GMG Classical Music Forum

The Back Room => The Diner => Topic started by: kishnevi on March 06, 2018, 08:45:20 PM

Title: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: kishnevi on March 06, 2018, 08:45:20 PM
A thread for art purchases, including artbooks and photography books, since the most relevant threads don't really fit.
I'll leave it to the mods to decide if this should be pinned.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: kishnevi on March 06, 2018, 08:47:12 PM
Starting off.

Visited a used book store today I had never been to, and came away with four art books.
One an extensive but not complete collection of works by John Singer Sargent
A similar book devoted to Hokusai.
A collection of  works depicting birds and animals by Hiroshige
And a companion volume containing the complete 100 Famous Views of Edo. by Hiroshige.

Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Baron Scarpia on March 06, 2018, 11:02:36 PM
I'm not usually one for visual arts. One artist I appreciate is Edward Hopper, particularly for his depictions of New York City, where I lived at one point. I was impressed by an exhibition of his work at the National Gallery, in Washington, D.C., and I have this book:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51K3dBKf-%2BL._SX401_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

It is edited by Ivo Kranzfelder. I probably got it at Borders books or Barnes and Noble.

One of my favorite works of his is "Macombs Dam Bridge."

(https://d1lfxha3ugu3d4.cloudfront.net/images/opencollection/objects/size4/57.145_SL1.jpg)

It is one of those things in New York city which is still named after some long gone piece of history. (Who was Macomb?). It connects Manhattan to Jerome Avenue in the Bronx. (Who was Jerome?)  I have seen it from the Major Deegan Expressway. (Who was Major Deegan?)

Here's what it looks like now.

(http://stephenesherman.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/macombs-dam-bridge.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Christo on March 06, 2018, 11:21:19 PM
Bougth this very Dutch still life from the artist - showing it here herself:

Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 07, 2018, 04:28:15 AM
I'm not usually one for visual arts. One artist I appreciate is Edward Hopper, particularly for his depictions of New York City, where I lived at one point. I was impressed by an exhibition of his work at the National Gallery, in Washington, D.C., and I have this book:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51K3dBKf-%2BL._SX401_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

There was a splendid Hopper exhibit at the MFA, many moons ago now (in the era when I worked at the Gift Shop).

Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on March 07, 2018, 07:43:57 PM
Atget Probably the greatest book ever published (not joking). I wrote a long blog post back when I used to have a blog...

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41SGuSAHaaL._SX406_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Art/Photo books: Edward Steichen, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Galen Rowell, Troy Paiva, Paul Strand, Michael Kenna, Sebastiao Salgado, Fred Herzog, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Karl Blossfeldt, Ernst Haeckel, et al...



Hiroshige, various Art Deco, Maxfield Parrish, Impressionists, Van Gogh, Michelangelo, Books on Rolex, Cartier watches, Patek Philippe et al.

Museum books: Hermitage, Russian Museum, Norton Simon, Vatican Museum, Oslo National Gallery, British Museum, National Gallery (U.S.), Chester Beatty Library, National Museum of Ireland (archaeology), Book of Kells, CHinese stamps and landscape paintings (bought in Guangzhou), BErlin Museums (Gemaldgallerie, Neues Museum, Altes Museum, Pergamon Museum), etc.

Art I've purchased: ALong with my one-of-a-kind Wu Tang Clan album, have various watercolors from various places we've visited (mostly Europe), a few original 19-teen Maxfield Parrish prints...

I also consider my Oracle Delphi Mk. III a work of art! 

I have also some framed botanical prints, travel posters (TWA flying over the Golden Gate Bridge), and some of my own photographs on display at Chez Valkyrie
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on March 08, 2018, 10:00:46 AM
Cool thread, Jeffrey.

The last proper art book I bought features the work of Stanley Cursiter, a British Futurist.

I've very few photography coffee table books because lol. But back when I had the studio there was a small section of the lounge area given over to photography and cinematography books, mostly techie. Also, stage lighting books/manuals by people like McCandless, Bel Geddes, and Rosenthal.

Original artworks? - very few. Since moving into this new place there's currently only three on the wall. One (with the subject a ballerina) is a watercolour by Vellani Marchi. Another is a 10x8 printed for the photographer who shot it, Richard Avedon, of the boxer Rocky Marciano. The last is a charcoal sketch which was originally part of a series of four. Three sold, but one gained no interest. The subject is a woman's back. It's from the 1980s. Can't remember the name of the artist and it isn't signed.

In the 1950's a series of magazines were published on the subject of 'How to Photograph Women'. The photographers were such as Bunny Yeager, Peter Gowland, Peter Basch, so they're cheesy glamour. And they're definitely aimed at amateurs, but some of the shots are nice. Anyway, I picked up a collection of them that someone had bound.

Some of you will be familiar with Serge Lido. He was a Russian/French photographer who shot a lot of stuff featuring ballet dancers. In doing so he documented almost another world. A couple of volumes of his work are on my shelves.

I've also a small collection of colour wheels. Most are lithographs from old books. They're interesting, informative and cool, IMO.

e: forgot, I have some of Sam Haskin's work. Oh yeah.

