GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Great Recordings and Reviews => Topic started by: Harry on January 08, 2008, 02:08:57 AM

Title: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 08, 2008, 02:08:57 AM
Today I started with the first Organ box in the Landscapes series. MDG is running this series for a long time now, and great credit it is to them.
This one is from 1991, and coming from Mecklenburg.
Needless to say I acquired almost all their offerings, and this is the first one that has to undergo my scrutiny, lol.
What are your favourite recordings and recommendations, for I love the instrument dearly!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Cato on January 08, 2008, 09:48:27 AM
What a coincidence, since I was just raving yesterday on the French Composers' Poll about the missing name of Louis Vierne and his six great Organ Symphonies.

C.M. Widor is also a good choice, not to mention Alexandre Guilmant: they all descend from the Franck school and know how to rattle the rose windows!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: hautbois on January 08, 2008, 12:04:54 PM
Durufle is a must! Though i adore Durufle's own recordings of his own works, i find that the organ benefits from digital sound a lot. There is a recording of Piet Kee playing various organ works in the Concertgebouw, and that is wonderful!

Howard
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: hautbois on January 08, 2008, 12:06:15 PM
And the Helmut Walcha Organ Works DG boxed set (12 discs).
The complete Bach from Walcha is now available on a different label, 10 cds if memory serves me right, and ridiculously priced as well!

Howard
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: FideLeo on January 09, 2008, 12:13:05 AM
The complete Bach from Walcha is now available on a different label, 10 cds if memory serves me right, and ridiculously priced as well!

Howard

The 10 cd box contains mono recordings made in late 1940s-early 1950s.  The "original masters" version from Archiv itself certainly isn't ridiculously priced - you were probably looking at the  "documenta" version issued by Memoran (sp.?) which may or may not be an authorised reissue.

I will recommend the Francois Couperin Masses played by Pierre Bardon (Pierre Verany).  The historic (18th century) instrument at Saint-Maximin-en-Province is truly sensational - especially the crumhorn and bombarde stops whose combination simply sounds so French.   :D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 09, 2008, 04:17:03 AM
Organ Landscape Pomerania
Martin Rost Organ.
MDG. 3 cd's.
CD 1

Works by Buxtehude/Volckmar/Anonymus 1617/Fischer/Alberti/Anonymus 1650/Ritter/Schmugel/Wolff/CPE Bach/Hertel.

Organs played on: Stralsund/Griebenow/Wartin/Deyelsdorf/Zettemin/Rugenwalde/Gingst.

The second box in this MDG series, and every bit as exiting as the first. Not only many unknown composers, but also Organs of great renown, allthought not often used in recordings. Holger Schlegel, a topnotch engineer made fabulous registrations. I do not know who tuned all the instruments, but it is done to perfection. As are the performances by Martin Rost, this man is a giant amongst his peers.
I am really looking forward to all the boxes laying ready to be played.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 09, 2008, 04:45:20 AM
Theophil Andreas Volckmar (1686-1768)  names to remember in organ composition.
Johan Fischer (1646-1716)
Johann Friedrich Alberti (1642-1710)
Christian Ritter (1645-1725)
Johann Cristoph Schmugel (1727-1798)
Christian Michael Wolff (1709-1789)
All unknowm works for me, and unknown composers.
This series is a real treasure trove my friends.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 09, 2008, 05:25:06 AM
CPE Bach's piece "Aus der Tiefe rufe ich" is a masterwork, lasting only 5:07, but is a revelatory experience.....
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bassio on January 09, 2008, 01:58:14 PM
For Bach,

Peter Hurford's playing is crystal-clear. (though with an eccentric BWV565 .. what a let down)

I also heard the complete recordings by Walcha. I do not know how they compare to others though.

The Goldberg variations on organ will feel weird for a pianist like me.

Any thoughts on Saint-Saens "Organ" Symphony and the Albinoni Adagio for organ and strings, Frank's?
Any other hidden masterpieces?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 11, 2008, 06:00:04 AM
Organ Landscapes.
Pomerania.
Martin Rost, Organ.
CD 2.

Works by: Heinrich Scheidemann 1595-1663.
              Johann Martin Rubert 1615-1680.
              Dietrich Buxtehude 1637-1707.
              Christain Michael Wolff 1709-1789.
              Anton Ludwig Ernst Trutschel 1787-1869.
              Wilhelm Rudnick 1850-1927.
              Max Wagenknecht 1857-1922.
              Georg Scheel 1866-1945.
              Karl Kuhn 1851-1930.
              August Wilhelm Bach 1796-1869.

Organs:   Stolp (Slupsk)
              Saal.
              Gutzkow.
              Patzig.
              Belgard (Bialogard)
              Stolpmunde (Ustka)
              Kenz.

The second disc in this box wirh Organs from Pomerania, and every bit as successfull. Well recorded and perfectly tuned, a wide array of fine organ music is unfloding before your ears. The booklet contains all the stops and pictures of the organs in full color.

             
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Morigan on January 11, 2008, 09:21:33 AM
I can't seem to find a satisfying recording of Pachelbel's magnificat fugues... (now, wouldn't it be easier if I just wanted his go***mn canon in D?)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 11, 2008, 09:24:10 AM
I can't seem to find a satisfying recording of Pachelbel's magnificat fugues... (now, wouldn't it be easier if I just wanted his !!!!!!!!!! canon in D?)

We could do without the word, if you please my friend.... :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 13, 2008, 06:38:48 AM
Organ Landscape, "Pomerania".

Works from: Flugel/Zingel/Steinicke/Loewe/Grossmann/Sering/Voight/Wenzel/Wagner/ Sumnich/Hildebrandt/Wangemann/Hecht.

Organs from: Greifswald/Steglin/Stettin/Gristow/Koslin/Nehringen/Demmin.

Played by Martin Rost.

CD 3 from this fabulous box in this MDG series.
For me this has the highest marks. 
 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 21, 2008, 03:40:17 AM
Organ Landscape Thuringia.

Works by Pachelbel/J.M. Bach/Walther/Heinrich Bach/JS Bach/JC Bach/JB Bach/Kellner/Krebs.

Played on the organs in Romhild/Ohrdruf/Klettbach/Neustadt/Orla/Kornhochheim/Eixleben/Altenburg,

Organs played by Michael Schonheit.

This starts with a fabulous piece by Pachelbel, the Praeludium in d, that amazed me no end, well written it is, very well written indeed, followed by Partita sopra by JM Bach, absolutely stunning in its conception. Imagine 3 discs full of such beauties, and you will understand my enthusiasm. It is a State of the Art recording, and is played by one of the greats in Germany Michael Schonheit, he does his name honour indeed.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Morigan on January 21, 2008, 06:39:08 AM
Great discovery Harry. I'm glad you enjoyed the Pachelbel. I think the time has come to resurrect his awesome work for the organ and to bury the canon. I'm alarmed by the lack of recordings for Mr. P. :(
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 23, 2008, 06:17:02 AM
Great discovery Harry. I'm glad you enjoyed the Pachelbel. I think the time has come to resurrect his awesome work for the organ and to bury the canon. I'm alarmed by the lack of recordings for Mr. P. :(

True, that is a omission in the recording repertoire. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 23, 2008, 06:26:41 AM
Organ Landscape Thuringa.

Works by: JS Bach/Walther/Vogler/Krebs/Kittel/Rinck/Liszt.

Played on the Organs in: Altenburg/Zella Mehlis, Ortstell Zella/Dornburg/Ohrdruf/Denstedt.

Organs used: Trost/Rossdorf/Rommel/Gerhardt/Ratzmann Brothers/ Peternell


Played by Michael Schonheit.

As Premont said the work by JS Bach, BWV 538 played on the Trost organ is fabulous, but I pretty much enjoyed all what's on this second disc from this box Thuringa. The sound is not so good as on the first disc, but still very good.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on January 31, 2008, 03:56:28 AM
Organ Landscape Thuringia.

Works by: Liszt/Brahms/Topfer/Reger/Keller/Seifert.

Organs from: Ronneburg/Koningsee/Erfurt/Ilmennau/Bad Salzungen.

Performed by Michael Schonheit.


Beautiful sound, played by a master on the organ. All finely tuned organs, with the added bonus of all composers.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on February 07, 2008, 03:33:02 AM
Organ Landscape Transylvania. (Rumania)

Organs from Sibiu/Brasov/Cisnadioara/Somartin/Alba Julia/Cisnadie/Codlea/Medias/Agirbiciu/Seleus.

Played by: Ursula Philippi & Eckart Schlandt.

Works by Paul Richter/Johann Leopold Bella/Rudolf Lassel/Girolamo Diruta/Valentin Greff Bakfark/Daniel Croner/Samuel Marckfelner/Waldemar von Baussern/Ernst Irtel/Hand Peter Turk/Tudor Ciortea.


Another fabulous release from MDG, it which is really nothing wrong. Thumbs up.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Wanderer on February 07, 2008, 03:36:15 AM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/5060113440310.jpg)

Has anyone heard this recording yet?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on February 24, 2008, 06:30:28 PM
I'm looking for a good recording of the organ music by Nicolaus Bruhns!
Any recommendations? :)

Some candidates I found at jpc:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/5400439002043.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0025091007028.jpg)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203712328.jpg) (http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/04/513204.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51hxwfJ3h9L._SS500_.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Don on February 24, 2008, 08:13:53 PM
The best Bruhns organ disc I know isn't all Bruhns - also has a few pieces of Hanff that are exceptional.  The disc is Loft Recordings 1012 and performed by William Porter on the Cathedral Organ at Roskilde; the organ was originally built in 1554 and sounds fantastic.  One of my treasured organ discs, and that includes Bach.  BUT, it might not be easy to find.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on February 17, 2009, 07:54:27 AM
I've got a warm spot for Scheidemann's organ music.  Naxos recorded five volumes, vol. 2 by Karin Nelson being the gem of the cycle. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on February 17, 2009, 08:06:49 AM
Another superb Scheidemann organ disc is played by Gwendolyn Toth on the Zefiro label - includes bird stops and some chant.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 02, 2009, 05:06:12 AM
I am just baffled by the fact that Stefan Bleicher has not recorded more organ works by Bach.  I have the following set, which is quite nice in my opinion.  But then I am no expert in Franz Liszt.  Isn't he supposed to be one of the promising younger-generation German organists?


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51WP2pujjhL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 02, 2009, 07:57:19 AM
Organ lovers have been talking a lot about the compositions of J.S. Bach, and the various interpreters.

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,638.0.html

Let's talk about others & their compositions, too, as well as recordings of their work!
Of course it's allowed to talk about Bach. His work might be well suited for making comparisons. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: 71 dB on May 02, 2009, 11:02:04 AM
CPO label has a wonderful ongoing series of North German Baroque organ works played by Friedhelm Flamme. I have the first 2 volumes consisting works by Nicolaus Bruhns, Georg Dietrich Leyding and Vincent Lübeck. I am waiting for the 3rd volume (Johann Adam Reincken, Andreas Kneller, Christian Geist) to arrive.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 02, 2009, 11:37:31 AM
Nicholas Bruhns composed some nice organ works and I have the following SACD.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/611CHSA105L._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 02, 2009, 12:09:53 PM
It's gonna be a CPO thread! ::)

I recently bought the complete organ works of Franz Tunder and Nicolaus Hasse. I think it's part of the Northern German Baroque Organ Works series, mentioned by 71dB:

(http://www.hbdirect.com/coverm/69/1065769.jpg)

But I'm also happy with a Pachelbel CD of the series Süddeutsche Orgelmeister, a production of Oehms Classics.

(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/full/102/1020032.jpg)

I think I'm falling in love with the German organ tradition. Alas, nowadays every love one holds costs money. :'(
Nevertheless: I'll keep your advices in mind!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 02, 2009, 12:19:09 PM
The best Bruhns organ disc I know isn't all Bruhns - also has a few pieces of Hanff that are exceptional.  The disc is Loft Recordings 1012 and performed by William Porter on the Cathedral Organ at Roskilde; the organ was originally built in 1554 and sounds fantastic.  One of my treasured organ discs, and that includes Bach.  BUT, it might not be easy to find.

And I missed the chance to visit the Roskilde Cathedral back in spring of 94 when I visited Copenhagen.     :(
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on May 02, 2009, 12:24:58 PM
I've merged with an earlier thread, started by Harry. I do hope nobody is going to be upset or anything... :-X

An excellent idea to revive the organ discussion beyond Bach! :)
I'll follow this thread will interest, perhaps someone will have the answer to my earlier question on comparisons between the various Bruhns recordings?

I'd like to point out that besides the Bach thread there is also a separate (and interesting) thread on Buxtehude (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,3769.0.html).

Q

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 02, 2009, 12:48:06 PM
NO!!!!

IT WAS MY IDEA!!!!

O, my mistake. Sorry, Harry.

........

Yeah, thanks Que, for merging the threads. :)
I still consider myself an organ rookie, and probably will be attached to Bach for a while. Hopefully this thread will be filled with interesting posts by organ lovers, from Heinrich Scheidemann up to Messiaen (and the rest).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on May 02, 2009, 12:54:37 PM

I still consider myself an organ rookie, and probably will be attached to Bach for a while. Hopefully this thread will be filled with interesting posts by organ lovers, from Heinrich Scheidemann up to Messiaen (and the rest).

Well, it seems that we Dutch have a thing with organs.... ;D

And luckily we have plenty of superb instruments around! :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on May 02, 2009, 12:58:17 PM
Wonderful, this thread revived. That makes me happy.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 05, 2009, 04:26:30 AM
I'll follow this thread will interest, perhaps someone will have the answer to my earlier question on comparisons between the various Bruhns recordings?

Que, I only have the recordings of Helmut Winter on the Coci/Klapmeyer organ at the St. Nicolaskirche in Altenbruch, Germany. I like them a lot, but I can't compare them to others.

BTW, Winter also plays works of Pachelbel on that disc.
Here's the playlist:
http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/cds/hmu1230.htm

If you're interested, these recordings were recollected in a 6cd-box set by Harmonia Mundi France, entitled Les Orgues Historiques: labelnumber 2901225.30. I'm not sure if these recordings are still available, though.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 05, 2009, 04:51:15 AM
These are all the CD's I have on Bruhns' organ works with the respective labels indicated.  The big boys like the DG and Philips are nowhere to be found ...

Bruhns   Organ Works                Winter/Organ       Harmonia
   Organ Works                Christensen (SACD)   ARSIS
   Complete Organ Works   Flamme (SACD)       CPO

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 05, 2009, 07:23:06 AM
These are all the CD's I have on Bruhns' organ works with the respective labels indicated.  The big boys like the DG and Philips are nowhere to be found ...

Bruhns   Organ Works                Winter/Organ       Harmonia
   Organ Works                Christensen (SACD)   ARSIS
   Complete Organ Works   Flamme (SACD)       CPO

And what can you tell us about your personal preferences, in terms of both interpretation and recording sound?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 05, 2009, 08:12:06 AM
And what can you tell us about your personal preferences, in terms of both interpretation and recording sound?

I have not played any of these CD's in a while.  My initial impression of Bruhns' organ works was, wow, this fellow composed some nice organ works.  I will have to re-listen to these CD's before I can make any comments ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: 71 dB on May 05, 2009, 08:58:16 AM
I have not played any of these CD's in a while.  My initial impression of Bruhns' organ works was, wow, this fellow composed some nice organ works.  I will have to re-listen to these CD's before I can make any comments ...

Nicolaus Bruhns was extremely talented but sadly died at age 32. What's worse, most of his music is lost. The cpo SACD is a no-brainer but there is also a brilliant disc of Bruhns' organ works (+3 cantatas) on Tempéraments label (Jan Willem Jansen/Le Parlement de Musique/Martin Gester).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 05, 2009, 09:14:03 AM
Nicolaus Bruhns was extremely talented but sadly died at age 32. What's worse, most of his music is lost.

Yes, too bad, I listen to his organ music with great pleasure.
I do recall that, after listening to the Helmut Winter recording and after reading Bruhns' biography (being a violin & organ virtuoso), for a moment I thought: well, could he be the composer of Bach's BWV 565? :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 05, 2009, 09:17:19 AM
Yes, too bad, I listen to his organ music with great pleasure.
I do recall that, after listening to the Helmut Winter recording and after reading Bruhns' biography (being a violin & organ virtuoso), for a moment I thought: well, could he be the composer of Bach's BWV 565? :)

But there is no dispute as to the exact nationality of Bruhns as compared with Buxtehude.  Bruhns was 100% Danish without a doubt ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 05, 2009, 11:04:46 AM
But there is no dispute as to the exact nationality of Bruhns as compared with Buxtehude.  Bruhns was 100% Danish without a doubt ...

I have doubts.  Bruhns was born and died in Germany.  He did have a post in Copenhagen, but I don't know its duration.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 05, 2009, 11:10:19 AM
Just dug up this Chandos CD to play.  The Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland by Bruhns is quite nice.  The first movement and the last movement are each preceded by some lovely soprano singing.  It was this CD that first introduced me to the artistry of Nicholaus Bruhns.  This CD is OOP but is available as used on Amazon ranging in price from $53 to $120 ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41P98EQ6BFL._SS400_.jpg)

Unfortunately, the track information is not too sharp and I am too lazy to take my own picture of the CD jacket ...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410hStNwhBL._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 05, 2009, 11:37:47 AM
Just dug up this Chandos CD to play.  The Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland by Bruhns is quite nice.  The first movement and the last movement are each preceded by some lovely soprano singing.  It was this CD that first introduced me to the artistry of Nicholaus Bruhns.  This CD is OOP but is available as used on Amazon ranging in price from $53 to $120 ...

I wonder why those Amazon crooks think they can sell the disc for such a ridiculous price.  Although I don't personally own it, I can listen to it all day long on the Naxos Music Library site.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 05, 2009, 12:52:37 PM

Bruhns   Organ Works      Christensen (SACD)   ARSIS
   

Which Christensen?? Jens E Christensen??
Do you know a link to this recording?
Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 05, 2009, 01:03:34 PM
I'm looking for a good recording of the organ music by Nicolaus Bruhns!
Any recommendations? :)

I own all these (and the P Kee) except the Foccroulle, which is on my wish-list.

Listened to day to the Bruhns / Ghielmi and was not impressed. Most of the playing sounds stiff and unengaged in these ears, and this Ahrend organ in Milano strikes me not as being the best suited medium for this music.
I can listen to the others in the run of the week.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 05, 2009, 01:07:41 PM
Which Christensen?? Jens E Christensen??
Do you know a link to this recording?
Thanks in advance.

(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/full/59/595281.jpg)

Amazon does not have a photo ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: drogulus on May 05, 2009, 01:17:44 PM


     This is from Resonance Records, a download from HDTracks:

     (http://img21.imageshack.us/img21/4734/frenchorganmasterworks.jpg)

     Grison, Jules : Toccata for Organ in F major

     Maurice Duruflé (1902 - 1986) : Scherzo for Organ, Op. 2

     Guilmant, Felix Alexandre : Sonata for Organ no 5 in C minor, Op. 80
     Scherzo

     Maurice Duruflé (1902 - 1986) : Méditation for Organ

     Gabriel Pierné (1863 - 1937) : Pieces (3) for Organ, Op. 29
     no 3, Concert Scherzando

     Samuel-Rousseau, Marcel : Scherzo for Organ

     Jongen, Joseph : Scherzetto for Organ, Op. 108

     Alain, Jehan-Ariste : Choral phrygien for Organ, AWV 76

     Bonnet, Joseph : Pieces (12) for Organ, Op. 5
     no 3, Toccata

     Guilmant, Felix Alexandre : Sonata for Organ no 8 in A major, Op. 91
     Scherzo

     Alain, Jehan-Ariste : Choral dorien for Organ, AWV 75

     Widor, Charles-Marie : Symphony for Organ no 5 in F minor, Op. 42 no 1
     5th movement, Toccata

     Widor, Charles-Marie : Symphony for Organ no 4 in F major, Op. 13 no 4
     4th movement, Scherzo

     D'Indy, Vincent : Prelude for Organ in B minor, Op. 66

     Vierne, Louis : Pièces de fantaisie - Suite no 3, Op. 54
     2nd movement, Impromptu

     Widor, Charles-Marie : Symphony for Organ no 8 in B flat major, Op. 42 no 4
     Finale

     
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on May 05, 2009, 02:36:09 PM
I own all these (and the P Kee) except the Foccroulle, which is on my wish-list.

Wow! :) Didn't expect anyone to have (almost) all of them, not even you!  :o   ;D


Quote
Listened to day to the Bruhns / Ghielmi and was not impressed. Most of the playing sounds stiff and unengaged in these ears, and this Ahrend organ in Milano strikes me not as being the best suited medium for this music.

Now there is a slight surprise, just listened to his Bach/Brahms disc, with Bach played on the same organ, and kind of liked it! :)  But then Bach and Bruhms are different composers...

Quote
I can listen to the others in the run of the week.

Any impressions you could share wil be appreciated! :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 05, 2009, 08:44:00 PM
I have doubts.  Bruhns was born and died in Germany.  He did have a post in Copenhagen, but I don't know its duration.

He was German indeed, AFAIK. Born in Schleswig-Holstein, son of organist Paul Bruhns. Pupil of Buxtehude, who helped him to get the job at the Copenhagen Court. Buxtehude was Danish, but some scholars think he was (like Bruhns) born in Schleswig-Holstein (Oldesloe). Anyway, his roots may have been German, since there is a town near Hamburg called Buxtehude.

I own all these (and the P Kee) except the Foccroulle, which is on my wish-list.

Please give us a list of baroque organ cd's you don't own. :D

Wow! :) Didn't expect anyone to have (almost) all of them, not even you!  :o   ;D

A shameful example of underestimation! ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 06, 2009, 10:34:46 AM

Please give us a list of baroque organ cd's you don't own. :D


Well, I must say, that I am beginning to loose track of things. Actually I just realised that I do not - to my surprise - own the Bruhns / Flamme CD, but  I am going to acquire it with my next order together with his Tunder CDs from CPO.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 06, 2009, 04:13:46 PM
Well, I must say, that I am beginning to loose track of things. Actually I just realised that I do not - to my surprise - own the Bruhns / Flamme CD, but  I am going to acquire it with my next order together with his Tunder CDs from CPO.

I bet I may have some obscure organ works CD's (not necessarily Bach) you do not have, even though I am no nut of organ recordings.  I currently have only 6 complete sets and have no intention of getting more than another set or two (one of them must be the third cycle by Marie-Claire Alain).  I think my Bach organ works collection is quite balanced considering that I have 1000+ LP's/CD's on various works of Bach ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 07, 2009, 07:44:59 AM
I bet I may have some obscure organ works CD's (not necessarily Bach) you do not have, even though I am no nut of organ recordings. 

Of course you have, and probably quite a lot.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 07, 2009, 08:34:48 AM
I think my Bach organ works collection is quite balanced considering that I have 1000+ LP's/CD's on various works of Bach ...

Of course.  Each of us thinks our collections are balanced based on our respective preferences.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 07, 2009, 01:09:28 PM
Just dug up this Chandos CD to play. 

Do you grow CDs in your backyard?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 07, 2009, 03:50:13 PM
Do you grow CDs in your backyard?
 

These are the CD's on organ works that came into my collection mainly in the late 80's and early 90's that generally have few or no works by Bach ...

North German Organ Music   Leonhardt/Organ   SONY
Early English Organ Music   Preston/Pinnock   Archive
Early English Organ Music, Vol. 1   Payne/Organ   NAXOS
Early English Organ Music, Vol. 2   Payne/Organ   NAXOS
Early French Organ Music, Vol. 2   Payne/Organ   NAXOS
Great European Organs No. 10   John/Organ   Priory
Two Mander Organs   Page/Organ   Priory
German Organ Music Vol 1   Payne/Organ   NAXOS
German Organ Music Vol 2   Payne/Organ   NAXOS
Du Mage, Bach, Franck & Widor   Brandstetter   Thorofon
Organ Music in France & S. Netherlands   Leonhardt/Organ   SONY
A Treasury of English Organ Music   Phillips/Organ   Impressions
Orgues D'lle-de-France/Volume 1   Alain/Escaich   Chamade
Orgues D'lle-de-France/Volume 2   Jansen/Bouvard   Chamade
Piet Kee at Weingarten   Kee/Organ   Chandos
The Arp Schnitger Organ   Leonhardt/Organ   SONY
Historic Organs of Austria   Leonhardt/Organ   SONY
The Organ Encyclopedia Vol 1   Payne/Organ   NAXOS
The Organ Encyclopedia Vol 2   Payne/Organ   NAXOS
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 07, 2009, 04:00:27 PM
Of course.  Each of us thinks our collections are balanced based on our respective preferences.

Not true.  A Bach collection which is made up of 80% of organ works cannot be considered balanced.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 07, 2009, 04:21:38 PM
Not true.  A Bach collection which is made up of 80% of organ works cannot be considered balanced.

It can be considered balanced by the person owning the collection.  For example, 50% of the organ collection is on historical organs.

This is nuts - screw balance.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 07, 2009, 04:55:12 PM
It can be considered balanced by the person owning the collection.  For example, 50% of the organ collection is on historical organs.

This is nuts - screw balance.

This is new math ...   ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 07, 2009, 11:29:53 PM
Not true.  A Bach collection which is made up of 80% of organ works cannot be considered balanced.

