GMG poll: 11 favorite works for organ and didgeridoo.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 26, 2014, 08:53:52 AM
Pretty quiet here.

Well, what can you say about Glass that doesn't just repeat what was said before?
 ::)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 26, 2014, 09:14:23 AM
Pretty quiet here.

Well, what can you say about Glass that doesn't just repeat what was said before?
 ::)

anyone seen The Perfect American? I'm considering the Blue Ray, curious about the quality of the BR and the camerawork of the production.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 26, 2014, 09:29:09 AM
Call it a tangent or a tribute, but my colleague and friend Joseph Fear (when I say I know Fear, he's the guy I'm talking about) just finished a piece called Glass Menagerie (https://soundcloud.com/#joseph-fear/glass-menagerie-final).
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 01, 2014, 02:32:45 AM
My first full listen to this Naxos disc featuring the amazingly beautiful Harpsichord Concerto by Philip Glass. Definitely a few things I prefer from this newer performance over the first release from Orange Mountain Music. A piece very worthy of a second recording.


Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on June 18, 2014, 01:13:09 PM
A new recording of Koyannisqatsi is available on iTunes. It's a live performance featuring the Philip Glass Ensemble, New York Philharmonic and Collegiate Chorale conducted by Michael Reisman. I've only heard 90 seconds clips of each movement, but the sound is very full and clear for the Ensemble and NYP, although the sample of Vessels was quite different, the voices sounded distant and not as coherent. It's labeled as Mastered for iTunes and I don't see it listed on Amazon.com at the moment, perhaps an iTunes exclusive? I'll do more research.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 11, 2014, 06:25:44 AM
Glass and Reich reunited after 40 years..

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/09/11/arts/music/philip-glass-and-steve-reich-reunite-at-bam.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=1&referrer=
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on December 09, 2014, 12:46:09 PM
Nicolas Horvath is recording the complete piano music in a series for Grand Piano (Naxos). Volume I is going to be released this spring.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Bogey on December 21, 2014, 11:45:04 AM
(http://store.acousticsounds.com/images/large/AOWS_05__100088__09112014031537-4727.jpg)

This one getting a release on vinyl.  Anyone here know the music?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 06, 2015, 03:53:54 PM
Orange Mountain Music, the record company dedicated to the music of Philip Glass, has released ringtones of Glass' music available for Apple devices. My Christmas wish has come true.  0:)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: EigenUser on February 06, 2015, 04:05:55 PM
Orange Mountain Music, the record company dedicated to the music of Philip Glass, has released ringtones of Glass' music available for Apple devices. My Christmas wish has come true.  0:)
My text message alert and my ringtone are both Messiaen (Des Canyons aux Etoiles and Turangalila-Symphonie, respectively).

Anyhow, can you do me a favor? I asked Ken on the listening board, but he missed it I guess:
1. If there was one Glass symphony for EigenUser to hear, which would it be?
2. If there was one Glass solo piano work for EigenUser to hear, which would it be?
Don't give me more than one per question or I'll get confused, overwhelmed, and probably never end up listening :-\.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 06, 2015, 04:11:34 PM
My text message alert and my ringtone are both Messiaen (Des Canyons aux Etoiles and Turangalila-Symphonie, respectively).

Anyhow, can you do me a favor? I asked Ken on the listening board, but he missed it I guess:
1. If there was one Glass symphony for EigenUser to hear, which would it be?
2. If there was one Glass solo piano work for EigenUser to hear, which would it be?
Don't give me more than one per question or I'll get confused, overwhelmed, and probably never end up listening :-\.

Do I need to answer in third person?  ;D

1. Symphony No. 3
2. The Orphee Suite for Piano

Not that those are my top choices in those genres, and they are great, but recommended for starters.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: EigenUser on February 06, 2015, 04:34:08 PM
Do I need to answer in third person?  ;D

1. Symphony No. 3
2. The Orphee Suite for Piano

Not that those are my top choices in those genres, and they are great, but recommended for starters.
Great! Thanks! I will give these a listen soon.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 06, 2015, 05:05:02 PM
Great! Thanks! I will give these a listen soon.

Anytime.  ;D
Let me know what you think. I could give you other recs based on if you like or dislike these first pieces.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 06, 2015, 07:34:00 PM
My text message alert and my ringtone are both Messiaen (Des Canyons aux Etoiles and Turangalila-Symphonie, respectively).

Anyhow, can you do me a favor? I asked Ken on the listening board, but he missed it I guess:
1. If there was one Glass symphony for EigenUser to hear, which would it be?
2. If there was one Glass solo piano work for EigenUser to hear, which would it be?
Don't give me more than one per question or I'll get confused, overwhelmed, and probably never end up listening :-\.
9. Or 8.
Metamorphosis.
Engineers!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 07, 2015, 12:12:41 AM
9. Or 8.
Metamorphosis.
Engineers!

