GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Opera and Vocal => Topic started by: Anne on June 09, 2007, 06:49:53 PM

Title: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on June 09, 2007, 06:49:53 PM
I thought we could use a thread where we could mention items, books, etc. that an opera lover might use.

http://opera_on_dvd.home.att.net/        Opera DVD's that will be issued.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: beclemund on June 09, 2007, 07:34:19 PM
Opera Today (http://www.operatoday.com/) is very useful for CD, DVD and performance reviews and release information, but also because it has synopsi (and libretti) of many operas along with those reviews, so you can get a feel for the story even if you do not speak the language of the performance. The best part of it is the very legible format.

And if you're exploring an opera that is new to you and you just want to cut down to the meat of it by listening to the notable arias (particularly helpful before making a trip to the music store so you can sample tracks at the store if you can listen before buying), The Aria Database (http://www.aria-database.com/) is a very useful information source. Some also include midi files for when you need one of those "aha" moments to recognize where a tune comes from.

If your budget opera release arrives without a libretto, Stanford University has an helpful resources page in Opera Glass (http://opera.stanford.edu/main.html). There are links to other sites with libretti and that site includes other vocal works as well, like Bach's Passions and Cantatas, and other liturgical and secular works along with opera synopsi, discographies and performance histories.

Music & Vision's (http://www.mvdaily.com/) online classical music magazine provides another source for opera reviews. Granted, Robert Anderson's reviews don't generally say much, but each review provides brief Quicktime clips of the opera reviewed. It can give you a good idea of how the principles perform.

Want to know where in the world you can see the next live performance of Jenufa? Or would you rather find out where the nearest opera house is to your front door? Operabase (http://www.operabase.com/index.cgi?lang=en) is a good place to start. A huge database of artists, operas and venues with links to the venues' web sites so you can keep up with performance schedules.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: knight66 on June 10, 2007, 05:07:19 AM
Good idea.....I have made this topic sticky to keep it at the top for the moment and we will see how useful it is. Here are some sites I visit.

Gossip and news...

http://www.parterre.com/

Reviews....

http://npw-opera-concerts.blogspot.com/

The reviews are by Nigel and always well worth reading. A lot of what he sees is subsequently issued on DVD.

Mike
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: uffeviking on June 10, 2007, 06:49:24 PM
There is

http://www.opera.co.uk/

a monthly publication with selected articles accessable on the net. Excellent world wide coverage of performances, schedules and listing of opera festivals.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Steve on June 10, 2007, 07:47:13 PM
There is

http://www.opera.co.uk/

a monthly publication with selected articles accessable on the net. Excellent world wide coverage of performances, schedules and listing of opera festivals.

Thanks for the info!  ;)
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on June 11, 2007, 10:07:06 AM
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b/104-6944379-3143911?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=101+Opera+Librettos

This book truly has 101 Opera Librettos and is 1,474 pages.  At the time I bought it 8 or 9 years ago, it cost $25.  Now you see how expensive it is.  It was published by Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, NY.  Wait a second when viewing the picture as true color is blue.

Keep your eye out for it.  It is too heavy to carry around but invaluable when you can't find a libretto.

Be sure to read the reports at Amazon regarding the book so you know the book's strengths and weaknesses.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on June 15, 2007, 08:05:16 AM
There is a wonderful 3-volume set of books The Operas of Verdi by Julian Budden.  I checked at Amazon and they only sell the books individually.  A friend of mine haunted the used book stores until a complete set was found.

Here are the individual volumes from Amazon:

I would look elsewhere for volume one.