.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Turner on March 09, 2018, 02:10:22 AM
Antiquarian booksellers are becoming fewer here in Copenhagen, and prices are going down a lot, so I´ve collected a good deal & could easily have bought many more, in case there was space for them ...

Among the rarities, there is a long series of the original Le Figaro Illustre magazine from Paris in the 1890s, a high-society entertainment publication, with very varied and colourful content. They include several short stories in their first publication with original  illustrations by Toulouse-Lautrec, various travel reports and articles about contemporary culture, society life etc. The magazines I´ve got are without the famous, coloured front covers, however.

Here you´ll see examples, including an article about imagined, future communication with extraterrestrials, a photograpy competition for readers on bicycles in the Paris region, articles on the entertainment at popular markets also known from contemporary paintings by Picasso, etc.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Turner on March 09, 2018, 02:14:12 AM
....and some more ....
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on March 09, 2018, 11:01:17 AM
Antiquarian booksellers are becoming fewer here in Copenhagen, and prices are going down a lot, so I´ve collected a good deal & could easily have bought many more, in case there was space for them ...

Among the rarities, there is a long series of the original Le Figaro Illustre magazine from Paris in the 1890s, a high-society entertainment publication, with very varied and colourful content. They include several short stories in their first publication with original  illustrations by Toulouse-Lautrec, various travel reports and articles about contemporary culture, society life etc. The magazines I´ve got are without the famous, coloured front covers, however.

Here you´ll see examples, including an article about imagined, future communication with extraterrestrials, a photograpy competition for readers on bicycles in the Paris region, articles on the entertainment at popular markets also known from contemporary paintings by Picasso, etc.

Those look wonderful.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on March 11, 2018, 09:02:12 AM
Art? I'm not sure if this is the sort of thing Jeffrey had intended for his thread, but it'll at least serve to give it a wee bump. And I'd really like to see and read about any art/art book others enjoy.


The above post by Turner featured one of his recent purchases that look really interesting and cool. Here's one of the kind of things that I've collected since about the mid 1980s or something. I spoke of them before - and of how when my ex girlfriend and I parted she took one card in particular that I liked. Anyway, these are only a few of the doubles/duplicates or damaged examples that I replaced in the collection. Also, sometimes when you buy a whole collection a few reproductions sneak in.

(https://i.imgur.com/TWBCZxT.jpg)
I think this is a set of four. Or maybe six. And like all of these, some have found their way into being reused as poses when I put a lens on someone.


(https://i.imgur.com/kIX1EMK.jpg)
Excuse the censorship via guitar pick - I'm not sure what's appropriate/acceptable to post. Hahaha.


(https://i.imgur.com/kFMz3fp.jpg)



(https://i.imgur.com/NrDRrAU.jpg)
These are by Albert Joseph Pénot, a particular favourite.


(https://i.imgur.com/a4LuQZJ.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on March 11, 2018, 02:30:55 PM
I'm not usually one for visual arts. One artist I appreciate is Edward Hopper, particularly for his depictions of New York City, where I lived at one point. I was impressed by an exhibition of his work at the National Gallery, in Washington, D.C., and I have this book:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51K3dBKf-%2BL._SX401_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

It is edited by Ivo Kranzfelder. I probably got it at Borders books or Barnes and Noble.

One of my favorite works of his is "Macombs Dam Bridge."

(https://d1lfxha3ugu3d4.cloudfront.net/images/opencollection/objects/size4/57.145_SL1.jpg)

It is one of those things in New York city which is still named after some long gone piece of history. (Who was Macomb?). It connects Manhattan to Jerome Avenue in the Bronx. (Who was Jerome?)  I have seen it from the Major Deegan Expressway. (Who was Major Deegan?)

Here's what it looks like now.

(http://stephenesherman.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/macombs-dam-bridge.jpg)
I like Hopper too - especially that night cafe scene. Interesting to see the comparative photos.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on March 11, 2018, 02:31:31 PM
Bougth this very Dutch still life from the artist - showing it here herself:
And very nice it is too.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on March 11, 2018, 02:39:25 PM
Twelve Views of Manet's Bar is a book that I like very much. I have seen the originally painting, in London, on numerous occasions:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Twelve-Princeton-Century-Culture-Society/dp/0691036918/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1520807830&sr=8-1&keywords=Views+of+Manet%27s+bar&dpID=51mFSqEIxmL&preST=_SY291_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Baron Scarpia on March 14, 2018, 03:51:17 PM
I like Hopper too - especially that night cafe scene. Interesting to see the comparative photos.

What I find most interesting about the Hopper Macomb's bridge photo are the tenement buildings in the background, which are ubiquitous in the Bronx, although gradually being replaced with more glitzy, but much less substantial modern structures.

The Bridge was built in 1890, there was a bridge on the site as early as 1815.

Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on March 20, 2018, 06:56:44 PM
Late night shopping - you can't beat it. In this case, I've just bought -

(https://i.imgur.com/Ydc0sph.jpg)

Kees Van Dongen - http://www.theartstory.org/artist-van-dongen-kees.htm

(https://i.imgur.com/POwwZno.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HsICpqO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nlpKfeX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1RoOPZI.jpg)

He went through a period of using lavish, lush colours, which when I look at find to be the antithesis of yer average Joe's digitally coloured images - more provocative than simply saturated.

e: and don't forget to kiss your model for 15 minutes beforehand to make their lips full and plump and red.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on March 26, 2018, 10:19:54 PM
Bougth this very Dutch still life from the artist - showing it here herself:

Christo, that's been a few weeks now since you purchased the piece. You hung it? How is it to live with it?
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on March 26, 2018, 11:09:28 PM
What I find most interesting about the Hopper Macomb's bridge photo are the tenement buildings in the background, which are ubiquitous in the Bronx, although gradually being replaced with more glitzy, but much less substantial modern structures.

The Bridge was built in 1890, there was a bridge on the site as early as 1815.

Interesting - thanks for this. Hopper is my favourite American painter - the 'Roy Harris' of painting!
 :)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on March 26, 2018, 11:28:12 PM
I don't know, sometimes I think it's kind of silly to have 'favourites' with this kind of stuff. But having said that, when I think of Hopper it's most often 'Stairway at 48 Rue DeLille'.


e:
(https://i.imgur.com/D59FLih.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on March 27, 2018, 12:20:56 AM
At the bookshop of the Bozar in Brussels, after visiting the wonderful Fernand Léger exhibition (as reported here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,25936.msg1136884.html#new)), I noticed a lavishly produced, slightly damaged and outrageously expensive book on the painter being sold. It was published in 1971 by the Galleria Apollinare in Milan, and edited by that gallery's owner Guido Le Noci. The blurb on the book (from the Musée d'Art Moderne de Lille-Métropole) is this:

"Ouvrage entièrement illustre comprenant 34 photographies documentaires, 61 photographies de Leger ou de ses amis, 68 planches en noir ou en couleurs, 55 facsimiles, etc. "La monographie sur Fernand Léger 'Sa vie, son oeuvre, son rêve' retrace d'une façon peu banale la vie du peintre. Le livre releve a la fois de l'album de photographies reproduisant les lieux de son enfance, de la compilation critique réunissant les fac-similes des articles sur Léger, passant par son atelier en montrant des documents alors inédits sur sa façon de concevoir l'enseignement"

The book had a limited edition of 1.150 numbered copies, and it turns out that an Amazon MP seller was offering one (allegedly new)  for the price of any modern paperback. I have just received confirmation that my order has shipped!  :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41vP3GVW-xL.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Turner on March 27, 2018, 12:41:18 AM
Congratilations - I got curious and checked that Leger book further
https://www.abebooks.it/ricerca-libro/autore/leger-fernand-le-noci-guido/

Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on March 27, 2018, 12:48:25 AM
Congratilations - I got curious and checked that Leger book further
https://www.abebooks.it/ricerca-libro/autore/leger-fernand-le-noci-guido/
Thanks, Turner!  Yes, I immediately turned to abebooks  (and it's Spanish franchise iberlibros--these sites are a treasure trove for anyone looking for OOP books), but in this instance the Amazon MP seller was offering their copy at a fraction of the price quoted on abebooks.   :)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on March 27, 2018, 02:03:13 AM
At the bookshop of the Bozar in Brussels, after visiting the wonderful Fernand Léger exhibition (as reported here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,25936.msg1136884.html#new)), I noticed a lavishly produced, slightly damaged and outrageously expensive book on the painter being sold. It was published in 1971 by the Galleria Apollinare in Milan, and edited by that gallery's owner Guido Le Noci. The blurb on the book (from the Musée d'Art Moderne de Lille-Métropole) is this:

"Ouvrage entièrement illustre comprenant 34 photographies documentaires, 61 photographies de Leger ou de ses amis, 68 planches en noir ou en couleurs, 55 facsimiles, etc. "La monographie sur Fernand Léger 'Sa vie, son oeuvre, son rêve' retrace d'une façon peu banale la vie du peintre. Le livre releve a la fois de l'album de photographies reproduisant les lieux de son enfance, de la compilation critique réunissant les fac-similes des articles sur Léger, passant par son atelier en montrant des documents alors inédits sur sa façon de concevoir l'enseignement"

The book had a limited edition of 1.150 numbered copies, and it turns out that an Amazon MP seller was offering one (allegedly new)  for the price of any modern paperback. I have just received confirmation that my order has shipped!  :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41vP3GVW-xL.jpg)

To savour!
Enjoy it at your leisure.  :)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Christo on March 27, 2018, 11:08:09 AM
Christo, that's been a few weeks now since you purchased the piece. You hung it? How is it to live with it?
Well, it looks fine in the (classic) room where it was (meant to be) hung. Its 'Contemporary Realism', referring to Dutch 17th Century paintings, is better known from Henk Helmantel (http://www.helmantel.nl/schilderijen/stillevens.html).
E.g. (http://www.helmantel.nl/wmspub/media/images/fotoboeken/stillevens/17426.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on August 10, 2018, 05:42:22 AM
Submitted a successful bid for this print by Manuel Ángeles Ortiz at an auction here in Madrid in mid-July:

(https://www.ansorena.com/sites/default/files/styles/pantalla_completa_lg/public/images/lotes/386/2/656.jpg?itok=CcwRf0dk)

Ángeles (1895-1984) is considered a member of the Spanish “School of Paris”, a group of painters that settled (temporarily or permanently) in the French capital in the wake of Picasso, and which included names such as Óscar Domínguez, Francisco Bores and Ismael González de la Serna, among many others. While in Paris in the 1920s, Ángeles designed the sets for the first performances of Falla’s Master Peter’s Puppet Show, Poulenc’s Aubade, and (posthumously) Satie’s Geneviève de Brabant.

