Recent Posts

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The Diner / Re: Pictures I like
« Last post by bwv 1080 on Today at 04:38:31 AM »
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The Diner / Re: What games do you play on your phone/pad?
« Last post by bwv 1080 on Today at 04:36:23 AM »
Get Baldur's Gate - they ported the early 2000s D&D game to iPad
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Madiel on Today at 04:28:03 AM »
Holmboe, Symphony No.9


The first movement tends to make me think of things crawling in the night...
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The Diner / Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Last post by milk on Today at 04:17:00 AM »
My response to you was not gracious?
I thought you could have considered my point more rather than saying that I had just boiled it down to a weak reading. I think the film is fascinating. But don’t mind my oversensitivity. I’m sure you meant well.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Judith on Today at 04:14:23 AM »
One of my Twitter friends is a violinist for the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra. He posted a radio catch up link of them performing Schumann Symphony no 2 conducted by Riccardo Muti. What a performance. Beautiful, especially the finish to the final movement. It was so full and fiery.
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The Diner / Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Last post by k a rl h e nn i ng on Today at 04:10:30 AM »
The theme of the movie is not that people have faulty memories or recollections of what happened. It’s that they lie about that happened out of shame. This is not a radical reading of Rashomon. I am not saying anyone is stupid for disagreeing with me, by the way. I have a critique of the film that I’m willing to question if anyone is willing or generous enough to take it into consideration. The two responses to me weren’t very gracious.

My response to you was not gracious?
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Bubbles on Today at 04:05:58 AM »
My oh my, what a good way to start the day....

Cras: L'oeuvre pour orchestre
Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg & Jean-François Antonioli
Timpani



Includes the above-mentiioned Legende.  But IMHO Journal de Bord is even better!  Or maybe I say that just because I'm listening to it right now.

When I listen to this music, I feel such a rush of exhilaration.  I feel like maybe I'm going out to sea for the first time, maybe on one of those antique tall sailing ships, or maybe on an ultra-modern catamaran.  Maybe not for the first time, but sailing somewhere where the overall beauty of the experience overwhelms the senses.

Anyway, it's all good.  Anyone who hears it will like it instantly.

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The Diner / Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Last post by milk on Today at 04:03:28 AM »
And you know this, how?

Science has demonstrated repeatedly that people's memories of even very recent events are often faulty. Declaring that every character subjectively knows the same things might accord with your understanding of how the world works, but it doesn't accord with any objective assessment of how subjective memory works.

Please note, I'm not being definitive about this, but I have a problem with you being definitive about it. To me it's an open question in the film (from what I remember of it) how much of the unreliability of narrators is deliberate and how much it is accidental.

I note that courts in real life have to deal with this all the time. I've certainly seen a number of judgements where a judge concludes that a witness is both truthful and unreliable. I can remember being involved in at least one tribunal case where the tribunal member (my boss) reached that kind of conclusion: that a witness was sincere but shouldn't be trusted except where the testimony could be verified by another witness.

I also note that Wikipedia indicates the actors couldn't work out "what happened". They kept asking Kurosawa and he refused to tell them "the truth". So a reading that asserts that the characters know differs from the experience of the people who actually portrayed those characters.
The theme of the movie is not that people have faulty memories or recollections of what happened. It’s that they lie about that happened out of shame. This is not a radical reading of Rashomon. I am not saying anyone is stupid for disagreeing with me, by the way. I have a critique of the film that I’m willing to question if anyone is willing or generous enough to take it into consideration. The two responses to me weren’t very gracious. Oh well. In my view, which is not eccentric or even original, the stories of the three villains are faulty because they lie to protect their honor and avoid shame. I think this is clear in what Kurosawa is saying: not that it’s unclear to them but that they treat each other with such inhumanity. This is underscored by what happens at the end when the woodcutter (priest and other character) discover the baby. The film ends with compassion for the baby as the characters have weighed the gravity of the inhumanity that was recounted. Irrespective of what the actors got out of the script when they were filming, I’m not the only one to think that there is a clear truth to be ascertained by looking at the recollections logically. I believe this was Kurosawa’s intention and I’m not alone. The woodcutter has no reason to lie, only to leave out his shameful act of theft. We can deduce what happened by removing the self-serving parts of each recollection which are clearly supposed to be shameful lies - not faulty memories, and considering the woodcutter’s second retelling of what he saw. Again, it’s a pretty mainstream and logical reading of the film that it’s about morality and compassion for the people who have so debased and dishonored themselves (including the women who is raped). This fits with the ending. Im not sure it’s really possible to interpret Rashomon as being about faulty memories. I don’t see how the film works that way but I’m open to hearing what I’ve missed and what many if not most critics have missed.
Edit to add: let me also remind people that the final woodcutter’s scene presents THE most shameful and realistic view of the sword fight ending in murder. This is the pathetic behavior we’re meant to understand and feel sick about. Again, what I’m saying here I think is quite uncontroversial. What seems to be controversial is my cringing over the rape depiction. I find it a fascinating question of exactly why this film could not be made today. I think “political correctness” is the lazy answer.
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The Polling Station / Re: Six favourite lesser known Piano concertos.
« Last post by Cato on Today at 04:02:45 AM »
Hartmann, Cto for piano, winds & percussion (which, coincidentally, I just revisited a couple of days ago)
Wuorinen, Piano Concerto #4 (heard the première in Symphony Hall, great, great piece)
Copland — for Copland, this is an obscure piece
Bernstein, Age of Anxiety Symphony (a pf cto in all but name)
Stravinsky, Cto for piano & winds — for Igor Fyodorovich, this is an obscure piece
Hindemith, Konzertmusik, Op.49 for pf, brass & two harps (the most brilliant Hindemith work that too few of us know)

Great choices!  I first heard the Stravinsky in high school and loaned the record to some friends who were big on Stravinsky.   One of my favorites!

 I recall watching Aaron Copland play this concerto on television: my grandmother (a fine pianist) found it too avant-garde, but I was enthused!

The broadcast has been preserved:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/vC3qQpyp4rI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/vC3qQpyp4rI</a>
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Madiel on Today at 03:57:22 AM »
Sibelius, Six Runeberg songs, op.90


I'm near the end of this set (this is the last published opus), and I know I've said things like this repeatedly while going through this set, but... op.90/1 is startling, stark and dissonant. And no.2 has some of the same tone. After that things become a bit more conventional, but I continue to think that Sibelius' songs are an important part of his output.  No.5 has a gorgeous change of mood and pace.
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