Nice, Ken. You went straight to the meat and potatoes, I believe 8 & 9 are overall better compositions than 3, I thought that they might be too heavy for a starter. But I know Nate is on his way to becoming a full fledged GlassHead.

My true #1 introduction piece for Glass is Knee No. 5 from this 1996 recording of Einstein on the Beach. From the opening deep organ and choir counting to 8, to the lonely violin and narrator reciting the story about Love. It's mesmerizing.

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Sean on February 07, 2015, 12:55:17 AM
Glass isn't much of symphonist, though I don't know the later ones; here are some of his finest works-

Company
In the upper room, eg movs 7-8
Violin concerto No.1
Koyaanisqatsi
Mad rush
Dance No.1
Songs from liquid days
Belle et la Bete
The Photographer
Satyagraha
Einstein on the beach

Here's a link to In the upper room 8, lovely piece for a start https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpewOlR-z_4
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 07, 2015, 06:47:22 AM
Glass isn't much of symphonist, though I don't know the later ones; here are some of his finest works-

Company
In the upper room, eg movs 7-8
Violin concerto No.1
Koyaanisqatsi
Mad rush
Dance No.1
Songs from liquid days
Belle et la Bete
The Photographer
Satyagraha
Einstein on the beach

Here's a link to In the upper room 8, lovely piece for a start https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpewOlR-z_4

Yep. But symphonies 8 and 9 are excellent. I would add the concertos, consistently better than the symphonies.  Nate should give the double tympani concerto a spin.

PS Nice to see Photographer get some love. It's a sheep from the goats score I find. Too strict for most, but I love it.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Sean on February 07, 2015, 06:50:24 AM
Okay. Will try get hold of 9 or 8 today.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on February 07, 2015, 06:50:52 AM
Nice, Ken. You went straight to the meat and potatoes, I believe 8 & 9 are overall better compositions than 3, I thought that they might be too heavy for a starter. But I know Nate is on his way to becoming a full fledged GlassHead.

My true #1 introduction piece for Glass is Knee No. 5 from this 1996 recording of Einstein on the Beach. From the opening deep organ and choir counting to 8, to the lonely violin and narrator reciting the story about Love. It's mesmerizing.



Yes. It was Liquid Days and Einstein that glazed me.  :laugh: the kneeplays are where the rubber hits the road in terms of what is so new and original about minimalism. (I may expand on this idea sometime, when I figure out how to express the idea so that it will piss off the maximum number of GMGers.  :) but  :blank: )
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Sean on February 08, 2015, 05:29:40 AM
Glass's Ninth, two playings so far and it's getting better. There's a sustained architectural control that emerges despite the familiar language; not sure about some of the bombast in the finale but overall it's not wasting my time, even if it's very valedictory both for Glass and Western art music.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 10, 2015, 10:45:48 AM
Lisitsa's album of Michael Nyman piano music was one my favorite albums of last year. I expect no less from this March 10th release. Two discs worth of music.

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 10, 2015, 07:01:20 PM
Lisitsa's album of Michael Nyman piano music was one my favorite albums of last year. I expect no less from this March 10th release. Two discs worth of music.



This is wonderful. I find myself collecting quite a bit of Lisitsa's recordings, I'm really quite fond of her musical form and approach. I am a big fan of her Nyman disc, as mentioned above, and now she has done it again with Glass's music. Her programming is unique, and offers a broad variety of Glass' piano music. Lisitsa plays freely with the rhythm and tempi, resulting in beautiful and very personally influenced performances. Highly recommended.

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rons_talking on March 11, 2015, 05:53:26 PM
What are his best recent works? I heard something last month that sounded much better than the Glass I used to passionately avoid.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on March 12, 2015, 10:19:00 AM
What are his best recent works? I heard something last month that sounded much better than the Glass I used to passionately avoid.
Various concerti and the 8th and 9th symphonies.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on April 01, 2015, 02:19:45 AM
Just downloaded the latest issue of Gramophone. Glass, Reich and Riley and "Minimalism" are the featured subject....

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on April 09, 2015, 05:26:34 AM
Philip Glass was interviewed on NPR's Fresh Air on Monday.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: EigenUser on April 18, 2015, 02:27:02 AM
James likes Glass?!?!?!?!?!?!

?!?!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: North Star on April 18, 2015, 02:31:41 AM
James likes Glass?!?!?!?!?!?!

?!?!
Nothing mysterious in why he posted that:
2002 – Pierre Boulez
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 21, 2015, 06:51:40 PM
"Bruce Brubaker on Philip Glass". Brubaker has a new recording of Glass' piano music releasing soon...


https://www.youtube.com/v/FZ6j3jG57vY
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on July 11, 2015, 06:19:41 PM
Releasing July 30th in the U.S., pre-orders available on Amazon...