You seem to think, that mine is, but the share of organ works is far less.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 08, 2009, 03:24:19 PM
You seem to think, that mine is, but the share of organ works is far less.
 

I just cited some number as an example.  I have no idea about the size of your collection.  I imagine if you have 30 Bach Organ Works (at average of 15 CD's per set) sets and you have 15,000 CD's, your collection is still well balanced. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 08, 2009, 05:19:27 PM
 

I just cited some number as an example.  I have no idea about the size of your collection.  I imagine if you have 30 Bach Organ Works (at average of 15 CD's per set) sets and you have 15,000 CD's, your collection is still well balanced. 

The correct number is probably about 4000, and ca 20% Bach organ music.

But who decides whether a collection is well balanced or not? Romantic and modern music e.g. is as well as unrepresented in my collection.  Never-the-less the collection is well balanced as to my interests.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 08, 2009, 05:30:00 PM
The correct number is probably about 4000, and ca 20% Bach organ music.

But who decides whether a collection is well balanced or not? Romantic and modern music e.g. is as well as unrepresented in my collection.  Never-the-less the collection is well balanced as to my interests.

I am a mathematician by training.  As such, I view my 7000+ LP's/CD's/tapes in classical music from this standpoint, i.e. if my collection is balanced.  I am also an avid investor and pretty much follow the same philosophy in that area as well.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 08, 2009, 05:57:47 PM
The correct number is probably about 4000, and ca 20% Bach organ music.

Never-the-less the collection is well balanced as to my interests.

Exactly.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 12, 2009, 03:00:45 PM
I am a mathematician by training.  As such, I view my 7000+ LP's/CD's/tapes in classical music from this standpoint, i.e. if my collection is balanced. 

Right, but you're the one making the "balance" decision.  Another person might consider your collection skewed.  All I'm getting at is that balance of a record collection is very subjective except for my own collection which is a marvel of equilibrium. 8)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 12, 2009, 03:32:36 PM
Right, but you're the one making the "balance" decision.  Another person might consider your collection skewed.  All I'm getting at is that balance of a record collection is very subjective except for my own collection which is a marvel of equilibrium. 8)

No way in hell my collection can be considered skewed by any fair-minded person since my collection starts with the Renaissance and ends with composers like Sibelius (the very late romantic).  There are 800+ CD's/LP's on piano works alone and a nice collection of operas ... 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 12, 2009, 05:50:20 PM
No way in hell my collection can be considered skewed by any fair-minded person since my collection starts with the Renaissance and ends with composers like Sibelius (the very late romantic). 

Sounds like you don't have anything from the last 80 years or so - you're skewed. :D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 12, 2009, 05:54:13 PM
Sounds like you don't have anything from the last 80 years or so - you're skewed. :D

Buddy, get that calculator out.  Sibelius lived till 1957 ...   ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 12, 2009, 06:05:53 PM
Buddy, get that calculator out.  Sibelius lived till 1957 ...   ;D

Tell me about all the music he composed after the 1920's.  Sorry, but you have a "black hole" in your collection that will only deepen as time moves on.

Of course, I'm only teasing.  I have a bunch of black holes and feel fine about it.  My collection only goes back to 1500, and I have just a small amount of modern music (composers currently alive). 

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: snyprrr on May 16, 2009, 01:50:05 PM
Judging by all your arguing, MY collection is the most balanced, ha!!!

Anyhow, this was the ORGAN thread, right? $:)

I'm curious. I enjoy some of the slightly un-spectacular modern works, the mellower majors, such as Frank Martin's "Passacaglia." Any cds of nice, maybe slightly anonymous sounding, misterioso-type early to mid century organ works of this type? I have the Hindemith which I like a whole lot, but all my other organ cds have either flute, horn, or trumpet. Any major trombone+organ works? I know there's a bunch of cds with that combo. I do prefer the more meditative organ works...though nothing contemporary/new age-y.

And yes, I used to have most of the Hurford/Bach set. Probably had to sell at the time for $$$. Chorale preludes, yea!
I even went down the Messiaen/Bates road, but he seems to spectacular/langorous for me. What are his mellowest works here?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on May 16, 2009, 04:22:25 PM
Judging by all your arguing, MY collection is the most balanced, ha!!!

You've convinced me, so you win the recognition of having the most balanced classical music collection of all board members.  And little did you know, you have also been cited as the most emotionally balanced person on the board.  8)

With two awards in one day, I'm sure you're elated.  An acceptance speech would not be out of order. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: FideLeo on May 16, 2009, 10:38:29 PM
Black holes suck - organ pipes blow  ;D

currently listening:

(http://www.die-orgelseite.de/cds/SaintMaximinEnProvence_Bardon.jpg)

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: springrite on May 31, 2009, 07:52:41 PM
In my collection of 3000 or so, organ is probably the least represented, in that I only have obligatorily collected 2 Bach organ CDs, one Franck, one Widor, one Liszt, two Messiaen, one modern compilation (Ligeti, etc.) and a few odd organ symphonies, none of which I listened to much if at all. Soon I will be listened to them with a bit more attention and see if I can get into them and maybe add to my collection.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: FideLeo on May 31, 2009, 07:54:03 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/518lF7HcaKL._SS500_.jpg)

Organists are often not very insistent on HIP when it comes to instruments of choice, maybe because the programme at hand can be too mixed anyway.  Rene Saorgin records 16th and 17th century organ music (from all over Europe) on a 19th-century Piedmontese organ in a French church.  :D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 09, 2009, 12:05:41 AM
Radio archive of a Dutch broadcast corporation:

http://orgelconcerten.ncrv.nl/ncrv?nav=jlvbuCsHtGAkBbC

Yes, the language is Dutch, but on the right one can quite easily select:
- Organisten (organists)
- Orgels (organs)
- Componisten (composers).

Just give it a try, every week a new concert from the past is added to this interesting archive.
Right now I'm listening to Bach's Prelude & fugue in E minor BWV 548, played by Johan Beeftink, on the Schnitger organ of the Der Aa-kerk in Groningen, NL. What an amazing instrument this is! Still in repair though, hopefully there will be concerts again on this organ from appr. 2011 or 2012.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 09, 2009, 01:57:12 AM
Radio archive of a Dutch broadcast corporation:

http://orgelconcerten.ncrv.nl/ncrv?nav=jlvbuCsHtGAkBbC

Yes, the language is Dutch, but on the right one can quite easily select:
- Organisten (organists)
- Orgels (organs)
- Componisten (composers).

Just give it a try, every week a new concert from the past is added to this interesting archive.
Right now I'm listening to Bach's Prelude & fugue in E minor BWV 548, played by Johan Beeftink, on the Schnitger organ of the Der Aa-kerk in Groningen, NL. What an amazing instrument this is! Still in repair though, hopefully there will be concerts again on this organ from appr. 2011 or 2012.

Thanks a lot! :)

[Frescobaldi - Canzona Quarta - de Rooij]
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 09, 2009, 01:09:27 PM
Radio archive of a Dutch broadcast corporation:

http://orgelconcerten.ncrv.nl/ncrv?nav=jlvbuCsHtGAkBbC


Thanks for this link, Marc. Rodrigo de Sá sent it to me once, but it was lost in a harddisc breakdown.
Many interesting pieces and almost every Dutch organist of distinction represented.

Very interesting is also Helmut Walcha´s Bach pieces, especially his performance of his own arrangement for organ of the six-part Ricercare from Musikalisches Opfer, which he published in score at Peters, but never recorded. I once heard him play this piece at a recital in Copenhagen.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on August 09, 2009, 01:39:52 PM
In my collection of 3000 or so, organ is probably the least represented, in that I only have obligatorily collected 2 Bach organ CDs, one Franck, one Widor, one Liszt, two Messiaen, one modern compilation (Ligeti, etc.) and a few odd organ symphonies, none of which I listened to much if at all. Soon I will be listened to them with a bit more attention and see if I can get into them and maybe add to my collection.


Many classical music lovers just do not like organ music, plain and simple.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on November 19, 2009, 11:57:56 PM
Anyone familiar with organist Albert Bolliger and his recordings on the Sinus label, now at bargain prices at jpc (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/home/search/-/label/Sinus?page=1)? A series called "Historische Orgeln der Schweiz" seems tempting! :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 22, 2009, 09:57:12 AM
Anyone familiar with organist Albert Bolliger and his recordings on the Sinus label, now at bargain prices at jpc (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/home/search/-/label/Sinus?page=1)? A series called "Historische Orgeln der Schweiz" seems tempting! :)

Q

I own the two CDs, Bolliger has recorded in Denmark. I find him reliable and informed. Maybe not the most individual player, but as time goes by, I am beginning more and more to appreciate musicians without towering ego´s.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on November 22, 2009, 02:29:30 PM


Many classical music lovers just do not like organ music, plain and simple.

It reminds them of the death phase. ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 23, 2009, 10:55:01 AM
I own the two CDs, Bolliger has recorded in Denmark. I find him reliable and informed. Maybe not the most individual player, but as time goes by, I am beginning more and more to appreciate musicians without towering ego´s.

Not towering, alright. I like that statement.
But a strange feller he is indeed: going to Denmark to record historical Swiss organs?
:P
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on November 23, 2009, 12:10:38 PM
Not towering, alright. I like that statement.
But a strange feller he is indeed: going to Denmark to record historical Swiss organs?
:P

According to the site of the Sinus label (http://www.sinus-verlag.ch/) he has done some travelling & recording around - all on historical organs.

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 23, 2009, 02:33:30 PM
Thanks for mentioning him anyway.
Recommended by Premont & Que: it could have been worse. :-*

I'll be watching for him, and hopefully listening to him one day. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 23, 2009, 02:44:44 PM
It reminds them of the death phase. ;D

Yet this blowing instrument is full of life! 8)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on November 23, 2009, 06:35:56 PM
Thanks for mentioning him anyway.
Recommended by Premont & Que: it could have been worse. :-*

I'll be watching for him, and hopefully listening to him one day. :)

Correction: I was informing after him myself! :) 

So I'm with you in the desire to hear something by him. If we are to believe the press quotes on the site, he is at least a very able organist. Mayb I'll try some of the bargain stuff on offer at jpc.

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 23, 2009, 11:18:58 PM
Correction: I was informing after him myself! :) 

So I'm with you in the desire to hear something by him. If we are to believe the press quotes on the site, he is at least a very able organist. Mayb I'll try some of the bargain stuff on offer at jpc.

I was blinded by your word 'tempting' and forgot about the verb 'to seem'. ;)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on November 24, 2009, 02:03:01 AM
My long reply can wait.  The computer crashed and I'll have to re-write and re-scan.
but here's a link to a site with a lot of information
http://www.gothic-catalog.com/
and this one will give you a radio program that can be accessed when you want it
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/

Favourite organs are the Silbermann at Marmoutier, the Riepp at Ottobeuren and the Gabler at Weingarten.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 24, 2009, 06:03:12 AM
My long reply can wait.  The computer crashed and I'll have to re-write and re-scan.
but here's a link to a site with a lot of information
http://www.gothic-catalog.com/
and this one will give you a radio program that can be accessed when you want it
http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/

Favourite organs are the Silbermann at Marmoutier, the Riepp at Ottobeuren and the Gabler at Weingarten.

Thanks for the links, and good luck with the PC!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on November 24, 2009, 12:17:23 PM
As interesting as the repertoire for organ is the sound of the organs themselves.   There are regional differences, the preferences of the builders, tunings, and the buildings they are in.
Worth getting a sampling:  Bach and Buxtehude on North  German organs, South German organs (Riepp and Gabler), Alsace - Silbermann family (Daquin Noëls are appropriate at this time of year),
the reeds of southern France ( e.g. St. Maximin-en-Provence), the horizontal trumpets of Spanish organs (Covarrubias is particularly impressive)...   then there's the inoffensive quality of most British organs, the flutes of limited range of early Italian, and then....

For repertoire that is sort of decadent look for Charles Ives' Variations on America and Lefebure-Wely Sorties which sound as if they were written for cinema Wurlitzers.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 24, 2009, 12:42:34 PM
As interesting as the repertoire for organ is the sound of the organs themselves.   There are regional differences, the preferences of the builders, tunings, and the buildings they are in.
Worth getting a sampling:  Bach and Buxtehude on North  German organs, South German organs (Riepp and Gabler), Alsace - Silbermann family (Daquin Noëls are appropriate at this time of year),
the reeds of southern France ( e.g. St. Maximin-en-Provence), the horizontal trumpets of Spanish organs (Covarrubias is particularly impressive)...   then there's the inoffensive quality of most British organs, the flutes of limited range of early Italian, and then....

For repertoire that is sort of decadent look for Charles Ives' Variations on America and Lefebure-Wely Sorties which sound as if they were written for cinema Wurlitzers.

Good heavens!
You want me bankrupt?
;D

I´ve only just begun, but I´m trying to get the differences. ???

For a start I compare Schnitger & (Gottfried) Silbermann organs as much as I can. Roughly said is this my experience: the Silbermanns sound more granular (=reedy?). Maybe even more balanced (less influence of the praestant/principal stops?).

But I feel quite OK whilst listening to Schnitgers, really. (I´m referring to discs of Bach, Buxtehude, sometimes Pachelbel .... those guys.)

Pleaze, shoot me if I talk nonsense.  0:)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on November 24, 2009, 12:59:04 PM
It's like railfanning.  There are steam/diesel, freight/passenger, rider/watcher, modeler (subcategories N-scale, O-scale, H-scale)/non-modeler/ephemera collectors etc.  I observed the manias early on and managed to stay interested without getting fixated.   With organ music, watch for sale prices on items that interest you and if you travel try to hear some live.  That will probably require attending church services....(for some a really repellent idea if of the wrong denomination). 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 24, 2009, 01:09:03 PM
Railfanning! Nice comparison!
For years I stayed rather neutral towards organ music, but this year I suddenly got the flu.
Which means I had an expensive spring & summer, and I listened  live to instruments of Schnitger, Hinsz, Huisz and Timpe. All of them North German influenced I guess.

I'd rather not talk about the money spent on discs. :-[

But apparantly I'm charmed by a large amount of organ sounds, although I prefer, say, the 17th/18th century instruments (and the music of that period), or the so-called modern neo-baroque ones. Of the latter, I 'discovered' recently that I very much seem to like the Bernard Aubertin ones, played by a.o. Olivier Vernet & Benjamin Alard. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 24, 2009, 01:22:06 PM
As interesting as the repertoire for organ is the sound of the organs themselves.   There are regional differences, the preferences of the builders, tunings, and the buildings they are in.

You probably already own this outstanding European organ journey, containing among others Helmut Winther´s Bruhns Toccata´s as well as some Spanish organ music played by Francis Chapelet. A must for organ fan´s.

Link:
http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Historische-Orgeln-in-Europa/hnum/3749757
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 24, 2009, 01:31:51 PM

...I 'discovered' recently that I very much seem to like the Bernard Aubertin ones, played by a.o.  Benjamin Alard.

The Triosonatas I suppose. How does he play them?

I know from elsewhere the sound of the organ he plays. A full and relative soft sound, very original, not like anything I have heard before.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on November 24, 2009, 01:44:41 PM
Got the hm set on CD and some on the original vinyl (kept for the notes and illustrations)
I pulled this (ebs 6012) off the shelf after the last post,  nice recording of the Weingarten organ with a very good annotation.  Bach Passacaglia 582, Aria ..italiana 989, Pastorale 590 and Toccata & F 540, plus a demo track of the "Kuckuck und Nachtigall."   There are recordings that do use the "La Force" stop, a 42-stop C-note.

A lot of organists new to me listed above, I'll look for them here.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 24, 2009, 01:50:59 PM
Got the hm set on CD and some on the original vinyl (kept for the notes and illustrations)
I pulled this (ebs 6012) off the shelf after the last post,  nice recording of the Weingarten organ with a very good annotation.

Yes, a good recording of this organ - one of the most difficult organs to record.
I also like Bleicher´s rather serious style.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 24, 2009, 02:05:03 PM
The Triosonatas I suppose. How does he play them?

Colourful. :)
(I also added a short message at the Bach organ thread.)

Quote from: premont
I know from elsewhere the sound of the organ he plays. A full and relative soft sound, very original, not like anything I have heard before.

Listening to the Adagio of BWV 525 right now, like a comforting prayer.
Lots of nice pics in the booklet btw, but no list of registration choices (there is a stop list, though). And the registration thing is something that I can't say that many about, and I want to learn more about.
I only had one short (Dutch) introduction/explanation at the Le Picard-choir organ of the Groningen Martinikerk. There are principals (praestants), flutes and reeds (tongue works, literally translated from Dutch to English), that's what I learned. Summarized: the strings, flutes and other wind instruments of the orchestra? O yes, if I remember it well, the Vox humana also belonged to the reed stops. Is this sort-of-correct? ???

What am I asking?
I should make a study of this site:
http://www.organstops.org/
:D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on November 24, 2009, 09:12:08 PM
The Chandos CD I showed in my first reply above with Piet Kee at Weingarten (CHAN 0520) includes the registrations for each piece.  Walther's Jesu, meine Freude variations concludes with the La Force stop.  Mikes are a bit closer, and there is some nice separation in echo sections but no loss of room resonance.  Kee happily includes 3 tracks to show off the "gadgets" - cymbala/Zimbelstern, 2 carillons and the  cuckoo and nightingale.  2 Chaconnes by Pachelbel, and Bach 534 P&F in f in the programme.
Neighbors above and to the side are out this evening so I can enjoy the 32ft pedal stops.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 25, 2009, 02:00:45 AM
The Chandos CD I showed in my first reply above with Piet Kee at Weingarten (CHAN 0520) includes the registrations for each piece. 
That's how it should be.
Although I understand that it's not done with bargain-priced compilation discs/samplers.

Quote from: listener
Neighbors above and to the side are out this evening so I can enjoy the 32ft pedal stops.
;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 06, 2009, 11:36:14 AM
Having lots of listening pleasure lately with the orgue Bernard Aubertin de Saint-Louis en l'Île, Paris.
Bach's Trio Sonatas by Benjamin Alard (check the Bach organ thread).
And now: organ works of Mozart, played by Olivier Vernet and some quatre mains with Cédric Meckler.

(http://www.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/1f0432b003.jpg) (http://www.freeimagehosting.net/)

Beautiful instrument!
(Though the Alard recording is much warmer recorded, with more space also.)

With Mozart and the organ it's something like what if he had grown older and got a job as organist, f.i. at the Wiener Stephansdom? Considering his works of 1791, including the unfinished Requiem, my guess would be that we wouldn't have to worry about the quality.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Antoine Marchand on December 07, 2009, 04:28:11 PM
Menno van Delft plays "Vater unser im Himmelreich" by Georg Böhm on the Arp Schnitger organ in the Jacobikerk at Uithuizen, The Netherlands.


http://www.youtube.com/v/Md2qlTxG2ng
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 08, 2009, 05:50:30 AM
Menno van Delft plays "Vater unser im Himmelreich" by Georg Böhm on the Arp Schnitger organ in the Jacobikerk at Uithuizen, The Netherlands.

Thanks for posting. :)
Beautiful piece, beautiful instrument!
Constructed by Schnitger, and built (1699-1701) by two of his employees: Rudolf Garrels and Johannes Radeker.
After the last restoration (Bernhard Edskes, 2001): Hoofdwerk, Rugwerk, Pedal, 28 stops, 21 of them are original Schnitgers.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on December 22, 2009, 09:11:34 PM
Nice story in the New York Times - replica of an unplayable historic organ at Vilnius built in Rochester NY

some excerpts
The organ, the Craighead-Saunders, is a unique instrument, not only because of its lovely sound, but also because it is a nearly exact copy of a late Baroque organ built by Adam Gottlob Casparini of East Prussia in 1776. The original stands in the Holy Ghost Church in Vilnius, Lithuania.
The project to build a replica of the Vilnius organ began in 2000 at the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, but Eastman had long wanted a new instrument for Christ Church. David Higgs, a concert organist and head of the Eastman organ department, had been seeking one for years.

In 1998, Mr. Higgs met Dr. Davidsson, the founder of the Goteborg Organ Art Center in Sweden. The center specializes in reconstructing historic organs and in making sure that restored instruments sounded the way the builders intended and that they properly played the music that was written for them.

Reconstruction is not easy. The technique for building large Baroque pipe organs had matured by the 17th century, but progress since then has put new tools in builders’ hands. Entirely new schools of organ-building, performance, composition and taste evolved. These days, organs are tuned differently. Many are bigger, more robust and designed to play different kinds of music. Older organs needed to keep up with the times, so they were modified, sometimes so radically that their original tone could no longer be discerned.

It took four years to make the parts in Goteborg. Meanwhile, in Rochester, specialty cabinet-makers were building a new organ balcony for Christ Church, using lumber salvaged from a 19th-century South Carolina factory. Digital scans enabled the team to reproduce the carvings of the Vilnius cabinet, including the statue of King David above the console. German specialists painted the exterior wood surfaces with 18th-century-style gesso.

The Goteborg Center formed a collaboration with the Lithuanian Ministry of Culture and Mr. Gucas to support Lithuania’s efforts to restore the Vilnius organ and make a replica as part of the project.

The team began by measuring everything in the Vilnius organ, including the cabinets and the smallest hand-wrought iron fixtures and nails. Team members made drawings of every fixture, every join, every pipe and every surface. The data were printed out and put together in enormous manuals the size of telephone books.

Then they were analyzed. The team removed the pipes to study the metal composition and to test the acoustics. The Vilnius organ was not playable, so the team could not hear what it sounded like. In fact, the meticulous preparations were necessary partly because the replica was to provide guidance in restoring the original.
The organ arrived in Rochester in 2007 and took a year to assemble. Behind the soaring facade, the interior is roomy and airy like a three-story, walk-in pine closet. Pipes of all sizes leap toward the rafters, but virtually all the moving parts — stop throttles, key action, air valves and trackers — are made of wood and driven mechanically by the power of human hands and feet.

The organ made its debut in October 2008, with four days of lectures, workshops and concerts.


http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/22/science/22organ.html?_r=1&ref=science&pagewanted=all
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on December 22, 2009, 09:25:13 PM
Nice story in the New York Times

Thanks for the excellent article, which was a pleasure to read ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 24, 2009, 02:56:37 AM
Thanks for the excellent article, which was a pleasure to read ...
Yep. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on February 06, 2010, 01:40:12 AM
Well, this thread deserves a good awakening! :)

I've immersed myself in this disc with music by Michael Praetorius (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Praetorius) (not to be mistaken with Jacob Praetorius), an early German Baroque composer and music theorist, contemporary and colleague of Heinrich Schütz.

(http://www.outhere-music.com/data/cds/265/BIG.JPG) (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/22/Tangerm%C3%BCnde%2C_Stephanskirche%2C_Orgel_%282007-10-19%29.JPG/450px-Tangerm%C3%BCnde%2C_Stephanskirche%2C_Orgel_%282007-10-19%29.JPG)

This disc comprises ten organ compositions from his music collections Musae Sioniae (fantasias on Lutheran chorales) and Hymnodiae Sioniae (Latin Hymns). I think it's brilliant stuff, brilliantly played. The fact that the music consists of heavy polyphonic fantasias on chorales and hymns, drawn to heavenly length does provide an hurdle for the listener to get into the music. But that being said, both composer and performer provide ample variation and colour to keep our attention. If anyone can guide us into this music, it's Jean-Charles Ablitzer (http://pagesperso-orange.fr/ablitzer/) who combines intellectual rigour and grasp of musical structure with an airy touch and wonderful articulation. He is supported by the wonderful organ of the Sankt-Stephanskirche in Tangermünde, built in 1623-24 by Hans Scherer the Younger and Fritz Scherer, which has a beautiful colourful tone, clarity and refinement. One can't get enough organ recordings of this instrument IMO! :)

Interestingly, this recording was made under supervision of Ablitzer himself, Alpha has just issued it! But you won't notice - it's technically excellent. More info about this recording HERE (http://www.outhere-music.com/store-Alpha_114).

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 06, 2010, 05:14:16 PM
I've immersed myself in this disc with music by Michael Praetorius (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Praetorius) (not to be mistaken with Jacob Praetorius), an early German Baroque composer and music theorist, contemporary and colleague of Heinrich Schütz.

Maybe I should draw your attention to a CD with organ works of Jacob Prætorius played by Leon Berben (also on the Scherer organ in Tangermünde) (Ramée).  I do not know if I can recommend it, because the works are even more difficult to access than the organworks of Michael Prætorius. But the splendid organ is well caught and the playing is as far as I can hear - for obvious reasons I have not heard much other organ music by this composer, as this CD as far as I know is the only existing exclusively Jacob Prætorius CD -  stylish.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on February 07, 2010, 02:34:37 AM
Maybe I should draw your attention to a CD with organ works of Jacob Prætorius played by Leon Berben (also on the Scherer organ in Tangermünde) (Ramée).  I do not know if I can recommend it, because the works are even more difficult to access than the organworks of Michael Prætorius. But the splendid organ is well caught and the playing is as far as I can hear - for obvious reasons I have not heard much other organ music by this composer, as this CD as far as I know is the only existing exclusively Jacob Prætorius CD -  stylish.

Thanks, I have noticed that intersting disc as well! :) Looks like absolutely mouth watering stuff! ;D (I'm dooooomed.. :-\ 8))
(http://www.ramee.org/images/ram0402cover.jpg)

Info & samples HERE (http://www.ramee.org/0402gb.html).

