GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Classical Music for Beginners => Topic started by: hornteacher on April 16, 2007, 06:34:29 PM

Title: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: hornteacher on April 16, 2007, 06:34:29 PM
Thought it would be fun for everyone to share (or plug) their local Classical Music station.

In the Charlotte, NC area the station is WDAV located on the campus of Davidson College.  I like to take students up there twice a year to answer phones for their pledge drive, the kids get a real kick out of it.

You can listen to WDAV online for free at:

http://www.wdav.org

then click on "listen online".
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Bogey on April 16, 2007, 06:41:21 PM
Thought it would be fun for everyone to share (or plug) their local Classical Music station.

In the Charlotte, NC area the station is WDAV located on the campus of Davidson College.  I like to take students up there twice a year to answer phones for their pledge drive, the kids get a real kick out of it.

You can listen to WDAV online for free at:

http://www.wdav.org

then click on "listen online".

Excellent idea.  However, I am tuned to mine right at the moment, so maybe in a bit (see listening thread). :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Don on April 16, 2007, 06:59:33 PM
My overall opinion of the classical music station in Albuquerque, New Mexico is that it sucks: too much crossover, too much light classical, too much guitar music, too much Vivaldi and a major penchant for playing only parts of compositions.  So the only time I give it a try is when I forget to have any cds in the car.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Bogey on April 16, 2007, 07:35:58 PM
My overall opinion of the classical music station in Albuquerque, New Mexico is that it sucks: too much crossover, too much light classical, too much guitar music, too much Vivaldi and a major penchant for playing only parts of compositions.  So the only time I give it a try is when I forget to have any cds in the car.

Here is the playlist for our station today in Denver (we share some programming with L.A. as well).  How does it compare to yours Don?:

http://www.kvod.org/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=249
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Steve on April 16, 2007, 09:13:54 PM
WFMT in Chicago is wonderful. They currently broadcast recordings of both the CSO and Lyric.  ;D Especially entertaining, is a lovely program at 7.00 pm on weekdays. Specific subgeneras of music, or particular composers are discussed, and major as well as relatively unknown items from their oevure are aired. The station is quite a boon to music lovers in Chicago!
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Iconito on April 16, 2007, 10:58:27 PM

Not my “local Classical Music station”... but every now and then I visit  Live365.com (http://www.live365.com).

Thousands (100+ Classical... Plus Jazz, Rock, Poo Pop and every imaginable genre...) of free online radio stations there.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: hornteacher on April 17, 2007, 03:22:33 AM
Here is the playlist for our station today in Denver (we share some programming with L.A. as well).

That's a pretty nice playlist and they seem to be mixing it up well throughout the day.  Do they play anything modern?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Maciek on April 17, 2007, 04:23:37 AM
I listen to Polish Radio Channel 2 (http://www.polskieradio.pl/dwojka/). They are not exactly a classical radio station but a "cultural" one, which means that they also have lots of stuff about literature, the arts etc. in their program. But music does dominate, and what's more they give lots of time to contemporary music (at least half an hour a day - new recordings are broadcast daily from 12:30 to 13:00 on weekdays, but usually it's much more than that if you count in the stuff they do evenings and late night - sometimes it's even 4-5 hours of contemporary music a day!). I'd say they have achieved ideal proportions: a bit of jazz (about an hour 3-4 times a week), a tiny bit of film music (an hour a week), lots of "old" classical (60-70% of the time) + a decent serving of contemporary.

You can listen on-line at:
http://www.polskieradio.pl/sluchaj/play.aspx?p=i2 (http://www.polskieradio.pl/sluchaj/play.aspx?p=i2)
or
http://www.polskieradio.pl/sluchaj/play.aspx?p=r2 (http://www.polskieradio.pl/sluchaj/play.aspx?p=r2)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Bogey on April 17, 2007, 04:28:17 AM
That's a pretty nice playlist and they seem to be mixing it up well throughout the day.  Do they play anything modern?

Ocassionally.  However, they do have this every Saturday night (included is last weeks playlist):

Modern Masterpieces with Alan Chapman
Alan invites you to explore the great musical works of the past three-quarters of a century and share the unique emotional power that only music of our time can offer.

 
10:01 pm  Leos Janacek: String Quartet #1 "The Kreutzer Sonata"
Brodsky Quartet
Brodsky 3503
 
10:20 pm  Karol Szymanowski: Symphony #3 "Song of the Night" Op 27
City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra / Simon Rattle
CBSO Chorus
Jon Garrison, tenor
EMI 55121
 
10:45 pm  Igor Stravinsky: Octet
London Sinfonietta / Riccardo Chailly
London 417114
   
11:01 pm  George Antheil: Airplane Sonata
Marthanne Verbit, piano
Troy 146
 
11:07 pm  Kurt Weill: Concerto for Violin & Wind Orchestra Op 12
London Sinfonietta / David Atherton
Nona Liddell, violin
Deutsche Grammophon 423255
 
11:35 pm  Paul Hindemith: Nobilissima Visione
Philadelphia Orchestra / Wolfgang Sawallisch
EMI 55230
 
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: karlhenning on April 17, 2007, 04:41:36 AM
My overall opinion of the classical music station in Albuquerque, New Mexico is that it sucks: too much crossover, too much light classical, too much guitar music, too much Vivaldi and a major penchant for playing only parts of compositions.

So that's where WCRB got the ideas from!
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Todd on April 17, 2007, 05:16:10 AM
Though I live in a smaller market, I still have access to a fine radio station in KBPS. (http://www.allclassical.org/index.php5)  They actually play entire pieces of music and have a variety of interesting programs, both original and syndicated.  The over the air sound is very good, too.  They stream, so apparently people from all over listen.  During the last fund-raiser someone from Uzbekistan pledged money.  I tell you, non-commercial is the way to go.  There's also a non-commercial jazz station that's as good.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Don on April 17, 2007, 06:21:05 AM
Here is the playlist for our station today in Denver (we share some programming with L.A. as well).  How does it compare to yours Don?:

http://www.kvod.org/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=249

Significantly better than mine.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Hector on April 17, 2007, 06:54:42 AM
BBC's Radio 3.

The only radio station in the Western hemisphere to receive requests NOT to play a certain composer...Telemann, as it was sending some of its listeners to sleep mid-morning ::)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Iconito on April 17, 2007, 09:34:33 AM


Do they play anything modern?


Currently Playing:

Henri Dutilleux / Cello Concerto 'Tout un monde lontain...' / Rostropovich / Orchestre de Paris / Baudo / EMI

Recently Played:

Richard Strauss - Oboe Concerto in D Major - 'Masterpieces for Oboe' / Lencsés / Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart / Marriner / Hänssler [25:04] 
Jean Sibelius - Andante festivo - 'Cantatas & Orchestral Works' / Lahti SO / Vänskä / BIS [05:15] 
Jean Sibelius - Overture in a minor - 'Cantatas & Orchestral Works' / Lahti SO / Vänskä / BIS [09:14] 
Theo Bruins - Quartet '84, for piano - 'Complete Works' / Q Disc [07:50] 
Wolfgang Rihm - In-Schrift - 'Rückblick Moderne' / Bamberger Symphoniker / Zender / col legno [21:13]
John Harbison - The Natural World – Felty / LA Phil. New Music Group / New World [14:17] 
Ezra Sims - Come Away – Felty / Dinosaur Annex / CRI [20:37] 


Just taken from  Contemporary Classical (http://www.live365.com/stations/20classics), one of the stations at  Live365.com (http://www.live365.com).