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on August 02, 2015, 03:45:19 PM
Releasing July 30th in the U.S., pre-orders available on Amazon...



This is some cruel parodist's merciless assault on Philip Glass. He should sue for defamation.

You know I'm a Glass fan. I love some of the early symphonies, piano pieces, Fog of War, The Hours...but this is not good. Especially "Concert Overture," which might be the worst Glass I've ever heard, infused as it is with so much cloying sentimentality. He has spent too long in Hollywood.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 03, 2015, 06:41:38 AM
This is some cruel parodist's merciless assault on Philip Glass. He should sue for defamation.

You know I'm a Glass fan. I love some of the early symphonies, piano pieces, Fog of War, The Hours...but this is not good. Especially "Concert Overture," which might be the worst Glass I've ever heard, infused as it is with so much cloying sentimentality. He has spent too long in Hollywood.

Thanks for the feedback, Brian.
I read positive and negative comments when the symphony premiered a few years back. And again with the recording I'm reading positives and negatives. It seems to be a trend with Glass' new music. But I'm always up for the challenge.  8)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on August 27, 2015, 04:49:34 PM
Here's hoping I like NEXT month's new Philip Glass CD a lot more than I liked LAST month's Philip Glass CD!

(http://media.mdt.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/8/5/8559766.jpg)

Blurb from Naxos:
"Philip Glass’ Fifth String Quartet is the most substantial of his five quartets and the most traditional, using formal structures and expressive contrasts which go far beyond minimalism. While maintaining Glass’ unmistakeable personal style, this is a quartet which delivers both driving energy and an unforgettable, threnody-like tenderness. Glass chose a string quartet for his score to the film Dracula to ‘evoke the feeling of the world of the 19th century’, the music underpinning the film’s visual drama while avoiding obvious ‘horror’ effects. The String Sextet is an arrangement of Glass’s Third Symphony (Naxos 8559202), combining symphonic scale with the intimacy synonymous with the chamber music genre. The Carducci Quartet’s critically acclaimed recording of Philip Glass’s String Quartets Nos. 1-4 can be heard on Naxos 8559636."

Well, Symphony No. 3 and Dracula are two of my favorite Glass pieces, so this CD is looking good so far!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Brian on October 13, 2015, 01:09:41 PM
Petition to officially change the name of this thread to "Glass Houses".
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: North Star on October 13, 2015, 01:40:34 PM
Petition to officially change the name of this thread to "Glass Houses".
Or The Glass Ceiling, or Shards of Glass...
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on October 13, 2015, 02:27:31 PM
Translucent.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on October 13, 2015, 03:39:19 PM
Various concerti and the 8th and 9th symphonies.

BUT NOT the Harpsichord Concerto.

I agree re the 8th and 9th symphonies, and I'll add the 10th to that. His best concerto out of the recent ones I've heard is probably the first cello concerto. He seems to be in a good period of writing orchestral music at the moment, which is pretty cool. I like orchestral music.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on October 13, 2015, 03:42:26 PM
Or The Glass Ceiling, or Shards of Glass...

I like Shards of Glass....but maybe something on a bigger scale, like glass skyscrapers/buildings or something like that?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on October 13, 2015, 06:49:12 PM
BUT NOT the Harpsichord Concerto.

I agree re the 8th and 9th symphonies, and I'll add the 10th to that. His best concerto out of the recent ones I've heard is probably the first cello concerto. He seems to be in a good period of writing orchestral music at the moment, which is pretty cool. I like orchestral music.

You and Brian can have a cage fight over the 10th. I have yet to hear it. Brian hated it enough to encourage my hopes.  8)
And he still hasn't apologized to John for expressing that opinion on this thread either.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on October 13, 2015, 09:29:18 PM
You and Brian can have a cage fight over the 10th. I have yet to hear it. Brian hated it enough to encourage my hopes.  8)
And he still hasn't apologized to John for expressing that opinion on this thread either.

Wait, I am mistaken, I meant no. 7, couldn't remember if I was thinking of the one before those two or after.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Alberich on October 26, 2015, 11:10:07 AM
Koyaanisqatsi.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on October 26, 2015, 05:25:41 PM
Koyaanisqatsi.

+1
I saw the Philip Glass ensemble, with the composer himself on keyboard, perform the piece in front of screen displaying the film. An all timer event for me.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on October 30, 2015, 03:12:03 AM
Lucky people who get to see the living legend perform live :(

One of my freinds saw Einstein on the Beach last year!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Rinaldo on October 30, 2015, 04:44:02 AM
Lucky people who get to see the living legend perform live :(

*brag mode on*

I saw the ensemble with the man himself perform Music in 12 parts in Ostrava few years ago, unbelievable thing. That twelve-tone finale? BLISS. Especially as I was still high from doing a phone interview with Glass for the music magazine I worked for. Just half an hour of talk mostly about opera but he was super-nice and even gave me a few quotes that didn't sound rehearsed. Good times.