The Operas of Verdi (Revised Edition)  3 Volumes:
Vol. 1 - From Oberto to Rigoletto (Blue)
 
http://www.amazon.com/Operas-Verdi-Oberto-Julian-Budden/dp/0304310581/ref=sr_1_9/104-6944379-3143911?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181924762&sr=1-9
 
Vol. 2 - The Operas of Verdi From Il Trovatore to La Forza del Destino Revised edition (green)
 
http://www.amazon.com/Operas-Verdi-Volumes-Trovatore-Destino/dp/0195204506/ref=sr_1_2/104-6944379-3143911?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181924762&sr=1-2
 
Vol. 3 - The Operas of Verdi From Don Carlos to Falstaff Revised edition (red)
 
http://www.amazon.com/Operas-Verdi-Don-Carlos-Falstaff/dp/0198162634/ref=sr_1_1/104-6944379-3143911?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181924762&sr=1-1

Copyright is 1973, 1992
 
Each book is about 520 pages.

They received 5 stars at Amazon at one time.


Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on June 15, 2007, 12:04:44 PM
Volume 3 from The Operas of Verdi has an editorial review that I missed the first time and didn't know if others might have not noticed it either.

Editorial Review:

Amazon.com
The three volumes of studies of Verdi's operas by Julian Budden are rightly classics of the genre. This is owing to their scope of information on the genesis, circumstances, variants, and specifics of the operas themselves--certainly the fullest description these works have ever been given--as well as to the wealth of surrounding information about the composer, his life, his friends, and his times. It is a measure of the excellence of Budden's achievement that this cornucopia of information is surveyed in very readable prose--readers get a picture of each work within its context. Budden's knowledge of 19th-century opera--both in Italy and in France--is wide-ranging, and he is able to place Verdi and his works in comparison with those of Donizetti, Pacini, Mercadante, and Meyerbeer. He discusses how the great operatic genius emerged from the background of early-19th-century opera and how Verdi's own early, uneven works blossomed into the glory of his later ones. Budden, thankfully, is not a hagiographer, and he recognizes Verdi's faults as well as his strengths, but few--if any--writers have managed to demonstrate how Verdi both blended in with his musical surroundings and stood out from them. These studies, with all their richness, are a good source of information about a host of lesser composers of the time. Budden includes many musical examples to highlight his writing in this, a work of scholarship of the highest order. --Patrick J. Smith --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description
Volume 3 covers roughly a quarter of a century, a period which saw grand opera on the Parisian model established throughout Italy, the reform of the Conservatories, and the spread of cosmopolitan influences to an extent that convinced many that Italian music was losing its identity. Verdi produced his four last and greatest operas - Don Carlos, Aida, Otello, and Falstaff - in this period, which ended with the advent of `verisimo', in which a new, recognizably Italian idiom was inaugurated.

Citations (learn more)
21 books cite this book
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Hector on July 16, 2007, 05:27:58 AM
There is a wonderful 3-volume set of books The Operas of Verdi by Julian Budden.  I checked at Amazon and they only sell the books individually.  A friend of mine haunted the used book stores until a complete set was found.

Here are the individual volumes from Amazon:

I would look elsewhere for volume one.


The Operas of Verdi (Revised Edition)  3 Volumes:
Vol. 1 - From Oberto to Rigoletto (Blue)
 
http://www.amazon.com/Operas-Verdi-Oberto-Julian-Budden/dp/0304310581/ref=sr_1_9/104-6944379-3143911?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181924762&sr=1-9
 
Vol. 2 - The Operas of Verdi From Il Trovatore to La Forza del Destino Revised edition (green)
 
http://www.amazon.com/Operas-Verdi-Volumes-Trovatore-Destino/dp/0195204506/ref=sr_1_2/104-6944379-3143911?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181924762&sr=1-2
 
Vol. 3 - The Operas of Verdi From Don Carlos to Falstaff Revised edition (red)
 
http://www.amazon.com/Operas-Verdi-Don-Carlos-Falstaff/dp/0198162634/ref=sr_1_1/104-6944379-3143911?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181924762&sr=1-1

Copyright is 1973, 1992
 
Each book is about 520 pages.

They received 5 stars at Amazon at one time.




These are, currently, the reference works in English on Verdi's operas.

He puts the works in historical context.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on November 07, 2007, 09:20:35 AM
There are 2 books each accompanied by 2-Cd's from Naxos that may interest everyone.  Operas are alphabetically listed with summary, list of characters and their vocal range, premier date, # of acts and sometimes how accepted the works were then and now.  In addition the composers are listed alphabetically with all their operas listed with page #'s.