OK. I swear I won’t mention this site again! :D (But, if you don’t know it, I think it’s worth a visit...)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Robert on April 17, 2007, 09:53:27 AM
Currently Playing:

Henri Dutilleux / Cello Concerto 'Tout un monde lontain...' / Rostropovich / Orchestre de Paris / Baudo / EMI

Recently Played:

Richard Strauss - Oboe Concerto in D Major - 'Masterpieces for Oboe' / Lencsés / Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart / Marriner / Hänssler [25:04] 
Jean Sibelius - Andante festivo - 'Cantatas & Orchestral Works' / Lahti SO / Vänskä / BIS [05:15] 
Jean Sibelius - Overture in a minor - 'Cantatas & Orchestral Works' / Lahti SO / Vänskä / BIS [09:14] 
Theo Bruins - Quartet '84, for piano - 'Complete Works' / Q Disc [07:50] 
Wolfgang Rihm - In-Schrift - 'Rückblick Moderne' / Bamberger Symphoniker / Zender / col legno [21:13]
John Harbison - The Natural World – Felty / LA Phil. New Music Group / New World [14:17] 
Ezra Sims - Come Away – Felty / Dinosaur Annex / CRI [20:37] 


Just taken from  Contemporary Classical (http://www.live365.com/stations/20classics), one of the stations at  Live365.com (http://www.live365.com).

OK. I swear I won’t mention this site again! :D (But, if you don’t know it, I think it’s worth a visit...)


If you like 20th century its a must...all you have to do is go to the site and check all the composers they play....you can also request......five star......
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Robert on April 17, 2007, 10:01:37 AM
Though I live in a smaller market, I still have access to a fine radio station in KBPS. (http://www.allclassical.org/index.php5)  They actually play entire pieces of music and have a variety of interesting programs, both original and syndicated.  The over the air sound is very good, too.  They stream, so apparently people from all over listen.  During the last fund-raiser someone from Uzbekistan pledged money.  I tell you, non-commercial is the way to go.  There's also a non-commercial jazz station that's as good.
Todd
all the Bartok, Pettersson, Szymanowski you can handle......contemporaryclassical.com....
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Todd on April 17, 2007, 10:10:59 AM
all the Bartok, Pettersson, Szymanowski you can handle......contemporaryclassical.com....


Pettersson I can see, but Bartok and Szymanowski as contemporary?  How about Hartke and Rautavaara and Gubaidulina instead . . .
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Danny on April 17, 2007, 10:13:30 AM
Mine is Capital Public Radio out of Sacramento, CA.  Mostly Baroque/Classical during the day, with the later stuff played at night.  Not bad while in the car, but at home I avoid it.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Iconito on April 17, 2007, 10:36:07 AM

Pettersson I can see, but Bartok and Szymanowski as contemporary?  How about Hartke and Rautavaara and Gubaidulina instead . . .

Check their  composers’ list (http://contemporary-classical.com/composer_list.jsp). Rautavaara and Gubaidulina are there... Hartke ... Mmm... Nop... But you can ask! :D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Robert on April 17, 2007, 11:03:48 AM

Pettersson I can see, but Bartok and Szymanowski as contemporary?  How about Hartke and Rautavaara and Gubaidulina instead . . .

all you can eat...... 20th century ......Seriously when was the last time you heard a complete piece by Feldman, Mahler, Pettersson etc......
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Todd on April 17, 2007, 11:28:50 AM
Seriously when was the last time you heard a complete piece by Feldman, Mahler, Pettersson etc......


Pettersson and Feldman get little to no airplay, but everytime the local station plays Mahler, the whole work is played.  Same with Bruckner.  (Unless it's listener request night, in which case only one movement might get played.)

I love 20th Century music, but as some of it is now over a century old, it's time to refine the usage of "contemporary."
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Robert on April 17, 2007, 01:34:37 PM

Pettersson and Feldman get little to no airplay, but everytime the local station plays Mahler, the whole work is played.  Same with Bruckner.  (Unless it's listener request night, in which case only one movement might get played.)

I love 20th Century music, but as some of it is now over a century old, it's time to refine the usage of "contemporary."

I cannot disagree with you.....Its a word that always had some meaning for me.....
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Iconito on April 17, 2007, 04:58:46 PM

I love 20th Century music, but as some of it is now over a century old, it's time to refine the usage of "contemporary."

You're right, Todd. And I've just checked the FAQ at http://contemporary-classical.com and they agree with you too...

Is music from the first half of the 20th century really "contemporary"?

Well, no, not really. But we find that playing music from 1900 on, along with more truly "modern" music, makes for a particularly good listening experience. It also lets us play many underappreciated composers from the first half of the 20th century.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Symphonien on April 17, 2007, 06:51:36 PM
Another vote for contemporary-classical here. I listen to it all the time now while I'm on the internet. The best part is being able to request a work, and they play it an hour later.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 18, 2007, 04:45:23 AM
In the Charlotte, NC area the station is WDAV located on the campus of Davidson College.  I like to take students up there twice a year to answer phones for their pledge drive, the kids get a real kick out of it.

You can listen to WDAV online for free at:

http://www.wdav.org


Horn Teacher - being up the road in W-S, we can 'pull in' the Davidson station - excellent & abundant classical music programming - need to start listening to it some more!  Locally, we have the Wake Forest Univeristy channel, WFDD (88.5) - the classical programming has dropped substantially, now mainly a 'talk' station in the AM & afternoon - music more at night (just listened to the Fred Childs program the other day); we are annual 'day sponsors' but have not been pleased w/ the excess of these 'talk shows' although many are certainly quite good.  :D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: oyasumi on April 18, 2007, 06:55:03 AM
www.kcsn.org

the best classical station in LA, and they make it a point to play contemporary and otherwise adventurous stuff
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: hornteacher on April 18, 2007, 01:31:31 PM
Horn Teacher - being up the road in W-S, we can 'pull in' the Davidson station - excellent & abundant classical music programming - need to start listening to it some more!

Excellent.  I wasn't aware the signal made it that far.  The staff there is a lot of fun to hang around with during the pledge drives.  They let my students tour the station as well.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 18, 2007, 01:53:02 PM
Excellent.  I wasn't aware the signal made it that far.  The staff there is a lot of fun to hang around with during the pledge drives.  They let my students tour the station as well.

Well, it does vary from 'day to day' - I do have a 'cheap' roof FM antenna, but should probably invest in a better one.  :-\ :D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Brewski on May 23, 2007, 10:02:52 AM
On his blog, Alex Ross posted a link to RadiOm (http://www.radiom.org/), which looks really great for 20th-century fans.  It's sponsored by Other Minds (in San Francisco) and here are some sample programs below.  You have to register, but it's free and quick. 