*brag mode off*
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on July 12, 2016, 07:34:08 PM
Double posting, just in case some Glass fans don't visit the "concert" thread...

Since I hadn't posted in a while I thought I'd share an important concert I attended. Important for me at least. My birthday present last month to myself was...

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Peter Oundjian - Conductor

Robert McDuffie - Violin

Glass: Violin Concerto No.2 "American Four Seasons"
Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique

This was the third time I've seen fantastique live, but it's such an amazing work that I'd be willing to see a dozen more times. The real treat was Philip Glass' VC No. 2, which I was a little nervous about how the Atlanta crowd would react to this. I personally love the piece, and own the McDuffie recording of the work, released about 5 years ago. McDuffie's performance at the concert was flawless, and he's a real physical performer which added to the spectacle of the music. To my delight the rest of the crowd was just as mesmerized, they sprung to their feet in excitement the very second the music ended. I was so gitty I actually went to meet McDuffie and have him sign a copy of the CD. Yes, I bought a second copy there at the hall just for the autograph. <----Nerd Alert.   :o

More exciting Glass news from me...
I just purchased tickets to attend the 80th Birthday Celebration of Philip Glass at Carnegie Hall in January! It will also be the world premiere of his 11th Symphony performed by Dennis Russell Davies and the Bruckner Orchestra of Linz. I'm beyond thrilled to be going to this event!!!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jlaurson on July 12, 2016, 11:56:10 PM
Double posting, just in case some Glass fans don't visit the "concert" thread...

Since I hadn't posted in a while I thought I'd share an important concert I attended. Important for me at least. My birthday present last month to myself was...

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Peter Oundjian - Conductor

Robert McDuffie - Violin

Glass: Violin Concerto No.2 "American Four Seasons"
Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique

This was the third time I've seen fantastique live, but it's such an amazing work that I'd be willing to see a dozen more times. The real treat was Philip Glass' VC No. 2, which I was a little nervous about how the Atlanta crowd would react to this. I personally love the piece, and own the McDuffie recording of the work, released about 5 years ago. McDuffie's performance at the concert was flawless, and he's a real physical performer which added to the spectacle of the music. To my delight the rest of the crowd was just as mesmerized, they sprung to their feet in excitement the very second the music ended. I was so gitty I actually went to meet McDuffie and have him sign a copy of the CD. Yes, I bought a second copy there at the hall just for the autograph. <----Nerd Alert.   :o

More exciting Glass news from me...
I just purchased tickets to attend the 80th Birthday Celebration of Philip Glass at Carnegie Hall in January! It will also be the world premiere of his 11th Symphony performed by Dennis Russell Davies and the Bruckner Orchestra of Linz. I'm beyond thrilled to be going to this event!!!

Noice! I just finished the Glass autobiography that a dear friend had sent me (signed by PG, no less). Very nifty work; not great in any literary way... but breezy enough and with lots of New York flavor that reminded me of my time in the big apple when it seemed more appreciably like back when.

I once called Robert McDuffie a "second tier violinist" or something to that effect in my column for the Washington Radio Station. No, wait, here's the exact quote: "A major niche career".

Quote
Robert McDuffie had a major niche career as the go-to violinist for American repertoire. His recording of Glass and Adams violin concertos with Christoph Eschenbach should be a staple in any good classical record collection. But there is only so much Diamond, W.Schuman, and Rosza to perform, and somehow his career didn’t take off any further with Mendelssohn or Bruch. At the Philips Collection you can hear him (along with students and faculty from his own “Center for Strings” at Mercer University) on Sunday October 3rd, at 4PM, if you’re not busy listening to Bach...

His management took such exception to this paragraph that they cancelled a planned recording with WETA over it. Nitwits. And they wanted to convince me of how wrong I was to have formed this opinion, by quoting his busy concerting schedule including the Detmold Philharmonic, the Chattanooga Symphony, and the Symphony Orchestra Vorarlberg. (I'm paraphrasing, but these -- or orchestras within that estimable third or fourth tier -- were highlighted as making their point. Goes to show on how different a page we were on, because I thought they were making exactly my point. And worst thing: I never meant it in any denigrating way to suggest that he has a major niche career. There are only ten or twenty top violinists on the circuit at any given time... and the rest has to find some way to make their name despite not breaking into that phalanx. Being known as the go-to-guy for the two Glass concertos (and the Adams, I think) isn't the worst thing, is it?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on July 13, 2016, 03:32:53 AM
Noice! I just finished the Glass autobiography that a dear friend had sent me (signed by PG, no less). Very nifty work; not great in any literary way... but breezy enough and with lots of New York flavor that reminded me of my time in the big apple when it seemed more appreciably like back when.

