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Konx-Om-Pax

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The Diner / Re: Brexit Negotiations.
« Last post by XB-70 Valkyrie on Today at 06:14:37 PM »
I'm afraid this isn't very flattering to the British

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/opinion/sunday/brexit-ireland-empire.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

The Malign Incompetence of the British Ruling Class

With Brexit, the chumocrats who drew borders from India to Ireland are getting a taste of their own medicine.

By Pankaj Mishra

The basic idea seems to be that the combination of arrogance and incompetence that was inflicted on British Colonies is now being applied at home....

Well, not very flattering to the ruling class and royalty in any case I suppose. Nevertheless, an excellent article that should be required reading, and explains much of the needless suffering, genocide, and horror of the last, oh 400 (?) years! Also they forgot to point out the chumocrats' well-known penchant for bestiality (oink! oink!) among other "interesting" behaviors. (You peons wouldn't understand!) Forgive me for not being enthralled every time there is news of a new royal spawn.

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The Diner / Re: Identify Your Avatar
« Last post by Mirror Image on Today at 06:13:48 PM »
Yeah, I think she is too.  :)
It was either going to be that photo of her or a shot of Maureen O'Sullivan from the old MGM series of Tarzan movies - because she's adorable as Jane. And when I say 'adorable' that word fails to impart what quality I'm referring to. 8)

Maureen O’Sullivan was quite a looker as well, but I think Paulette Goddard is in a class of her own along with Grace Kelly, Ava Gardner, Gene Tierney, Lauren Bacall, among others.
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Typically, spindle tracks on the label (laziness and/or insufficient light  ::) ) and ring wear on the cover are warning signs the LP may have been abused. Also, generally, I've noted the more obscure the music, the more likely the LP will be in good condition. Everyone 50 years ago probably had a Beethoven 5, whereas people in that time period with Schubert songs, Bach cantatas, Second Viennese School, etc. would have had to hunt to find those items and, they were generally not cheap (generally pretty expensive in inflation adjusted terms).

Anyway, this is today's digitization. Hollywood SQ playing Tchaikovsky and Borodin. The sonics on these Capitol LPs were always quite good (later stereos were stunning in some cases), very little inner groove distortion and they were able to pack in 50+ mins of music with no compression. The Hollywood SQ had a lean, muscular, analytic sound, and they always played with great enthusiasm and energy. They do not have the lush, dark sound I prefer in some SQ repertiore as with the Budapest, Baryilli, Paganini (with Henri Temianka) Curtis SQs for example. But, their recordings are always worth collecting, and their approach I find refreshing, especially in more modern repertoire (their Villa-Lobos is incredible). A very nice LP that had been sitting around neglected for 25+ years on my shelves.



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The Diner / Re: Identify Your Avatar
« Last post by NikF on Today at 05:58:59 PM »
Yeah, I think she is too.  :)
It was either going to be that photo of her or a shot of Maureen O'Sullivan from the old MGM series of Tarzan movies - because she's adorable as Jane. And when I say 'adorable' that word fails to impart what quality I'm referring to. 8)
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The Diner / Re: Worst looking CD/LP artwork
« Last post by NikF on Today at 05:54:13 PM »
I see that kind of image and wonder who exactly plays a piano in the middle of the woods.

My problem with cover is a different one.  My first impulse was to think either the composer or the pianist was someone named Lisztkhatia. My second impulse was to think Lisztkhatia was the name of a work by the hitherto unknown composer Franz  Buniatishvili. Only on the third try did my brain correctly unscramble composer and performer names.

Yeah, and I know people complain about time and money being a pressure, but there's a reason good pros from different fields can both make the time and then make the most of that time so everything comes together to the standard required.
And that particular font would be better suited if she was playing in a warehouse while surrounded by wooden packing crates, because then it would at worst be a particularly obvious cliche to employ.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Mahler Mania, Rebooted
« Last post by JBS on Today at 05:52:14 PM »
Parallel with this mini-topic is the use of boy singers for the dead brother in Das Klagende Lied.  I have read that Mahler dropped the idea in his later revision of the work.

What say ye to that idea?  I am thinking of Chailly's DECCA CD from 30 years ago with a boy singer.

Well, given that several recordings use the first part of the original in conjunction with the two parts of the revised version, I think it fair to say that Mahler's intentions with dKL are disregarded routinely.

When I suggested using a male alto, I had in mind Bernstein's use of a boy soprano in the Fourth Symphony. Most people think it didn't work, although I think it does work better than most people give it credit for.

I seem to remember a countertenor who recorded several Mahler songs, including the Wunderhorn song included in the Second Symphony, bit don't remember his name. (So did Hampson in his recording with MTT.)
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Composer Discussion / Re: Mahler Mania, Rebooted
« Last post by SurprisedByBeauty on Today at 05:49:53 PM »
...In fact, I prefer Schubert's Wintrese sung by an alto, even though that is certainly not what Schubert intended.

Oh boy, you do have eclectic taste.  ;D
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by André on Today at 05:46:18 PM »


Big, big works, teeming with good themes and a propensity toward enthusiastic development. At almost 50 minutes, the piano quartet is the longest of its genre I have come across. It's amazing it doesn’t outstay its welcome.

The piano trio is for the unusual combination of violin, viola and piano (no cello). It was programmed often by Eugène Ysaÿe (to whom Jongen had dedicated his violin sonata) and Lionel Tertis, the english violist.

Both works boast a big, very demanding piano part. The quartet in particular is almost a piano concerto in disguise. The program notes rightly point to Ernest Chausson as a major influence. Indeed, the latter’s Concert for piano, violin and string quartet (also dedicated to Ysaÿe) is similarly symphonic in its dimensions and busy writing.
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The Diner / Re: Worst looking CD/LP artwork
« Last post by JBS on Today at 05:42:17 PM »


Regardless of time/money budget or circumstances, artistic demands, considerations given to all substrates potentially being used, and no matter who shot it, it's a terrible, terrible thing. Even the swan looks embarrassed. And the irony is, there's an unintentional better job of disguising that swan's beak (via posing it foreshortened) than the clumsy method of hiding Khatia's nose behind her hair.

For what it's worth, I'd have flattened everything with a combo of low lighting ratio and long focal length and quickly got the shot. And then taken her for a drink. That's not a joke. 8) Although if George is reading this, then yes, it's entirely dependant on her not having rollerskates hidden under that dress.  ;D

I see that kind of image and wonder who exactly plays a piano in the middle of the woods.

My problem with cover is a different one.  My first impulse was to think either the composer or the pianist was someone named Lisztkhatia. My second impulse was to think Lisztkhatia was the name of a work by the hitherto unknown composer Franz  Buniatishvili. Only on the third try did my brain correctly unscramble composer and performer names.
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