Sample programs:

Ode To Gravity: Brian Eno (Special Edition, I of IV) Uploaded: 11/20/2003.  Charles Amirkhanian and Brian Eno discuss Phonetic Poetry, how Brian writes his lyrics, and the spirit of inquisitiveness at KPFA Radio, on Saturday February 2, 1980.  Listen to some of Brian Eno's pieces, "After the Heat",...

John Cage and David Tudor in Concert in San Francisco, Jan. 16, 1965 Uploaded: 12/11/2003.  Recorded by KPFA Radio on the 39th birthday of David Tudor, this historic concert with John Cage thundered through the halls of the sculpture court of the San Francisco Museum of Art before a capacity audience that included the late Darius...

Stravinsky in Rehearsal from 1947 Uploaded: 01/22/2004.  In 1947, William Malloch possessed of a sense of history, recorded Igor Stravinsky rehearsing his new revision of his symphonies of wind instruments in memory of Debussy.  The sound is antique but the picture of what Stravinsky is striving...

--Bruce
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Robert on May 23, 2007, 10:55:29 AM
www.kcsn.org

the best classical station in LA, and they make it a point to play contemporary and otherwise adventurous stuff
Adventurous? whoa perhaps I should listen. I tuned out years ago....Jim Svejda Adventurous???  Please give me an idea of some of the adventurous pieces they have recently played.....
Title: MonteVerdi.tv - One site for all your classical music needs!
Post by: WebRep MonteVerdi on March 30, 2008, 02:02:31 PM
Hello everyone,
MonteVerdi is absolutely free and is able to provide all of your classical music needs in a single place! Has anyone tried the Music Quiz offered on the site? With over 200 international radio stations, the world’s largest classical music video collection, downloads, and full screen galleries of your favorite artists, it really is a one of a kind classical music resource. I urge you to take the guided tour of the site offered at www.monteverdi.tv

The site also contains an area to keep up to date on the latest classical music news, and an excellent classical music community. At MonteVerdi customer feedback is very important to us, and we would like to hear what you like/dislike about the site and the services it offers. Furthermore, we take the current lack of Mac support very seriously and are working on providing service to Mac users in the very near future.

If you have any problems with the site, please email me at bpaylor@webrepassociates.com
Cheers,
Ben
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Opus106 on June 24, 2008, 09:56:42 AM
A quick search didn't reveal any mention of this stream.

I just discovered that RCO offers over 10 hours (as of this date) of* concert music as a web stream, available as 128 and 256 kbps streams.

http://www.concertgebouworkest.nl/ [Click on the banner that says Start Web Radio (duh!). The player is embedded in a pop-up window.]

http://www.concertgebouworkest.nl/en/nieuws/nieuws-detail.asp?id=335&cnt=6 [details]


*That was on 2008.02.01


Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Brewski on June 24, 2008, 10:07:52 AM
Oh no!   There goes any remaining free time I had... 

;D  ;D  ;D

Seriously, thanks for posting.   :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 24, 2008, 10:29:37 AM
Didn't know this. Listening as I write...

Thanks!
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Norbeone on January 25, 2009, 01:42:20 PM
Nice. Added to favourites. Thanks!
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Kuhlau on January 26, 2009, 03:33:52 AM
Terrific. :)

I've added the main radio station listings page to my blog's 'Resources' page. (http://aneverymanforhimself.wordpress.com/resources/) ;)

FK
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Brewski on January 26, 2009, 11:33:54 AM
Great site, thanks!  Awhile ago I noticed the line-up included music by Eve Beglarian, Leo Ornstein and Hans Abrahamsen.  If that's representative I may be logging on to this site often.

--Bruce
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Daedalus on June 21, 2009, 10:00:21 AM
Whilst surfing the web, I came across a classical music radio toolbar that links to around 70 different classical music stations.

The majority of the stations are American and I have never heard of them before.  ;D

Here in England, we only really have BBC Radio 3 (which is excellent) and Classic FM (shudder  :-X).

I've never really listened to radio on the Internet before and I'm fascinated by the amount of classical stations out there.

So, my question is, which stations are worth checking out? And which classical stations do you enjoy listening to generally?

D.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: ChamberNut on June 21, 2009, 11:17:21 AM
Navneeth (opus 106) and I both "grew up", at least in terms of our beginning interest in Classical Music, to 'Beethoven Radio' (http://www.beethoven.com) in Hartford, CT.  It was also the first time I participated in any kind of online forum, in which I was able to discuss my new found love of classical music and received many recommendations.  A very memorable time.  :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 11:44:41 AM
Navneeth (opus 106) and I both "grew up", at least in terms of our beginning interest in Classical Music, to 'Beethoven Radio' (http://www.beethoven.com) in Hartford, CT.  It was also the first time I participated in any kind of online forum, in which I was able to discuss my new found love of classical music and received many recommendations.  A very memorable time.  :)


So you listen to Hartford, CT classical station online.  How is it?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: ChamberNut on June 21, 2009, 11:57:33 AM


So you listen to Hartford, CT classical station online.  How is it?

Good.  However, they seem to play a limited repertoire, and replay/recycle that repertoire.  Terrific for the casual fan of classical music, but not for the avid fan.  They also tend to play only one or two movements, instead of the entire symphony/string quartet.  Nevertheless, it was a wonderful way for me to become acclimatized with classical music.  I don't listen to the station anymore, but it would be one of the first places I'd recommend a new fan to check out.  :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 12:00:22 PM
Good.  However, they seem to play a limited repertoire, and replay/recycle that repertoire.  Terrific for the casual fan of classical music, but not for the avid fan.  They also tend to play only one or two movements, instead of the entire symphony/string quartet.  Nevertheless, it was a wonderful way for me to become acclimatized with classical music.  I don't listen to the station anymore, but it would be one of the first places I'd recommend a new fan to check out.  :)


I would imagine the CBC must have gobs of classical music programs online or on air, i.e. FM and TV.  No?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Dr. Dread on June 21, 2009, 12:02:53 PM
Well, we have MPR around these parts. You guess what it stands for.   ;D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 12:05:30 PM
This is the local classical station I listen to.  Obviously, I can listen via my desktop or this FM tuner ...

(http://www.cyfa.co.kr/data/file/market_1/2038507706_40b767ca_zzz.jpg)

http://www.wshu.org/music/music_main.php
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: ChamberNut on June 21, 2009, 12:10:11 PM


I would imagine the CBC must have gobs of classical music programs online or on air, i.e. FM and TV.  No?

Nope, not anymore.  :(  Since last September, they completely "revamped" and trashed a fantastic CBC Radio II, which had mostly classical music programming.  No more classical music on the ride to work the morning, instead replacing it with a quasi-folk program.  The only main classical music programming was reduced to 5 hours a day, from 10AM to 3PM, so again....on the commute back home from work.....no classical.  They kept 'some' of the more popular classical programs such as Saturday Afternoon at The Opera, and Sunday Choral Music. 