Also, Ablitzer did a another Michael Praetorius disc - this time with organ adaptations of motets and secular dances - "Auch auff Orgeln" on Musique et Mémoirs (http://www.musetmemoire-prod.com/productions_e.php). That disc features a rare cabinet organ.

(http://www.orgelkunst.be/wcms/uploads/img4b4455f24e3ff.jpg) (http://www.musetmemoire-prod.com/images/image_presprod2.jpg)

Review in French HERE (http://classiquenews.fr/ecouter/lire_chronique_cd.aspx?id=928). (In a Googled "translation" HERE (http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?hl=nl&ie=UTF-8&sl=fr&tl=en&u=http://classiquenews.fr/ecouter/lire_chronique_cd.aspx%3Fid%3D928&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.nl&usg=ALkJrhi8iZWfHQul2QfVUptfkgtU2jZzng)).
A review by Johan van Veen HERE (http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Musique_Memoire_MMP080901.html).

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 07, 2010, 04:12:36 AM
Also, Ablitzer did a another Michael Praetorius disc - this time with organ adaptations of motets and secular dances - "Auch auff Orgeln" ... That disc features a rare cabinet organ.

Fortunately the Compenius organ in Frederiksborg Slotskirke is well documented on disc already, but Ablitzers Prætorius programming is of course interesting. Do you think it is possible to get hold of the his CD without having to execute extraordinary procedures as to payment?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on February 07, 2010, 06:21:22 AM
Fortunately the Compenius organ in Frederiksborg Slotskirke is well documented on disc already, but Ablitzers Prætorius programming is of course interesting. Do you think it is possible to get hold of the his CD without having to execute extraordinary procedures as to payment?

Don't know. But I've spotted that disc also at regular French sources like fnac (http://musique.fnac.com/a2789318/Michael-Praetorius-Auch-auff-Orgeln-Transcriptions-de-Motets-et-Danses-CD-album?Mn=-1&Mu=-13&Ra=-29&To=0&from=1&Nu=1&Fr=0), alapage (http://www.alapage.com/m/ps/mpid:MP-91370M3448919#moid:MO-91370M5269611) or CDmail (http://www.cdmail.fr/affich_fich.asp?refcdm=CDM911779).
La Chaumière (http://www.chaumiereonline.com/Musique-Classique/Auch-auff-Orgeln-un-art-de-la-transcription-entre-Renaissance-et-Baroque-549819.aspx) is also a very reliable source for French rarities! :)

Do you have any hot tips on recordings of that particular organ? :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 05, 2010, 07:07:57 AM
Maybe this link has been posted before, but anyway: organ lovers might enjoy it!

http://mypipeorganhobby.blogspot.com/

Beginning with vids (+ sound) of Gwendolyn Tóth, playing at the 1531 built organ in Krewerd, Groningen, NL.

In the region, the instrument is known as de skreeuwerd van Krewerd (= the screamer of Krewerd). ;D

Why?, you ask.
I really haven't any clue. :-\

Check it out yourself!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Est.1965 on March 05, 2010, 10:33:55 AM
Has anyone here visited the 'Bruckner Organ' at St. Florestan, if so, do you have nice photo of it you can publish here?  Also, the Linz organ?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 05, 2010, 11:23:09 AM
Maybe this link has been posted before, but anyway: organ lovers might enjoy it!

http://mypipeorganhobby.blogspot.com/

Thanks for this great link, Marc.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Est.1965 on March 05, 2010, 12:09:50 PM
Magnificent.  Thank you for that, it's just the vision I needed.

PREMONT thank you for the link, it has everything I coiuld have asked for in this exploration.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on March 05, 2010, 09:30:16 PM
SALE ON THIS WEEK AT GOTHIC

for the benefit of the penurious but obsessive-compulsive...
The March Madness sale is here:
This week, for one week only, all single organ solo recordings are $18.98 $9.98
Double organ CDs are $29:98 $14.98
Triple organ CDs are $39.98 $19.98
Includes new releases!
Offer limited to stock on hand on the labels:
Loft Recordings, Gothic Records, reZound
Offer expires midnight Friday March 12, 2010

http://www.gothic-catalog.com/Default.asp

and oh, do I feel tempted....
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 06, 2010, 12:30:21 AM
PREMONT thank you for the link, it has everything I coiuld have asked for in this exploration.

Well, I think I shall forward your thanks to Marc.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 06, 2010, 07:23:59 AM
SALE ON THIS WEEK AT GOTHIC [....]

Offer expires midnight Friday March 12, 2010

http://www.gothic-catalog.com/Default.asp

and oh, do I feel tempted....
Yes, Gothic has got some yummie issues in their catalog!
For Europeans a.o. though, there's that lazy import tax thing .... but thanx for drawing our attention to this!

Well, I think I shall forward your thanks to Marc.
Thanx and you're all very welcome.
Maybe we should all thank the blog owner for that nice informative site! :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on April 02, 2010, 11:31:29 PM
.



As Premont commented before, this is an excellent disc. Coming from Froberger's works for harpsichord (see the German Baroque thread) that are very much oriented on the French tradition, this is somewhat of a surprise since this seems to me quite focused on Italian organ music by Frescobaldi et al. Pretty elusive and somewhat austere stuff too, basically a large collection of exercises in counterpoint. Playing by Van Asperen is pretty straight, unfussy. It is on the conservative side but not as much as his teacher Leonhardt. What makes it a success is the flexibility and subtle phrasing, bold at some times, almost transcendental at others. And the warm, intimate, characterful and transparent sound of the  organ of the Basilica S.Martini in Bologna, built in 1556 by Giovanni Cipri. Recording by the German label Aeolus (http://www.aeolus-music.com/ae_en/), that specialises in organ music, is exemplary. A rewarding disc for advanced organ listeners.

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 11, 2010, 11:47:31 AM
Lovely little clip about the restoration of the Lohman organ (1817), Village Church, Zuidwolde, NL.
A few days before the restoration started, I played a few Mozart bars on this one .... in an awful manner, of course. :-[

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I05jbWIrCCU
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 11, 2010, 03:33:13 PM
Also, Ablitzer did a another Michael Praetorius disc - this time with organ adaptations of motets and secular dances - "Auch auff Orgeln" on Musique et Mémoirs (http://www.musetmemoire-prod.com/productions_e.php). That disc features a rare cabinet organ.

(http://www.orgelkunst.be/wcms/uploads/img4b4455f24e3ff.jpg) (http://www.musetmemoire-prod.com/images/image_presprod2.jpg)


I have now purchased this CD and agree that it is most interesting. Maybe the  music might be better chosen and I do not care for the inclusion of a cornet even if Dongois is a great musician. But the CD gives a very fair picture of this unique organ.

Other recordings with the Compenius organ are:

About one third of Koopman´s  four CDs Sweelinck integral for Philips
http://www.amazon.de/Cembalowerke-Ton-Koopman/dp/B00005ND44/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1273687323&sr=1-4

One half of a CD by Albert Bolliger (Sinus)
http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Albert-Bolliger-Orgel/hnum/4118529

One CD by Per Kynne Frandsen on DaCapo
http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/D%E4nische-Orgelmusik/hnum/7742201

One CD by Lena Jacobsson on BIS
http://www.amazon.de/Court-Dance-Music-Renaissance-Baroque/dp/B0000263OT/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1273687415&sr=1-2

I think most of these are available at the moment, see links.

Francis Chapelet and Helmut Tramnitz have also made recordings with this organ on Harmonia Mundi France and Archiv, but these are as far as I know OOP.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 11, 2010, 03:35:02 PM
Lovely little clip about the restoration of the Lohman organ (1817), Village Church, Zuidwolde, NL.
A few days before the restoration started, I played a few Mozart bars on this one .... in an awful manner, of course. :-[

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I05jbWIrCCU

Thanks for this entertaining and indeed lovely clip, Marc.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on June 15, 2010, 09:28:35 AM
ALICE TULLEY HALL NYC 

Pipe Organ Returns to Alice Tully Hall
By JAMES R. OESTREICH
Hiroko Masuike for The New York Times Workers carry one of the organ pipes into Alice Tully Hall.

Skepticism stirred when Lincoln Center spirited the pipe organ out of Alice Tully Hall before the building’s renovation in 2006, promising its eventual return. The skepticism only grew when the renovated hall reopened in early 2009 with no sign of the organ.

But Lincoln Center promised all along, and now it has delivered. The 19-ton instrument, 4,192 pipes strong, returned to Tully Hall on Monday morning aboard two semitrailers. Employees of the manufacturer, Orgelbau Th. Kuhn of Männedorf, Switzerland, and Lincoln Center stagehands began unloading the trucks at 8 a.m.

The process started at the hall’s loading dock on 66th Street, with smaller pieces at first. Occasionally a recognizable feature — the organist’s bench, for example — would float by. Other objects required a bit of explanation: wind chests, wooden frames about the size of small pool tables, each with hundreds of holes on the upper face to hold miniature pipes. (One of these elicited a choice bit of stagehand lingo, as the workers were told to “Iwo Jima it onto the dolly,” the makeshift verb evidently denoting a number of brawny backs leaning into a task.) But most of the early cargo remained anonymous, in wooden crates or cardboard boxes.

A little later, the second truck started yielding up organ pipes on 65th Street, where the stage entrance provided a more direct route and easier turns into the hall. The pipes were laid on the floor of the orchestra level, between rows of seats. A Kuhn technician had to caution a stagehand to carry pipes cradled in his arms, not resting on a shoulder, which could leave a dent in the soft metal, an alloy of tin and lead.

Then it was back to 66th Street for the unloading of squarish wooden pipes (the contrebombarde) and the heaviest item yet: the console, looking naked, stripped of its wooden cabinet. The renovation of Lincoln Center, which has continued in the organ’s absence, has evidently made a few things easier. When the console was removed, the door of the freight elevator had to be left open, a stagehand recalled, and the instrument rubbed up against the walls. But the renovation has brought a new, larger elevator to the Tully loading area.

The organ, a personal gift to the hall from Alice Tully, was built by Kuhn in 1974 and inaugurated in 1975 by the organist E. Power Biggs. In recent years it has resided in storage facilities at the Adirondack Scenic company in Argyle, N.Y., some 20 miles northeast of Saratoga Springs. It was cleaned and rebuilt there by Kuhn in May.

The various parts are being scattered about the Tully stage, each as close to its ultimate destination as possible. “The bench can go right in place,” a technician said. The rear wall of the stage, which has large sliding doors, “remains exactly the same,” John Tiebout, Lincoln Center’s director of concert halls and operations, said on Monday, though “a small amount of cutting and chopping” will take place behind the scenes.

The reinstallation of the organ will take weeks. The next event scheduled in Tully Hall is the first of three shows featuring the Blind Boys of Alabama on July 12, part of the Lincoln Center Festival. The first performance on the restored organ is a reading of Bach’s “Clavier-Übung,” Part 3, by Paul Jacobs on Nov. 16, part of Lincoln Center’s new fall festival, White Light.
source:
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/14/pipe-organ-returns-to-alice-tully-hall/
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: snyprrr on June 15, 2010, 10:46:23 AM
Contemporary Organ of Notre Dame (Solstice):

Xenakis
Chaynes
Chapelet

Wow! Can I get a witness?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on June 17, 2010, 09:17:07 AM
LONDON,   Royal Festival Hall

The Royal Festival Hall has received £950,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund to restore and reinstall a grade I listed organ in its main auditorium.

The instrument, which has 7,710 pipes, was installed in the auditorium in 1954 but was removed for renovation work.

The restoration on the organ will be undertaken by Harrison and Harrison Ltd, its original creators.

The work, which is the final phase of revamp of the building on London's South Bank, will finish by 2013.
Organ's anniversary

The organ was known for its open-plan design and eclectic tone. Most of the components of the organ are being stored in Durham.

It will be reinstalled in its original location at the heart of Sir Leslie Martin's concert auditorium in time for the instrument's 60th anniversary celebration in 2014.

Alan Bishop, chief executive of Southbank Centre in London, said: "I would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their significant contribution to the full restoration of the great organ of the Royal Festival Hall for the next generation."

He said a fundraising campaign would be launched in September to appeal for public support.

Sue Bowers, head of the Heritage Lottery Fund for London, said she was delighted that the restoration will put the "amazing internationally important organ back in its rightful place".

from  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/england/london/10342262.stm
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: ccar on June 17, 2010, 10:51:19 AM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Hy9pFg9lZgE/Rd-6CZW7BLI/AAAAAAAAACA/Zy-a6jzVAhs/s320/mafra_convento_1-br.jpg)(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_eIrNyPm081A/Sxsa12oN0bI/AAAAAAAAAJI/O9bftzK0TaI/s400/Bas%C3%ADlica+de+Mafra.jpg)(http://www.tintafresca.net/_uploads/edi%C3%A7%C3%A3o%2086/Mafra_Orgaos2.JPG)

The Convent of Mafra is a large baroque monastery, built by King John V of Portugal in 1730. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mafra_National_Palace.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mafra_National_Palace.)
 
The church includes a set of 6 historic baroque organs and 2 carillons, unique in the world. The 6 organs were recently restored and a concert with the complete set was held a few months ago.  This excerpt is only a small aperitif  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eet-yGNW-EA&feature=related  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eet-yGNW-EA&feature=related)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on June 19, 2010, 08:07:18 PM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Hy9pFg9lZgE/Rd-6CZW7BLI/AAAAAAAAACA/Zy-a6jzVAhs/s320/mafra_convento_1-br.jpg)(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_eIrNyPm081A/Sxsa12oN0bI/AAAAAAAAAJI/O9bftzK0TaI/s400/Bas%C3%ADlica+de+Mafra.jpg)(http://www.tintafresca.net/_uploads/edi%C3%A7%C3%A3o%2086/Mafra_Orgaos2.JPG)

The Convent of Mafra is a large baroque monastery, built by King John V of Portugal in 1730. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mafra_National_Palace.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mafra_National_Palace.)
 
The church includes a set of 6 historic baroque organs and 2 carillons, unique in the world. The 6 organs were recently restored and a concert with the complete set was held a few months ago.  This excerpt is only a small aperitif  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eet-yGNW-EA&feature=related  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eet-yGNW-EA&feature=related)

Nice.     ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Sid on July 12, 2010, 10:08:37 PM
I'm just beginning to get into organ music again, after a long hiatus. I used to go to organ recitals in the '90's here in Sydney. I want to do that again, but every time there's an organ recital on, it clashes  with another concert I want to go to!

Anyhow, in the mean time, I have purchased some cd's of organ music. I especially like the French composers for this instrument. I have got Couperin's two organ masses, a cd of selections from Widor's organ symphonies on Naxos, some of Franck's organ music, some Durufle works, as well as a mixed collection of pieces by guys like Langlais, Boellmann (the amazing Suite gothique), Guillmant, and others. I've also got a cd with some of D. Scarlatti's organ sonatas.

Composers I want to get on cd (& of course, hear live) are guys like Messiaen, Sweenlick, Elgar (the organ arangment of his Enigma) and Alain (heard his Litanies live and it was amazing). I like organ concertos less, though I do have a cd of Respighi's, Lovelock's and Poulenc's efforts in that genre. I really can't stand Saint-Saens' Organ Symphony.

I really like the unique colours of the organ, it is the king of instruments, no less. The breadth and depth of it's sounds can only be compared to a large orchestra, if anything. I also like the harmonies, which can be very rich & subtle. There is much out there for me to discover yet.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 13, 2010, 09:52:33 AM
Another re-discovery of the organ!

Even though I have different favourite flavours, I'm convinced you're gonna have a good time with this renewed journey. Enjoy yourself!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: vandermolen on July 17, 2010, 12:32:22 AM
Fine new CD of Organ/Choral music:
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on July 28, 2010, 01:13:30 AM
I tought I'd post my first impressions on this right away.

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4101380101793.jpg)

Harry wasn't pleased with it at all. I am a bit more positive. But what doesn't help is the recording (from 1979): it creates a very diffuse and overtly bright sound picture which might be responsible for the fact that Felix Friedich's playing comes of as a bit too superficial and glitzy. After my ears adjusted, I found that Johann Ludwig Krebs (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Krebs-Johann-Ludwig.htm) was composer that wrote some pretty damn good German "Baroque" organ music: clearly infuenced by Bach but already more forward looking - Krebs was kind of a transitional figure in the Gurn's Classical Corner way! :D More "feminine" music due to the projected "emfindlichkeit" that is quintessential for this musical movement and slightly less intellectually rigorous than Bach.

Felix Friedrich (http://felixfriedrich.kilu.de/) turns out to be an authority on Johann Ludwig krebs, he who wrote several academic publications on the composer. I found out he did a complete Krebs cycle on Querstand (http://www.querstand.de/lang-en/index.html). He fits into the "Music Academics behind the Organ School" with Harald Vogel (Buxyehude) and Gerhard Weinberger (Bach). So competent and very historically correct playing, though he sounds to my ears less "academic" than Vogel or Weinberger.

I would like to explore Krebs' organ music - any suggestions? Anyone heard Friedrich cycle on Querstand, which is probably better recorded?

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 28, 2010, 02:21:51 AM
[....]
I would like to explore Krebs' organ music - any suggestions? Anyone heard Friedrich cycle on Querstand, which is probably better recorded?
I have some Krebs at home and I certainly love to listen to his organ stuff. The discs are from Naxos (forgot organist) and Friedrich (forgot label).

I'm at work right now, and tonight I'll be listening to Lorenzo Ghielmi live in the Martinikerk (unlucky me :D).
No Krebs at his programme, but Bruhns, Buxtehude, Sammartini and .... Bach.

But I'll come back on this .... if Premont doesn't beat me. ;)

I guess our Danish connaisseur will say something like I like Krebs very much, but he always makes me longing for the Grandmaster (a certain JS Bach) even more.

Let's wait and see ....
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Harry on July 28, 2010, 02:25:01 AM
I have some Krebs at home and I certainly love to listen to his organ stuff. The discs are from Naxos (forgot organist) and Friedrich (forgot label).

I'm at work right now, and tonight I'll be listening to Lorenzo Ghielmi live in the Martinikerk (unlucky me :D).
No Krebs at his programme, but Bruhns, Buxtehude, Sammartini and .... Bach.

But I'll come back on this .... if Premont doesn't beat me. ;)

I guess our Danish connaisseur will say something like I like Krebs very much, but he always makes me longing for the Grandmaster (a certain JS Bach) even more.

Let's wait and see ....

I will try to be there too, I was just listening to Lorenzo Ghielmi, playing organ on a Frescobaldi disc! ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 28, 2010, 08:11:51 AM
I guess our Danish connaisseur will say something like I like Krebs very much, but he always makes me longing for the Grandmaster (a certain JS Bach) even more.

Almost spot on, Marc. To be honest I have never been seriously attracted by Krebs´organ works. Too much copying of Bach´s works, going so far as to paraphrase specific Bach works, and much of it sounding like a collection of Bachian turns in casual order, without the tension and inner logic, which marks Bach´s organ works (do not confuse this with intellectual rigorism!). And many of Krebs´fugue subjects are lame and do not really evolve in the course of the fugue. Accordingly he is sparingly represented in my collection, and I have never considered a purchase of an integral. I own all in all six Krebs CD´s including a few overlappings together representing about one third of his works.  These are two CD´s with Riccardo Doni, the one discussed above with Felix Friedrich, and one each with Gerhard Weinberger (Christophorus), Graham Barber (ASV) and Gerhard Gnann (Naxos). All are competent musicians and do their best to make the music interesting without overdoing it, but - as you write - I can not listen to Krebs without longing for the real thing all the time. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on July 28, 2010, 09:05:00 AM
Interesting, Premont! :)
I guess you are less impressed by Krebs' transitional quality in style. But I do understand what you are saying and do not necessarily disagree. Still, but my impression was that I would enjoy a nice chunk of his music, provided tht it is played by the right organist (expressive, articulated) and on the right organ.

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 28, 2010, 11:07:35 AM
I made a mistake: I don't have a Krebs disc with Friedrich, but with Beatrice-Maria Weinberger (Gerhard Weinberger's spouse). It's a copy of Volume 1 of their Krebs-integral for the Motette label.

Here's a Dutch link:

http://www.landgoedgerianna.nl/nieuws/cd-besprekingen/nr.-12-09-motette-krebs-serie-complete-organ-works-gerhard-beatrice-weinberger.html

BTW1: the Ghielmi concert was very fine, with exquisite registrations, especially the final Toccata, Adagio & Fugue in C-Major BWV 564.
I was only slightly disappointed with BWV 622 (O, Mensch, bewein dein' Sünde groß), played a bit too aloof. IMO, Ghielmi didn't get the severe protestant atmosphere of that piece.

BTW2: Harry, were you there?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 04, 2010, 12:43:36 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/QHWT6kP5AvI

The instrument at the end of the clip is the historic organ of the Martinikerk, Groningen, NL, restored during 1976-1984 by Jürgen Ahrend, after thorough research by Cor Edskes.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Bulldog on August 04, 2010, 01:07:54 PM
I would like to explore Krebs' organ music - any suggestions? Anyone heard Friedrich cycle on Querstand, which is probably better recorded?

Q

A Krebs organ disc I can recommend without any reservations is William Porter playing the Krebs Clavier-Ubung and two chorales on a Loft disc #1026.  Porter is one of my favorite organists and does himself proud on this recording (significantly better than Gnann on Naxos).  His choice of instrument is the Pehr Schiorlin organ (1806) located in Gammalkil, Sweden.  The recording was made in 2001 and times in at 76:54.

Of course, there is a limit to how much one can enjoy the music of Krebs, but Porter takes me to its upper reaches.
I do suggest listening to just a few pieces at one sitting. 

For those of you who might consider going to the Naxos Music Library to listen to 15 minutes of the Loft disc, it unfortunately is not listed as of today.  However, I'm confident it will be added soon.  FWIW, I love the aesthetic appeal of the cover.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on August 08, 2010, 06:24:05 AM

I would like to explore Krebs' organ music - any suggestions? Anyone heard Friedrich cycle on Querstand, which is probably better recorded?

Q

Q,

I have all 6 volumes of Krebs Complete Organ Works by John Kitchen on the Priory Label.  You may want to check them out ... (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dpopular&field-keywords=priory+kitchen+krebs&x=0&y=0&ih=5_1_0_0_1_0_0_0_0_1.112_166&fsc=-1)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: pjme on October 27, 2010, 01:04:21 PM
A Belgian organ inCairo – 1914.

Egypt boasts 15 church organs. One of them was built in 1914 ( by Georges Cloetens, in Brussels) for the Heliopolis cathedral, near Cairo.

 
Modern Heliopolis (Arabic: مصر الجديدة‎, transliterated: Maṣsr el-Gedīdah – literally "New Egypt", is a district of Cairo. The town was established by the Heliopolis Oasis Company, headed by the Belgian industrialist Édouard Louis Joseph, Baron Empain, as well as Boghos Nubar, son of the Egyptian Prime Minister, Nubar Pasha, beginning in 1905. The Baron, a well known amateur egyptologist and prominent European entrepreneur, arrived in Egypt in January 1904, intending to rescue one of his Belgian company's projects in Egypt; the construction of a railway line linking Matariya to Port Said. Despite losing the railway contract to the British, Empain stayed on in Egypt; a decision due to his relationship with Yvette Boghdadli and/or love of the desert.
The Basilique Catholic church situated on Al-Ahram street is a famous landmark in Heliopolis, and it is the burial place of Baron Empain. The many places of worship in the district, including Saint Maron and Saint-Rita church on Beirut street, a Jewish synagogue on Al Missalah street, and the mosques all over the neighborhood, demonstrate that the city has been living in religious tolerance since it was established.

Over the years the organ in the Basilique became silent : desert sand filled the pipes and Heliopolis itself became part of greater Cairo.

Belgian organbuilder Gerard Pels and the Ktesibios http://www.ktesibios.eu/kte%20projecten.html organisation found money to restore this instrument. After more than a year of hard work , the instrument will be playable again.
Ktesibios tries to restaure organs in Arabia and third world countries.
Festive concert on november 12th!




Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 04, 2010, 04:30:55 AM
Repost from the Christmas music thread:


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61LmLq11R-L.jpg) (http://www.orgue-saorge.fr/upload/4.png)

Recently got this cute little Christmas CD with organ music.

René Saorgin plays the organ of the Sainte Chapelle du Château Ducal de Chambéry for the first four tracks, and the remainder of the disc - works by Claude Beningne Balbastre ( 1727- 1799) - on the Serassi organ (1807) of the Cathédrale de Tendre (pictured)

The pieces by Balbastre, 12 parts from Recueil de noëls formant quatre suittes, avec des variations pour le clavecin et le piano-forte, cleverly written for organ, as well as harpsichord and piano, take pride of place. Together with another "noël" - a short organ piece on a traditional Christmas theme - by Louis Claude Daquin (1694-1772). Virtuosic and stylish variations on familiar and unfamiliar (at least to me) Christmas themes, which seem just Saorgin's cup of tea. That combined with the historical organs make, as I said, a cute disc - very enjoyable. :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: snyprrr on December 04, 2010, 07:28:26 AM
Any favs here?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 26, 2011, 11:57:52 PM
Came accross this, any comments on the composer and the music? :)

Samples sounded pretty impressive.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pqKiXC8VL._SS400_.jpg)


http://www.youtube.com/v/y9TJohwbSIc&hl

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 27, 2011, 12:09:44 AM
He's been mentioned in the JS Bach organ thread:

Walter Kraft recorded in the late 1950es the organ works of Vincent Lübeck for Vox. Unfortunately it was released (recorded?) only in mono and never - to my knowledge - made its way to CD. An interpretation in the same vein as his Buxtehude set.