I once called Robert McDuffie a "second tier violinist" or something to that effect in my column for the Washington Radio Station. No, wait, here's the exact quote: "A major niche career".

His management took such exception to this paragraph that they cancelled a planned recording with WETA over it. Nitwits. And they wanted to convince me of how wrong I was to have formed this opinion, by quoting his busy concerting schedule including the Detmold Philharmonic, the Chattanooga Symphony, and the Symphony Orchestra Vorarlberg. (I'm paraphrasing, but these -- or orchestras within that estimable third or fourth tier -- were highlighted as making their point. Goes to show on how different a page we were on, because I thought they were making exactly my point. And worst thing: I never meant it in any denigrating way to suggest that he has a major niche career. There are only ten or twenty top violinists on the circuit at any given time... and the rest has to find some way to make their name despite not breaking into that phalanx. Being known as the go-to-guy for the two Glass concertos (and the Adams, I think) isn't the worst thing, is it?

It's not the worst thing if you can create an enjoyable experience such as the concert I attended. But I get your point, Jens, and don't think you're way off base. And he's good at his niche  :)

I need to read that autobiography, and also re watch the Scott Hicks documentary which was done quite well.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 14, 2016, 05:55:47 PM
Been a while, but revisited the wonderful music of The Photographer today. The lengths of Act II and Act III are perfect for allowing Glass' music to build and intensify, which Act III truly reaches a high level of. These movements and their build ups are similar to some of his earlier operas like Einstein and Akhnaten. The Photographer is great for headphones as well, the whirlwind of the synthesizers are mesmerizing, especially at 8:26 in Act III.

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on August 14, 2016, 10:59:57 PM
The Photographer is probably what I believe to be the pinnacle of his work with the Philip Glass Ensemble after Einstein on the Beach.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 03, 2016, 07:25:24 AM
There are good amount of recordings of Philip Glass piano music available, but unfortunately most of them seem to feature similar programming. I mean how many recordings of Metamorphosis does one need? But this new disc from Anton Batagov is different, and worth it. Not all of Glass' music sounds great when transcribed to piano, but these selections from Einstein and Koyaaanisqatsi successfully make that transition, especially Night Train. These works are still from an early time in his career when pure Minimalism was still in the forefront of his compositions.


Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on September 06, 2016, 04:11:46 PM
Of all the Glass compositions out there, I find the piano works to be of least interest to me. Of course, there are always exceptions like '600 Lines' which is often performed on piano and I enjoy that work very much.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Reckoner on September 11, 2016, 05:36:47 AM
More exciting Glass news from me...
I just purchased tickets to attend the 80th Birthday Celebration of Philip Glass at Carnegie Hall in January! It will also be the world premiere of his 11th Symphony performed by Dennis Russell Davies and the Bruckner Orchestra of Linz. I'm beyond thrilled to be going to this event!!!

That is super cool. I hadn't realised he had written an 11th.

btw, for anyone who may be interested, much of Glass' catalogue has recently been made available on Apple music for the first time:

http://philipglass.com/glassnotes/philip-glass-on-apple-music-press-release/
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Drasko on September 11, 2016, 07:21:46 AM
New release:

(http://media.mdt.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/O/A/OA1178D.jpg)  (http://media.mdt.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/O/A/OABD7173D.jpg)

Quote
Glass / Wilson
Einstein On The Beach
Theâtre du Châtelet
Helga Davis
Kate Moran
Antoine Silverman

The Philip Glass Ensemble / Michael Riesman

Director: Robert Wilson
Choreography: Lucinda Childs

This seminal work of avant-garde opera from composer Philip Glass and director Robert Wilson arrives full-circle, coming to France, the site of its 1976 Avignon Festival world premiere, at the tail end of this 2014 revival tour for a landmark Theâtre du Châtelet production and a first ever filming by award-winning arts filmmaker Don Kent. Eschewing conventional narrative, the opera revolves loosely around pacifist Einstein’s relationship to the creation of the atomic bomb. In continuity with the opera’s debut, for this new production, hailed by Le Figaro as ‘meticulously crafted total artwork in which the visual and musical craft are inseparable’, the music is again performed by the Philip Glass Ensemble and the choreography devised by original cast member Lucinda Childs for her Lucinda Childs Dance Company, with the scenes taking place under Bob Wilson’s own digitally remastered light design.

This very special release is packaged in a luxurious 56 page hardcover book.