The bigwigs at CBC Radio claimed they wanted to appeal to a broader range of Canadians, and have a national station that represents a broader group of Canadians.  Well, as could be predicted, the ratings have tanked since the programming change.  There were mass protests and appeals trying to stop the format change (and these protests are still ongoing), yet the stubborn bigwigs got their way.  They also axed the CBC National Orchestra.  >:(
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 12:15:27 PM
The classical FM scene in the US is no better.  Even big city like NY has only one commercial classical station, WQXR.  WNCN, a competitor to WQXR, was converted to a rock station by its owner about 15 years ago ...    >:(
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: ChamberNut on June 21, 2009, 12:18:02 PM
The classical FM scene is the US is no better.  Even big city like NY has only one commercial classical station, WQXR.  WNCN, a competitor to WQXR, was converted to a rock station by its owner about 15 years ago ...    >:(

I really don't understand the logic.  There are hundreds and hundreds of rock/pop stations to compete with?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 12:19:53 PM
I really don't understand the logic.  There are hundreds and hundreds of rock/pop stations to compete with?

The FM rock station is more profitable to the owner than a classical FM.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: ChamberNut on June 21, 2009, 12:23:25 PM
The FM rock station is more profitable to the owner than a classical FM.

Yes, but aren't there already too many rock stations, aren't they over saturated?  You would think that someone would want to stay in with the 'niche' classical market?  ???
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 12:26:04 PM
Yes, but aren't there already too many rock stations, aren't they over saturated?  You would think that someone would want to stay in with the 'niche' classical market?  ???
 

I am not in the advertising business so I have no clue as to whether companies prefer to run ads on a rock station ...
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 05:31:21 PM
Whilst surfing the web, I came across a classical music radio toolbar that links to around 70 different classical music stations.

The majority of the stations are American and I have never heard of them before.  ;D

Here in England, we only really have BBC Radio 3 (which is excellent) and Classic FM (shudder  :-X).

I've never really listened to radio on the Internet before and I'm fascinated by the amount of classical stations out there.

So, my question is, which stations are worth checking out? And which classical stations do you enjoy listening to generally?

D.

Please post the link you found and I will provide some suggestions ...   ;D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Joe Barron on June 21, 2009, 05:50:37 PM
Philadelphia lost its only classical radio station more than ten years ago. The staff and playlist moved to a local college station, which is now half classical, half jazz. The classical half has the same problem chamber nut says the Hartford station has: limite repertoire, safe choices. The best classical station in the Philadelphia area today is WPRB, Princeton, the university station that broadcasts classical only in the mornings. They play everything, from medieval to avant garde. You'll hear Webern beside Saint-Saens, and one of their hosts plays mostly contemporary music (though his choices also tend to be rather safe).

You can listen at www.wprb.com. Times are 6-11 a.m. Monday-Friday, which would be about 10 a.m.-3 p.m. your time. Great station, yet not so great as BBC 3.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 21, 2009, 06:07:29 PM
Philadelphia lost its only classical radio station more than ten years ago.
   

Was the FM license turned over to some rock station?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Daedalus on June 22, 2009, 12:07:59 AM
Please post the link you found and I will provide some suggestions ...   ;D

http://www.classical-toolbar.com/

You can delete all of the other links on the toolbar so you are just left with the radio tool. You can also add your own stations if you know the streaming address.

D.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Opus106 on June 22, 2009, 01:21:05 AM
Whilst surfing the web, I came across a classical music radio toolbar that links to around 70 different classical music stations.

I've never really listened to radio on the Internet before and I'm fascinated by the amount of classical stations out there.

Most media players, like WMP and Real Player in Windows, are equipped to play web streams. That was, in fact, how I discovered "internet radio" in March '06. With nothing to match 'Mozart', I typed 'Beethoven' and found my way to beethoven.com.

Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Joe Barron on June 22, 2009, 07:46:39 AM
   Was the FM license turned over to some rock station?

Yep: is was WFLN, 95.7. What's gratifying is that it's has about four different formats in the past ten years, and none of them has been successful. Now it's Ben-FM, which seems to have more staying power than the rest have had.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: The Six on June 22, 2009, 07:58:58 AM
www.kusc.org

best classical radio in Los Angeles, nevermind KUSC and KMozart
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Cato on June 22, 2009, 09:46:46 AM
I have been impressed by the classical station in Dayton, Ohio (home of the Wright Brothers, and a host of others):

http://www.dpr.org/Listen%20Live.htm (http://www.dpr.org/Listen%20Live.htm)

They have not given in much to the mania for "news" from NPR.

Their main announcer had been the former conductor of the Dayton Philharmonic, Charles Wendelken Wilson: unfortunately he died a month ago.  I assume, however, their high standard of quality will remain so.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: dave b on October 20, 2009, 06:06:47 PM
I have no idea how many of you know about this, but I just discovered it and it is most fascinating.

http://www.listenlive.eu/classical.html   
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Sef on March 15, 2010, 04:11:43 AM
So I'm in the UK for a few days and so I searched for a Radio station to listen to and got Classic FM (which I've heard of from a "Top 100" complilation CD someone bought me years ago). So far it's full of "pap". Smooth Classics etc. What about the jagged classics - where can I get them from? Got me to thinking that because I can get just about any radio station on the internet from my iPhone, what classical stations are out there (in any country), and how would you describe their content?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidRoss on March 15, 2010, 04:49:30 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/classical/
http://www.capradio.org/programs/classicalmusic/

the sites will explain content better than I can
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Lethevich on March 15, 2010, 05:11:51 AM
Definitely avoid Classical fm - it's a joke. Radio 3 tries hard but is gradually diluting its content. It still has a lot of good stuff, though.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Opus106 on March 15, 2010, 06:50:48 AM
Try MR3-Bartók Rádió (http://www.mr3-bartok.hu/). It is streamed from Hungary (a shocker, isn't it?) at 320 kbps. While I haven't tried the radio myself -- it's difficult to navigate without an English version of the site [addendum: and stream bits at @ 320 will definitely affect the internet bill amount adversely], I have downloaded a lot of ripped streams. Live concerts and a wide selection of repertoire.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Todd on March 15, 2010, 10:25:34 AM
Sift through the offerings listed on this site: http://classicalwebcast.com/ (http://classicalwebcast.com/).  I'm sure you can find something to meet your needs.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Spotswood on March 15, 2010, 06:11:54 PM
wprb.com, Princetone radio, has very creative classical programing. Eastern US time. It's worth listening to: the other morning I heard Morton Feldman next to Beethoven. Marvin Rosen has a fine contemporary program: mostly modern ormantic, but he also hosts an avant-garde show.

Unfortunately, WPRB broadcasts classical music only from 6 to 11 a.m. Eastern US time.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Sef on March 16, 2010, 01:50:21 PM
Thanks everyone - I'm now back in the US, so shall start trying out a few. If I find something I like I'll post on here.

If anyone else has any suggestions please keep them coming.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Chaszz on March 17, 2010, 09:30:28 AM
How about nominating an internet classical streaming station, or stations, worthy of being kept on for hours or all day? For my own private humble two cents, this station would:

1. Not play much, or any, light frippery music that reminds one of circuses, pinwheels turning in the breeze or hussars doing the mazurka dressed in pink striped pajamas. You know what I mean...
2. Keep it serious. Music of the Classical era would tend to be thoughtful and creative and avoid  little symmetrical movements that sound like pretty clockwork. Music of the Romantic era would avoid lachrymose teary excesses.
5. Not play Broadway show tunes.
4. Have a minimum of announcer talk.