Although originally from Jaén in Andalusia, he grew up in Granada, and returned often to that city from exile after 1958. The Albaicín, the old neighbourhood on a hill across from the Alhambra, was a constant theme of his work in his later years, and the print I bought is one of those “albaicines”.  Another version (oil on canvas) is in the collection of the Reina Sofía Museum:

(http://www.museoreinasofia.es/sites/default/files/obras/AS01993.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on August 10, 2018, 11:46:35 PM
Hey ritter - that's an interesting post. And as a bonus, it's another artist a (quite a while back you spoke of Fernand Leger - and I found his work to be so free, almost boldly liberated. Wonderful!) for me to check out.
Anyway, hope the print turns out to be as good and cool to view and live with as you could hope for. 8)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on September 24, 2018, 04:51:34 AM
Some surrealism entering ritter’s flat  :):

(https://www.dorotheum.com/fileadmin/lot-images/38B180327/hires/andre-masson-5097452.jpg)

André Masson is a painter I have long admired (I first became aware of him in my early childhood thanks to an article in an issue of the Connaissance des Arts magazine my parents had). This etching is a very late work (it’s from 1985, and he died aged 91 in 1987), and the series of 100 copies was produced for leading Berlin gallery Busburg. At this point in his career, he had stopped painting and continued only drawing. His pre-war and American work (he spent the WW2 years in the US) is the most critically acclaimed, and to a degree, his work in exile paved the way for the style of Jackson Pollock and tha abstract expressionists. After his return to France, he mellowed and became “officialised”, with public commissions—the ceiling of the Théâtre de l’Odéon in Paris—and retrospective exhibitions in e.g. MoMA and the Grand Palais. I find this print (titled “Lansquenet et courtisane”) rather attractive, slightly Picassian in its execution, but also harking in some respects back to Masson’s surrealist style (the image is from the web, and my copy has a different number).

Several Masson canvases hang on the walls of the second floor of the Museo Reina Sofía here in Madrid (one could argue he’s actually overrepresented, given the museum’s focus on Spanish art from 1900-1945). He was the father of conductor Diego Masson (who recorded Pierre Boulez’s Domaines for Harmonía Mundi many years ago, and whom I saw conduct an all-Elliott Carter program—which included the Symphonia: sum fluxae pretium spei—some ten years ago). Masson père also designed the cover for the first recording of Le marteau sans maître from the Domaine Musical on the Véga label.

Also, I got hold—at a very reasonable price—of the lavish facsimile reprint (in 3 volumes) made by Albert Skira in 1981 of all the numbers—1933 to 1939–of the Minotaure magazine:

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/abebooks-seller-images/1661080/10212553382._SY1500_.jpg)
(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/S/abebooks-seller-images/LIBRAIRESASSOCIES/30033281279._SY1500_.jpg)

The covers of the individual issues were by Picasso, Derain, Borès, Miró, Masson (the last number) and others, and the magazine was the mouthpiece of the surrealist movement in those years (André Breton was one of the co-editors).  I’m expecting confirmation it’s been dispatched (my order of the Léger book I mentioned some months ago was never fulfilled, despite the seller confirming not once but twice that he had sent it—obviously, he didn’t have it in stock, and was ashamed to admit it>:(—but of course I got a full refund).
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on October 13, 2018, 08:31:38 AM
Purchased a copy of the original release in 1956 (i.e. posthumous) of this poster (65 x 49 cm.) by Raoul Dufy, printed by Mourlot:

(http://www.brightcolors.com/londonartsgroup/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Raoul-Dufy-Tragedie-Comedie-Original-Poster-Art-1956-380429060787.jpg)

This attracted me for several reasons. Firstly, it’s very typical of Dufy (a painter I greatly admire despite his reputation for shallowness and facility); there’s the trademark baroque drawing, and use of contrasting colours in patches (the latter only for the “tragic” characters on the left, while the “comic” group on the right is only in b&w).

Secondly, there’s the historical context. From what I have read, the drawing & gouache was made by Dufy in the early 50s for the Renaud-Barrault Theatre Company, intended for a poster that never materialised (to be used in a tour to the US). After the painter’s death, the poster finally was printed—500 copies—to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the foundation of the company, and used in a tour to South America in 1956 (during which the company’s music director, Pierre Boulez, conducted a symphony orchestra for the first time in his life in my old hometown of Caracas).