- World premiere BD for Philip Glass’ landmark opera from 1976.
- Director Robert Wilson & Philip Glass revived the work in 2012 for a world tour ---the first time the work had been performed in 20 years.
- ‘‘Einstein’’ helped to establish the international reputations of Glass and Wilson.
- Extra features: Includes a Cast Galler

Running time: 263 minutes
Sound format: LPCM & DTS Master Audio 5.1

http://www.mdt.co.uk/glass-wilson-einstein-on-the-beach-riesman-opus-arte-2blu-rays.html
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 11, 2016, 09:40:16 AM
New release:

(http://media.mdt.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/O/A/OA1178D.jpg)  (http://media.mdt.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/O/A/OABD7173D.jpg)

http://www.mdt.co.uk/glass-wilson-einstein-on-the-beach-riesman-opus-arte-2blu-rays.html

Thanks for the info, Drasko. A definite purchase for me.
I've seen footage online of what I'm guessing is from this production, not 100% sure, but I'm very excited to watch this.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Reckoner on September 30, 2016, 07:19:27 AM
I've been going through a lot of his stuff on Apple Music lately.

Some great discoveries:

Les enfants terribles - absolutely brilliant. Scored for a Stravinsky-esque 3 piano line-up, Glass creates an extraordinary sound world, full of rhythmic bite and lyrical beauty.

La belle et la bete - some remarkable colours and harmonies are extracted from a slightly larger than usual Philip Glass ensemble. As in the above piece, the singing in French works really well with the music.

Concerto for Saxophone Quartet - surprisingly jazzy in places, this is one of the more inventive orchestral pieces he's written. The slow third movement is particularly atmospheric, and there's some great interplay between the saxophones throughout.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 30, 2016, 05:19:48 PM
I've been going through a lot of his stuff on Apple Music lately.

Some great discoveries:

Les enfants terribles - absolutely brilliant. Scored for a Stravinsky-esque 3 piano line-up, Glass creates an extraordinary sound world, full of rhythmic bite and lyrical beauty.

La belle et la bete - some remarkable colours and harmonies are extracted from a slightly larger than usual Philip Glass ensemble. As in the above piece, the singing in French works really well with the music.

Concerto for Saxophone Quartet - surprisingly jazzy in places, this is one of the more inventive orchestral pieces he's written. The slow third movement is particularly atmospheric, and there's some great interplay between the saxophones throughout.

All great works, Reckoner. Have you ever watched Cocteau's film of belle et la bete with Glass' playing over it? It works really well.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 30, 2016, 05:53:17 PM
More exciting Glass news from me...
I just purchased tickets to attend the 80th Birthday Celebration of Philip Glass at Carnegie Hall in January! It will also be the world premiere of his 11th Symphony performed by Dennis Russell Davies and the Bruckner Orchestra of Linz. I'm beyond thrilled to be going to this event!!!

Four months away from this event. Bought a ticket for my lifelong friend, also a Glass fan, to meet me in NY for the concert.
Here's the program from the CH website...

Bruckner Orchestra Linz
Dennis Russell Davies, Music Director
Angelique Kidjo, Vocals

ALL-PHILIP GLASS PROGRAM
Days and Nights in Rocinha
Ifé: Three Yorùbá Songs (NY Premiere)
Symphony No. 11 (World Premiere)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on September 30, 2016, 06:42:49 PM
Four months away from this event. Bought a ticket for my lifelong friend, also a Glass fan, to meet me in NY for the concert.
Here's the program from the CH website...

Bruckner Orchestra Linz
Dennis Russell Davies, Music Director
Angelique Kidjo, Vocals

ALL-PHILIP GLASS PROGRAM
Days and Nights in Rocinha
Ifé: Three Yorùbá Songs (NY Premiere)
Symphony No. 11 (World Premiere)

Decades ago, before Glass got really famous, an acquaintance of mine saw him at a local high school.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Reckoner on October 01, 2016, 08:09:51 AM
All great works, Reckoner. Have you ever watched Cocteau's film of belle et la bete with Glass' playing over it? It works really well.

I haven't. But I'd heard good things before, and glad to hear good things again! Will have to check it out at some point.

They're performing Les enfants terribles in London for his 80th birthday but I found out too late and it's sold out now.  :-[
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on October 01, 2016, 09:16:31 AM
Decades ago, before Glass got really famous, an acquaintance of mine saw him at a local high school.

From High School to Carnegie Hall. The title to his second book of memoirs?

They're performing Les enfants terribles in London for his 80th birthday but I found out too late and it's sold out now.  :-[

That would be great to see live, Reckoner, keep looking for someone selling them online!
. I'm hoping PG will be in attendance at the Carnegie Hall concert considering they're premiering his 11th Symphony.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Reckoner on October 01, 2016, 11:27:36 AM

 I'm hoping PG will be in attendance at the Carnegie Hall concert considering they're premiering his 11th Symphony.

If he is, you need to make a selfie happen.  ;D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on October 01, 2016, 11:36:20 AM
If he is, you need to make a selfie happen.  ;D

Oh ill try. Last time I saw Glass in concert was pre-cell phone days so pics happened.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Keep Going on November 30, 2016, 10:31:01 AM
Releasing July 30th in the U.S., pre-orders available on Amazon...