The first book/2-Cd's is The A to Z of Opera and has 762 pages.  Price $9.97.  At amazon 5 stars.

http://www.amazon.com/Z-Opera-762-page-booklet/dp/B00004YYRR


The second book/2-Cd's is A to Z of Classical Music and has  562 pages.  Price #9.97.  At amazon 4 1/2 stars.

http://www.amazon.com/Z-Classical-Music-Ernst-Ottensamer/dp/B00004YYRT/ref=pd_bxgy_m_img_b/104-6944379-3143911

A friend sent the 1st set to me as a gift.  I found it rather complete for listing the operas written by the composer.

These books are listing the Naxos recordings.  As my friend said, "Who cares about the Naxos Cd's, we want the book!"  I agree.  It is useful for beginner to the experienced listener.  The books are printed on good paper and have numerous photos.  The only way a book of this quality + 2 Cd's can be sold this cheaply is charging it off to advertising.  Much work has gone into these 2 sets.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on February 06, 2008, 07:40:25 PM
Joseph Kerman's book, Opera As Drama, "is one of the most controversial, thought-provoking and entertaining works of operatic criticism ever written...."

Paul Henry Lang, author of The Experience of Opera - An Informal Introduction to Operatic History and Literature, has offered the reader and opera enthusiast a unique combination of scholarly breadth and critical acumen.  It is based on Dr. Lang's experience as a music critic of the New York Herald Tribune.

Both of the above books are fascinating and insightful reading for anyone interested in opera.

The next book Debussy, The Quiet Revolutionary, is from the "Unlocking the Masters" series available at Amazon.  It has a 20-page section on Pelleas et Melisande.  I have searched for quite some time to find help understanding this opera and this book really has the type of info I was looking for.  That entire series of books is terrific.  Most of them ($19.00 paperbacks) have one or two Cd's secured on the inside back cover that illustrate the text in the book.  Highly recommended.

Yesterday on one of the threads at GMG people were discussing Debussy and Wagner.  This last book has interesting things to say about that topic.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: stridonolassu on March 17, 2008, 01:46:47 AM
I thought we could use a thread where we could mention items, books, etc. that an opera lover might use.

http://opera_on_dvd.home.att.net/        Opera DVD's that will be issued.

The invaluable site that Anne mentioned sadly went dark in December 2007.  It was a great resource for avid opera on dvd collectors such as myself.  A replacement for this site can now be found at:

http://stridonolassu.googlepages.com

The complete catalog list is still under construction but the new and upcoming releases are being updated almost daily.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on March 19, 2008, 08:32:37 AM
I felt bad when the sight went dark also.  Thanks for giving us a replacement!

I just went to the site for which you gave us the address.  Unfortunately I see nothing that makes it look like the site that went dark in December.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Wendell_E on March 19, 2008, 09:39:38 AM
I felt bad when the sight went dark also.  Thanks for giving us a replacement!

I just went to the site for which you gave us the address.  Unfortunately I see nothing that makes it look like the site that went dark in December.

Try this:

http://stridonolassu.googlepages.com/

googlepages, not googlespages.   :)
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on April 08, 2008, 10:43:36 AM
http://www.hmv.ca/hmvcaweb/en_CA/displayProductDetails.do?sku=1065342

Good Price!
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: jhar26 on March 08, 2009, 05:35:30 PM
blogs...

http://operachic.typepad.com/opera_chic/

http://mostlyopera.blogspot.com/

http://operatattler.typepad.com/

Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Brünnhilde forever on March 09, 2009, 06:00:09 AM
Remember Nigel Wilkinson? His blog:

http://npw-opera-concerts.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Anne on April 28, 2009, 12:39:33 PM
I received this email today which says the author can deliver a libretto of Verdi's opera Attila.*  The man's prices are high IMO but sometimes price is no object.

If you read his mini-resume, he sounds very competent.  Does anyone know him or have any info on him?  He started sending monthly advertising via email about 8 - 12 months ago.