Please supply a link or links. I myself would nominate Danish Radio - DR - if I could figure out which of their many streams I usually try to listen to. I will try to get back here with a link before this thread runs its course.

Of course (if you must) you are free to take aim at my gatekeeping preferences.

 
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Todd on March 17, 2010, 10:14:34 AM
I usually end up just listening to my local classical station, which also streams: https://www.allclassical.org/modx/ (https://www.allclassical.org/modx/).  It's publicly funded, so no commercials, and they play pretty much nothing but complete works, including obscure music.  (It does have some recurring programs where film music and/or show tunes may intrude, but otherwise it's pretty serious.)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: jimmosk on March 17, 2010, 07:48:51 PM
I'm very fond of the main Classical channel at http://www.radioio.com/genres/Classical-Jazz (http://www.radioio.com/genres/Classical-Jazz). The little-known works get more attention than the warhorses, which is just the way I like it.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: imperfection on March 17, 2010, 07:53:57 PM
Not a radio, but free and good quality streaming at www.grooveshark.com

Fantastic selection, I haven't been disappointed by it once since I started using it a month ago. From Prokofiev to Bach to Ligeti to Carter, it has it all.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Chaszz on March 18, 2010, 06:43:48 AM
Not a radio, but free and good quality streaming at www.grooveshark.com

Fantastic selection, I haven't been disappointed by it once since I started using it a month ago. From Prokofiev to Bach to Ligeti to Carter, it has it all.

How do I use it? I'm there but cannot get it to do anything....
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Opus106 on March 18, 2010, 06:50:44 AM
How do I use it? I'm there but cannot get it to do anything....

Do you see the large search bar at the centre of the page?


Not a radio, but free and good quality streaming at www.grooveshark.com

Fantastic selection, I haven't been disappointed by it once since I started using it a month ago. From Prokofiev to Bach to Ligeti to Carter, it has it all.

Imperfection, thanks for the link to Groove Shark. Although the name sounds familiar, I haven't been there before; but I already like their interface. :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: imperfection on March 18, 2010, 04:18:05 PM
Do you see the large search bar at the centre of the page?


Imperfection, thanks for the link to Groove Shark. Although the name sounds familiar, I haven't been there before; but I already like their interface. :)

You are welcome  ;) It's such a great website. I was just listening to Prokofiev's Toccata, op.11 played by Argerich. Stunning quality, compared to youtube and most internet radios I've tried.

@Chaszz: You can create an account (although it's not necessary) first, then just go to the huge search bar in the middle, type in what you want to listen to, and hit enter. A list of tracks available will show up, and you double click on them to play them. If you are a registered member, you can favorite tracks, add them to your playlist (which will be saved automatically for future visits to the site), share them on facebook/twitter/myspace, and much more. I hope you'll enjoy discovering what else Grooveshark has to offer. As I said before, it's a fantastic website.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: jlaurson on March 20, 2010, 11:56:49 PM
self-serving though the point is: Classical WETA 90.9 (Washington DC, operating on EST) can be listened to on-line and via i-Tunes. Drive-time is to be avoided, of course, but other than that the programing is increasingly varied. And, if you are interested in vocal music, WETA has just, finally resuscitated "Viva la Voce", a dedicated internet-only ('radio') channel to broadcast vocal works which are, for commercial reasons, largely excluded from the regular music line-up.


All at www.ClassicalWETA.org (http://www.ClassicalWETA.org)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: listener on March 26, 2010, 08:08:13 PM
an interesting program coming up (Sibelius' 7th)
"BERKELEY SYMPHONY:  KALW is proud to be the exclusive broadcast home of the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra.  Hear Music Director Joana Carneiro lead the orchestra in Steven Stucky’s Radical Light and Elegy, plus Sibelius’s Symphony No. 7 and Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite.  KALW’s Alan Farley hosts.  Full details and online program notes HERE.  Sunday March 28  from 4-6pm"
This station rarely gives me problems logging on to.
http://www.kalw.org/ 
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Ric on May 27, 2010, 12:03:08 PM
I  listen to spanish radio station "Radio Clásica". They play a wide repertoire, usually with entire pieces, and broadcast live concertos.

You can listen to it on line (small right window).

http://www.rtve.es/radio/radioclasica/
Title: On Medici.tv: Festival de Saint-Denis and Eschenbach Mahler cycle
Post by: Brewski on June 10, 2010, 10:13:55 AM
Once again Medici.tv is broadcasting concerts from the Festival de Saint-Denis, free.  (And available for two months.) 

I also notice they are doing an entire Mahler cycle with Eschenbach and the Orchestre de Paris, all year.  Currently they have up Symphonies 1, 2, 6 and 8--again, all free.

And if you haven't experienced this website before, the audio and video quality are outstanding.

--Bruce
Title: Re: On Medici.tv: Festival de Saint-Denis and Eschenbach Mahler cycle
Post by: Franco on June 10, 2010, 10:49:38 AM
Once again Medici.tv is broadcasting concerts from the Festival de Saint-Denis, free.  (And available for two months.) 

I also notice they are doing an entire Mahler cycle with Eschenbach and the Orchestre de Paris, all year.  Currently they have up Symphonies 1, 2, 6 and 8--again, all free.

And if you haven't experienced this website before, the audio and video quality are outstanding.

--Bruce

 A new site for me, and one I am sure to revisit often - right now, they are playing one of my most cherished works, the Faure Requiem.

Thanks, Bruce!
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Brewski on June 10, 2010, 10:57:31 AM
The site is usually a membership-only site (i.e., you pay for access), but every summer, they offer broadcasts from Saint-Denis, Aix-en-Provence and (I hope) the Verbier Festival.  The latter usually has performances by Martha Argerich; one year I watched her do the Prokofiev Third Piano Concerto (with the young, talented Verbier Festival Orchestra) maybe five of six times.  The camerawork was superb, with some great close-ups of her hands. 

It's great, because if you like that performance you're watching, you can view it as often as you like.   :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on June 12, 2010, 05:11:00 PM
The site is usually a membership-only site (i.e., you pay for access), but every summer, they offer broadcasts from Saint-Denis, Aix-en-Provence and (I hope) the Verbier Festival.  The latter usually has performances by Martha Argerich; one year I watched her do the Prokofiev Third Piano Concerto (with the young, talented Verbier Festival Orchestra) maybe five of six times.  The camerawork was superb, with some great close-ups of her hands. 

It's great, because if you like that performance you're watching, you can view it as often as you like.   :D

--Bruce

Bruce,

Since you live in NYC, what has happened to WQXR?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Brewski on June 14, 2010, 10:51:03 AM
Bruce,

Since you live in NYC, what has happened to WQXR?

Just a caveat: I'm not a regular radio denizen--not because I don't like radio, but because I'm not at home to listen all that often.  So I may not be the best "average radio listener."

I did tune in last week, when WQXR did the NY Phil's broadcast of Le Grand Macabre, which was terrific.  There seems to be a bit more contemporary programming (e.g., their new initiative called Q2) than in the past, but that is strictly my subjective impression and may not be borne out by the actual programming statistics.