I felt like the 10th symphony was a slight disappointment, after the big, poetic statements of the 8th and 9th. I wasn't impressed by the fact that he re-hashed old material for the work. Here's hoping he gets back to good form in the upcoming Symphony No. 11.

If anyone's interested, there are some great, detailed notes here on all the symphonies:

http://dunvagen.com/d/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/SymphonyBox_NOTES.pdf

I'll try to get round to posting a 'favourite works' list for Phil. There'd be so many to choose from.  8)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on December 01, 2016, 03:45:30 AM
I felt like the 10th symphony was a slight disappointment, after the big, poetic statements of the 8th and 9th. I wasn't impressed by the fact that he re-hashed old material for the work. Here's hoping he gets back to good form in the upcoming Symphony No. 11.

If anyone's interested, there are some great, detailed notes here on all the symphonies:

http://dunvagen.com/d/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/SymphonyBox_NOTES.pdf

I'll try to get round to posting a 'favourite works' list for Phil. There'd be so many to choose from.  8)

Hi, KGoing, I started a thread of favorite Glass works, hasn't gotten much traffic though...

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26070.msg988668.html#msg988668

Thanks for the notes on the symphonies, will read later for sure.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Keep Going on December 04, 2016, 02:05:08 AM
Hi, KGoing, I started a thread of favorite Glass works, hasn't gotten much traffic though...

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26070.msg988668.html#msg988668

Thanks for the notes on the symphonies, will read later for sure.

Hi GSM - thanks for the link.

I'll try and get round to posting a list, although keeping it down to 5 will be a tricky one!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 09, 2017, 11:26:10 AM
Four months away from this event. Bought a ticket for my lifelong friend, also a Glass fan, to meet me in NY for the concert.
Here's the program from the CH website...

Bruckner Orchestra Linz
Dennis Russell Davies, Music Director
Angelique Kidjo, Vocals

ALL-PHILIP GLASS PROGRAM
Days and Nights in Rocinha
Ifé: Three Yorùbá Songs (NY Premiere)
Symphony No. 11 (World Premiere)

A fantastic evening! Philip was in attendence and even sitting in the box directly below us. When Davies first arrived at the podium he turned our way and bowed, a spotlight appeared and I became very confused. Leaned over and saw the top of Glass' head, was really cool  considering he's like a rock star to me.
The concert itself was perfect. Rochina was beautifully played. I own this on record but hearing it live, and especially with Carnegie's acoustics, was special. The Three Songs was a NY premiere, and a first time hearing it for me as well. The soloist, Kidjo, was sublime.
The real treat was the world premiere of the 11th. Very similar in structure to his previous symphonies nos.2 and 9 with three movements. It required 8 percussionists, harps, keyboards and full orchestra. I thought the piece was exhilarating, didn't really incorporate a slow movement as all three reached a full-throttle fever at many moments, although the 2nd mvt was hinting with a calmer opening. The 3rd opened with a minute or two of percussion only, very march-like that really set the tone for the constant motion that rarely seemed to let up. Musically it seemed to come closer to Glass' mid-80s to 90s period, strongly minimalistic and more thematic than melodic.
The Bruckner Linz were perfect, seeing the string players fight through constant arpeggios was a joy!
The picture is one I took from my box during the ovation after the 11th ended.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C3jAdpsWQAItWhm.jpg)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: Ken B on March 09, 2017, 12:55:02 PM
Welcome back Monkey Greg!

Glad it was great.

" he's like a rock star to me." Not me! I admire him!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 09, 2017, 02:50:56 PM
Welcome back Monkey Greg!

Glad it was great.

" he's like a rock star to me." Not me! I admire him!

 ;D

howdy, Ken!
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: vandermolen on March 14, 2017, 12:50:17 AM
I have some Glass and generally enjoy it. Which symphony do you consider to be his best?
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 14, 2017, 02:10:36 AM
I have some Glass and generally enjoy it. Which symphony do you consider to be his best?

I find nos. 1, 3, 8 and 9 to be his best. But honestly I do enjoy them all. Once you get into some of the purely orchestral ones, like the previously mentioned four, then give his 5th a spin, about 90 mins long (2 discs) and features a full choir and soloists.

Interesting fact: Glass' didn't begin composing symphonies until he was in his 50s, he's now 80 years old.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: vandermolen on March 14, 2017, 03:24:03 AM
I find nos. 1, 3, 8 and 9 to be his best. But honestly I do enjoy them all. Once you get into some of the purely orchestral ones, like the previously mentioned four, then give his 5th a spin, about 90 mins long (2 discs) and features a full choir and soloists.