I have never bought anything from him but he might be a good source for desired librettos that we can't find elsewhere.

*  The La Scala DVD of Attila with Sam Ramey  is excellent.  When he and the soldier from Rome sing their duet in act I, it always sends chills tingling down my arms and spine.  This DVD has been praised many places.  Ladies or anyone else, if you like your "heroes" bare-chested, this is the DVD for you.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A New Opera Journeys Libretto Attila with Italian/English translation side-by-side interspersed with music highlight examples.

Available in print $ 10.50 plus S/H
or Ebook $ 9.00

Giuseppe Verdi’s rousing 9th opera (1846) will have its Met Opera premiere during the 2009-2010 season, together with the Met debut of acclaimed conductor, Riccardo Muti.

 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 About Opera Journeys' author and editor: Burton D. Fisher is a former opera conductor who studied at the Mannes and Juilliard schools. He is the author and publisher of over 130 books about opera: the Opera Classics Library Series, Opera Journeys Mini Guide Series, Opera Journeys Libretto Series, the popular college textbook, A History of Opera: Milestones and Metamorphoses, the Opera Classics Library Puccini Companion: the Glorious Dozen, and recently, Mozart's Da Ponte Operas. He is principal lecturer for the Opera Journeys Lecture Series at Florida International University; a lecturer for opera and music "theme" cruises; a commissioned author for Season Opera Guides and Program Notes for regional opera companies; a translator of librettos for new CD/DVD releases for SONY-BMG; and a frequent opera commentator on National Public Radio.
 

For photocopy and re-use requests, contact:

COPYRIGHT CLEARANCE CENTER

Phone: (978) 750-8400 Fax: (978) 646-8600
Email: info@copyright.com or On Line www.copyright.com


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Burton D. Fisher
www.operajourneys.com

Opera Journeys
Opera Journeys Publishing
2850 Palmwood Terrace
Suite 228
Boca Raton FL 33431
(561) 347-6713

Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Coopmv on June 20, 2009, 03:51:43 PM
I have a few dozen operas on LP.  I only started buying ALL the Wagner operas on CD about 2 1/2 years ago and now have all his operas on CD in addition to LP.  To me, opera lovers must have at least some operas on LP since the liner notes that come with LP's are so much better than those that come with CD's.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: knight66 on June 20, 2009, 10:02:16 PM
I am an opera lover and have no LPs. Although what you say is true in part, often the CD issues have excellent notes and some reissues give you everything that was in the LP versions, just in a smaller format.

I don't see having LPs as being vital to the life of the opera lover.

Mike
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Sean on June 20, 2009, 10:16:15 PM
Remember Nigel Wilkinson? His blog:

http://npw-opera-concerts.blogspot.com/

I think it was me who made him leave actually- my Promethean impudence cheesed him off pretty good.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: knight66 on June 20, 2009, 10:17:18 PM
No Sean, it was not anything to do with you.

Mike
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: 71 dB on June 21, 2009, 12:07:28 AM
LPs for opera?  :P How many LPs is an 4 hour long opera? Well 4*60/45=5.33..

DVDs is the way to go! Blu-ray if you can.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Wendell_E on June 21, 2009, 07:16:37 AM
How many LPs is an 4 hour long opera? Well 4*60/45=5.33..

Yep.  And the original LP release of Solti's recording of Götterdämmerung took six LPs.  Some of those LPs did have great booklets:  the RCA Soria series, Solti's Rosenkavalier.  Nice stuff, but I don't really think it's necessary. 
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: knight66 on June 21, 2009, 07:32:55 AM
The Rosenkavalier really was exceptional, beautiful illustrations by Roller and I think it had a foldout page with musical motifs.

Mike
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Scarpia on May 12, 2010, 07:48:47 AM
What have they done to the opus arte went site?  It used to be an elegant listing of their wonderful products, now they've attempted to make is some sort of amazon.com of classical music.   Whenever I search for one of their DVDs I get an endless listing of audio downloads instead of the dvds I'm looking for.   >:(
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: sospiro on May 15, 2010, 10:07:16 AM
Thanks everyone. Lots of books to go on my 'wish list'.