... oh, that Lübeck: a man not a city or an organ in that city. I didn't even know his existence until now. Another name to explore. :)

Yep!
Vincent Lübeck (ca. 1654-1740).
Unfortunately, only a small amount of Lübeck's works has survived. His best known composition is a large organ Fantasia on Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ.
He was a.o. organist at the Nikolaikirche in Hamburg, where they had a large Schnitger organ. Here's a quote from Johann Mattheson: This extraordinary organ … also has an extraordinary organist. But how to praise someone who is already greatly renowned? I only need to give his name, Vincent Lübeck, to complete the whole eulogy.
One of his sons, Vincent jr., also became a well-known musician and composer.
(And the third more or less well-known Vincent Lübeck was this son's grandfather. Are you still with me? ;))
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 27, 2011, 12:36:13 AM
Came accross this, any comments on the composer and the music? :)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pqKiXC8VL._SS400_.jpg)

Lübeck is one of the most interesting North German baroque organ composers between 1650 - 1700 , along with Buxtehude and Bruhns. His music is however not quite as innovative or inventive as the best music of these two. His complete surviving organ music fills only one CD and consists in one great chorale phantasy (Ich ruf zu dir) and a number of "preludes and fugues" formally in the Buxtehude pattern (freestyle sections alternating with fugal sections). Because of the archaic and sometimes formulaic texture of Lübeck´s works it is obviously difficult for performers to strike a fruitful balance between formal grandeur and improvisatory feeling. The available recordings are not that different. I could live with Berben, but marginally I prefer Bernard Coudurier on BNL.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 27, 2011, 12:44:09 AM
There's also some Lübeck organ stuff on this very nice (but difficult to get) 2-cd:

(http://i52.tinypic.com/2r7lg6f.jpg)

Information on these recordings (in German):

http://www.landschaftsverband-stade.de/arp-schnitger-orgel-cd1.html

Unfortunately, most of these issues are (very) limited editions.
Probably there are still some German, Dutch, eBay or MarketPlace related sites that have this one in catalogue (?).

For Dutchmen (and women!) there's always this site:
http://www.groningenorgelland.nl/cd.htm

But who knows: if an interested foreigner writes them a friendly e-mail (info@groningenorgelland.nl), there might be something possible to arrange. But I can't promise anything.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 27, 2011, 01:03:36 AM
Thank you both for the comments! :) :)

Premont, I was about to ask after the organ Coudurier uses (another name I need to explore), but this was self-explanatory:

(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/08/ciu/fc/70/721bf96642a0a048b9cf9110.L.jpg)

But while we're on the topic: what would you guys get for Bruhns?  :) (Though I do vaguely remember we've touched that topic before)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 27, 2011, 01:16:49 AM
[....]
But while we're on the topic: what would you guys get for Bruhns?  :) (Though I do vaguely remember we've touched that topic before)

This is a nice one IMO:

(http://i53.tinypic.com/rm5pjo.jpg)

http://www.amazon.de/Complete-Organ-Works-Bruhns/dp/B000BK539M/

And on this interesting set, Helmut Winter plays (almost) all Bruhns organ works:

(http://i56.tinypic.com/19ms0y.jpg)

http://www.amazon.de/Orgues-Historiques-Chapelet/dp/B000HXDS0Y/
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 27, 2011, 02:40:46 AM

But while we're on the topic: what would you guys get for Bruhns?  :) (Though I do vaguely remember we've touched that topic before)

About a year ago you asked a similar question, and I did some comparative listening to the Bruhns sets I own (and acquired some more sets), and ended up preferring Helmut Winter´s recording on HM. He plays the old Altenbruch organ and plays in an unfussy, fresh style. No. two was Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen playing on small neo-baroque organs in Northern Germany. If you want, I can redo the test, but it will take some time (about 12 different versions).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 27, 2011, 02:46:44 AM
There's also some Lübeck organ stuff on this very nice (but difficult to get) 2-cd:

(http://i52.tinypic.com/2r7lg6f.jpg)


Almost all the organs are well represented in my library, and the organists are as well as unknown to me - this may of course be my fault. And the problems of getting hold of the CD set seems to be very great, so I shall let this one pass.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 27, 2011, 03:59:39 AM
Marc, Premont, thank you both again! :)


If you want, I can redo the test, but it will take some time (about 12 different versions).

No need to bother again, this is plenty to go on! Thanks.  :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on March 27, 2011, 03:58:51 PM
Interesting, Premont! :)
I guess you are less impressed by Krebs' transitional quality in style. But I do understand what you are saying and do not necessarily disagree. Still, but my impression was that I would enjoy a nice chunk of his music, provided tht it is played by the right organist (expressive, articulated) and on the right organ.

Q

I have 6 volumes of Krebs' Complete Organ Works by John Kitchen on the Priory label ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on April 01, 2011, 12:40:15 AM
Wanamaker Organ to double in size !

http://www.gothic-catalog.com/v/vspfiles/photos/G-49240-2.jpg
Wanamaker organist Peter Richard Conte today confirmed plans to double the size of the Wanamaker Grand Court Organ, now located in Macy’s flagship department store in Philadelphia.  Already the world’s largest musical instrument, the new additions will substantially increase the tonal resources available to the talented Wanamaker organist.

John Bishop confirmed that Macy’s had purchased The Organ Clearinghouse’s entire collection of used organs and pipework to enable the expansion. In the future, the organist can not only select not a wide range of stops, but also a wide range of organ builders.  “You could play an entire piece on just Austin, Moller or Skinner pipes,” quipped Conte.

Macy’s reportedly made the acquisition on reports that Nordstrom’s was getting a pipe organ for its Seattle store.


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 01, 2011, 03:48:52 AM
Wanamaker Organ to double in size !

http://www.gothic-catalog.com/v/vspfiles/photos/G-49240-2.jpg

[....]

Seeing a pic like that makes me wanna listen to Viva Las Vegas! by 'The Pelvis' .... (or by the Dead Kennedys ....)  ;)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on April 01, 2011, 04:13:27 AM
I love Messis by that great Danish original, Rued Langgaard. It's full of fantasy, atmosphere and majesty.


(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Apr01/LanggaardMessis.jpg)


Read more about it here:


http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Apr01/messis.htm
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 01, 2011, 11:27:40 AM
I love Messis by that great Danish original, Rued Langgaard. It's full of fantasy, atmosphere and majesty.
[....]

OK. Ordered it at ze library.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on April 01, 2011, 11:48:19 AM
OK. Ordered it at ze library.


You won't regret it. It comes coupled with a closely-related piece, like a sort of curtain-raiser, In ténebras exteriores. (I seem to remember you're Dutch, too. Which library? In Rotterdam?)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on April 01, 2011, 10:32:18 PM
more news from Gothic today  01-04-11
Washington National Cathedral announces new plans for the Great Organ

The Washington National Cathedral announced yesterday that it has cancelled its plans to replace the aging Aeolian-Skinner organ with a large new instrument by Casavant.  “We have decided, instead, to purchase an electronic organ from Japan,” said Michael McCarthy, Director of Music for the Gothic-style cathedral.  “The people of Japan are suffering from a great earthquake and tsunami, and we felt that it would be best for us to provide them with the work of creating a truly global instrument for our great Cathedral.”

Plans for the new organ include an impressively-sized console, which most people believe is the actual instrument, according to Cathedral organist, Scott Dettra. “There are some who still look for pipes, and for them, we will leave a pipe fence in front of the speakers to satisfy traditional needs.”  The new organ will have six manuals and 543 stops. A unique feature allows it to be played from anywhere in the room with an Apple iPad.  Cathedral staff also were quick to point out that the new instrument will not use any Japanese auto parts.

See Scott Dettra’s new recording of the
Washington National Cathedral Great Organ here

___________________________
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: The new erato on April 02, 2011, 12:12:23 AM
Strangely enough it's the 2nd of April where I live!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 02, 2011, 08:51:05 AM
You won't regret it. It comes coupled with a closely-related piece, like a sort of curtain-raiser, In ténebras exteriores. (I seem to remember you're Dutch, too. Which library? In Rotterdam?)

Rotterdam, yes.  The central catalogue. I'm a heavy user. :)

Just curious about this one, you know.

I'm mainly a baroque bloke. So it could be a good, could be a bad experience. Let's wait and hear.

Right now it's Pachelbel I'm listening to, played by Gerd Wachowski.
Probably something completely different. ;)

(http://i52.tinypic.com/sw8wa8.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on April 02, 2011, 09:03:11 AM

 Rotterdam, yes.  The central catalogue. I'm a heavy user.
 
 Just curious about this one, you know.
 
 I'm mainly a baroque bloke. So it could be a good, could be a bad experience. Let's wait and hear.

 
 I borrowed a lot of music there, too, in the late 1990s. If you encounter any skips on the discs, contact me... I love Bach's organ works. Langgaard's music is very different, but his use of the organ is very inventive... Ik ben benieuwd.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 02, 2011, 09:37:36 AM
I borrowed a lot of music there, too, in the late 1990s. If you encounter any skips on the discs, contact me... I love Bach's organ works. Langgaard's music is very different, but his use of the organ is very inventive... Ik ben benieuwd.

The organ has grown into my fave instrument during the last two years, like it was during my childhood.
I visited some concerts and also had encounters with 19th and 20th century organ music.

Here's a 20th century piece that sometimes can bring me into musical heaven, if I'm in the right mood:

http://www.mediafire.com/?989lfas9u6lklr2

Jan Welmers (*1937), Sequens. Played by Jan Hage on the König organ (1776) in the Stevenskerk, Nijmegen, NL.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on April 02, 2011, 09:46:30 AM
Here's a 20th century piece that sometimes can bring me into musical heaven, if I'm in the right mood:

http://www.mediafire.com/?989lfas9u6lklr2 (http://www.mediafire.com/?989lfas9u6lklr2)

Jan Welmers (*1937), Sequens. Played by Jan Hage on the König organ (1776) in the Stevenskerk, Nijmegen, NL.


Thanks! I'll give it a listen...


Here the opening movement of Messis, as a foretaste...


http://www.mediafire.com/file/nwime2nm2cm/Flemming_Dreisig_Rued_Langgaard_Messis_Organ_drama_5_Mesis__Drama_i_tre_Afterner_for_Orgel_BVN_228__1_Anskriget.mp3
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 02, 2011, 10:01:41 AM
[....]
Thanks! I'll give it a listen...

Here the opening movement of Messis, as a foretaste...

[....]

Thanks to you, too!
Listening right now .... and enjoying it. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on April 02, 2011, 12:12:54 PM
Thanks J Z and Marc for these examples which I also have downloaded and intend to listen to to morrow.    :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on April 02, 2011, 02:29:47 PM
@Marc Just listened to Jan Welmers' Sequens for the first time. There are some wonderful sounds in that piece. The playing seems to me to be excellent, too. By coincidence I just discovered that several of my musical friends on Facebook know the organist, Jan Hage! I had never heard of him before you gave me that link...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 03, 2011, 02:22:52 AM
@Marc Just listened to Jan Welmers' Sequens for the first time. There are some wonderful sounds in that piece. The playing seems to me to be excellent, too.

I think Sequens works better as a live experience.
My fist encounter with this piece was during a concert of Jan Hage in the Martinikerk, Groningen. At a certain moment, the entire church seemed to be filled with organ and nothing but organ. That was great!

Quote from: J. Z. Herrenberg
By coincidence I just discovered that several of my musical friends on Facebook know the organist, Jan Hage! I had never heard of him before you gave me that link...

Yes, he's not entirely unknown. ;)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on April 03, 2011, 02:32:10 AM
I think Sequens works better as a live experience.
My fist encounter with this piece was during a concert of Jan Hage in the Martinikerk, Groningen. At a certain moment, the entire church seemed to be filled with organ and nothing but organ. That was great!


I recognise this. In 1994, 9 May (just looked it up in my notes), my then wife and I were at an organ concert in Notre-Dame, Paris. The organist, Helmschrott, played one of his own pieces, called Méditation 4. This made an enormous impression. The whole church was flooded by sound, which crashed over you from the heights...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on April 03, 2011, 04:20:28 AM

I recognise this. In 1994, 9 May (just looked it up in my notes), my then wife and I were at an organ concert in Notre-Dame, Paris. The organist, Helmschrott, played one of his own pieces, called Méditation 4. This made an enormous impression. The whole church was flooded by sound, which crashed over you from the heights...

When it comes to performance of organ works,  you western and northern Europeans have it made.  You have the churches and you have the organists.  We Americans have few choices.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 03, 2011, 06:48:08 AM
When it comes to performance of organ works, you western and northern Europeans have it made. You have the churches and you have the organists. We Americans have few choices.

We'll keep on uploading some stuff from over the ocean once in a while, Coop. ;)

Don't underestimate your fellow countrymen- and women, though!
I can only speak of baroque organ recordings, but that area is definitely not a European only thing.
 
Of course, the historic instruments are here in Europe, but I have listened with enjoyment to several American organists, like E. Power Biggs, Daniel Chorzempa, Peter Sykes, Elizabeth Harrison, Joan Lippincott and George Ritchie.
And there are many interesting instruments in the USA, built on historical principles.

But I think it is true that most American music lovers are raised in a culture of equal temperament, which means that there aren't that many possibilities for those who like keyboard instruments tuned in meantone (et al) in 17/18th (or earlier) music.

To be honest though: this tuning and temperament stuff isn't really my thing. This (American :)) musician certainly knows more about that:

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bpl/
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on April 03, 2011, 09:55:38 AM
We'll keep on uploading some stuff from over the ocean once in a while, Coop. ;)

Don't underestimate your fellow countrymen- and women, though!
I can only speak of baroque organ recordings, but that area is definitely not a European only thing.
 
Of course, the historic instruments are here in Europe, but I have listened with enjoyment to several American organists, like E. Power Biggs, Daniel Chorzempa, Peter Sykes, Elizabeth Harrison, Joan Lippincott and George Ritchie.
And there are many interesting instruments in the USA, built on historical principles.

But I think it is true that most American music lovers are raised in a culture of equal temperament, which means that there aren't that many possibilities for those who like keyboard instruments tuned in meantone (et al) in 17/18th (or earlier) music.

To be honest though: this tuning and temperament stuff isn't really my thing. This (American :)) musician certainly knows more about that:

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bpl/

Indeed, I have always enjoyed the performance of Daniel Chorzempa.  In fact, I think Chorzempa may have renounced his US citizenship and re-naturalized as an Austrian citizen - he is of Austrian heritage.  E. Power Bigg's style sounds too old-fashioned to me and I have yet to have any serious listen of Joan Lippincott's performance - listened over the web but own no actual recordings ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on May 10, 2011, 10:12:12 AM
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/arthausmusik107508.jpg)

New, and currently on offer at Presto (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Arthaus%2BMusik/107508). Has anyone watched this series?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on May 10, 2011, 01:15:33 PM
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/arthausmusik107508.jpg)

New, and currently on offer at Presto (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Arthaus%2BMusik/107508). Has anyone watched this series?

It would have been most interesting if Helmut Walcha was included in the DVD set as well. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on June 26, 2011, 10:34:03 PM
Repost from the French Baroque thread:

(http://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/27/61/0794881346127_600.jpg) (http://organiste.blogs.lalibre.be/media/00/01/2114977848.jpg)

A 3-CD set with the complete organ music of Louis Couperin (1626-1661). Davitt Moroney plays the organ of the Abbaye de Saint-Michel-en-Thiérache, built by Jean Boizard in 1714.

I hate to recommend hard-to-find items, but this issue on Tempéraments (TEM 316001/3 (1995) is really something.... In 1957 a private collector rediscovered 68 unknown organ compositions by Louis Couperin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Couperin), uncle of François. Only in the early nineties a publication of the works was prepared by Davitt Moroney and in these recordings from 1995 he also premiered the music on recording.

And what wonderful music and what wonderful recording it is!  :o :)I'm still discovering the French organ school, but this is surely the best I've heard so far. Louis Couperin emerges as a tremendous organ composer. Pride of place take the two stunning Cycles de Fugues et Fantaisies that take over half of the three disc. They are preceded by just over one disc of more traditional styled music, mostly in plein jeu. These cycles of fugues outshine even any of his efforts for the harpsichord that I have heard. It seems that before it was a similar, smaller cycle of Fugues et caprices by François Roberday (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fran%C3%A7ois_Roberday) was pointed out of being the equivalent from the French baroque of later examples by Bach. However fine that cycle is (more about it later), Louis Couperin is the real thing. Beautiful are these fugues: subtle, inventive, expressive, delectable and very touching. Couperin was befriended with Froberger and was through him exposed to Italian influences which are clearly noticeable in these cycles.
Amazing how a rediscovery of lost music can change the outlook of a composer and of a whole era. :o

Anyway: all organ buffs take heed if this set happens to come your way!

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 01, 2011, 09:07:00 AM
Dutch organist and advisor Jan Jongepier has died of cancer yesterday at the age of 70. He was well-known and admired for his improvisations and also as a teacher, and as advisor for organ restorations and (re)building.
Another sad message for the Dutch organ world, after the premature death of Ewald Kooiman in 2009.

(http://i55.tinypic.com/2ptqy3n.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on August 01, 2011, 09:22:58 AM
The Grim Reaper has been busy - a old friend of my father's died of cancer, too, yesterday.  :(
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 01, 2011, 09:37:36 AM
The Grim Reaper has been busy - a old friend of my father's died of cancer, too, yesterday.  :(

My condolences.
If you feel like comforting yourself with Bach's BWV 565, check out JSB's personal organ thread.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on August 01, 2011, 09:42:24 AM
My condolences.
If you feel like comforting yourself with Bach's BWV 565, check out JSB's personal organ thread.


Thank you. Perhaps I shall...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on September 26, 2011, 10:19:42 AM
Inspiring ancient organ music played on an ancient organ:

(http://i55.tinypic.com/fkazrc.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/William-Byrd-Clarifica-me-Composer/dp/B000UTOD5E

Léon Berben plays William Byrd on the organ of the Grote Kerk in Oosthuizen, NL. Oldest pipework from early 16th century, rebuilt in the 2nd half of the 17th century by Pieter Backer. Recently restored by Flentrop organ builders.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Geo Dude on October 05, 2011, 02:36:12 PM
Anyone interested in a contemporary composer's organ works should look into the recording The Music of Dan Locklair (http://www.amazon.com/Music-Dan-Locklair/dp/B0039OC0LG/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1317853840&sr=1-1).  It's good stuff.  I'll post some more detailed thoughts once I give it a re-listen.

(http://www.sequenza21.com/calendar/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/DLLoftCDCover110.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Rinaldo on October 05, 2011, 04:24:45 PM
Organ thread and no mention of Petr Eben? Here, let me fix that:

http://www.youtube.com/v/NmbxcTBqJZI

Schiager's cycle on Hyperion (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/c.asp?c=C1122&vw=dc) is tremendous.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Cato on October 05, 2011, 05:23:26 PM
Many thanks for introducing us (or at least me) to Petr Eben!

I came across this performance on YouTube of the last half of Julius Reubke's incredible Sonata on the 94th Psalm.

Anna Schorr, apparently a student in Munich:

http://www.youtube.com/v/7DufAzljZ50


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 25, 2011, 07:02:14 AM
Anyone know which organ / church (?) this is?

(http://ru.fishki.net/picsw/112011/24/pics/pics-0073.jpg)

First I vaguely thought "Alp D'Huez" (because of the natural light from above), but that's not it, of course...

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 25, 2011, 07:29:42 AM
Anyone know which organ / church (?) this is?

(http://ru.fishki.net/picsw/112011/24/pics/pics-0073.jpg)

First I vaguely thought "Alp D'Huez" (because of the natural light from above), but that's not it, of course...



In the internetz, it goes by the name of the "Seven Story Slide at the St. Louis Museum" or something along those lines.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 25, 2011, 08:21:24 AM
In the internetz, it goes by the name of the "Seven Story Slide at the St. Louis Museum" or something along those lines.

How did you findz it so quickly?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 25, 2011, 08:24:14 AM
How did you findz it so quickly?

da googlz ma frnd <3
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 25, 2011, 08:29:04 AM
da googlz ma frnd <3

A googlz meself, but nuh findin' nottin. What search terms did you use?

Incidentally I'm a bit disappointed; I though the bit that turns out to be the staircase was part of the Wurlitzer, in some weird, strange, modern-yet-old crazy fashion.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 25, 2011, 08:35:18 AM
A googlz meself, but nuh findin' nottin. What search terms did you use?

My input was your picture. :)

http://www.google.com/insidesearch/searchbyimage.html

Quote
Incidentally I'm a bit disappointed; I though the bit that turns out to be the staircase was part of the Wurlitzer, in some weird, strange, modern-yet-old crazy fashion.

My initial suspicion was photoshopping by someone with a weird sense of humour.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 18, 2011, 02:01:23 AM
Organ music lovers! :)

After the (re)discovery of Georg Böhm's wonderful harpsichord repertoire (Mitzi Meyerson's set is still available at amazing bargain price HERE (http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Georg-B%F6hm-1661-1733-Die-Claviersuiten-Gesamtaufnahme/hnum/9979369)) I've decided to give his works for organ a try.

Any views on the recordings available?? :)

Just released is a twofer by Friedhelm Flamme. And then there are the two separate discs by Josef Sluys, which on sampling sound pretty good/competitive in comparison.

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0761203750122.jpg)

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4011222323422.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4011222323736.jpg)

Then there is a re-releas of a single disc by Foccroulle:

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/5400439003194.jpg)

And some dark horses: Mikkelsen on Kontrapunkt and a Naxos series that is presumably in progress?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ZtQGYm36L._SL500_AA280_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61XbxN9q0jL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41qB1uvHPQL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


Frankly, I'd wish Leon Berben had recorded it - based on his recent Bach recordings, I would snap that up just like that! :D

Q




Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 24, 2011, 01:32:07 AM
Organ music lovers! :)

After the (re)discovery of Georg Böhm's wonderful harpsichord repertoire [..] I've decided to give his works for organ a try.

Any views on the recordings available?? :)

Any opinions are welcome! :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 24, 2011, 01:57:03 AM
Any opinions are welcome! :)

Relax bro.
Last month I switched to harpsichord, vocal and pop music, so .... ;)

Dunno all these issues, a.o. Mikkelsen. But he's very good in Bruhns, so I think you can't go wrong with him. His Böhm is on my (extremely long) wish-list.
The same goes for the Flamme twofer.

Foccroulle is, as always, more than reliable. Always convincing in registration, articulation and phrasing. He's my 'Herreweghe' on the organ. :) And what a magnificent organ this one in Alkmaar is!

The Naxos series is, I'm afraid, not really developing. But this single disc is (again) worthwhile having. Teeuwsen is playing the Reil-organ of the Bovenkerk in Kampen (so not the famous Hinsz), but this is a beautiful intrument, too.

The Sluys discs are very interesting indeed: magnificent organs!

These are my vague memories from about 2 months back (and earlier).
If they're still valid and trustworthy .... dunno.

Merry Christmas to all!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 25, 2011, 12:04:39 PM
]Any views on the recordings available?? :)

I am on my way through some of these, report after X-mas.
 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 25, 2011, 12:06:09 PM
Relax bro.
...Mikkelsen. But he's very good in Bruhns, so I think you can't go wrong with him.

Do you own his Bruhns twoofer?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 25, 2011, 01:14:28 PM
Dunno about a twofer.
One doesn't need a twofer to perform Bruhns' (survived) complete organ works. ;D

Or are you referring to a combined organ/harpsichord 2-cd set ....?

Anyway: I have this one (recommended!), thanks to the library, or maybe even thanks to some friend .... my memory fails me ;):

(http://i39.tinypic.com/1izdjc.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Organ-Works-Sven-Ingvart-Mikkelsen/dp/B000025ZDH/
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 25, 2011, 03:16:38 PM
Dunno about a twofer.
One doesn't need a twofer to perform Bruhns' (survived) complete organ works. ;D

As far as I know, Bruhns left no harpsichord works. Sorry. I am confusing Bruhns´organ works with another prominent organ composers works on a twoofer played by the equally eminent Mikkelsen. I´ll let you know more in the foreseeable future.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 29, 2011, 01:41:23 AM
Relax bro.
Last month I switched to harpsichord, vocal and pop music, so .... ;)

I am on my way through some of these, report after X-mas.

Thank you both, gentlemen! :) :)

And the plot thickens with the recent release I discovered of Böhm's complete organ works by Stef Tuinstra, a name I am familiar with from the complete Sweelinck set.

(http://www.landgoedgerianna.nl//images/stories/Recensie-6/img4ee065797e6c0.jpg)

Samples HERE (http://www.refdag.nl/muziek/muzieknieuws/stef_tuinstra_wil_georg_bohm_uit_de_schaduw_halen_1_605803). More info on the recording and possibility to order HERE (http://www.documuziekproductie.nl/index.php?linkid=160) (in Dutch). Tuinstra plays the big Arp-Schnitger organ of the St. Jacobikirche in Hamburg.