--Bruce
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Daverz on June 14, 2010, 03:15:27 PM
Try MR3-Bartók Rádió (http://www.mr3-bartok.hu/). It is streamed from Hungary (a shocker, isn't it?) at 320 kbps. While I haven't tried the radio myself -- it's difficult to navigate without an English version of the site [addendum: and stream bits at @ 320 will definitely affect the internet bill amount adversely], I have downloaded a lot of ripped streams. Live concerts and a wide selection of repertoire.

Unfortunately, Bartok radio stopped streaming at high rates some months ago.  128 kbps seems to be their highest streaming rate.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Brewski on July 06, 2010, 10:52:49 AM
Once again, medici.tv is providing high-quality broadcasts from the Verbier Festival (and others).  The broadcasts are free.  (I think you have to register--just provide name and email.)  The concerts are archived, available for listening for two months.  Opening night is July 16:

Verbier Festival Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, conductor
Yuja Wang, piano

Enescu: Romanian Rhapsody No. 1
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 2
Mahler: Symphony No. 1

--Bruce
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Todd on July 07, 2010, 09:33:34 AM
I went on a long road trip over the holiday weekend and rented a car with Sirius XM in it and promptly searched out classical stations.  There are three that I could find, plus a fourth that plays movies soundtracks (some of which ain't too bad).  Anyway, the station called Symphony Hall is one of the best stations I've heard.  I got to hear Yakov Kreizberg's recent-ish recording of DSCH 5, Karajan's Bruckner 1, Mozart's 13th & 14th string quartets, some works by Spohr, Amy Beach, some even more obscure composers, as well as Brahms, Beethoven, Mahler, and others.  No commercials and minimal chatter, too.  The only downside is that even satellite reception is hindered in hilly, forested areas.  The "Pops" classical station is unusual in that it doesn't so much play pops works as it does play interesting movements from standard rep works (slow movement from Dvorak's 9th, piano miniatures (eg Passepied), etc).  The Met Opera broadcast station is a treasure trove of performances ancient and modern.

So, I'm left wondering, should I spend the money for a satellite radio at home?  I'm not convinced the business model is viable, and I could be left with worthless junk in a short period of time.  And beyond the classical stations, I get the same feeling I do whenever I watch cable television.  (I only do so on vacations.)  There’s so much choice, but almost all of it is crap.  I received around 250 satellite radio stations, but I could not find a good jazz station, and the rock stations focused on music I didn’t like at all, or could take only in small doses.  There were also at least a half dozen French language stations (?) playing crappy French pop (??), and well over a hundred talk stations, or at least stations where people were babbling about something or other.  Is that really worth a monthly fee? 

Internet radio available via WiMax seems to be a more viable alternative for the near future.

(I will say that satellite radio is much better than cable television, which has apparently gotten worse in the year since I last channel surfed dozens of channels.  I didn’t think that was possible.  Really, who is this Nancy Grace moron?)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on July 11, 2010, 04:12:31 PM
I went on a long road trip over the holiday weekend and rented a car with Sirius XM in it and promptly searched out classical stations.  There are three that I could find, plus a fourth that plays movies soundtracks (some of which ain't too bad).  Anyway, the station called Symphony Hall is one of the best stations I've heard.  I got to hear Yakov Kreizberg's recent-ish recording of DSCH 5, Karajan's Bruckner 1, Mozart's 13th & 14th string quartets, some works by Spohr, Amy Beach, some even more obscure composers, as well as Brahms, Beethoven, Mahler, and others.  No commercials and minimal chatter, too.  The only downside is that even satellite reception is hindered in hilly, forested areas.  The "Pops" classical station is unusual in that it doesn't so much play pops works as it does play interesting movements from standard rep works (slow movement from Dvorak's 9th, piano miniatures (eg Passepied), etc).  The Met Opera broadcast station is a treasure trove of performances ancient and modern.

So, I'm left wondering, should I spend the money for a satellite radio at home?  I'm not convinced the business model is viable, and I could be left with worthless junk in a short period of time.  And beyond the classical stations, I get the same feeling I do whenever I watch cable television.  (I only do so on vacations.)  There’s so much choice, but almost all of it is crap.  I received around 250 satellite radio stations, but I could not find a good jazz station, and the rock stations focused on music I didn’t like at all, or could take only in small doses.  There were also at least a half dozen French language stations (?) playing crappy French pop (??), and well over a hundred talk stations, or at least stations where people were babbling about something or other.  Is that really worth a monthly fee? 

Internet radio available via WiMax seems to be a more viable alternative for the near future.

(I will say that satellite radio is much better than cable television, which has apparently gotten worse in the year since I last channel surfed dozens of channels.  I didn’t think that was possible.  Really, who is this Nancy Grace moron?)

I grappled with the same issue after I had some exposure with the Sirius XM trial in my car, but not for very long.  Most stations are crap IMO.  I am still more favor of building my own comprehensive classical music collection that I can listen to at the time of my choice instead of relying on some classical music radio stations, regardless of its broadcast technologies ...
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: stingo on July 21, 2010, 11:27:58 AM
WVIA (http://www.wvia.org/radio/listen-live) is my local public radio station (and the only venue on the air for classical music).
Title: Classical TV - Streaming Videos Online (Free and PPV)
Post by: Opus106 on August 28, 2010, 06:22:13 AM
A cursory search didn't bring anything up about this site; so, here it is:

WHAT IS CLASSICAL TV?
Classical TV is a viewer-friendly, ever-changing destination at www.classicaltv.com (http://www.classicaltv.com/), offering videos of the best classical performances from around the world.  The site combines frequent live and as-live special events - hot-ticket performances from the world's great opera houses, theaters, and concert halls - with an exclusive library of full-length videos of current and recent performing arts events, all available for streaming on your home computer.

In addition, Classical TV offers a wealth of lively, informative, and decidedly unstuffy feature articles, topical playlists, insider columns, and cultural news that give fresh insights into the exciting world of classical performance. New features are added all the time. Classical TV's roster of writers and commentators includes some of the world's most respected cultural journalists.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on September 26, 2010, 04:38:38 PM
Anyone here listen to their radio through ipod touch/iphone and know any good apps?  I've tried the mainstream: pandora, last.fm, aol etc but they don't do classical well.  Unless you consider classical works individual movements played like you took your whole collection and put it on random play.  Some stations have apps, but I might end up installing alot until I find a good one.  Anyone already been down that road?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: bosniajenny on October 07, 2010, 10:35:58 AM
Interesting that a few have mentioned BBC Radio 3 and Classic FM (both UK). I can't stand Classic FM, just awful, acres of "pop" classic, nothing played complete, eurgh!

Radio 3 is the "must have" for anyone classically-inclined, although there has been some controversy recently about dumbing down and not getting to grips with the "difficult" stuff like they used to. They do, however, broadcast every single Promenade concert in the summer, which is a huge plus.

I listen a lot here (Sarajevo) and although the morning programming, in particular, is kind of bland these days, it does provide me with decent general listening.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: (poco) Sforzando on October 13, 2010, 05:27:00 PM
Just a caveat: I'm not a regular radio denizen--not because I don't like radio, but because I'm not at home to listen all that often.  So I may not be the best "average radio listener."