Some sites I've found useful (many of you will know these already).


http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/main.jsp - Not ordered from here, yet

http://www.bachtrack.com/ - Good for finding operas to go to

http://www.diverdi.com/tienda/default.aspx - Have bought several CDs from this site

http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/search.html - Search for lieder

http://www.opera-guide.ch/opern_komponisten.php?uilang=en&first-letter=A - Good libretti site

http://www.operatoday.com/ - News & reviews

http://www.operissimo.com/ - Search for an opera/concert

http://www.musicroom.com/Browse/Series.aspx?seriesid=series1169 - Schirmer's libretti

http://www.selections.com/music/ - Some good bargains









Title: Older Met Casts (late '70s)
Post by: kishnevi on May 20, 2010, 06:08:07 PM
Not sure this is answerable:
I'm trying to find actual cast rosters from the productions the Met toured with during the late '70s.  I was a college student in Atlanta, and each year when the Met came for one week in May, I would attend as many productions as possible--usually at least three, one year all seven (I was lucky enough to be an usher that year). 
Problem is, while I can remember some of the individual productions--the Chagall Magic Flute, Zefferelli Otello, the Tosca production that was toured with twice in the four years I attended, Boris Godunov, Favorita, etc.--I can not remember any of the singers.  The lone exception is John Alexander in Favorita, and that is only because he was a last minute substitute announced from the stage (to the great displeasure of the audience,  because Pavarotti was the scheduled tenor.) I remember Jon Vickers also cancelled at the last minute from Otello, but don't remember who sang the role in his place.

So I would like find information online as to whom the singers were
I've hunted and pecked through the Met's website but don't see anything that would help.  Can anyone here make suggestions where to look?
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Guido on May 21, 2010, 01:00:54 AM
The best way would be to contact the met directly - they'll definitely have records and are usually only too pleased to help.
Title: Re: Older Met Casts (late '70s)
Post by: Wendell_E on May 21, 2010, 02:08:07 AM
Not sure this is answerable:
I'm trying to find actual cast rosters from the productions the Met toured with during the late '70s. ....Can anyone here make suggestions where to look?

The Met's online database is at http://archives.metoperafamily.org/archives/frame.htm
Or if you're at the regular Met website, you can click the "Archives" link near the bottom of the page, then on the next page click "MetOpera Database".

Just put atlanta in the "Search box" and the date range in the appropriate boxes, and you'll get a list of performances.

Based your "the late '70s" comment here are some of them:

Atlanta, Georgia
May 7, 1977 Matinee
In English (Translation: Ruth and Thomas Martin)


DIE ZAUBERFLÖTE {221}

Pamina..................Carmen Balthrop
Tamino..................John Brecknock
Queen of the Night......Rita Shane
Sarastro................John Macurdy
Papageno................Donald Gramm
Papagena................Betsy Norden
Monostatos..............Nico Castel
Speaker.................Morley Meredith
First Lady..............Elizabeth Volkman
Second Lady.............Jean Kraft
Third Lady..............Sheila Nadler
Genie...................Peter Fekula
Genie...................Adam Guettel
Genie...................Adam Hyman
Priest..................Charles Anthony
Priest..................Gene Boucher
Guard...................Philip Booth
Guard...................John Carpenter

Conductor...............James Conlon

Atlanta, Georgia
May 1, 1979


OTELLO {235}
Giuseppe Verdi--Arrigo Boito

Otello..................Richard Cassilly
Desdemona...............Gilda Cruz-Romo
Iago....................Sherrill Milnes
Emilia..................Jean Kraft
Cassio..................Frank Little
Lodovico................James Morris
Montàno.................Robert Goodloe
Roderigo................Andrea Velis
Herald..................Arthur Thompson