There’s a copy of this same poster inscribed by Jean-Louis Barrault to the Alliance Française in Bogotá (now in the archives of the French Ministry of a foreign Affairs).  A variation was used for the company’s visit to the Baalbeck Festival in 1957, and finally the poster was reproduced (in a reduced format) in 1959 in the book Art in Posters, which deals with Mourlot’s collaboration with painters such as Picasso, Braque, Miró and many more.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: 2dogs on October 13, 2018, 09:24:32 PM
I've just bought these two decks of large cards to use in the same way as the publishers other decks on the Solar System, the Elements and the American Museum of Natural History - to read on a Tarot forum instead of actual Tarot cards. The other decks work surpisingly well and there's the added interest of learning more about the various subjects while doing it 8).
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: North Star on October 14, 2018, 04:51:37 AM
Submitted a successful bid for this print by Manuel Ángeles Ortiz at an auction here in Madrid in mid-July:


Ángeles (1895-1984) is considered a member of the Spanish “School of Paris”, a group of painters that settled (temporarily or permanently) in the French capital in the wake of Picasso, and which included names such as Óscar Domínguez, Francisco Bores and Ismael González de la Serna, among many others. While in Paris in the 1920s, Ángeles designed the sets for the first performances of Falla’s Master Peter’s Puppet Show, Poulenc’s Aubade, and (posthumously) Satie’s Geneviève de Brabant.

Although originally from Jaén in Andalusia, he grew up in Granada, and returned often to that city from exile after 1958. The Albaicín, the old neighbourhood on a hill across from the Alhambra, was a constant theme of his work in his later years, and the print I bought is one of those “albaicines”.  Another version (oil on canvas) is in the collection of the Reina Sofía Museum:

Some surrealism entering ritter’s flat  :):

André Masson is a painter I have long admired (I first became aware of him in my early childhood thanks to an article in an issue of the Connaissance des Arts magazine my parents had). This etching is a very late work (it’s from 1985, and he died aged 91 in 1987), and the series of 100 copies was produced for leading Berlin gallery Busburg. At this point in his career, he had stopped painting and continued only drawing. His pre-war and American work (he spent the WW2 years in the US) is the most critically acclaimed, and to a degree, his work in exile paved the way for the style of Jackson Pollock and tha abstract expressionists. After his return to France, he mellowed and became “officialised”, with public commissions—the ceiling of the Théâtre de l’Odéon in Paris—and retrospective exhibitions in e.g. MoMA and the Grand Palais. I find this print (titled “Lansquenet et courtisane”) rather attractive, slightly Picassian in its execution, but also harking in some respects back to Masson’s surrealist style (the image is from the web, and my copy has a different number).

Several Masson canvases hang on the walls of the second floor of the Museo Reina Sofía here in Madrid (one could argue he’s actually overrepresented, given the museum’s focus on Spanish art from 1900-1945). He was the father of conductor Diego Masson (who recorded Pierre Boulez’s Domaines for Harmonía Mundi many years ago, and whom I saw conduct an all-Elliott Carter program—which included the Symphonia: sum fluxae pretium spei—some ten years ago). Masson père also designed the cover for the first recording of Le marteau sans maître from the Domaine Musical on the Véga label.

Also, I got hold—at a very reasonable price—of the lavish facsimile reprint (in 3 volumes) made by Albert Skira in 1981 of all the numbers—1933 to 1939–of the Minotaure magazine:

The covers of the individual issues were by Picasso, Derain, Borès, Miró, Masson (the last number) and others, and the magazine was the mouthpiece of the surrealist movement in those years (André Breton was one of the co-editors).  I’m expecting confirmation it’s been dispatched (my order of the Léger book I mentioned some months ago was never fulfilled, despite the seller confirming not once but twice that he had sent it—obviously, he didn’t have it in stock, and was ashamed to admit it>:(—but of course I got a full refund).

Very cool, Rafael! (well, apart from the Léger book)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: JBS on October 14, 2018, 08:57:02 AM
I've just bought these two decks of large cards to use in the same way as the publishers other decks on the Solar System, the Elements and the American Museum of Natural History - to read on a Tarot forum instead of actual Tarot cards. The other decks work surpisingly well and there's the added interest of learning more about the various subjects while doing it 8).

I have the books on which those are based.  Supposedly every artwork in the collections of each museum, although some in such reduced image size their entry is not very useful.  There is also a third one devoted to the museums and major sites in Florence, although it doesn't pretend to be complete.  One thing is certain: they are among the heaviest books in my collection.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: 2dogs on October 14, 2018, 08:52:08 PM
I have the books on which those are based.  Supposedly every artwork in the collections of each museum, although some in such reduced image size their entry is not very useful.  There is also a third one devoted to the museums and major sites in Florence, although it doesn't pretend to be complete.  One thing is certain: they are among the heaviest books in my collection.

That is good information thank you. There is enough information on the back of the cards for me so I shouldn't need the big books.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Brian on October 15, 2018, 07:09:57 AM
Just arrived at home: a high-quality woodblock print from a work at the Toledo Museum of Art (hello, Cato!). Hiroshi Yoshida was a Japanese artist who traveled the national parks of America and depicted them in his own style.

We got Mount Rainier:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51crrEY3hIL.jpg)

(The image is from Amazon but the print was not.)

We have three more on the way as well - still lifes by Manet and Cézanne for the dining room, and "Lake Keitele, 1905" by Gallen-Kallela, my favorite painting in the National Gallery in London.