Interesting fact: Glass' didn't begin composing symphonies until he was in his 50s, he's now 80 years old.
Thanks very much.  :)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on April 01, 2017, 03:58:29 AM
In honor of Philip Glass' 80th Birthday DG has altered their 100 Great Symphonies Box Set. Added a few of his symphonies and replaced Schumann's face with the iconic portrait of Glass.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 19, 2017, 04:14:47 PM
Live streaming of Symphony No. 5 right now....

https://www.trinitywallstreet.org/video/philip-glass-symphony-no-5-0
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: arpeggio on May 19, 2017, 07:34:40 PM
For many years I really did not care for the music of Glass but I recently have discovered some of his music that really appeals to me.

Two works that I have discovered are:

The concerto for two timpanists:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lnw0IHgjE2E (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lnw0IHgjE2E)

And the concerto for Saxophone Quartet:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYkIrYh7zuw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYkIrYh7zuw)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9pUnqtc4-k (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9pUnqtc4-k)
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 20, 2017, 04:48:39 AM
For many years I really did not care for the music of Glass but I recently have discovered some of his music that really appeals to me.

Two works that I have discovered are:

The concerto for two timpanists:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lnw0IHgjE2E (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lnw0IHgjE2E)

And the concerto for Saxophone Quartet:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYkIrYh7zuw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYkIrYh7zuw)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9pUnqtc4-k (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9pUnqtc4-k)

Great works, arpeggio. Glass has a handful of other concertos you might like.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 20, 2017, 04:50:37 AM
Live streaming of Symphony No. 5 right now....

https://www.trinitywallstreet.org/video/philip-glass-symphony-no-5-0

Tonight's performance of No. 5 is live streaming as well.

The Choir of Trinity Wall Street, Downtown Voices, and NOVUS NY, conducted by Julian Wachner
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on May 20, 2017, 05:28:19 PM
I have some Glass and generally enjoy it. Which symphony do you consider to be his best?

I would say 8 is definitely my favourite, followed closely by 2.....2 is probably one of the more underrated symphonies he has written but it has some really interesting harmonic and melodic writing as it is influenced by an interest he had in bitonality. Also, it's a purely orchestral work and from first glance it seems to be more like a fairly normal kind of symphony, nothing that really stands out amongst the plethora of other 45 minute symphonies out there.......but the way harmony and melody work with and against each other create some really fascinating musical tensions that give the symphony a unique sound in his symphonic output.

But I do like 8 more. ;D
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: opaquer on May 20, 2017, 05:30:52 PM
I would say 8 is definitely my favourite

Same for me, that one has it all. Very much a constantly changing piece, it's quite a fun symphony matter of fact!  :)

Can't say Glass floats my boat often though
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 20, 2017, 05:50:01 PM
I would say 8 is definitely my favourite, followed closely by 2.....2 is probably one of the more underrated symphonies he has written but it has some really interesting harmonic and melodic writing as it is influenced by an interest he had in bitonality. Also, it's a purely orchestral work and from first glance it seems to be more like a fairly normal kind of symphony, nothing that really stands out amongst the plethora of other 45 minute symphonies out there.......but the way harmony and melody work with and against each other create some really fascinating musical tensions that give the symphony a unique sound in his symphonic output.

But I do like 8 more. ;D

8 is great, and very unique in its 3-movement structure with each movement becoming slower, darker.

Jessop, you might like his 11th Symphony. I found it similar to his 2nd, and also 9th. Purely orchestral, and contains the same musical tensions that you mentioned. 
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: jessop on May 20, 2017, 05:53:50 PM
8 is great, and very unique in its 3-movement structure with each movement becoming slower, darker.

Jessop, you might like his 11th Symphony. I found it similar to his 2nd, and also 9th. Purely orchestral, and contains the same musical tensions that you mentioned. 
Sounds good! I wonder when a recording will be released.......I believe there's already a box set of his symphonies in existence which has now been demoted to being an Incomplete Symphonies of Philip Glass.......

I wouldn't be surprised if he ends up making it to 13, 14 or even 15 in terms of the number of symphonies he gets through.
Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 20, 2017, 06:11:59 PM
Sounds good! I wonder when a recording will be released.......I believe there's already a box set of his symphonies in existence which has now been demoted to being an Incomplete Symphonies of Philip Glass.......

I wouldn't be surprised if he ends up making it to 13, 14 or even 15 in terms of the number of symphonies he gets through.

When I saw the 11th premiere it was Bruckner Linz and Dennis Russell Davies, and they've recorded the previous 5 symphonies so I'm sure a recording is on it's way.

Title: Re: Philip Glass
Post by: TheGSMoeller on November 10, 2017, 05:28:28 PM
Bagatov returns to the piano music of Glass, this time performing all of the 20 etudes. I loved Bagatov's first Glass album, Prophecies, that featured transcriptions of works from Einstein and Koyaanisqatsi, and this newest release is just as good. Bagatov offers a delicate and lyrical approach to these works, more so than other Etudes on record, but still gives every one it's own individual voice. A beautiful album.