I listened to the samples of a few of the recordings mentioned. Tuinstra seems of the stately and well considered Old School, and I have my doubts of the "orchestral approach" he seeks on that big organ really works... Mikkelsen sounds nice, but definitely not the right organs for me. Josef Sluys (Arts Musici) on the other hand, plays very much the right organs which sound marvelous. I also like his style, though his tempi are still on the conservative side - but primarily his tempi, his registrations are very colourful. Friedhelm Flamme (CPO) ...an issue is that the samples on jpc are too damn short.... ::) The Creutzburg organ from Duderstadt sounds very nice, but is it the right choice for the repertoire? Perhaps our resident experts can tell us more. :) Another thing is that Flamme's playing, which is in full and modern HIP-style, sounds rather comfortable for music in the Stylus Phantasticus style. And if it is one thing I learned from the harpsichord works, Böhm music needs a daring, highly imaginative approach, befitting the style of the music. I haven't listened to Foccroulle yet.

Meanwhile I saw that premont has purchased the CPO-set by Friedhelm Flamme - I can't for your comments! :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 30, 2011, 11:46:47 AM
Many thanks for introducing us (or at least me) to Petr Eben!

I came across this performance on YouTube of the last half of Julius Reubke's incredible Sonata on the 94th Psalm.

Anna Schorr, apparently a student in Munich:

http://www.youtube.com/v/7DufAzljZ50

That was filmed during the first part of the finals of the Organ Competition at the ARD Music Competition...  The Reubke is one of Sir Simon Preston's favorite organ pieces.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 30, 2011, 12:05:45 PM
That was filmed during the first part of the finals of the Organ Competition at the ARD Music Competition...  The Reubke is one of Sir Simon Preston's favorite organ pieces.

Thanks for bring back Cato's post -- I overlooked the video for some reason earlier, but now watched (the footwork, especially!) and listened to the piece (or at least 9 minutes of it). That was one wild fugue to finish it off!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Jake on January 30, 2012, 03:02:01 PM
Hi all!

I'm a constant lurker but rarely post. It's a nasty habit I have...

Today, my posting couldn't be helped. A few weeks ago I received the three volumes which compose Naxos' recording of Das Buxheiner Orgelbuch and am quite taken. The liner notes and other sources around the internet hint that there are books of other, even earlier organ music out there. This excites me but I can't seem to find any recordings of them (Google hasn't helped much. Maybe I'm not using the right combination of words). Aside from Naxos' own early French, English and Iberian organ discs, do you guy know of any recordings of really, really early organ music? Curious is all. Thanks for the help!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on January 31, 2012, 11:21:47 AM
Just a quick reaction:

Here's a nice disc I know, early organ music combined with compositions of Arvo Pärt, played by Lorenzo Ghielmi:

http://www.amazon.com/Tintinnabulum-Organ-Works-Arvo-Part/dp/B00005ASY6

Of course there's the famous Susanne van Soldt manuscript, but that's mainly 16th century stuff:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susanne_van_Soldt_Manuscript

And maybe you can get hold of a copy (library?) of this collection, selected by E. Power Biggs. The names of the compositions published in this book might help you with your search on the net.

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Treasury-Of-Early-Organ-Music/1915718

Good luck!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 31, 2012, 01:03:50 PM

Codex Robertsbridge ca.1360 is as far as I know the earliest manuscript with music designed for organ (keyboard) It contains just six pieces.
Codex Faenza (early 14th century) contains a number of instrumental pieces - mostly for two voices, which probably at least alternatively was played on the organ.
But I think the Buxheimer organ book is the earliest greater collection of music intended for organ.

Here is a recording of one of the three estampies from Codex Robertsbridge.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IY_duFIJ5oI

And one of the others:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnE2MDqYtLw&feature=related
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Jake on February 01, 2012, 07:50:19 AM
Magical! Those recordings are really interesting.

I shall investigate further. Thank you both!

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Geo Dude on February 18, 2012, 07:07:32 PM
This recording is wonderful.



I was worried that it would be a bit too simplistic and uninteresting, but that's certainly not the case.  I'll definitely be picking up more recordings in this series. (And the other early organ recordings on Naxos!)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Leo K. on February 19, 2012, 07:08:08 AM
This recording is wonderful.



I was worried that it would be a bit too simplistic and uninteresting, but that's certainly not the case.  I'll definitely be picking up more recordings in this series. (And the other early organ recordings on Naxos!)

That looks interesting, thanks for the heads up!


My latest acquisition is Leonhardt's Sweelinck recording, which my wife got me:

(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/msi/full/1/0000104081_170.jpg)

I have not heard yet, and I'm new to Sweelinck!

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Geo Dude on February 19, 2012, 08:36:31 AM
Make sure to give some thoughts on that recording when you get a chance to hear it.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 26, 2012, 10:31:22 PM
I've been playing Daniel Chorzempa's record of Mozart K608, the Fantasia for mechanical organ.

This is one of my favourite pieces of music by Mozart, and over the years I've listened to lots, including transcriptions for piano and winds. Up to now I'd contented myself with E Powers Biggs's brash bravura take on the music. It's fun.

Nothing had quite prepared me for what Chorzempa makes of it. There's a depth of feeling here which goes way beyond what I've heard from others. The central passage is extremely inward looking.

It's an old recording but one which I'd somehow passed over.  Then premont mentioned Chorzempa and that set me thinking about him. I've got to know it through spotify, where there are lots of other K 608s. But this one is really standing out at the moment.

K608 is one of Mozart's darker pieces, like the Masonic Funeral Music and K475. It's a masterpiece.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on April 01, 2012, 09:09:08 AM
(http://www.cdeuroxpress.com/images2/845221000220.jpg)
Having recently gotten into Bach's organ music, I downloaded this for contrast. It is quite a contrast.
It's a very interesting sounding instrument. I'm enjoying this earlier (though not "really, really early") organ music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on April 01, 2012, 09:43:49 AM
Having recently gotten into Bach's organ music, I downloaded this for contrast. It is quite a contrast.

Next, you should probably try Christopher Herrick or Alain II, for a contrast in sound in Bach.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on April 01, 2012, 05:55:07 PM
Next, you should probably try Christopher Herrick or Alain II, for a contrast in sound in Bach.
For Bach I have some Herrick, Weinberger, and I bought the integral sets from Foccroulle and Walcha.
Alain II might have to wait. But perhaps I'll get there. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on May 08, 2012, 05:55:58 AM
A programme that interests me very much.



This original program brings together composers from 4 centuries: from Kerll, Couperin, Buxtehude and the monumental Passacaglia in C minor by J.S. Bach, far into the 20-th century with Reger, Shostakovich and Jan Welmers.

Recorded on the magnificent Martti Pothan organ Kotka Church in Sweden, by young virtuoso Matthias Havinga, whose earlier recording on this organ (Brilliant Classics 94203) with Italian Concertos by J.S. Bach received enthusiastic reviews in the press.


Bach, J S: Passacaglia & Fugue in C minor, BWV582
Buxtehude: Passacaglia in D minor, BuxWV161
Couperin, F: Pièces de clavecin II: Ordre 8ème in B minor: Passacaille
Kerll: Passacaglia in D minor -- Edited by C. David Harris
Mendelssohn: Passacaglia in C minor
Reger: Introduction and Passacaglia
Shostakovich: Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk: Passacaglia
Welmers: Passacaglia

Matthias Havinga (Martti Porthan organ in Kotka Church, Sweden)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: JaapT on May 22, 2012, 01:24:56 PM
I recently bought Joris Verdin's 2 discs with Cesar Franck's organ works. They are in general enjoyable, but he plays all works much faster than any other version I know. But I must say that a fast tempo for Final works very well, with a slow tempo the whole point of the works seems obscure. Another organ player who played Final quite fast was Jeanne Demessieux (from the early sixties). I must say I like her version better. Verdin tries sometimes to do a bit too much with music, changing tempos, playing with dynamics, which I find every now distracting.

Anybody else some thoughts on Verdin, Demessieux or other interpretations of Franck's works?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 26, 2012, 11:56:06 AM
A programme that interests me very much.

[Passacaglia / Havinga / Brilliant Classics]

This original program brings together composers from 4 centuries: from Kerll, Couperin, Buxtehude and the monumental Passacaglia in C minor by J.S. Bach [....]

[....]

Heard Bach's Passacaglia this evening in the medieval church of Noordbroek (Groningen, NL). American organist Craig Cramer gave a superb performance on the Schnitger organ there. Plus some other titbits from the baroque period, a.o. by Scheidemann, Buxtehude and Böhm. Cramer was in great shape, probably because I wished him good luck beforehand. 0:)

http://www.organists.net/cramer.html

(http://oi46.tinypic.com/mmarrl.jpg)

I will be in Cloud Country Land for some days now. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Toccata&Fugue on May 27, 2012, 11:05:11 AM
This new SACD is quite enjoyable--has amazingly clear sound:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ixRypJK3L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Tracklist:

Präludium & Fuge BWV 533
Passacaglia BWV 582
Toccata & Fuge BWV 565
Toccata, Adagio & Fuge BWV 564
Choräle BWV 617, 636, 648, 709, 727, 731
Chaconne aus Partita BWV 1004
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: petrarch on July 01, 2012, 11:40:31 AM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Hy9pFg9lZgE/Rd-6CZW7BLI/AAAAAAAAACA/Zy-a6jzVAhs/s320/mafra_convento_1-br.jpg)(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_eIrNyPm081A/Sxsa12oN0bI/AAAAAAAAAJI/O9bftzK0TaI/s400/Bas%C3%ADlica+de+Mafra.jpg)(http://www.tintafresca.net/_uploads/edi%C3%A7%C3%A3o%2086/Mafra_Orgaos2.JPG)

The Convent of Mafra is a large baroque monastery, built by King John V of Portugal in 1730. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mafra_National_Palace.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mafra_National_Palace.)
 
The church includes a set of 6 historic baroque organs and 2 carillons, unique in the world. The 6 organs were recently restored and a concert with the complete set was held a few months ago.  This excerpt is only a small aperitif  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eet-yGNW-EA&feature=related  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eet-yGNW-EA&feature=related)

This is now on DVD + book (http://www.althum.com/index.php?cid=__catalogo&prid=*53EF4C6B6B4650180C9ABB00E24A20481A9356CA), a very worthwhile and interesting concert.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: petrarch on July 01, 2012, 11:45:34 AM
(http://i.prs.to/t_200/arthausmusik107508.jpg)

New, and currently on offer at Presto (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Arthaus%2BMusik/107508). Has anyone watched this series?

Got it last December. Loved it; great organists, great music, some absolutely fantastic instruments.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on July 01, 2012, 07:20:30 PM
Got it last December. Loved it; great organists, great music, some absolutely fantastic instruments.

Thanks for letting us know. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on July 08, 2012, 12:29:57 AM
(http://www.abram.no/vfk%20orgelfacade%20011.JPG-for-web-large.jpg)
On Saturday, I was fortunate to attend Masaaki Suzuki's Sweelinck harpsichord and organ recital at Kobe Shoin Women's University Chapel in Kobe, Japan. I had purchased Suzuki's organ recording of Sweelinck a week before the concert. However, I went into the event feeling sorry I wasn't going to hear Bach and thinking that I would experience enough Sweelinck to last me a while. Even though I was equally surprised by my reaction to the harpsichord and the organ parts of the program, I'll limit my comments to the organ. I'm not musically educated and this is only the second organ concert to which I've been. The first was a performance by Lorenzo Ghielmi at Izumi hall in Osaka. Izumi hall is a fairly large concert hall and the organ there is, I believe, a large German-made instrument (I'm guessing it was built to accommodate many periods of music). I have to say that this was the most memorable classical recital I've ever experienced. Kobe Shoin chapel is small (ovular shaped?) and only accommodates about 250 people. The instrument is described as a copy (built by Mac Garnier) of a 17th century French organ. I was mesmerized by both the sound of the instrument and by Suzuki's performance. I'm not sure how organ aficionados describe it: wonderful clarity; distinct and interesting variety of tones in the registrations? I've never had quite this experience before. It was a powerful experience for me. Perhaps it was the combination of the wonderful instrument, insightful performance and, I suppose, the beauty of Sweenlick's music. During the concert, I was struck by the depth of Sweelinck's toccatas and fantasias. I feel lucky to have been able to experience Suzuki's recital in such an intimate setting on such a beautiful instrument. I hope I have a chance to attend an event like this in the future. I'm guessing that it's rare to see a top-notch performer in such an intimate setting. I'm enjoying Sweelinck a bit more since the concert - although I'd still like an opportunity to hear Suzuki play Bach live on this organ.     
(http://www.shoin.ac.jp/guide/campus/map/img/ind_img02.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 08, 2012, 04:30:26 AM
[....]
On Saturday, I was fortunate to attend Masaaki Suzuki's Sweelinck harpsichord and organ recital at Kobe Shoin Women's University Chapel in Kobe, Japan. I had purchased Suzuki's organ recording of Sweelinck a week before the concert. However, I went into the event feeling sorry I wasn't going to hear Bach and thinking that I would experience enough Sweelinck to last me a while. Even though I was equally surprised by my reaction to the harpsichord and the organ parts of the program, I'll limit my comments to the organ. I'm not musically educated and this is only the second organ concert to which I've been. The first was a performance by Lorenzo Ghielmi at Izumi hall in Osaka. Izumi hall is a fairly large concert hall and the organ there is, I believe, a large German-made instrument (I'm guessing it was built to accommodate many periods of music). I have to say that this was the most memorable classical recital I've ever experienced. Kobe Shoin chapel is small (ovular shaped?) and only accommodates about 250 people. The instrument is described as a copy (built by Mac Garnier) of a 17th century French organ. I was mesmerized by both the sound of the instrument and by Suzuki's performance. I'm not sure how organ aficionados describe it: wonderful clarity; distinct and interesting variety of tones in the registrations? I've never had quite this experience before. It was a powerful experience for me. Perhaps it was the combination of the wonderful instrument, insightful performance and, I suppose, the beauty of Sweenlick's music. During the concert, I was struck by the depth of Sweelinck's toccatas and fantasias. I feel lucky to have been able to experience Suzuki's recital in such an intimate setting on such a beautiful instrument. I hope I have a chance to attend an event like this in the future. I'm guessing that it's rare to see a top-notch performer in such an intimate setting. I'm enjoying Sweelinck a bit more since the concert - although I'd still like an opportunity to hear Suzuki play Bach live on this organ. 
[....]   

Sounds like a great experience indeed. Sweelinck's music is fantastic IMHO. In May, I attended a Sweelinck concert in the village church of Zeerijp, on a 17th century organ (by Th. Faber, A.D. 1651), played by Stef Tuinstra, and that was something quite special.

(http://thumbnails78.imagebam.com/20061/19e1b4200605073.jpg) (http://www.imagebam.com/image/19e1b4200605073)

This next box is a gem. About a year ago there were several opportunities to get it for a nice price ....

http://www.amazon.com/Jan-Pieterszoon-Sweelinck-Complete-Keyboard/dp/B000065618/

These Naxos discs (with Glen Wilson on harpsichord and James David Christie on organ) are very worthwhile, too:

http://www.amazon.com/Jan-Pieterszoon-Sweelinck-Music-Harpsichord/dp/B0020MSTH2/
http://www.amazon.com/Sweelinck-Organ-Works-Jan-Pieterszoon/dp/B000001409/

Btw, I was lucky to hear Suzuki 3 weeks ago in Groningen, NL, playing the historic instrument (a.o. Schnitger/Hinsz) in the Martinikerk. He played Sweelinck, Buxtehude and Bach (a.o. BWV 768 and 582). Another fine experience!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on July 08, 2012, 11:08:53 AM
Sounds like a great experience indeed. Sweelinck's music is fantastic IMHO. In May, I attended a Sweelinck concert in the village church of Zeerijp, on a 17th century organ (by Th. Faber, A.D. 1651), played by Stef Tuinstra, and that was something quite special.

(http://thumbnails78.imagebam.com/20061/19e1b4200605073.jpg) (http://www.imagebam.com/image/19e1b4200605073)

This next box is a gem. About a year ago there were several opportunities to get it for a nice price ....

http://www.amazon.com/Jan-Pieterszoon-Sweelinck-Complete-Keyboard/dp/B000065618/

These Naxos discs (with Glen Wilson on harpsichord and James David Christie on organ) are very worthwhile, too:

http://www.amazon.com/Jan-Pieterszoon-Sweelinck-Music-Harpsichord/dp/B0020MSTH2/
http://www.amazon.com/Sweelinck-Organ-Works-Jan-Pieterszoon/dp/B000001409/

Btw, I was lucky to hear Suzuki 3 weeks ago in Groningen, NL, playing the historic instrument (a.o. Schnitger/Hinsz) in the Martinikerk. He played Sweelinck, Buxtehude and Bach (a.o. BWV 768 and 582). Another fine experience!
Perhaps I will have to get to the Netherlands! Thanks for these recommendations.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 08, 2012, 08:19:46 PM
[....] Thanks for these recommendations.

How could I forget this one? :)

(http://i45.tinypic.com/30m0kz7.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Psalms-Geneva-Jan-Pieterszoon-Sweelinck/dp/B000J10K64/

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/BIS/BISCD1614

http://www.mdt.co.uk/sweelinck-psalms-from-geneva-organ-works-masaaki-suzuki-bis.html

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=144597

Reviews:

http://www.allmusic.com/album/psalms-from-geneva-mw0001857312

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/may07/Sweelinck_geneva_biscd1614.htm
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on July 08, 2012, 09:15:02 PM
How could I forget this one? :)

(http://i45.tinypic.com/30m0kz7.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Psalms-Geneva-Jan-Pieterszoon-Sweelinck/dp/B000J10K64/

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/BIS/BISCD1614

http://www.mdt.co.uk/sweelinck-psalms-from-geneva-organ-works-masaaki-suzuki-bis.html

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=144597

Reviews:

http://www.allmusic.com/album/psalms-from-geneva-mw0001857312

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/may07/Sweelinck_geneva_biscd1614.htm
Apparently, this is the organ I heard. I wonder if there are other copies of baroque organs in Japan. I'm guessing not many.
This is also the location where Suzuki recorded his Bach harpsichord partitas...but that's off topic. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 11, 2012, 01:18:20 PM
[....]
Btw, I was lucky to hear Suzuki 3 weeks ago in Groningen, NL, playing the historic instrument (a.o. Schnitger/Hinsz) in the Martinikerk. He played Sweelinck, Buxtehude and Bach (a.o. BWV 768 and 582). Another fine experience!

Masaaki Suzuki: celebrated conductor/harpsichordist/organist and world famous.
Reitze Smits: not so world famous.
But, IMHO, outclassing Suzuki as (Bach-) organist, this evening in the Martinikerk.
Right now I'm still in 7th organ heaven after Smits' Bach/Brahms recital, with a truly heartfelt Bach (Passacaglia and the Gloria chorales BWV 662-66), ending with two Brahms' chorales and a self-made arrangement of the Finale of Brahms' 4th Symphony. That was awesome!

Two Reitze Smits/Bach links (first short clip filmed in the audience):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-8Srv5AZgs
(only the Toccata-part of BWV 565)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caE6Q3WfYYE
(Concerto in G-Major BWV 986)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Roel on July 13, 2012, 11:49:58 AM
Having been a lurker on this forum for one year and a half, I registered today and write my first post.

I live in Groningen, a few minutes walking from the Martinikerk, and visit organ concerts there regularly. I'm fairly new to classical and organ music after having been a metalhead for 20 years (and I still am)

This week I heard the great organ (Schnitger et al.) in many different ways.
On Wednesday evening Reitze Smits played in an emotional way, from melancholic (Brahms) to extroverted (e.g. Bach Gloria BWV 664).
Today there was a good young organist, who played Sei gegrüsset, Jesu gütig. In some variations he used only one or two stops per manual/pedal. From time to time the organ sounded really raw. The last variation was ecstatic. The (this) organ is truly the master of them all.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Brewski on July 13, 2012, 12:04:58 PM
Welkom, Roel! If you like, please feel free to post a little more about yourself in the "Introductions" section.

You will find (or already have) a number of people here who like metal - and organ music, of course.

Anyway, again, welkom en geniet van jezelf.

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 13, 2012, 12:27:02 PM
Hello and welcome, ex-lurker!

Yes, at lunchtime today the young organist Sander van den Houten gave the Martini reed stops every chance to breathe!

Here you can hear and see Van den Houten improvising on the Hinsz-organ of the Broederkerk in Kampen, NL.

http://www.youtube.com/v/SpC6lB569aQ

Anyway, again, welkom en geniet van jezelf.

Geniet van jezelf .... sounds like another great translation machine! ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on July 29, 2012, 01:20:51 AM
If  you are not  a member of SymphonyShare (https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/Symphonyshare), you may not know that one of the members has hunted down, ripped and uploaded 7 volumes of a Nonesuch LP series called "Masterworks for Organ". And he also has uploaded one from a separate disc called "French Organ Masterpieces from the 17th and 18th Centuries".

I do not wish to post the links publicly, since this practice is generally frowned upon, unless stated otherwise explicitly by the uploader.

Here's what the first volume contains:

Jørgen Ernst Hansen (Frobenius Organ, St. Andrew's Church, Copenhagen)

Buxtehude:  Prelude and Fugue in D minor
Tunder:  Chorale Fantasy:  "Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott"
Bruhns:  Prelude and Fugue in G major
Kneller:  Prelude and Fugue in D minor
Hanff:  Chorale:  "Auf meinen lieben Gott"
Weckmann:  Fantasie in D minor
Böhm:  Chorale:  "Vater unser in Himmelreich"
Brunckhorst:  Prelude and Fugue in E minor
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 15, 2012, 10:22:58 AM
I saw Olivier Vernet play last night in the cathedral at Frejus, just near Saint Tropez. He played some Lully transcriptions, a Mendelssohn prelude and fugue and some French baroque character pieces (titles like "the devil dances" and "Joshua at Jericho") by a composer whose name I forget and some 19th century pieces, also by composers whose names I forgot. Unfortunately I've lost the programme.

The organ is from the late 19th century. It sounded rather metallic and the bass wasn't specially impressive.

I thought the performance was completely lackluster and uninspired. I'm not sure I liked the music much either. In one of the French pieces -- with a title a bit like "March Storms" -- there was a registration change which was so absurd, so stupid, so inappropriate and so striking -- that it's still painfully echoing in my ears.

This was the first organ recital I've been to since I was a kiddie at school, so clearly I'm not a good judge and all the above is probably rubbish.  But I think it was thoroughly inauspicious.

I noticed that Vartolo is playing in the same organ festival, this time in Cuers, with some Bach and Frescobaldi . His recital is obviously a special event (they're even broadcasting it on a giant screen in the forecourt) Unfortunately I'll be in London at the time of that concert, otherwise I would certainly have tried to catch it.

To make things worse on the walk home (a walk of about an hour) the heavens opened and an extremely violent Mediterranean storm reigned. I was totally drenched and I think I've caught a cold. Fuck!!!!!

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: PaulSC on October 22, 2012, 03:11:17 PM
Here's a potentially interesting new release: Walcha in the role of composer rather than performer; Rubsam in the role of performer rather than barber. The first in a projected series of four volumes…

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on November 01, 2012, 06:52:27 AM
nice short article with pictures from the Wall Street Journal -  Wendelen Eberle and Rieger organs
at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203630604578072871859674256.html
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 01, 2012, 10:04:05 AM
This Sweelinck disc is tremendous.

(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/non-muze/full/566030)

Oh by the way can someone tell be how many Sweelinck records Glen Wilson has recorded? I know the one on Naxos, but is there more?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 15, 2013, 01:57:34 PM
Has anyone read this? Does it go into his musical ideas much? Are there any (other?) good things to read about him, in English or French?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515Um1un1CL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 16, 2013, 10:28:29 AM
If  you are not  a member of SymphonyShare (https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/Symphonyshare), you may not know that one of the members has hunted down, ripped and uploaded 7 volumes of a Nonesuch LP series called "Masterworks for Organ". And he also has uploaded one from a separate disc called "French Organ Masterpieces from the 17th and 18th Centuries".

I do not wish to post the links publicly, since this practice is generally frowned upon, unless stated otherwise explicitly by the uploader.

Here's what the first volume contains:

Jørgen Ernst Hansen (Frobenius Organ, St. Andrew's Church, Copenhagen)

Buxtehude:  Prelude and Fugue in D minor
Tunder:  Chorale Fantasy:  "Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott"
Bruhns:  Prelude and Fugue in G major
Kneller:  Prelude and Fugue in D minor
Hanff:  Chorale:  "Auf meinen lieben Gott"
Weckmann:  Fantasie in D minor
Böhm:  Chorale:  "Vater unser in Himmelreich"
Brunckhorst:  Prelude and Fugue in E minor

Jørgen Ernst Hansen died about a month ago.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 16, 2013, 11:22:55 AM
Has anyone read this? Does it go into his musical ideas much? Are there any (other?) good things to read about him, in English or French?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515Um1un1CL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

It is in French and deals very little with his musical ideas, but preferably with when and where he played or recorded what. A number of his pupils (and spiritual pupils) write about when and where, they met him. There are some photo´s of limited interest to others than Walcha-philes.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 16, 2013, 09:35:00 PM
That's disappointing. His musical voice is so distinctive in the early records at least, it would be good to have a serious study of his ideas, origins, reception, influence etc.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 03, 2013, 05:15:39 AM
Found this through the YouTube channel OrganLiveRecordings (http://www.youtube.com/user/OrganLiveRecordings?feature=watch): http://www.paolocrivellaro.com

I happen to have some tape-recordings of a few old (and less old) concerts that I thought to “digitalize” and put on the web.