Finally, in November a nearby artist colony is having its final open studio weekend - the building has been bought by developers and will become luxury apartments. Ugh and grr. But the artists there are superb and I have a mind to go drop considerable money in moral support of them.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on October 15, 2018, 07:28:46 AM
That’s a very nice print, Brian! Very American and very Japanese at the same time. Congratulations. :)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: North Star on October 15, 2018, 07:37:07 AM
That’s a very nice print, Brian! Very American and very Japanese at the same time. Congratulations. :)
+1

And Gallén-Kallela's Keitele is one of my favourites, too.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on November 26, 2018, 01:59:31 PM
Stumbled on this in the Athenaeum bookshop in Beaune:

(https://www.humanite.fr/sites/default/files/styles/1048x350/public/images/46435.HR.jpg?itok=7gb2lg48)

(http://drouotstatic.zonesecure.org/images/perso/full/LOT/3/8582/132.jpg)

Paul Éluard’s beautiful poem Liberté is one of the most famous texts of the French resistance during WW2, and is known to many music lovers as it was set by Francis Poulenc in the last number of his Figure humaine for a capella chorus. It was published clandestinely in 1942, and then again in a collection of its author’s poetry immediately after the liberation. In 1953, Peter Seghers released a 16 page concertina book—which unfolded is 110 cm long—of the poem with illustrations by Fernand Léger (limited to 212 copies, which go for a smal fortune these days whenever one reaches the market). Seghers reprinted this edition in 2016, making it available to the wider public (including myself  ;)).
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on November 26, 2018, 03:06:26 PM
Not received yet:
(http://)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Artem on February 07, 2019, 07:42:28 PM
I like buying art books that were published for certain exhibition. I have fond memories of picking up these two great books after visiting Guggenheim museum sometime ago. The Wool and Motherwell exhibitions were amazing.

(https://www.guggenheimstore.org/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/650x/040ec09b1e35df139433887a97daa66f/m/o/motherwell-catalogue.jpg)(https://www.guggenheimstore.org/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/c/h/christopher-wool-catalogue.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Ken B on February 07, 2019, 07:53:31 PM
Not a huge number, but we have had this for a while

 Removed for size: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91YIH8uItwL.jpg

And have several Casson prints including

(https://michelinewalker.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/casson-blue-heron-regal-canvas.jpg)


I have a large Caravaggio book and this in a very large print

(http://www.dailyartmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/img-201707205970700eb2cde.jpg)

My favorite painters are actually Vermeer and Giotto, but I have neither books nor prints.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Artem on February 07, 2019, 08:42:28 PM
That Casson is nice.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: JBS on February 07, 2019, 08:59:37 PM
Resizing is allowed
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91YIH8uItwL.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF on February 08, 2019, 03:06:42 AM
Not a huge number, but we have had this for a while

 Removed for size: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91YIH8uItwL.jpg

And have several Casson prints including

(https://michelinewalker.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/casson-blue-heron-regal-canvas.jpg)


Good stuff, Ken B. I don't really know Casson and the only other of that group I'm at all familiar with is Frederick Varly.

Submitted a successful bid for this print by Manuel Ángeles Ortiz at an auction here in Madrid in mid-July:

(https://www.ansorena.com/sites/default/files/styles/pantalla_completa_lg/public/images/lotes/386/2/656.jpg?itok=CcwRf0dk)



And what about you, ritter, how are you getting on with this? Are you living with it on a daily basis?


Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on February 09, 2019, 08:36:13 AM
...
And what about you, ritter, how are you getting on with this? Are you living with it on a daily basis?
Oh yes, it’s doing its job splendidly! Thanks for asking.  :)

Since I bought it, it has some companions...

Two woodcuts by Raoul Dufy (as reported in the avatar thread (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,301.msg1195746.html#msg1195746)):

(http://keithsheridan.com/images/Dufy-LaDanseBig.jpg)  (https://static.picassomio.com/images/art/90/07/7f/raoul-dufy-artwork-large-59449.jpg)

And a late (1959)  lithograph by Georges Braque (my copy being inscribed by the artist to Fernand Mourlot, the man who ran the workshop where most of the leading artists in Paris in the mid-20th century created their work in the lithographic medium):

(http://www.artnet.fr/WebServices/images/ll03026lldopVJFgEUECfDrCWvaHBOctRXF/georges-braque-personnage-sur-fond-rose.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF4 on February 10, 2019, 04:15:06 AM
Oh yes, it’s doing its job splendidly! Thanks for asking.  :)

Since I bought it, it has some companions...

Two woodcuts by Raoul Dufy (as reported in the avatar thread (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,301.msg1195746.html#msg1195746)):

(http://keithsheridan.com/images/Dufy-LaDanseBig.jpg)  (https://static.picassomio.com/images/art/90/07/7f/raoul-dufy-artwork-large-59449.jpg)

And a late (1959)  lithograph by Georges Braque (my copy being inscribed by the artist to Fernand Mourlot, the man who ran the workshop where most of the leading artists in Paris in the mid-20th century created their work in the lithographic medium):

(http://www.artnet.fr/WebServices/images/ll03026lldopVJFgEUECfDrCWvaHBOctRXF/georges-braque-personnage-sur-fond-rose.jpg)


You're welcome.