I did tune in last week, when WQXR did the NY Phil's broadcast of Le Grand Macabre, which was terrific.  There seems to be a bit more contemporary programming (e.g., their new initiative called Q2) than in the past, but that is strictly my subjective impression and may not be borne out by the actual programming statistics.

--Bruce

The only classical station in one of the world's great cities used to broadcast a powerful signal at 96.3 KHz when it was owned by the New York Times. I had no trouble receiving the signal from my home 50 miles east of New York. A year or more ago the Times sold the station to WNYC, moved the frequency to a weaker signal at 105.9 which I cannot receive at home, and as far as I can see the station has continued its gradual descent into trite superficiality that began at least 10 years ago. The only time I can hear WQXR any more is when driving home from Manhattan; I lose the signal 30 miles east of the city and basically do not have a local classical station in my area.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Sef on October 22, 2010, 01:22:19 PM
Anyone here listen to their radio through ipod touch/iphone and know any good apps?  I've tried the mainstream: pandora, last.fm, aol etc but they don't do classical well.  Unless you consider classical works individual movements played like you took your whole collection and put it on random play.  Some stations have apps, but I might end up installing alot until I find a good one.  Anyone already been down that road?

I use a Wunder Radio app:

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wunder-radio/id292233889?mt=8

Not free, but well worth the small one off fee. Get loads of Radio channels, grouped intelligently, and easy to find. Spent many hours listening to classial radio around the world!
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on October 22, 2010, 01:26:10 PM
Oh cool Sef!  That might be worth it... if they have some stations that play complete works.  What stations do you listen to and how would you describe their programming? :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on October 24, 2010, 06:44:35 AM
The only classical station in one of the world's great cities used to broadcast a powerful signal at 96.3 KHz when it was owned by the New York Times. I had no trouble receiving the signal from my home 50 miles east of New York. A year or more ago the Times sold the station to WNYC, moved the frequency to a weaker signal at 105.9 which I cannot receive at home, and as far as I can see the station has continued its gradual descent into trite superficiality that began at least 10 years ago. The only time I can hear WQXR any more is when driving home from Manhattan; I lose the signal 30 miles east of the city and basically do not have a local classical station in my area.

That was a very sad story.  As NYT has been on the rope financially for a number of years and it chose to unload WQXR.  I was equally saddened when the other commercial classical FM WNCN was unloaded in the early 90's by GAF, a chemical company that happened to own a classical FM station.  It is absurd that NYC cannot even support one full-time commercial classical FM station.  WNYC is just part of the NPR network and probably plays classical music no more than 60% of the time ...
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: (poco) Sforzando on October 24, 2010, 01:49:56 PM
That was a very sad story.  As NYT has been on the rope financially for a number of years and it chose to unload WQXR.  I was equally saddened when the other commercial classical FM WNCN was unloaded in the early 90's by GAF, a chemical company that happened to own a classical FM station.  It is absurd that NYC cannot even support one full-time commercial classical FM station.  WNYC is just part of the NPR network and probably plays classical music no more than 60% of the time ...

WNYC is mostly talk radio. Some of the talk is pretty good, I admit: "Car Talk" on Saturday mornings is both hilarious and informative. They also have someone named Jonathan Schwartz who plays Sinatra ad nauseam and has the radio personality of a dishrag. I hear no classical music on WNYC itself.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on October 24, 2010, 04:43:07 PM
WNYC is mostly talk radio. Some of the talk is pretty good, I admit: "Car Talk" on Saturday mornings is both hilarious and informative. They also have someone named Jonathan Schwartz who plays Sinatra ad nauseam and has the radio personality of a dishrag. I hear no classical music on WNYC itself.

Is the old WQXR being operated as a sister FM station by WNYC?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on November 05, 2010, 04:08:51 PM
Well I've been looking into streaming options and what I've found is that:

(a) Naxos Music Library has the best selection overall, has good sound quality and works fine on the pc.  But the websites sometimes moves sluggishly and will hang, sometimes it takes 1-2 minutes just to log in.  And the app for the ipod is riddled with streaming errors and track skipping that makes it doa and the customer service hasn't been able to figure anything out.

(b) Rhapsody has all of those major labels that NML doesn't have.  Unfortunately the search engine is TERRIBLE.  There is no power search, and you can only search by artist or album keyword, which means that you can very easily miss what you're looking for or not find it unless you search by performer instead of composer.  To top it off the album titles are incomplete, and what is shown is so vague and unhelpful that you have to click to find out, and then navigate back.  On the pc streaming yielded flash errors (really!), but the app worked fine.  On the ipod the app allows you to download and listen to anything in your library/playlists which is AWESOME!  I wish naxos had that.  Still the poor search was a deal breaker and I've moved on.

(c) Napster: I didn't even log in for a free trial because half of the searches I tried on their site generated errors.  Idiots.

(d) MOG.  That is what I'm trying now, it is only $5/mo unless you also want the ipod/phone/android app coverage as well.  The search is still too simple (as in like Rhapsody) but at least it is 10x faster and shows enough info on albums.  Seems to have pretty much the same catalog as rhapsody.  The app allows downloads too, and does them at 320k which is pretty cool.

I'm keeping NML, I just want a second service to provide the major performers from the major labels.  Naxos represents nearly all of the small labels well.

Anyone else dip their feet into the non-NML streaming services? :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on November 05, 2010, 04:11:54 PM
Just wanted to add that the Naxos search works like a charm searching keywords through all tags, you can easily search by composer, performer etc all at the same time.  I think that it is STUPID that the search engines on these huge streaming sites are so poorly designed.  But then again how long has netflix been around and it has an incredibly simplistic search engine! :D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidRoss on November 07, 2010, 07:42:19 AM
 David--MOG looks interesting.  (I'll bet Benji likes it!)  Unfortunately their site does not make it easy to find basic information about the service.  What format and rate do they use for streaming files?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on November 07, 2010, 07:54:37 AM
I believe they use 256k aac for streaming on the pc, 64k aac streaming for the mobile, and 320k mp3 for downloads on the mobile.  Kind of complicated! :D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidRoss on November 07, 2010, 08:01:33 AM
aac, huh?  Does that mean we have to playback through iTunes?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on November 07, 2010, 08:02:41 AM
Nah it's through the web, all you need is a browser with flash. :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidRoss on November 07, 2010, 08:05:02 AM
Thanks, maybe I'll try it.  ;D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on November 07, 2010, 08:07:56 AM
It's too bad spotify is not available in the US, they offer 320k streaming which is pretty cool. :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Brewski on December 01, 2010, 11:17:02 AM
Just got word that medici.tv is streaming (free) the October 7 opening night concert of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, with Gustavo Dudamel and tenor Juan Diego Flórez. 

And until Dec. 17, they're continuing streaming Dudamel's concert with the Vienna Philharmonic that closed the Lucerne Festival in September.  The program is Rossini, Ravel, Bernstein and Orbón--the same program I heard here in October, and it was a fantastic concert. 

www.medici.tv

--Bruce
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: dziendobry on August 31, 2011, 09:51:45 AM
Have you seen http://www.iheartradio.com (http://www.iheartradio.com)?  It streams radio stations from around the country. I haven't looked for classical on it.  My wife uses it to listen to stations in SoCal.
Anyone here listen to their radio through ipod touch/iphone and know any good apps?  I've tried the mainstream: pandora, last.fm, aol etc but they don't do classical well.  Unless you consider classical works individual movements played like you took your whole collection and put it on random play.  Some stations have apps, but I might end up installing alot until I find a good one.  Anyone already been down that road?
 