Conductor...............James Levine


Atlanta, Georgia
May 3, 1978


BORIS GODUNOV {208}

Boris Godunov...........Jerome Hines
Prince Shuisky..........Robert Nagy
Pimen...................John Macurdy
Grigory.................Misha Raitzin
Marina..................Mignon Dunn
Rangoni.................Morley Meredith
Varlaam.................Fernando Corena
Simpleton...............James Atherton
Nikitich................Andrij Dobriansky
Mitiukha................Philip Booth
Shchelkalov.............Allan Monk
Innkeeper...............Batyah Godfrey Ben-David
Missail.................Paul Franke
Officer.................Richard Best
Xenia...................Loretta Di Franco
Feodor..................Robert Sapolsky
Nurse...................Shirley Love
Khrushchov..............Charles Kuestner
Lavitsky................Robert Goodloe
Chernikovsky............Charles Anthony
Boyar in Attendance.....Charles Kuestner

Conductor...............Richard Woitach

Atlanta, Georgia
May 4, 1978
In Italian


LA FAVORITA {21}

Leonora.................Bianca Berini
Fernando................John Alexander
Alfonso.................Louis Quilico
Baldassarre.............James Morris
Inès....................Alma Jean Smith
Don Gasparo.............John Carpenter
Dance...................Diana Levy
Dance...................Lucia Sciorsci
Dance...................Marcus Bugler

Conductor...............Michelangelo Veltri

The above link takes you
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Wendell_E on May 21, 2010, 02:19:57 AM
Speaking of opera companies' online databases, La Scala's is now available again (it was available at one time, but hasn't been for the last few years).  Unlike the Met's, you will need to register:  http://www.archiviolascala.org/
Title: Re: Older Met Casts (late '70s)
Post by: kishnevi on May 21, 2010, 03:48:47 PM
The Met's online database is at http://archives.metoperafamily.org/archives/frame.htm
Or if you're at the regular Met website, you can click the "Archives" link near the bottom of the page, then on the next page click "MetOpera Database".

Just put atlanta in the "Search box" and the date range in the appropriate boxes, and you'll get a list of performances.

LA FAVORITA {21}[/b]
Leonora.................Bianca Berini
Fernando................John Alexander
Alfonso.................Louis Quilico
Baldassarre.............James Morris
Inès....................Alma Jean Smith
Don Gasparo.............John Carpenter
Dance...................Diana Levy
Dance...................Lucia Sciorsci
Dance...................Marcus Bugler

Conductor...............Michelangelo Veltri

The above link takes you

Thank you! I've bookmarked it for further use. 
I vaguely remembered Milnes singing in Otello,  but wasn't sure if my memory was correct.  Glad to see it was, for once.

I do remember Bianca Berini, but not by name, because she was apparently a very large lady.  Whenever Alexander was directly behind her, he was hidden from view. Presumably, of course, she was cast with the idea of singing with Luciano, who was by then well advanced in stomach girth, and therefore not easily hidden. (I'm fairly certain she wasn't the soprano who sang the role in the NYC performances.) Her acting abilities seemed to be fairly limited, and of the old school: when she sang an aria,  she would simply walk up to the front of the stage, face forward and sing away.  That, and Pavarotti's non-appearance (which drew some very loud boos when it was announced from the stage),  gave the night a feeling of below-par.

I don't remember Zauberflote being sung in English, but I do remember an agitated staff member running around demanding we ushers find a doctor because Donald Gramm had managed to get a big splinter in his thumb somewhere near the end of the opera.  Rather inconveniently, she waited until after the audience had completely gone, so there was no possibility of "Is there a doctor in the house?" (which, given the audience demographics at that time, there would certainly have been)

Ah, memories...
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: sospiro on June 08, 2010, 07:33:37 PM
New book (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0195381386/ref=s9_simh_gw_p14_i1?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-1&pf_rd_r=1KCMW5XMTJPX5ZD3J00M&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=467198433&pf_rd_i=468294)which looks interesting.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Qoa7dY-HL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU02_.jpg)
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: sospiro on June 21, 2010, 10:21:26 AM
First edition La Donna del Lago (http://www.museodeldiscodepoca.com/archivio/mostra_libretto.php?titolo=La%20*donna%20del%20lago&id_libretto=LB.0127.a1).

Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Guido on July 09, 2010, 12:52:14 PM
Does anyone know if there's somewhere online that I could get the Libretto for Die Liebe Der Danae? Usually I use this site:
http://www.opera-guide.ch/opern_komponisten.php?uilang=de&first-letter=A
but they don't have die Liebe Der Danae. An English tranlation alongside would be even better! It would also be good to have the English for Die Schweigsame Frau, Friedenstag and Die Aegyptische Helena.
Title: Re: Opera Resources: Bizet + Gilligan's Island + Shakespeare
Post by: Cato on February 25, 2013, 04:39:47 PM
I was not sure how to classify this:

A scene from Hamlet via Bizet's Toreador Song from Carmen via Gilligan's Island:  ???

http://www.youtube.com/v/bXId5jOTxdg&list=PLB025904E99F6A678
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: huntsman on April 18, 2013, 06:24:56 AM
Do you opera-buffs have a favourite site for buying Blue-Ray or DVD, perhaps?

Well-priced would be a welcome addition, but is not a requirement.  ;)
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: mjwal on July 03, 2013, 04:35:10 AM
My favourite book on opera is Dallapiccola On Opera,because it offers an insider's selective insights on his and others' operas. It is not comprehensive at all, though. I am eagerly waiting for the second volume, presumably on non-operatic music. A fun book is James Camner's The Operatic Quiz Book. "What famous singer also answered to the names Jacob Pincus Perelmuth, Pinky Pearl, Jascha Pearl, Paul Robinson and Randolph Joyce?"
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Octave on July 03, 2013, 05:04:44 AM
My favourite book on opera is Dallapiccola On Opera,[...]

I bought that book just several days ago, on your recommendation.  (An opera friend echoed your enthusiasm as well.) 
Glad to see you back at GMG.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: mjwal on July 03, 2013, 05:25:53 AM
I bought that book just several days ago, on your recommendation.  (An opera friend echoed your enthusiasm as well.) 
Glad to see you back at GMG.
Why, thank you, Octave. I only left for the space of a depressive sulk  ;)...Cheering to know a recommendation has borne fruit.
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Moonfish on May 14, 2018, 07:55:54 AM
I think it would be good to have some form of a discussion of the role of libretti in operas. The question interests me quite a bit.

In the past, when people went to the opera (i.e. before supertitles), did they have access to a libretto or did they simply experience the performance by just reading/knowing a brief synopsis of the events? Do people "prepare" for an opera by reading the libretto? Do you listen to an opera via audio without paying attention to the libretto - even if it is the first time?

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6f/Libretto_Cover_Andrea_Chenier.jpg)

Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: Moonfish on May 14, 2018, 07:56:01 AM
I'm revisiting Wagner's ring cycle (Solti) at the moment and I had forgotten how fabulous the performance of Das Rheingold is. I realize that most of the time I never refer to a libretto. If one has read it once and/or experienced the story of the opera on stage or via DVD the events seem to remain in one's mind. I just remembered the storyline as Wagner's music progressed and visualized the scenes. Isn't that how opera lives in one's mind? How often do we as listeners refer to the libretto after our initial exposure?  People often complain about their absence in compilations of recordings. Is that because it is almost assumed that the customer already is familiar with the operas?

(https://www.wiener-staatsoper.at/fileadmin/_processed_/f/f/csm_Das_Rheingold_19454_410737be02.jpg)
Title: Re: Opera Resources
Post by: betterthanfine on July 10, 2018, 03:42:46 AM
I'm very much text based in vocal music, be it Lieder or opera. When I listen to an opera for the first time, I definitely like to read along, libretto in hand. But I rarely make time to do sit down and do so. So most of my opera experiences are live in the theatre, or watching DVDs. When I listen to opera on mu stereo, audio only, most of the time it's a collection of aria's, or an opera I know well enough so I don't have to wonder what's happening all the time. ;)