Interesting purchases as ever - and the unique feature of the Braque litho making it particularly cool. Good stuff.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on February 10, 2019, 07:09:05 AM
Received now. An excellent book:

As is this:

Nemon sculpted Churchill many times but the cover shows Churchill's one and only sculpture - his portrait of Oscar Nemon.
(http://)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF4 on February 26, 2019, 12:33:42 AM
Do this stuff count?  ;D

(https://i.postimg.cc/nrPggtm6/IMG-20190226-080537-957.jpg)

I've a few of these large format glass slides of ballet backdrop curtains and stage sets. This recent purchase is from the 1930s and by Dufy for a Ballet Russe (MkII) production called 'Beach' (or 'Palm Beach') to music by Jean Françaix.
It's needing cleaned and after I do so will look great. Think of the image quality when 35mm film is projected in a cinema, then realise this slide is about four inches long on the same side, so with the right lens (and powerful enough bulb) it'll almost appear you can step in to it - and I have lenses/bulbs meeting that description.

Here's the original design (or at least one of them) for a general idea -

(https://i.postimg.cc/9X7kFsGF/IMG-20190226-082831-069.jpg)

Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on February 26, 2019, 01:50:08 AM
Do this stuff count?  ;D

(https://i.postimg.cc/nrPggtm6/IMG-20190226-080537-957.jpg)

I've a few of these large format glass slides of ballet backdrop curtains and stage sets. This recent purchase is from the 1930s and by Dufy for a Ballet Russe (MkII) production called 'Beach' (or 'Palm Beach') to music by Jean Françaix.
It's needing cleaned and after I do so will look great. Think of the image quality when 35mm film is projected in a cinema, then realise this slide is about four inches long on the same side, so with the right lens (and powerful enough bulb) it'll almost appear you can step in to it - and I have lenses/bulbs meeting that description.

Here's the original design (or at least one of them) for a general idea -

(https://i.postimg.cc/9X7kFsGF/IMG-20190226-082831-069.jpg)

Definitely! Amazing! What a great thing to have.
 :)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 02:23:21 AM
Definitely! Amazing! What a great thing to have.
 :)
A big +1....

Great stuff, NikF. And archetypal of Raoul Dufy's work: the sailboats, the ponies, the seashells...  Wonderful!  :)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Mirror Image on February 26, 2019, 07:10:49 AM
Do this stuff count?  ;D

(https://i.postimg.cc/nrPggtm6/IMG-20190226-080537-957.jpg)

I've a few of these large format glass slides of ballet backdrop curtains and stage sets. This recent purchase is from the 1930s and by Dufy for a Ballet Russe (MkII) production called 'Beach' (or 'Palm Beach') to music by Jean Françaix.
It's needing cleaned and after I do so will look great. Think of the image quality when 35mm film is projected in a cinema, then realise this slide is about four inches long on the same side, so with the right lens (and powerful enough bulb) it'll almost appear you can step in to it - and I have lenses/bulbs meeting that description.

Here's the original design (or at least one of them) for a general idea -

(https://i.postimg.cc/9X7kFsGF/IMG-20190226-082831-069.jpg)

Great stuff. Love Dufy’s colorful work.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on April 29, 2019, 11:29:47 PM
In 1922, Chilean poet Vicente Huidobro (initiator of the creationist aesthetic movement, and known to some music lovers because one of his texts was set by Edgar Varèse in his Offrandes), exhibited 13 "painted poems" in the Théâtre Édouard VII in Paris. The idea was for these works to be published using the pochoir (or stencil) technique, but the project didn't come to fruition.

In 2001, the Reina Sofía Museum here in Madrid recreated the 1922 event, and for the occasion issued the surviving works (12 in total, including some poems in two versions) in a limited edition folder of serigraphs on high-quality Arches paper, respecting the original dimensions (73 x 53 cm). I've been lucky enough to buy one set from the museum.

(https://www.ceciliadetorres.com/img/VH_Moulin.JPG)  (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v413/hugovera/hudobropoema.jpg)   (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v413/hugovera/poemahuidobro1.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF4 on May 25, 2019, 03:32:47 PM
In 1922, Chilean poet Vicente Huidobro (initiator of the creationist aesthetic movement, and known to some music lovers because one of his texts was set by Edgar Varèse in his Offrandes), exhibited 13 "painted poems" in the Théâtre Édouard VII in Paris. The idea was for these works to be published using the pochoir (or stencil) technique, but the project didn't come to fruition.

In 2001, the Reina Sofía Museum here in Madrid recreated the 1922 event, and for the occasion issued the surviving works (12 in total, including some poems in two versions) in a limited edition folder of serigraphs on high-quality Arches paper, respecting the original dimensions (73 x 53 cm). I've been lucky enough to buy one set from the museum.

(https://www.ceciliadetorres.com/img/VH_Moulin.JPG)  (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v413/hugovera/hudobropoema.jpg)   (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v413/hugovera/poemahuidobro1.jpg)

Very interesting. And another name for me to check out.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: NikF4 on May 25, 2019, 03:47:15 PM
Boxing Ballerinas by Tony McGee.