What a nice thing to do. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 03, 2013, 05:19:44 AM
Found this through the YouTube channel OrganLiveRecordings (http://www.youtube.com/user/OrganLiveRecordings?feature=watch): http://www.paolocrivellaro.com

I happen to have some tape-recordings of a few old (and less old) concerts that I thought to “digitalize” and put on the web.

What a nice thing to do. :)

Yep. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on April 03, 2013, 08:57:34 AM
Jozef Sluys' recordings of Böhm's music on Ars Musici. Are they good selections for a first set? (I see two different covers for both volumes, but I assume the recordings are the same.)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on April 03, 2013, 09:44:06 AM
Jozef Sluys' recordings of Böhm's music on Ars Musici. Are they good selections for a first set? (I see two different covers for both volumes, but I assume the recordings are the same.)

Concerning Böhm´s organworks I prefer Christiaan Teeuwsen (one CD Naxos) and Bernard Foccroulle (one CD Ricercare). Both only recorded about one half of Böhm´s ouvre, but in both cases the most important part, and Teeuwsen´s CD is called Vol.1, so maybe a vol. 2 will follow some day.

Sluys (2 CD Ars Musici), Flamme (2 CD CPO) and Stella (4 CD Brilliant - including the harpsichord music) have made complete recordings. I do not know Stella´s recording yet - it is on its way to me from JPC at the moment.

Sluys and Flamme are competent and listenable, but I do not think they capture the spirit of the music quite as well as Teeuwsen and Foccroulle.  Sluys has for one of the CDs the benefit of the Trost-organ in Waltershausen, which may be almost too colourful for Böhm´s music.

The Danish organist Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen has recorded the complete organworks for Kontrapunkt (2 CD). His playing is rather unimaginative and earthbound and the modern organ he uses is unsuited for the job IMO.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 03, 2013, 09:51:47 AM
Remember Christ Lag in Todesbanden played by Leonhardt in St Petersberg in 2011.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on April 03, 2013, 10:56:24 AM
Concerning Böhm´s organworks I prefer Christiaan Teeuwsen (one CD Naxos) and Bernard Foccroulle (one CD Ricercare). Both only recorded about one half of Böhm´s ouvre, but in both cases the most important part, and Teeuwsen´s CD is called Vol.1, so maybe a vol. 2 will follow some day.

Sluys (2 CD Ars Musici), Flamme (2 CD CPO) and Stella (4 CD Brilliant - including the harpsichord music) have made complete recordings. I do not know Stella´s recording yet - it is on its way to me from JPC at the moment.

Sluys and Flamme are competent and listenable, but I do not think they capture the spirit of the music quite as well as Teeuwsen and Foccroulle.  Sluys has for one of the CDs the benefit of the Trost-organ in Waltershausen, which may be almost too colourful for Böhm´s music.

The Danish organist Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen has recorded the complete organworks for Kontrapunkt (2 CD). His playing is rather unimaginative and earthbound and the modern organ he uses is unsuited for the job IMO.

Thank you for your suggestions, Premont. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 03, 2013, 09:05:44 PM
Or Stef Tuinstra, with this 3cd-set:

(http://i48.tinypic.com/etvfd2.jpg)

Fully recommended by yours truly.
Convincing informed and expressive organ & harpsichord playing by this Dutch organist.
Instruments: the Schnitger organ of the Jacobikirche in Hamburg, and the Hinsz organ of the Mariakerk in Zandeweer (Groningen, NL). A few pieces are played on a 1728 Christian Zell harpsichord (belonging to the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg).

Dutch website:

http://www.documuziekproductie.nl/website/cds/b%C3%B6hm

Might be difficult to purchase outside Europe, though.
But if you're interested, you can always send an e-mail to ask for more info:

info@documuziekproductie.nl

Or to the organist himself maybe?

stuinstra@nnoa.nl
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on April 03, 2013, 10:00:48 PM
Might be difficult to purchase outside Europe, though.

Yes, this was why I did not mention it.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on April 04, 2013, 12:55:26 AM
Ooh, tempting. It's always good to know what's out there -- you'll never know where they might turn up. Thank you, Marc. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on April 04, 2013, 04:49:44 AM
This is music I know nothing about. I wonder if anyone out there has heard this recording. Are you a fan of this music? And how about it as an organ transcription?
(http://cdn.7static.com/static/img/sleeveart/00/015/287/0001528759_500.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on April 05, 2013, 06:30:49 PM
Has anyone read this? Does it go into his musical ideas much? Are there any (other?) good things to read about him, in English or French?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515Um1un1CL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


My understanding is Helmut Walcha was blind most of his life.  How he became such an outstanding organist is beyond my comprehension ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on April 05, 2013, 10:57:20 PM
This is music I know nothing about. I wonder if anyone out there has heard this recording. Are you a fan of this music? And how about it as an organ transcription?
(http://cdn.7static.com/static/img/sleeveart/00/015/287/0001528759_500.jpg)

Venus, organ arrangement by Peter Sykes, as an example, to give you an idea:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_avJDA9EvP8
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 06, 2013, 08:24:29 AM

My understanding is Helmut Walcha was blind most of his life.  How he became such an outstanding organist is beyond my comprehension ...

André Marchal  was also blind, it's a strange coincidence! 

The book's lovely. It's basically written by someone who just adores Walcha, but the hagiographical element doesn't annoy me too much because there's a sort of naivety, when you read him it's a bit like listening to a child. Not that it's childish -- it's just simple, no agenda other than the enthusiasm he wants to transmit.

 A lot of it is just touching - what his house looked like etc. But there's ideas in there too. Here's a rough translation of something from the book:

Quote from: Helmut Walcha : Nuit de Lumière by Joseph Coppey, Jean-Willy Kunz, my translation

Bach's music and the music of those who came before him must, according to Walcha "preserve in its sound something still, calm and concentrated" As an example, he offers the simple recorder, which has limited nuances of intensity. All notes played on an organ offer the same power, and Walcha believes that the intensity of the music resides in this static sonority.


And then he goes on to suggest that these sort of ideas led Walcha to a very purified view of baroque performance practice -- back to urtexts with no dynamic markings, reducing the number of registration changes. That link between an aesthetic conception of early music and Walcha's performance style was new to me. How all this relates to Walcha's actual performance style in recordings is a contentious area I suppose.

Coppey and Kunz get these ideas from a monograph that Walcha published called "The Marvels of Polyphony" which I would like to read, but I just can't find it anywhere in English or French.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on April 06, 2013, 11:34:09 AM
André Marchal  was also blind, it's a strange coincidence! 

The book's lovely. It's basically written by someone who just adores Walcha, but the hagiographical element doesn't annoy me too much because there's a sort of naivety, when you read him it's a bit like listening to a child. Not that it's childish -- it's just simple, no agenda other than the enthusiasm he wants to transmit.

 A lot of it is just touching - what his house looked like etc. But there's ideas in there too. Here's a rough translation of something from the book:

And then he goes on to suggest that these sort of ideas led Walcha to a very purified view of baroque performance practice -- back to urtexts with no dynamic markings, reducing the number of registration changes. That link between an aesthetic conception of early music and Walcha's performance style was new to me. How all this relates to Walcha's actual performance style in recordings is a contentious area I suppose.

Coppey and Kunz get these ideas from a monograph that Walcha published called "The Marvels of Polyphony" which I would like to read, but I just can't find it anywhere in English or French.

The deaths of Gustav Leonhardt and Marie-Claire Alain earlier this year certainly marked the end of an era for performance of baroque organ works ...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Coopmv on April 06, 2013, 01:29:46 PM
Has anyone read this? Does it go into his musical ideas much? Are there any (other?) good things to read about him, in English or French?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515Um1un1CL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Is there an English version of this book?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Sammy on April 06, 2013, 02:17:06 PM
The deaths of Gustav Leonhardt and Marie-Claire Alain earlier this year certainly marked the end of an era for performance of baroque organ works ...

How so?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on April 06, 2013, 04:32:56 PM
André Marchal  was also blind, it's a strange coincidence! 
There are many blind organists. Holm Vogel is another example. In Copenhagen there is a school for blind organists, and I think this is a not uncommon occurrence elsewhere.

Quote from: Mandryka
..... a monograph that Walcha published called "The Marvels of Polyphony" which I would like to read, but I just can't find it anywhere in English or French.

It was part of a German book where ca. 20 different musicians each had written maybe 15 pages about themselves, among others Karl Münchinger and Wilhelm Kempff and of course Walcha. It must be more than 30 years since I read it, and I have since long forgotten the title. It was here Walcha wrote about his discovery of the F major invention as a young boy.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on April 06, 2013, 04:56:33 PM
And then he goes on to suggest that these sort of ideas led Walcha to a very purified view of baroque performance practice -- back to urtexts with no dynamic markings, reducing the number of registration changes. That link between an aesthetic conception of early music and Walcha's performance style was new to me. How all this relates to Walcha's actual performance style in recordings is a contentious area I suppose.

Certainly. And this is because Walcha´s level of historical information was limited. He created his own style out of the naked score. This does not however detract from the spellbinding effect of his playing, but it demonstrates once again, that Bach´s music works in many different ways of interpretation.

Also Walcha (born 1907) may be considered an important transitional figure between Karl Straube (the Leipzig school) and Anton Heiller and Marie Claire Alain. In a way I find Walter Kraft (born 1905) to be an even more important figure, because his style was much more informed.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 06, 2013, 10:31:10 PM
I like that discussion in the book about how, according  to Walcha, baroque music is "still, calm and concentrated", like Gregorian chant, not nuanced in terms of colours and dynamics like Liszt. It made me remember how much I like the later Bach records he made.

Coopmv, as far as I know the book isn't in English.

Premont, I like Kraft's Buxtehude because of its relative calmness and lack of fireworks  (though lately I've been listening to  Vogel more), but somehow I've never got into Kraft's  Bach, I'll have to give it another chance.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on April 11, 2013, 08:07:19 AM
........but somehow I've never got into Kraft's  Bach, I'll have to give it another chance.

The Orgelbüchlein - even if scattered over several CDs, some of the Leipzig chorales (fx BWV 656, 658, 659, 660 and 665), Clavierübung III (fx BWV 669 - 671 and 684) and some of the chorale free works fx BWV 543, 544, 546 and 548 might be the ones to persuade you of his style.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 11, 2013, 08:28:31 AM
The Orgelbüchlein - even if scattered over several CDs, some of the Leipzig chorales (fx BWV 656, 658, 659, 660 and 665), Clavierübung III (fx BWV 669 - 671 and 684) and some of the chorale free works fx BWV 543, 544, 546 and 548 might be the ones to persuade you of his style.

Well I'm slightly ahead of you in fact because today I was listening to a whole pile of BWV 678, and I was struck by the nobility and the strength of  Kraft. He's definitely moving on my radar for Bach.

By the way I made the Bwv 678 playlist because of two things. One was hearing Matteo Messori's performance, which uses some sort of bell, I don't think it's a cymbelstern, it doesn't tinkle. And the other was reading this comment (unreferenced) in wikipedia

Quote

The pastoral quality in the organ writing for the upper voices at the opening has been interpreted as representing the serenity before the Fall of Man; it is followed by the disorder of sinful waywardness; and finally order is restored in the closing bars with the calm of salvation.


I was interested to see if anyone does anything remotely like Messori (no), or whether anyone brings out this putative disorder (not sure, actually maybe this is a feature of Kraft's reading)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on April 24, 2013, 04:55:01 PM
Is F. Couperin's organ music great?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on May 17, 2013, 12:11:22 PM
I've started to listen to Gillian Weir's CD of Bruhns. What lovely music, instantly appealing.  Sometimes very noble and comforting, at least in Weir's hands, though you can often hear some very surprising and intesting things in the music, fantasticus style. I'm enjoying what she does. If anyone has any Bruhns records they love then please let me know as I'd like  to explore a bit further.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 18, 2013, 05:55:45 AM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)

Dip Your Ears, No. 138 (Mendelssohn Organ Works)
 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/05/dip-your-ears-no-138-mendelssohn-organ.html)
Quote
Felix Mendelssohn B. was fond of organs and organ music and wrote idiomatically for the instrument. You
just can’t hear it in his other compositions (think Bruckner, for contrast), and since you just about never hear
Mendelssohn’s organ music in recital or concert either, that part of his output—limited as it is—remains ignored.
A pity, I suppose, since his organ writing, like so much of Mendelssohn in any genre, can be uncommonly
attractive...
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/05/dip-your-ears-no-138-mendelssohn-organ.html[/url]
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on May 23, 2013, 06:08:36 AM
I've gone from Bach to modern French organ music. I made two purchases tonight:
(http://pixhost.me/avaxhome/8e/d3/000dd38e_medium.jpeg)
(http://boxset.ru/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/durufle_complete_organ_music.jpg)
I've jumped over romantic organ. I feel like I need to get a good sampler of romantic organ works.
 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 23, 2013, 12:28:01 PM
I've started to listen to Gillian Weir's CD of Bruhns. What lovely music, instantly appealing.  Sometimes very noble and comforting, at least in Weir's hands, though you can often hear some very surprising and intesting things in the music, fantasticus style. I'm enjoying what she does. If anyone has any Bruhns records they love then please let me know as I'd like  to explore a bit further.

One of the first Bruhns sets I acquired was Helmut Winter´s recording for Harmonia Mundi on the splendid Klappmeyer organ in Altenbruch. I think Winter succeded in making this truly phantastic music sound fresh anew. I have got some other sets, but this remains my favorite.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on May 23, 2013, 10:06:41 PM
One of the first Bruhns sets I acquired was Helmut Winter´s recording for Harmonia Mundi on the splendid Klappmeyer organ in Altenbruch. I think Winter succeded in making this truly phantastic music sound fresh anew. I have got some other sets, but this remains my favorite.

Thanks. i'll get ir just as soon as I'm back in the UK.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Geo Dude on June 24, 2013, 09:09:03 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ju5bgdRbL._SY300_.jpg)

Any thoughts on this?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 25, 2013, 08:58:38 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ju5bgdRbL._SY300_.jpg)

Any thoughts on this?

Yes. I've sampled it, mainly when I've been exploring different recordings of the same piece. My impression is that these are very extrovert exciting postive-mood buoyant performances, maybe lacking some of the emotional nuances which others have brought to the music.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Geo Dude on June 25, 2013, 10:03:23 AM
Yes. I've sampled it, mainly when I've been exploring different recordings of the same piece. My impression is that these are very extrovert exciting postive-mood buoyant performances, maybe lacking some of the emotional nuances which others have brought to the music.



Hmm...given the cheap price point on the market place it sounds like it might complement some of my other recordings well.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 25, 2013, 10:06:40 AM
Hmm...given the cheap price point on the market place it sounds like it might complement some of my other recordings well.

Which other recordings have you heard?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on June 25, 2013, 12:28:51 PM
Yes. I've sampled it, mainly when I've been exploring different recordings of the same piece. My impression is that these are very extrovert exciting postive-mood buoyant performances, maybe lacking some of the emotional nuances which others have brought to the music.

I have listened it all through once some months ago- not enough to judge it properly. Extrovert and a bit superficial was my first impression. In between many other projects I am going through the set once more, and my first reaction to the second listening was, that I found it deeper and more nuanced, than I recalled.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Gordo on June 25, 2013, 12:44:56 PM
I have listened it all through once some months ago- not enough to judge it properly. Extrovert and a bit superficial was my first impression. In between many other projects I am going through the set once more, and my first reaction to the second listening was, that I found it deeper and more nuanced, than I recalled.

Do you have his set of harpsichord works? I have read good reviews (one yours?), but the samples have never convinced me.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on June 25, 2013, 01:02:52 PM
Do you have his set of harpsichord works? I have read good reviews (one yours?), but the samples have never convinced me.

Even here I can not provide more than a first impression, but my initial reaction was more positive than my first reaction to his Bux organ recording.
I recall concepts like nice and melodious, and many of the suites benefit from that kind of approach.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 26, 2013, 01:30:51 AM
I have listened it all through once some months ago- not enough to judge it properly. Extrovert and a bit superficial was my first impression. In between many other projects I am going through the set once more, and my first reaction to the second listening was, that I found it deeper and more nuanced, than I recalled.

Obviously not everyone plays Buxtehude aiming for lots of  emotional expression, but I do think that if you're not going to play expressively,  then you have to have some other way of making the music  sound interesting. Reiner Oster, for example, doesn't seem particularly emotional, but there's tons of nobility in there.

My impression with Stella is fireworks, thrills and sometimes he makes me smile - as if he finds a bit of comedy in the music, a sense of fun in sound-making. I guess each has to decide for himself whether that does justice to Buxtehude.


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: JaapT on July 04, 2013, 01:56:57 PM
Mandryka mentioned whether someone had any recommendations the music of Bruhns. In general Foccroulle is the set to consider, he is always stylish and well informed and he plays on what I consider one of the most beautiful organs I know (unfortuately only from records): the Schnitger organ in Norden.

Having said that, my first encounter with Bruhns was his e-moll preludium played by Piet Kee in Haarlem. I still consider the best performance of this work. It is a CD with works from various composers (Bach, Bruhns, Mendelssohn, Kee). You can buy it second hand: http://www.marktplaats.nl/a/cd-s-en-dvd-s/cd-s-instrumentaal/m691932653-piet-kee-at-st-bavo-haarlem.html?c=8c285449651fa109c354bbabe740c1b&previousPage=lr

Yet another recommendation, but not organ: Bruhns' cantatas beautifully sung by Cantus Cölln.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 02, 2013, 10:59:45 PM
I think that the Reincken Rivers of Babylon fantasy here is wonderful, on the Arp Schnitke at St Jacobi.  It ebbs and flows. For the first time I could hear why it was that JSB liked that music so much

(https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTuXUUQVtr4x0Svo4exrIHp7G9leV-EdT5rsXcB0t6VzQKMuoJ0)

I don't say the rest of the record is so good, and it may well just be that the Reincken only sounds so special because it has been so neglected in recordings up to now (I know that sounds awul, and I don't mean to belittle Jean Claude Zehnder's achievement here.) . Jean Claude Zehnder plays the big Bux chorale 210 and I didn't see that that was so interesting.



Anyway that sent me on a BuxWV 210 hunt, all the usual suspects -- Stella, Bryndhorf, Vogel, Kraft. And the ususal results -- with Kraft delivering a performance which is more my cup of tea than most. Less virtuoso fireworks, more depth. But on spotify two major discoveries in Bux210. First Vernet, and then the completely mind blowing, revealing, revolutionary performance from Julia Brown. Slow, noble, natural and  inevitable progress of the music, this for me is great Bux playing. I'm gonna have to hear more Julia Brown, for sure.

(https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcScRndc6eswa1oT6CMT_cFDZ3ufprfbDJT9xfjzrmAGua7ojHdLwA)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on August 03, 2013, 03:42:16 AM
Anyway that sent me on a BuxWV 210 hunt, all the usual suspects -- Stella, Bryndhorf, Vogel, Kraft. And the ususal results -- with Kraft delivering a performance which is more my cup of tea than most. Less virtuoso fireworks, more depth. But on spotify two major discoveries in Bux210. First Vernet, and then the completely mind blowing, revealing, revolutionary performance from Julia Brown. Slow, noble, natural and  inevitable progress of the music, this for me is great Bux playing. I'm gonna have to hear more Julia Brown, for sure.

If you haven't tried Jean-Charles Ablitzer's Buxtehude yet, I suggest you do.  :) As downloads available on itunes, overview HERE (http://www.harmonicclassics.com/albums/ORGUE/).

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 03, 2013, 08:00:46 AM
If you haven't tried Jean-Charles Ablitzer's Buxtehude yet, I suggest you do.  :) As downloads available on itunes, overview HERE (http://www.harmonicclassics.com/albums/ORGUE/).

Q

No, I haven't heard Ablitzer but I can see he's put his Buxwv 210 on youtube so I can listen easily to how he sees the music.

Re Julia Brown, I just saw that there's a review of her Vol 5 on musicweb which singles out her 210 as something pretty special. I just listened for the first time to her play the g minor prelude (148), I like what I hear, this woman has a face, you know. The performances aren't generalised either, she means what she says. Her tempo choices in both pieces suit me fine.

She used a meantone organ tuning, to some stunning effects in both 210 and 148. The more I listen to baroque music the more I think tuning matters big time.

Oh, and by the way, one thing I'd like to hear is Vogel playing the Reincken Babylon Fantasie. It's on this CD

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31RQmyPcGdL._.jpg)

Does anyone know if it's the same as this

(http://www.groningenorgelland.nl/data/articles/images/big/b_15.jpg)

which is available here:

http://www.groningenorgelland.nl/index.php?item=cd_s&action=page&group_id=10&lang=NL
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 03, 2013, 11:02:29 AM
[....]
Oh, and by the way, one thing I'd like to hear is Vogel playing the Reincken Babylon Fantasie. It's on this CD

(http://102.imagebam.com/download/afFZYHI4Mp4g_M1D3YzP6w/26872/268713033/31RQmyPcGdL__.jpg)

Does anyone know if it's the same as this

(http://104.imagebam.com/download/GoqMTca8N2CsGMbIPKyyeg/26872/268713030/31RQmyPcGdLo__.jpg)

which is available here:

http://www.groningenorgelland.nl/index.php?item=cd_s&action=page&group_id=10&lang=NL

I own the second one mentioned, and it's a very fine disc with recordings Vogel made in the 70s and 80s for Radio Bremen. The first disc has got a slightly different selection of compositions played, so I can't tell you if the Reincken Babylon Fantasie is the same recording. Your question made me curious, too. That's why I just ordered that first one (Opera Omnia 1) at the library. Maybe in a week or 10 days I can tell you more.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 13, 2013, 07:30:49 PM
I own the second one mentioned, and it's a very fine disc with recordings Vogel made in the 70s and 80s for Radio Bremen. The first disc has got a slightly different selection of compositions played, so I can't tell you if the Reincken Babylon Fantasie is the same recording. Your question made me curious, too. That's why I just ordered that first one (Opera Omnia 1) at the library. Maybe in a week or 10 days I can tell you more.

No the same recordings. The first one mentioned is from 1991. It's slower, with different registrations. Both performances are a joy to listen joy. So: in either case, no money is thrown away. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on September 15, 2013, 10:17:20 PM
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/165/8999165.jpg)
Looks interesting.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on September 16, 2013, 08:09:25 AM
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/165/8999165.jpg)
Looks interesting.


Sure, provided we can figure out what is to be seen on that tiny picture! :laugh:

How is this? ;)



Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: milk on September 16, 2013, 08:17:34 AM
How is this? ;)



Q
[/quote]
Indubitably better! ;D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Opus106 on September 16, 2013, 08:28:02 AM
Indubitably

Way off-topic: I can't read or hear that word without being reminded of this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ubVBK3cKanw#t=269). ;D

Now, back to Leighton's disc...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on September 20, 2013, 11:19:37 AM
New release. It is hard to get my head around this: ArsMusici licensing 10 recordings to be sold by Membran in a box set for 13 euros...?? ??? ::) :)

Amazing..... :D

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0885150337936.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/rear/0/0885150337936.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: kishnevi on September 20, 2013, 12:01:13 PM
Niche market recordings will do that sometimes.  And I think any set which includes entries such as "Organ Music for Four Hands and Four Feet" and "Transylvanian Organ Music from the Renaissance to the Present"
qualifes as a niche market recording.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on September 21, 2013, 03:25:36 PM
New release. It is hard to get my head around this: ArsMusici licensing 10 recordings to be sold by Membran in a box set for 13 euros...?? ??? ::) :)

Amazing..... :D

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0885150337936.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/rear/0/0885150337936.jpg)

Q

I own much of  this already, but the low price justifies the purchase to acquire the rest. Have you got any link to this release?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on September 21, 2013, 10:59:32 PM
I own much of  this already, but the low price justifies the purchase to acquire the rest. Have you got any link to this release?

I guess I'm lucky to own none...  ;D ;) Which ones do you have and are they any good? :)

To me it seems that the Zipoli/Ghielmi disc alone should be sufficient to justify the price of admission. Other than that I see some recitals that should be nice and interesting at the least (1-4, 6 & 9)?

http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Famous-Organ-Music-from-Europe/hnum/2829815

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on September 22, 2013, 05:41:56 AM
I guess I'm lucky to own none...  ;D ;) Which ones do you have and are they any good? :)

To me it seems that the Zipoli/Ghielmi disc alone should be sufficient to justify the price of admission. Other than that I see some recitals that should be nice and interesting at the least (1-4, 6 & 9)?

http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Famous-Organ-Music-from-Europe/hnum/2829815

Q

I own vol. 1, 2, 4 and 5 (Zipoli is nice music , not that "great" but well played - I payed as much for it as this box costs). Vol. 1, 4 and 5 are excellent, while vol. 2 is somewhat colorless, like most I have heard from Radulescu.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 14, 2014, 09:44:01 AM
(http://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/12/29/3610154772912_600.jpg)

Found on spotify, a release made just a couple of weeks ago I think by the Bibliotheque Nationale de France of her 1956 recording of de Grigny's 1er Livre D'Orgue. The performances seem intense and engrossing.