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: DavidW on August 31, 2011, 09:54:12 AM
Doesn't seem to have classical but thanks.

Hey you live just a hundred miles from me!  Cool. :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Est.1965 on February 04, 2012, 05:20:25 AM
Here in the UK, I subscribe to SKY television, the biggest subscription broadcaster you can get.  I browse through the included channels and find only TWO Classical channels.  Just 2.  But if by some miracle of the stars I decide to listen to 'ethnic' music instead, serious cross referencing multiple choice becomes a key factor.   >:(

Europe is festooned with broadcasting Classical channels, my favourite and the most generous being Radio 4 from Holland.  Here in the UK we hear nothing of Europe, not even Radio 4.  We are kept bereft from the roots of Germanic and European Classical Music by being given two British channels, one which lost its way when it started getting bigger on 'World Music' and the other only good for the likes of Rossini Overtures.  And that even from SKY, the premiere subscription outfit.  It is disasterous.   >:(

***Radio Stations***
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: listener on February 10, 2012, 01:42:56 AM
links to 64 stations here:
http://www.radiotower.com/cat-classical.html
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Opus106 on February 10, 2012, 02:00:48 AM
links to 64 stations here:
http://www.radiotower.com/cat-classical.html

Thanks. I actually miss the mixed programming of radio stations; I should get back to it. In fact, the closest I come to seeing something like that these days are your posts in the listening thread. :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Johnll on February 11, 2012, 04:56:23 PM
The following is a good source for classical internet radio stations. Click on Europe first. http://www.mikesradioworld.com/
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: maes1 on February 25, 2013, 04:47:12 PM
I've got something for you. Radio player with many stations from all over the world - only classical music   ;) I don't want to spam - you can find it in my signature    :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Lisztianwagner on February 27, 2013, 10:12:28 AM
I don't listen to music on the radio very often, but when it happens, I usually listen to BR-Klassik or BBC Radio3; they broadcast lots of wonderful concerts and musical events, like the Bayreuth Festival, Jansons' concerts with the BRSO, and the BBC Proms.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on March 02, 2013, 10:25:09 AM
I don't listen to music on the radio very often, but when it happens, I usually listen to BR-Klassik or BBC Radio3; they broadcast lots of wonderful concerts and musical events, like the Bayreuth Festival, Jansons' concerts with the BRSO, and the BBC Proms.

I can only listen to the stations you mentioned over my internet tuner.  How do you receive those broadcasts?
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Lisztianwagner on March 02, 2013, 10:37:21 AM
I can only listen to the stations you mentioned over my internet tuner.  How do you receive those broadcasts?

I look for the broadcasts on the websites of BBC Radio 3 and BR-Klassik.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Coopmv on March 02, 2013, 11:19:26 AM
I look for the broadcasts on the websites of BBC Radio 3 and BR-Klassik.

So you listen to these broadcasts off your computer.  Not sure if it was a software issue or bandwidth issue, my past experience with listening off internet website for some classical broadcast was not so great as the streaming did not work well.  For some reasons, my internet tuner does not have the same problem.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: ChamberNut on November 30, 2013, 12:19:11 PM
I'm very excited about Winnipeg's new Classical & Jazz Music FM radio station, launching December 5th.

There is quite a following of classical and jazz music lovers here, so I'm thinking it will do well.  :)

At least, it will provide an alternative to a dozen stations playing whoever sings "This shit's bananas".  ::)  :D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Slezak on February 11, 2015, 01:58:31 PM
 An interesting program for collectors is The Collector's Vault, found at  www.gmmy.com/tenors    This is the Golden Music Memories of Yesteryear site. This show has a lot of extreme rarities. It's at noon during the week, as well as 4 p.m., and 11 a.m. on Sundays. This is central time.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Minor Key on February 20, 2015, 07:35:07 PM
The radio station that helped me "discover" classical music is WCPE in NC. I listen over the web using Foobar on my desktop PC. I still love that station. theclassicalstation.org
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: carlito77 on February 19, 2017, 05:27:41 AM
Radio Swiss Classic in Berne, Switzerland is my favorite station. They stream music 24/7 with very little interruption. They also have Radio Swiss Jazz. I think the station is state owned. You have your choice to listen in either French, German, Italian, or English. Not a day goes by without me listening to this station, especially when browsing the Internet.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: maxbeesley on August 04, 2017, 04:37:05 AM
It's amazing that WDAV songs are online for free.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Scion7 on August 04, 2017, 04:49:35 AM
The radio station that helped me "discover" classical music is WCPE in NC. I listen over the web using Foobar on my desktop PC. I still love that station. theclassicalstation.org

Ah!  Then you probably have heard me once or twice on there.   :)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Cato on August 04, 2017, 05:19:43 AM
Radio Swiss Classic in Berne, Switzerland is my favorite station. They stream music 24/7 with very little interruption. They also have Radio Swiss Jazz. I think the station is state owned. You have your choice to listen in either French, German, Italian, or English. Not a day goes by without me listening to this station, especially when browsing the Internet.

SWISS JAZZ !  Now that must be interesting!

Let me recommend WDPR out of Dayton, which has a very good selection of things: I have heard them program Pierre Boulez with no apologies!  ;)

https://www.discoverclassical.org/program-schedule.htm (https://www.discoverclassical.org/program-schedule.htm)
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Scion7 on August 04, 2017, 05:22:17 AM
I have heard them program Pierre Boulez with no apologies!  ;)

Then we'll just have to beat an apology out of them!   >:D
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Cato on August 04, 2017, 07:12:01 AM
Then we'll just have to beat an apology out of them!   >:D

 8) ;)

I believe that program also offered Penderecki and a host of others in the same club!
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: tjguitar on September 30, 2017, 05:34:57 PM
I recently moved from Southern California to Phoenix, AZ and we do have a decent classical station, but the playlist can get repetitive.

Here are three American streaming stations that tend to be live, 100% classical and seem to have extensive libraries.

http://www.kmfa.org/ out of Austin, TX
https://www.kcme.org/ out of Colorado Springs, CO
and: https://www.wdav.org/ out of Davidson, NC


Out of Europe, I like:

http://www.radioswissclassic.ch/en/  which is the public station from Switzerland

and BBC Radio 3: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/player/bbc_radio_three


A hidden gem might be WMNR from Monroe, CT, (www.wmnr.org) who has a variety of volunteer hosts on weekdays who apparently bring in their own CD's and LP's.
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Monsieur Croche on September 30, 2017, 07:10:57 PM
streaming classical music radio, available world-wide:

http://www.wfmt.com/listen/
Title: Re: Classical Radio Stations and Internet Broadcasts
Post by: Spineur on October 14, 2017, 11:03:57 AM
The Palazzetto Bru-Zane foundation has its own internet radio

http://classicalradio.bru-zane.com/live/player/ (http://classicalradio.bru-zane.com/live/player/)

Lots of wonderful music.