(https://i.postimg.cc/Hk4xskVb/IMG-0940.jpg)

(https://i.postimg.cc/wv3TV5Fk/mc1721-5-12-13.jpg)

A comparison of the training and in the process finding common discipline between ballerinas and boxers in Cuba. FWIW, when I think of Cuban dancers Carlos Acosta first comes to mind, while in boxing it's the great amateur heavyweight Teofilo Stevenson - remember him? Anyway...

In my opinion the best thing about this collection of images is that the photos were shot with more than one substrate in mind and so stuff like detail, contrast, shadows/light, even perceived proportions will still be accurately reproduced, regardless. That skill is often overlooked, perhaps because many are unaware that nowadays there's less difference between a smartphone screen and a high end monitor, than there is between traditional newsprint and magazine papers. The second best thing is the svelte arse on the dancer in the second photo.

It's both unfair and of little value to compare this with with 'Danse' series shot in the 1960s by Jeanloup Sieff, but I'll do so anyway. In this instance McGee is more an observer, often composing and almost editing on the fly, whereas Sieff was (trademark burning and dodging aside) an exponent of ensuring less is more from the outset. In any case both are worth a look.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: JBS on May 25, 2019, 06:03:49 PM
I saw this last week in the gift/book store of the Smithsonian Museum of American Art/National Portrait Gallery (technically they are two different museums who share the same building, although the galleries are intertwined and for visiting purposes they are one big museum) .  But it was too big and bulky to pack in my luggage, so I waited until I got home and ordered it off Amazon Marketplace.  It arrived in today's mail.
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51t3kAG9l%2BL.jpg)
It is a co-publication of the Smithsonian and Yale University Press.
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on June 17, 2019, 05:35:49 AM
I've been taking an interest in the work of Henri Matisse as of late. Until recently, I more or less avoided him (to the benefit of his near contemporaries Braque, Picasso, Léger et al.), and--wrongly--viewed his work as facile and decorative (while less elaborate than that of another artist of whom the same claim can be made, and I greatly admire--Raoul Dufy). I now fully recognise that Matisse's is a major, very personal, distinctive and absolutely fresh vision, and that my prejudice against him actually stemmed from my dislike of some renowned "post-Matisse" artists, who brought his style squarely into pop art territory (which I abhor) and IMO banality, than for lack of admiration for the man's own work. So, over the past several months, I've purchased these:

1)


A facsimile reprint of the 1947 edition of Beaudelaire's Les fleurs du mal, for which Matisse made 34 drawings.

(http://i-exc.ccm2.net/iex/1280/2012703003/2034040.jpg)  (https://cdn8.openculture.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/25000024/matisse-fleurs-du-mal.png)
Great to have one of my favourite collections of poetry ever illustrated by an artist my admiration for whom is growing.

2)


Another facsimile, this time of the legendary Tériade edition of Jazz (one of the most famous artist books of the 20th century). This reprint comes with the in-folio sheets loose (as the original), in a quality clothbound case. Beautiful to behold (the French edition--the case includes a small booklet with essays on the work and the artist--is significantly cheaper than the English or Italian versions).

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51SpRnowkYL.jpg)(http://www.valuevintageprints.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Matisse-Jazz4.jpg)  (https://http2.mlstatic.com/lienzo-tela-henri-matisse-jazz-1947-70x109cm-D_NQ_NP_680458-MLM26004451636_092017-F.jpg)

3)


A very well produced and quite affordable study of Matisse's paper cutouts (the main output of his last creative phase), with additional texts by such luminaries as Tériade, Louis Aragon, Henri Michaux and Pierre Reverdy.
(https://cdn.taschen.com/media/images/1640/art_matisse_cut_outs_ba_gb_open_0018_0019_49269_1612131517_id_1101917.jpg)  (https://cdn.taschen.com/media/images/1640/art_matisse_cut_outs_ba_gb_open_0068_0069_49269_1612131514_id_1101773.jpg)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 17, 2019, 06:26:39 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51t3kAG9l%2BL.jpg)
It is a co-publication of the Smithsonian and Yale University Press.

That looks magnificent!

Sarge
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: vandermolen on June 23, 2019, 10:30:13 PM
I bought this recently. It's rather better than similar books as it features quite detailed analyses of various works and movements:
(http://)
Title: Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
Post by: ritter on June 24, 2019, 12:45:39 AM
I've been lucky enough to add to my collection of Spanish painters of the École de Paris this small pencil and watercolour on paper by Joaquín Peinado (1898-1975):

(https://www.ansorena.com/sites/default/files/styles/pantalla_completa_lg/public/images/lotes/394/1/168.jpg?itok=zx7ArvpV)

Peinado was born in Ronda (Málaga), where there now is a museum dedicated to his work. He moved to Paris in the mid-1920s, embracing what you could call a post-cubist style, which later developed into a sort of neo-Cézanneism.

He spent his summers in the mid 60s in the tiny hamlet of Cogners in the Pays de la Loire. There's some landscapes (oil on canvas) form that time in  some public collections in Spain, and then small-scale watercolours and drawings like the one I bought at auction last week (unsigned, but dated and located) depicting village life.