Can someone comment on the Erato recordings that she made? There's a transfer of this early recording made by Qobuz as part of their studio masters series. Has anyone heard it?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 14, 2014, 10:47:04 AM
(http://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/12/29/3610154772912_600.jpg)

Found on spotify, a release made just a couple of weeks ago I think by the Bibliotheque Nationale de France of her 1956 recording of de Grigny's 1er Livre D'Orgue. The performances seem intense and engrossing.

Can someone comment on the Erato recordings that she made? There's a transfer of this early recording made by Qobuz as part of their studio masters series. Has anyone heard it?

She recorded the Livre d´orgue by Grigny several times. This link may provide some information:

http://www.france-orgue.fr/disque/index.php?zpg=dsq.eng.rch&org=%22Marie-Claire+ALAIN%22&tit=&oeu=de+grigny&ins=&cdo=1&dvo=1&vno=1&cmd=Search&edi=&nrow=80

I own the Sarlat recording (1967) on LP, and I have owned the Chaise-Dieu recording (1980) on LP but parted with the latter when I changed to CD for good, thinking that the Sarlat recording is much superior. I also own one half of the Poitiers recording (1996) thanks to a kind member of this forum. I have never heard the Paris St. Merry recording (1956).

Actually she also recorded an almost complete Bach integral (we may call it Alain 0 as opposed to Alain I, II and III) on the St.Merry organ, Paris in the 1950es, but this is the first time I have seen any of her St. Merry recordings released on CD. I consider this rather French type organ better suited for Grigny than for Bach, but I have not investigated the topic further, since it would demand a lot of resources, and I believe, that these early recordings are going to disappoint us, who know her later recordings of the same music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 14, 2014, 12:18:21 PM
She recorded the Livre d´orgue by Grigny several times. This link may provide some information:

http://www.france-orgue.fr/disque/index.php?zpg=dsq.eng.rch&org=%22Marie-Claire+ALAIN%22&tit=&oeu=de+grigny&ins=&cdo=1&dvo=1&vno=1&cmd=Search&edi=&nrow=80

I own the Sarlat recording (1967) on LP, and I have owned the Chaise-Dieu recording (1980) on LP but parted with the latter when I changed to CD for good, thinking that the Sarlat recording is much superior. I also own one half of the Poitiers recording (1996) thanks to a kind member of this forum. I have never heard the Paris St. Merry recording (1956).

Actually she also recorded an almost complete Bach integral (we may call it Alain 0 as opposed to Alain I, II and III) on the St.Merry organ, Paris in the 1950es, but this is the first time I have seen any of her St. Merry recordings released on CD. I consider this rather French type organ better suited for Grigny than for Bach, but I have not investigated the topic further, since it would demand a lot of resources, and I believe, that these early recordings are going to disappoint us, who know her later recordings of the same music.

Ah. This is the sort of thing I like -- great music and lots of different performances by a fine musician.

I've just ordered this, though I've actually no clear idea of the date of the recording. Nearly all of her Erato recordings of de Grigny have disappeared as far as I can see -- I'l have to wait till they come out again as downloads.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61VEf99yHDL._SY450_.jpg)

In the meantime I'll try to listen to Isoir. I haven't managed to get into the way Verlet plays de Grigny, but I'll give it another shot.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 14, 2014, 12:59:25 PM
I've just ordered this, though I've actually no clear idea of the date of the recording. Nearly all of her Erato recordings of de Grigny have disappeared as far as I can see -- I'l have to wait till they come out again as downloads.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61VEf99yHDL._SY450_.jpg)

In the meantime I'll try to listen to Isoir. I haven't managed to get into the way Verlet plays de Grigny, but I'll give it another shot.

The Alain you ordered is the Poitiers recording (1996), her last recording of the work.

I am not a great fan of Isoir - his performance is too polished to my taste. I have not listened to Vernet more than once, so I am in your situation. Among a few others I also own a recording by my countryman Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen on the organ of St. Maxim in Provence. This is one of the most colorful recordings of the Livre I know. This organ is a splendid vehicle for Grigny´s music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mookalafalas on February 15, 2014, 01:04:58 AM
New release. It is hard to get my head around this: ArsMusici licensing 10 recordings to be sold by Membran in a box set for 13 euros...?? ??? ::) :)

Amazing..... :D
Q

  Generally Membran doesn't license anything. In Germany music copyright expires after 50 years, or so I understand from reading about this particular label. Their best stuff is generally 51 years old ;)
   BTW, I'm not criticizing them. I LOOOOOVE membran, and own over 400 of their discs. (the Meister Konzerte 100 CD box is my favorite historical classical box. The 100 CD Modern Jazz is also awesome).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 15, 2014, 04:31:44 PM
  Generally Membran doesn't license anything...

They don't license anything... and they're cavalier about stealing other label's remasterings. Shoddy, cheap, and semi-legal.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 16, 2014, 10:47:41 AM
The Alain you ordered is the Poitiers recording (1996), her last recording of the work.

I am not a great fan of Isoir - his performance is too polished to my taste. I have not listened to Vernet more than once, so I am in your situation. Among a few others I also own a recording by my countryman Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen on the organ of St. Maxim in Provence. This is one of the most colorful recordings of the Livre I know. This organ is a splendid vehicle for Grigny´s music.

I've been focusing on two hymns -- Pange Lingua and Ave Maris Stella.

I think you're too harsh about Isoir, at least in this music. I didn't think the readings were too polished, I thought that the performances were very moving in fact -- and I believe he was trying to respond to the ideas expressed in the hymn verses. Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen seemed too consistently severe. To take an example, I thought there was more of a sense of mystery in the big five part fugue in Pange Lingue in Isoir than in  Mikkelson.  Isoir seemed more humane, forgiving, loving in the 4 part fugue in the Ave Maris Stella: that seemed to find the necessary emotional contrast with the music which preceded it, and to reflect the hymn's idea of Mary as someone who can "Dissolve the chains of the guilty, proffer light to the blind. . . "  Don should listen to Mikkelsen if he's interested in the music and doesn't know it already, it strikes me as a performance he may well appreciate.

I didn't like the singing on Mikkelsen's recording, which seemed a saccharine. I very much liked the singing on Isoir's CD (Ensemble Vocal Sagittarius), they discovered the plainchant text in Rheims, and very beautiful it is too.

Another recording which I enjoyed was Bernard Coudurier's.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 16, 2014, 02:23:09 PM
I've been focusing on two hymns -- Pange Lingua and Ave Maris Stella.

I think you're too harsh about Isoir, at least in this music. I didn't think the readings were too polished, I thought that the performances were very moving in fact -- and I believe he was trying to respond to the ideas expressed in the hymn verses. Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen seemed too consistently severe. To take an example, I thought there was more of a sense of mystery in the big five part fugue in Pange Lingue in Isoir than in  Mikkelson.  Isoir seemed more humane, forgiving, loving in the 4 part fugue in the Ave Maris Stella: that seemed to find the necessary emotional contrast with the music which preceded it, and to reflect the hymn's idea of Mary as someone who can "Dissolve the chains of the guilty, proffer light to the blind. . . "  Don should listen to Mikkelson if he's interested in the music and doesn't know it already, it strikes me as a performance he may well appreciate.

Maybe I am biased concerning Isoir. Or maybe I prefer this music played a little more severe than Isoir does.

Quote from: Mandryka
I didn't like the singing on Mikkelsen's recording, which seemed a saccharine. I very much liked the singing on Isoir's CD (Ensemble Vocal Sagittarius), they discovered the plainchant text in Rheims, and very beautiful it is too.

A CD with liturgical organ music is an abstraction, which IMO cannot recreate the atmosphere of the past, so generally I do not find singing relevant in this context. One can read the text, if one wants to know, what the music is supposed to express.

Quote from: Mandryka
Another recording which I enjoyed was Bernard Coudurier's.

Unfortunately I only own his recording of the Mass which I have enjoyed (you reminded me of the importance of completing the set with the Hymns).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 17, 2014, 04:03:45 PM
I've been focusing on two hymns -- Pange Lingua and Ave Maris Stella.

I think you're too harsh about Isoir, at least in this music. I didn't think the readings were too polished, I thought that the performances were very moving in fact -- and I believe he was trying to respond to the ideas expressed in the hymn verses.

I very much liked the singing on Isoir's CD (Ensemble Vocal Sagittarius), they discovered the plainchant text in Rheims, and very beautiful it is too.

There is no singing on the recording by Isoir, which I own, so I wonder, if we are talking about different recordings.

Maybe you are talking about this (if it really is another recording):
http://www.amazon.fr/Les-Cinq-hymnes-Nicolas-Grigny/dp/B00005BCWG/ref=sr_1_cc_3?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1392680291&sr=1-3-catcorr&keywords=isoir+grigny

I am talking about this (Mass):
http://www.amazon.de/Grigny-Messe-Isoir/dp/B000025V1M/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1392680407&sr=1-2&keywords=isoir+grigny

and this (Hymns):
http://www.amazon.de/Werke-von-Grigny-Marchand-Isoir/dp/B0000264YK/ref=sr_1_4?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1392680407&sr=1-4&keywords=isoir+grigny

These two CDs were recorded by Calliope 1972 on two different organs mentioned on the cover.

My main problem with this recording by Isoir is, that he plays general legato and that often suppresses the counterpoint by highlighting the cantus, making the music sound more homophone. This is particularly the case with plenum pieces and pieces, where the hymn is played on the pedal trumpet stop. This is what I mean, when I write polished, as many of the details are underplayed. His interpretation of the hymns sounds IMO generally better than the Mass, maybe reflecting that the Isnard organ in St. Maxim, Provence has got a better tonal balance than the Clicquot organ in Poitiers.

BTW the St. Maxim organ was also used for the recordings of the Livre d ´orgue by Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen and Pierre Bardon. The latter is the principal organist at that organ, if he hasn´t retired by now.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 17, 2014, 11:56:20 PM
There is no singing on the recording by Isoir, which I own, so I wonder, if we are talking about different recordings.

Maybe you are talking about this (if it really is another recording):
http://www.amazon.fr/Les-Cinq-hymnes-Nicolas-Grigny/dp/B00005BCWG/ref=sr_1_cc_3?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1392680291&sr=1-3-catcorr&keywords=isoir+grigny

I am talking about this (Mass):
http://www.amazon.de/Grigny-Messe-Isoir/dp/B000025V1M/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1392680407&sr=1-2&keywords=isoir+grigny

and this (Hymns):
http://www.amazon.de/Werke-von-Grigny-Marchand-Isoir/dp/B0000264YK/ref=sr_1_4?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1392680407&sr=1-4&keywords=isoir+grigny

These two CDs were recorded by Calliope 1972 on two different organs mentioned on the cover.

My main problem with this recording by Isoir is, that he plays general legato and that often suppresses the counterpoint by highlighting the cantus, making the music sound more homophone. This is particularly the case with plenum pieces and pieces, where the hymn is played on the pedal trumpet stop. This is what I mean, when I write polished, as many of the details are underplayed. His interpretation of the hymns sounds IMO generally better than the Mass, maybe reflecting that the Isnard organ in St. Maxim, Provence has got a better tonal balance than the Clicquot organ in Poitiers.

BTW the St. Maxim organ was also used for the recordings of the Livre d ´orgue by Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen and Pierre Bardon. The latter is the principal organist at that organ, if he hasn´t retired by now.

Ah yes, the Grigny CD I have is indeed different, this one:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51gH3D4MNyL._SX355_.jpg)

Mikkelsen's sound is definitely sharper than Isoir's, and hence I suppose the counterpoint is clearer - the pedals especially seem  more in forcus with Mikkelsen.

Anyway, I've made another de Grigny discovery, the Veni Creator Spiritus played by Marc Schaefer, on the (wonderful) J A silbermann organ in Villingen Church - CD 6 of that Membran big box which was discussed above. One thing that's taught me is how well the music works a suite  (and I learnt from Neu's Muffat how a S. German Toccata is a suite)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 18, 2014, 01:55:04 PM
Ah yes, the Grigny CD I have is indeed different, this one:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51gH3D4MNyL._SX355_.jpg)

When and where was this CD (twofer?) recorded? I suppose it is a substantial improvement compared to the Calliope recording.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 18, 2014, 11:47:03 PM
When and where was this CD (twofer?) recorded? I suppose it is a substantial improvement compared to the Calliope recording.

It was reorded in 1992 at the Abaye de Saint Michel in Thiérache. I haven't heard the one you have on Calliope.  It is a twofer, and it includes a motet by Charpentier after the elevation and one by Lully after the Deo Gratis.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 20, 2014, 10:01:51 AM
It's interesting just listening today to Vernet and Isoir (Erato) playng the de Grigny mass - Isoir spirited and bold, and Vernet much more weighty, solemn. It unbelievable music, I feel very enthusiastic about it. I kept thinking of Schnabel and Badura Skoda in the largo of op 10/3 - Schnabel weighty and full of mystical wisdom (Schnabel's Vernet) and Badura Skoda plays it like music written by a young man having a bit of an emotional crisis (PBS is Isoir.) De Grigny was hardly bowed down by the wisdom and cares of age when he wrote this mass, at least not in MY imagination. Anyway, I'm keeping hold of both - both fantastic in their way.

Can you imagine going to a mass and hearing this? I searched the web for someone playing it, the whole thing with a priest and chanting. But no.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Sammy on February 20, 2014, 11:57:26 AM
I have two highly enjoyable sets of Grigny's BK. 1 - Chapuis on Astree (1976) and John Grew on Atma (1997-98).  Both are likely oop.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 20, 2014, 01:27:52 PM
I have two highly enjoyable sets of Grigny's BK. 1 - Chapuis on Astree (1976) and John Grew on Atma (1997-98).  Both are likely oop.

I was fortunate to find the John Grew set at Amazon.fr, so trusting your words I ordered it. I also found the Chapuis recording there, but it is much too expensive.

http://www.amazon.fr/Grigny-Livre-dorgue/dp/B00000IACZ/ref=sr_1_13?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1392931025&sr=1-13&keywords=grigny

http://www.amazon.fr/GRIGNY-Livre-orgue-Nicolas-Grigny/dp/B000027OJ9/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1392931070&sr=1-2&keywords=grigny+chapuis
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 25, 2014, 08:31:08 AM
I'm finding myself getting increasingly interested in German Renaissance organ music. I can't explain why,  I think the music is strong and emotionally open and forthright, not without contrapuntal and harmonic interest. The CDs I've enjoyed most have been Jaroslav Tüma's recording with music by the Hassler Brothers and Joseph Kelemen's CD of music from the Buxheimer Orgelbuch (I've ordered Ton Koopman's Buxheimer record.) I can listen to the music on Keleman's CD for a long time without getting bored. Also Kimberly Marshall's CD of music by Arnolt Schlick (I've just ordered her renaissance compilation CD called Gothic Pipes) Generally I've  found Tachezi's compilation CDs useful.

Glen Wilson has a fascinating and fabulous recording of music published by Elias Ammerbach. Extraordinary sounds. It would be great to have that music on organ!

Anyway I know this music is rarely discussed here - maybe I'm the only one who appreciates it. But I thought it was worth posting just in case anyone can put me on to some good books or recordings.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 29, 2014, 11:34:11 PM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xvKQRA1bSBg/TekIV3xyePI/AAAAAAAAAGY/pyGhWO8CSSs/s1600/back.jpg)

Gillian Weir plays Roberday on the organ St Leonhardskirch in Basel, by J A Silbermann.

Like Leonhardt and Walcha, she is a serious musician. She avoids shallow musical effects. Her style is measured, noble and somewhat introspective. My bet is that the tuning is not meantone, and hence the dissonances are smoothed out. That may be a good thing or it may be a bad thing. I find the richness and grandeur of the organ not altogether to my liking.

What I will say is that the performance is much more challenging than Chapuis in the same music, just because Chapuis is ready to play for effects and to highlight his own virtuosity. For Weir, that sort of behaviour is unthinkable, anathema. What I'm not yet sure about is whether there's enough content to these fugues to justify her introspective austerity. The more I listen the more I think there is, but I'm not there yet.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 30, 2014, 12:01:17 AM
The more I listen the more I think there is, but I'm not there yet.

So, still on the hunt for perfection.  :) Honestly, I think Isoir did a fine job and got fair value out of these pieces by Roberday. Not suggesting that it couldn't be bettered upon, but performances are thin on the ground..It also might be the case that you have higher expectations of this music than I do? :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 30, 2014, 12:23:05 AM
So, still on the hunt for perfection.  :) Honestly, I think Isoir did a fine job and got fair value out of these pieces by Roberday. Not suggesting that it couldn't be bettered upon, but performances are thin on the ground..It also might be the case that you have higher expectations of this music than I do? :)

Q

Maybe. Look, I have the recording by Weir so why not try to make sense of what she was doing? Sure, Roberday isn't as great as Frescobaldi or Froberger, and maybe you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.  The approach of the musician is sufficienty original and coherent and considered as to be worth trying to understand nontheless.

As far as "thin on the ground" is concerned, he doesn't do much worse in organ music than L Couperin or Titelouze or Attaignant or Lebègue or Louis Marchand does he? I mean, early French music is an obscure little niche.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 30, 2014, 12:57:11 AM
As far as "thin on the ground" is concerned, he doesn't do much worse in organ music than L Couperin or Titelouze or Attaignant or Lebègue or Louis Marchand does he? I mean, early French music is an obscure little niche.

True. But definitely worthwhile!  :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 30, 2014, 10:50:27 AM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xvKQRA1bSBg/TekIV3xyePI/AAAAAAAAAGY/pyGhWO8CSSs/s1600/back.jpg)

Gillian Weir plays Roberday on the organ St Leonhardskirch in Basel, by J A Silbermann.

Like Leonhardt and Walcha, she is a serious musician. She avoids shallow musical effects. Her style is measured, noble and somewhat introspective. My bet is that the tuning is not meantone, and hence the dissonances are smoothed out. That may be a good thing or it may be a bad thing. I find the richness and grandeur of the organ not altogether to my liking.

What I will say is that the performance is much more challenging than Chapuis in the same music, just because Chapuis is ready to play for effects and to highlight his own virtuosity. For Weir, that sort of behaviour is unthinkable, anathema. What I'm not yet sure about is whether there's enough content to these fugues to justify her introspective austerity. The more I listen the more I think there is, but I'm not there yet.

In the days of LP I used to own Gilian Weir´s Roberday CD. On the sleve the organ was described as a modern Th. Kuhn organ, and I am sure it was equally tuned. No mention of J.A. Silbermann. The sound was sharp and rather thin, not that ingratiating. I did not like Weir´s at the same time lightweight and serious interpretation, I think she killed the music without offering anything else, so I parted with the disc.

At that time my only acquaintance with Roberday´s fugues - other than the score (it was easier to play the fugues myself than to find recordings) - was a recording of five of the fugues played by Claude Terasse (1965) on the organ of the Cathedral of Sarlat, FR (same organ Darasse uses for his Titelouze and similarly to this a part of the Vox French organ music encyclopedia LP). All I know about him is, that he was a pupil of Marie-Claire Alain, but he is actually rather good, giving the fugues a well measured weighty and noble air without being ponderous. See PM.

I think Chapuis´Roberday CD on Astrée is out of print since long, and I have not heard it. But I own this:

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Harmonia%2BMundi/HMA195760

However I also find this interpretation somewhat lightweight.

I also own Isoir´s recording (Temperaments)  - was not impressed by the first and only listening some years ago, and I also own another recording, which I only have listened to once:

http://www.amazon.fr/Musique-Pour-LOrgue-Roberday-Raquet/dp/B00004VDBN/ref=sr_1_12?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1396205081&sr=1-12&keywords=roberday

If you give me some time, I may do some comparative listening, but not until next weekend.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 30, 2014, 12:02:38 PM
In the days of LP I used to own Gilian Weir´s Roberday CD. On the sleve the organ was described as a modern Th. Kuhn organ, and I am sure it was equally tuned. No mention of J.A. Silbermann. The sound was sharp and rather thin, not that ingratiating. I did not like Weir´s at the same time lightweight and serious interpretation, I think she killed the music without offering anything else, so I parted with the disc.

At that time my only acquaintance with Roberday´s fugues - other than the score (it was easier to play the fugues myself than to find recordings) - was a recording of five of the fugues played by Claude Terasse (1965) on the organ of the Cathedral of Sarlat, FR (same organ Darasse uses for his Titelouze and similarly to this a part of the Vox French organ music encyclopedia LP). All I know about him is, that he was a pupil of Marie-Claire Alain, but he is actually rather good, giving the fugues a well measured weighty and noble air without being ponderous. See PM.

I think Chapuis´Roberday CD on Astrée is out of print since long, and I have not heard it. But I own this:

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Harmonia%2BMundi/HMA195760

However I also find this interpretation somewhat lightweight.

I also own Isoir´s recording (Temperaments)  - was not impressed by the first and only listening some years ago, and I also own another recording, which I only have listened to once:

http://www.amazon.fr/Musique-Pour-LOrgue-Roberday-Raquet/dp/B00004VDBN/ref=sr_1_12?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1396205081&sr=1-12&keywords=roberday

If you give me some time, I may do some comparative listening, but not until next weekend.

Ah yes, the organ. I just checked more carefully and it turns out that it's by Kuhn based on J A Silbermann's  organs.

I've ordered the CD of these fugues that Chapuis recorded because I was impressed by the LP he made, which I found on youtube (the LP is different from the CD.) It's fast, colouful,  played for effect, as you would expect, but still very attractive I thought.

In the booklet Weir writes this:

Quote
When I was in Basel I spent an evening playing through a pile of little known music I had brought along. Some of it was by Roberday. I decided to record it there and then. Music of this period is improvisatory and my delight in its discovery brought a spontaneity which enhances this element. . . I like the quirkiness of this composer, and his energy and sophisticated exuberance.

It strikes me that she can tall the talk but can't walk the walk. Spontaneity, energy, exuberance, improvisation -- these aren't concepts which seem to apply to Gillian Weir.  But I'm intrigued a bit by what she does so I won't condemn the CD till I've given it a few more tries.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on April 11, 2014, 10:34:48 PM
Ok guys.....could you help me out on here? :)

I am looking for some really good Gringy discs!

Since the French organ music world is still largely an enigma to me - with its aray of organists hardly known outside of France that record for tiny or miniscule labels that are seldom reviewed in the international press - I really need some guidance.

Knowing me, you'll probably know I am looking for historically informed performances on proper period instruments (HIPPI).  8)

Looking forward to you suggestions! :)

Q

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on April 12, 2014, 06:37:59 AM
Ok guys.....could you help me out on here? :)

I am looking for some really good Gringy discs!

Knowing me, you'll probably know I am looking for historically informed performances on proper period instruments (HIPPI).  8)


Mandryka and I discussed recordings of Le premier Livre d´orgue by de Grigny above, not long time ago.

The first of my two preferred rescordings (among the ones I know) is the first complete recording (Erato LP 1965) by Marie-Claire Alain on the organ of the Cathedral of Sarlat, FR. But I have never seen this released on CD. She rerecorded the Livre on other organs twice (1980 LP only and 1996/8 CD), but neither of these I find compare(s) to the first recording (I have only heard the Missa from the 1998 recording), even if they still are recommendable.

The other is Sven-Ingvart Mikkelsen´s recording for Danish ClassicCD, a colorful and opulent recording. Mandryka finds it to my surprise too severe.

I think that the sets by Pierre Bardon (Pierre Verany) and Bernard Coudurier (BNL) are recommendable too, and recently I acquired a nice set (recommended by Don) by John Grew (Athma), but haven´t heard it but once, which also is the case with the recording of Vernet (Ligia digial), the first impression was by the way favorable.

As I wrote above I am no friend of Isoir´s first recording (Calliope). I have not heard his second on Erato, which Mandryka likes. Grunenwald (Accord) cam be forgotten IMO. I have not heard Chapuis´recording.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Menschenstimme on April 12, 2014, 07:52:24 AM
I enjoy all of the organ CDs on the Telarc label.  I also have many other organ CDs, including several on the D&G label.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 12, 2014, 08:06:52 AM
Re Grigny, my feelings haven't moved on since the recent discussion here. Like Verlet in the mass (haven't heard the hymns, which isn't on spotify for some reason), liked Isoir in hymns and mass on Erato. I also felt positive about Coudurier. I should say that I like to hear this with some nice chanting, and that aspect is influencing my judgements.

Actually one way my feelings have moved on is that I've found a composer I like nearly as much as Grigny - that's Boyvin. If anyone has any suggestions about his music then I'd be interested.

(I have CDs by Schoonbroodt and Heurtematte. Isoir's Boyvin CD is really disappointing by the way. Haven't heard Chapuis.)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on April 14, 2014, 08:28:20 AM
Thanks you guys for all the Grigny recommendations so far! :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on May 10, 2014, 04:59:51 AM
Hey, Que, look at this!  ;D

(http://multimedia.fnac.com/multimedia/ES/images_produits/ES/ZoomPE/6/5/6/3487549902656.jpg)

Yes, when listening to this for the first time two days ago, I also thought of Que.

The playing is state of the art, and the newly built organ seems to have taken its model - as to sound - from the Scherer organ in Tangermünde. And what a beautiful neo-North German prospect.

I must say that for a moment I was confusing this apparently new issue with this older (2003) one:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5120BdnB39L.jpg).

But thanks guys, for pointing it out to me. The good news is that Ablitzer might have found his new "home" at Ligia. Hopefully there is more to come...

Anyway I encountered a slightly qualified recommendation of the new recording - on account of Albitzer's playing - on this Dutch organ site: https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=nl&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.orgelnieuws.nl%2Fl-ecole-du-nord%2F&edit-text=

Do the comments make sense? :) (Apart from the confusing, automated translation gibberish? :D)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: North Star on May 10, 2014, 05:19:08 AM
..And here's a link to the Amz FR product page, complete with samples..
(http://multimedia.fnac.com/multimedia/ES/images_produits/ES/ZoomPE/6/5/6/3487549902656.jpg) (http://www.amazon.fr/LEcole-du-Nord-Buxtehude-Dietrich/dp/B00I65234M/)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 10, 2014, 11:30:39 AM

But thanks guys, for pointing it out to me. The good news is that Ablitzer might have found his new "home" at Ligia. Hopefully there is more to come...

Anyway I encountered a slightly qualified recommendation of the new recording - on account of Albitzer's playing - on this Dutch organ site: https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=nl&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.orgelnieuws.nl%2Fl-ecole-du-nord%2F&edit-text=
Do the comments make sense? :) (Apart from the confusing, automated translation gibberish? :D)
Q

Relistening to this to day confirms my first impression. I think the Dutch reviewer is much too strict.

The organ is an outstanding early Baroque North German style-copy, rather Scherer than Schnitger, the flute stops are softer and the mixtures milder than Schnitger´s, and the recorded sound is excellent and well defined. Ablitzers interpretation is expressive and flawless, with well chosen registrations - displaying the instrument very well, and his pace is noble and fluent without any rush (or dragging). His articulation is sufficently detached without too much legato.  This CD is a must have.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on May 10, 2014, 11:43:49 AM
Relistening to this to day confirms my first impression. I think the Dutch reviewer is much too strict. [...]

This CD is a must have.

Yay! :)  Music to my ears.... :D Thanks, and Gordo for his comments too. :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: listener on August 19, 2014, 12:20:15 PM
I have just enjoyed my first listen to the 'new' organ by Eule in Duisberg's Mercatorhalle on Acousence  21 410.  It is built in the English turn-of-the-century tradition of concert organs rather than sacred ones.  Three 32' pedal stops.
An interesting program, if the period attracts, including the original Symphony for Organ and Orch. by Guilmant op.42 usually heard as an organ sonata solo., Jongen's Sonata Eroica and the Lemare transcription of the overture to Wagner's Rienzi.  The Thalben-Ball Variations on a theme of Paganini are new to me.
Thomas Trotter and Iveta Apkalna are organists with the Duisburg Philharmonic
Detailed notes  and description of the organ are in the booklet.    There are no chorale settings, if that's what you are looking for.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on September 25, 2014, 01:27:47 AM
I'm going to upload Daniel Chorzempa's Liszt recordings on symphonyshare today. Let me know if you want them but can't get them from there. The performances have never been off LP apart from the variations on Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Sagen. I thought they were worth transfering because they're not too flash, they're even introspective at times, and I like that more than the usual way with Liszt.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on November 16, 2014, 10:45:54 AM
Just to enjoy: Pierre Bardon demonstrating Les Grandes Orgues Historiques de la Basilique Sainte-Marie-Madeleine du Couvent Royal de Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume, Provence, France, built by Jean-Esprit Isnard and his nephew Joseph Isnard, around 1775.

http://www.youtube.com/v/WlfcuawEUvg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlfcuawEUvg
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 02, 2015, 01:46:24 PM
My latest discovery on spotify is Giorgio Questa. Worth hearing - I've been listening to a mass by Jacques Brunel, new music for me, but there's lots of other stuff, including a lot of Frescobaldi and Brahms and the inevitable JSB.

(http://i.prs.to/t_200/dynamiccds687.jpg)

Here's a thread about him on an organ forum

http://www.organmatters.com/index.php?topic=820.0
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 22, 2015, 09:56:06 AM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/434/MI0003434394.jpg)

Listening to this, the thought actually crossed my mind that it's all been downhill since Arnolt Schlick. Nonsense of course, but such is the strength of Kimberly Marshall's advocacy, and such is the integrity, the candour, of the music and the music making.

Anyway what I really want to say is, Arnolt's good. And Kimberly Marshall's neo-early organ sounds good to me.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Moonfish on January 22, 2015, 12:03:52 PM
What are your thoughts about this recent compilation of French Organ music performed by Alain?


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81C5OO6dCBL._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 31, 2015, 11:37:47 PM
(http://www.israbox.net/uploads/posts/2015-01/1421598283_front.jpg)

Bernard Foccroulle plays Weckmann on the restored organ of St Katherine's Church Hamburg.

The registrations are natural, beautiful, and somehow exotic - I'm reminded of the registrations that Kelemen used in his Weckmann CD.  Organ lovers will want this not just for the organ, but also for Foccroulle's conception of the music, which is distinctive not just for it's modesty and seriousness, but also because his legato and long phrasing results in a calm coherent forward movement.

I love Weckmann for some reason.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 14, 2015, 12:33:17 AM
Has anyone heard any of the Samuel Scheidt survey on Fagott? Any opinions? Which would be the best one to start with?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 14, 2015, 04:54:55 AM
Has anyone heard any of the Samuel Scheidt survey on Fagott? Any opinions? Which would be the best one to start with?

I own the first 8 volumes, and I have listened to about half of them. The recordings are very interesting from an organological point of view, and as far as I can judge (competition isn´t strong) the playing from a number of different - and to me largely unknown -  organists, is highly informed and also generally inspired.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 15, 2015, 06:28:05 AM
Warning. Prepare yourself for a rave.

This is what Skip Sempé says about Louis Couperin's organ works from the Oldham manuscript

Quote
Believe it or not, we do not really know for sure whether this Couperin is Louis or another member of the Couperin family. Louis Couperin was a known viol player and organist: it was his brother Charles who had an outstanding reputation as a harpsichordist. Charles Couperin was the father of François Couperin 'Le Grand', which may lead us to wonder if the finest eighteenth century French harpsichordist was actually trained by his father, rather than his uncle? As a further complication of the issue, the organ pieces of 'Louis Couperin' have recently been published, and it has been suggested that the manuscript source of these organ works represents an autograph of Louis Couperin. There is some disagreement on this matter. However, the harpsichord works are so much more interesting on grounds of musical content and finesse of style that I find it hard to imagine that these organ pieces are the work of the same composer. I have suggested that even if Louis Couperin was the scribe, does this lend real certainty as the composer of the music he was transmitting in his own hand? Perhaps we will never know.

And Glen Wilson, in a more scholarly manner, has tried to support his view that the Fantasias and Fugues aren't good enough to be by a master like LC, the paper's on the Glen Wilson website. Moroney was a  defender in performance I suppose, though I've never seen anything on it published by him, he seems to have remained quiet. I have a friend who went to hear Moroney play the music at St Gervais in Paris who says he was so bored he nearly fell asleep.

Up to now, I've known the pieces from Moroney's recording and from Jan Wilem Jansen's. Neither had convinced me that this was interesting music and quietly I sympahised with Skip Sempé and Glen Wilson. I haven't heard Peter Dirkson's recording.

Then I bought this, I took a punt. Result: I've started to change my mind:

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/743/MI0003743329.jpg)

What's so special about Beyhurst's take on the music is this: it reminds me of Titelouze. Contrapuntal, yes. But not academic. The function of the music is to effect your soul. And above all, it's an orgy of colour.

And Beyhurst seems to give the works something which seems right at the essence of French early music - the paradoxical combination of raucous vulgarity and refined elegance.

Why should the influences of LC's harpsichord music be the same as his organ music? There's no reason to expect similarities. I'm not sure if LC could have been aware of Titelouze's music or the Titelouze style - but listening to this recording, I'd bet he was.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 15, 2015, 09:34:48 AM
Warning. Prepare yourself for a rave.



Then I bought this, I took a punt. Result: I've started to change my mind:

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/743/MI0003743329.jpg)

What's so special about Beyhurst's take on the music is this: it reminds me of Titelouze. Contrapuntal, yes. But not academic. The function of the music is to effect your soul. And above all, it's an orgy of colour.

And Beyhurst seems to give the works something which seems right at the essence of French early music - the paradoxical combination of raucous vulgarity and refined elegance.


Too interesting to pass by, so I ordered the CD at once (from Fnac).  :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Moonfish on March 09, 2015, 02:14:11 AM
I came across this film showing Michel Chapuis performing at Saint Pons (recorded back in 2006). It is interesting to watch him play.

https://www.youtube.com/v/St6uZxVawcY
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 09, 2015, 08:12:58 AM
I heard Serge Schoonbroot play at Ste Croix in Bordeaux last night, he did some Sweelinck and Chaumont and Grigny and Marchand. The Marchand was particularly impressive. During the concert I kept thinking that I've never heard a musician so talented at making the music sound so fresh, as though it's an improvisation. Other organists may be great at other things, but for using techniques to make the music sound like spontaneous expression, Schoonderbroot is exceptional.

One aspect of this is about transitions. When a registration changes, even when it changes dramatically, Schoonbroot makes it sound really natural.

It also made me think that I'd better do something with my hi fi to get closer to the real Dom Bedos sound at home. Suggestions for amps, speakers, sub woofers etc appreciated.

How strange music is. There we all were listening to this big rich colourful sound in this enormous stone space. Yet somehow, staring at the green and gold pipes like you might watch a log fire or the surface of a lake, it all felt extremely intimate.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 16, 2015, 04:21:32 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71oToODIawL._SX522_.jpg)

What do you really get from meantone?

The disc above has some c17 Dutch style music played on a neo baroque organ (new pipes, old case.) Leonhardt plays it with equal tuning, and Matteo Imbruno plays it with meantone tuning.

Maybe, just maybe, I can hear the difference caused by the tuning. I can certainly hear a difference but  you have to bear in mind that the recording quality is different, and the organists may be using different magic powers in their touch to affect the sound (that's possible, right?) Is Leonhardt's recital "whiter" than Imbruno's? It doesn't sound like that to me in the van Noordt hymn or the Scheidemann Toccata.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 17, 2015, 05:13:27 AM
What do you really get from meantone?

You know the answer.

One gets almost pure tuning, in contrast to the universally out of tune equal tuning.



Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 17, 2015, 01:53:04 PM

One gets almost pure tuning, in contrast to the universally out of tune equal tuning.

I think I once more shall recommend this book:

Ross W. Duffin:
How equal temperament ruined harmony
W. W. Norton & Company, New York/London
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 17, 2015, 02:02:12 PM
I heard Serge Schoonbroot play at Ste Croix in Bordeaux last night, he did some Sweelinck and Chaumont and Grigny and Marchand. The Marchand was particularly impressive. During the concert I kept thinking that I've never heard a musician so talented at making the music sound so fresh, as though it's an improvisation. Other organists may be great at other things, but for using techniques to make the music sound like spontaneous expression, Schoonderbroot is exceptional.

One aspect of this is about transitions. When a registration changes, even when it changes dramatically, Schoonbroot makes it sound really natural.

It also made me think that I'd better do something with my hi fi to get closer to the real Dom Bedos sound at home. Suggestions for amps, speakers, sub woofers etc appreciated.

How strange music is. There we all were listening to this big rich colourful sound in this enormous stone space. Yet somehow, staring at the green and gold pipes like you might watch a log fire or the surface of a lake, it all felt extremely intimate.

Thanks for these inspiring thoughts. Schoonbroodt´s recordings very much confirm your impressions.

I recall, that you intended a few months ago to attend a recital with Robert Bates (Titelouze/Grigny) in St. Croix. What did you make of this?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on November 17, 2015, 07:36:38 PM
That Marie-Claire Alain set posted above looks great. I have her Erato set of the complete Bach and now I want this. Has anyone heard it?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 17, 2015, 09:41:39 PM
Thanks for these inspiring thoughts. Schoonbroodt´s recordings very much confirm your impressions.

I recall, that you intended a few months ago to attend a recital with Robert Bates (Titelouze/Grigny) in St. Croix. What did you make of this?

Don't ask. It was a disaster for me. I didn't make it to the church in time >:(
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 17, 2015, 09:43:05 PM
That Marie-Claire Alain set posted above looks great. I have her Erato set of the complete Bach and now I want this. Has anyone heard it?

I have it. The transfers are good. Unfortunately most of the music in the set doesn't interest me much.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: The new erato on November 17, 2015, 11:29:01 PM
I didn't make it to the church in time >:(
But were you married in the morning?

https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Get_Me_to_the_Church_on_Time (https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Get_Me_to_the_Church_on_Time)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jochanaan on November 18, 2015, 05:42:00 PM
...How strange music is. There we all were listening to this big rich colourful sound in this enormous stone space. Yet somehow, staring at the green and gold pipes like you might watch a log fire or the surface of a lake, it all felt extremely intimate.
Yes, the sounds draw us all in. 8)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on November 18, 2015, 11:54:02 PM
I think I once more shall recommend this book:

Ross W. Duffin:
How equal temperament ruined harmony
W. W. Norton & Company, New York/London

Can you recommend something shorter as an introduction?

Lately I am becoming even more enchanted with de Grigny's work, and am seeking additional recordings.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 19, 2015, 10:07:26 AM


Lately I am becoming even more enchanted with de Grigny's work, and am seeking additional recordings.

What have you been listening to?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on November 19, 2015, 03:10:55 PM
I have an LP on the Telefunken label (probably mid-60s) with  Premier Livre d'Orgue, 1699, La Messe. I am not sure who the artist is--I made a CD of that LP, but now I can't find the LP itself.

I also have a CD by Gerre Hancock, former organist at St. Thomas Church in NYC. This is outstanding BTW:

(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/630x630/music/785/1135785.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 19, 2015, 09:51:17 PM
I have an LP on the Telefunken label (probably mid-60s) with  Premier Livre d'Orgue, 1699, La Messe.

Michel Chapuis maybe. It sounds to me as though you've only heard the mass, not the hymns, so that may be something to think about. Do you want a recording which presents the music a bit like a church service, with some singing interspersed with the organ music?

Just this week saw the release of a new Grigny recording on the organ at Ste Croix in Bordeaux and at the northern church of St Michel en Thiérache , by Marina Tchebourkina. I've just started to listen to it, what I can say is that it's noble and serious and weighty and transparent and colourful and very well recorded.

(http://d250ptlkmugbjz.cloudfront.net/images/covers/48/01/3760075340148_300.jpg)

Tchebournika has collaborated on a publication on Grigny which looks interesting, I may buy it

http://symetrie.com/fr/titres/l-orgue/293-nicolas-de-grigny-1672-1703



Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 20, 2015, 04:28:45 AM
Michel Chapuis maybe. 

You may omit the "maybe".

Quote from: Mandryka
Just this week saw the release of a new Grigny recording on the organ at Ste Croix in Bordeaux and at the northern church of St Michel en Thiérache , by Marina Tchebourkina. I've just started to listen to it, what I can say is that it's noble and serious and weighty and transparent and colourful and very well recorded.

I can only find this available on mp3 download. Do you know if a CD exists?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on November 20, 2015, 05:19:23 AM
Can you recommend something shorter as an introduction?

The book contains 160 rather small pages, and note that the subject is very complicated.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 20, 2015, 07:57:08 AM
You may omit the "maybe".

I can only find this available on mp3 download. Do you know if a CD exists?

Not as far as I can see, they aren't selling a CD from their site at

http://www.natives.fr/
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on November 20, 2015, 10:54:44 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. I will look into that CD/MP3 or whatever it is.

I have been listening to more and more pipe organ music as my musical tastes have evolved over the years; the instrument and its literature (even Bach alone!) seem to be a universe unto itself--much more so than any other instrument. It is a place of solace far removed from the innumerable horrors wrought by humanity.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 01, 2016, 10:50:26 AM
(http://d250ptlkmugbjz.cloudfront.net/images/covers/06/54/3325480605406_600.jpg)

This is a life enhancing anthology of rare recordings by top musicians on lovely organs playing fascinating music from the Arion label.

Having said that, I have absolutely no idea who is playing what, or on which instruments! I can find a track list, but it doesn't go any further than specify  the titles of the tracks. And as far as I can see there is no cd, so no booklet.

http://www.qobuz.com/fr-fr/album/-lart-de-lorgue-vol1/3325480605406#

Added: found it, but is there a booklet?

http://www.grooves-inc.co.uk/brosse-langlais-darasse-beraza-the-art-die-orgel-vol-cornerstone-media-cd-album-pZZa1-1897437072.html

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 01, 2016, 01:27:20 PM
Voilà:

http://www.amazon.fr/LArt-lorgue-Vol-1-Compositeurs-divers/dp/B00005BIBK

For the content: Blow up the backside of the cover.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 14, 2016, 03:40:20 AM
(http://prodimage.images-bn.com/pimages/3576073081071_p0_v1_s272x272.jpg)

Fabulous Flemish organs beautifully recorded. Guillaume Van Belle (1686)/Nielles-les-Ardres and  Bremser (1646)/ Elzenveldkapel Antwerp. Both meantone. The recording is worth hearing for the organs alone IMO.

Fabulous organist. Makes very good use of dissonances, tasteful registrations, transitions sound natural and coherent, often colourful without being garish.

Fabulous music. I'd heard some of Peeter Cornet's music before on a recording by Koopman, but it didn't impress me half as much as this. A near contemporary of Titelouze, so we're approaching the fons et origo.

http://www.orguescattiaux.org/Liste%20des%20instruments/Nielles/Niellesl.html
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 14, 2016, 04:52:03 AM
Fabulous Flemish organs beautifully recorded. Guillaume Van Belle (1686)/Nielles-les-Ardres and  Bremser (1646)/ Elzenveldkapel Antwerp. Both meantone. The recording is worth hearing for the organs alone IMO.

Fabulous organist. Makes very good use of dissonances, tasteful registrations, transitions sound natural and coherent, often colourful without being garish.

Fabulous music. I'd heard some of Peeter Cornet's music before on a recording by Koopman, but it didn't impress me half as much as this. A near contemporary of Titelouze, so we're approaching the fons et origo.

I have also enjoyed this set very much for the reasons you mention.. A nice find that Cornet's music is so substantial.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 18, 2016, 10:20:24 AM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/073/MI0001073880.jpg)  (http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/036/MI0001036900.jpg?)

I would say that both these volumes represent a really interesting and for me revealing slant on Pachelbel. The music chosen is interesting for its counterpoint, the performances are  expressive, rarely flamboyant, never hectoring or brutal, always serious and he's not shy of using the organs' colours. And he uses a couple of lovely  old organs to boot. Payne sounds well at home with this idiom. I couldn't stop myself thinking of earlier music - Froberger and serious Scheidt - Bk 3!

The only piece I knew before was the Aria Sebaldina, and there I think that Payne is not as attractive to hear as (eg) Tüma on clavichord, just because he doesn't find the melancholy which I've been conditioned to expect in this music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on February 20, 2016, 07:45:48 PM
Just ordered this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51F-jwmU1WL._SX355_.jpg)

Should keep me busy for a while, and a hell of a bargain. I am still greatly enjoying her Bach 14 CD set I bought years ago.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on February 21, 2016, 01:33:38 AM



Fabulous Flemish organs beautifully recorded. Guillaume Van Belle (1686)/Nielles-les-Ardres and  Bremser (1646)/ Elzenveldkapel Antwerp. Both meantone. The recording is worth hearing for the organs alone IMO.

Fabulous organist. Makes very good use of dissonances, tasteful registrations, transitions sound natural and coherent, often colourful without being garish.

Fabulous music. I'd heard some of Peeter Cornet's music before on a recording by Koopman, but it didn't impress me half as much as this. A near contemporary of Titelouze, so we're approaching the fons et origo.

http://www.orguescattiaux.org/Liste%20des%20instruments/Nielles/Niellesl.html

Thanks for posting that, looks very interesting..and I didn't know the composer. :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 28, 2016, 02:20:36 PM

I would say that both these volumes represent a really interesting and for me revealing slant on Pachelbel. The music chosen is interesting for its counterpoint, the performances are  expressive, rarely flamboyant, never hectoring or brutal, always serious and he's not shy of using the organs' colours. And he uses a couple of lovely  old organs to boot. Payne sounds well at home with this idiom. I couldn't stop myself thinking of earlier music - Froberger and serious Scheidt - Bk 3!

I have taken this ad notam and am going to order these two CDs with my Next, soon to come Presto order.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 04, 2016, 11:53:59 PM
(http://is2.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Music1/v4/b5/f6/c6/b5f6c693-c0d7-6ad2-62a3-37865bda03fb/source/150x150bb.jpg)

A  flamboyant Buxtehude recording on a flamboyant neo-baroque organ, Formentelli/Merano (1967). Leonardo Carrieri is a keyboard player to watch out for I think. And the recording is worth catching for the organ alone, especially for people like me who like  astringency.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on March 05, 2016, 04:16:27 PM
I am looking for a complete box set of Reger's organ music. I have a few of them on Naxos, but would like a complete (or nearly complete) set.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Richard on March 06, 2016, 07:06:10 PM
I am looking for a complete box set of Reger's organ music. I have a few of them on Naxos, but would like a complete (or nearly complete) set.

You mentioned the Naxos series. I presume you've seen this:



Both Reger and Fugatto are working on the series as well, but I don't think that either are complete.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on March 06, 2016, 07:55:02 PM
Thanks, I actually have seen it, and it looks really good (good reviews), but I am wondering whether there is any competition in complete sets. I could not really find any on Amazon.

Have you heard this set?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Richard on March 07, 2016, 05:37:11 AM
Like you I have only heard a few volumes. Naxos used a number of different organists through the series (12? I think). I recall the playing being good and the recording being very good.

The price is right. Still... nineteen hours of Reger's organ music. That would be a test of concentration.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on March 12, 2016, 11:49:30 AM
Any thoughts on this set?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tAzfqcdXL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 12, 2016, 01:50:52 PM
Any thoughts on this set?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tAzfqcdXL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg)

If you can get it for 15 Euro's as I did, it is worth the cost. Not all the content is equally interesting, but among other things there is a fine Bach CD by Andreas Liebig and a fine CD played on North German Baroque organs by Harald Vogel. And the Zipoli CD by Lorenzo Ghielmi is worth listening to. The rest is good and less interesting things mixed together. I on my part find, that Radulescu's Muffat CD is the weakest part of the set, not because of the music but the interpretation is dull.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on March 12, 2016, 03:25:00 PM
Thank you. Yes, it's 16$ here, and it looked to have some interesting instruments as well as unfamiliar pieces (to me any way).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 14, 2016, 11:33:46 AM
Thank you. Yes, it's 16$ here, and it looked to have some interesting instruments as well as unfamiliar pieces (to me any way).

Go for it!

:)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 18, 2016, 04:52:07 AM
You mentioned the Naxos series. I presume you've seen this:



Both Reger and Fugatto are working on the series as well, but I don't think that either are complete.

I am looking for a complete box set of Reger's organ music. I have a few of them on Naxos, but would like a complete (or nearly complete) set.

I have some (maybe 5, 6 volumes) of the Naxos. Good stuff. Not great. But what is great in Reger organ works? What makes them work?
Rosalind Haas (MDG) certainly doesn't; have that, too, but it's dry as dust -- a few wonderful touches here and there notwithstanding.
So along came Bernhard Buttmann (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00BN2N9XE/goodmusicguide-20) (I know, unfortunate, isn't it) on Oehms and although I only have v.1 of so far three volumes (each 4 CDs, I think), it just totally blew me away. So much color, so flowery no: fruity... a real joy in the listening!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 19, 2016, 12:02:47 PM
Just to enjoy:

Sietze de Vries: Partita in Baroque Style on Psalm 86 (a prayer for help by David).

Zielman organ, Reformed church Die Kandelaar, Pretoria, South Africa.

https://www.youtube.com/v/mwvgQyyJF3A
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 21, 2016, 10:29:45 AM
Just to enjoy:

Sietze de Vries: Partita in Baroque Style on Psalm 86 (a prayer for help by David).

Zielman organ, Reformed church Die Kandelaar, Pretoria, South Africa.

https://www.youtube.com/v/mwvgQyyJF3A
Nice organ, the music was OK -- maybe over long. But what do you think of the idea of projecting his hands and feet on a screen as he's playing?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 21, 2016, 08:22:53 PM
Nice organ, the music was OK -- maybe over long. But what do you think of the idea of projecting his hands and feet on a screen as he's playing?

Some organs in NL have a mirror, which means the listener can watch ('reversed') action, though it's often difficult to see, and I've experienced a projector once (in the Der Aa Kerk, Groningen), where one could only see the player's hands.

For me, it doesn't change much and it takes away a bit of the 'mystery', but I heard some younger visitors afterwards who really appreciated it, so I think it's a nice add-on. I guess it will make organ concerts more expensive though, because camera's, projectors et al are not for free.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on June 28, 2016, 04:44:50 PM
Just received the Cornet 2 CD set (Arnaud Van de Cauter), recommended in this thread, and am enjoying it a great deal. Also, today, I stumbled across this set, which looks very intriguing. Does anyone have this?

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51TeqjueVgL._SX425_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41XMUSsrNZL.jpg)

My German is crap (I'm barely an A2 speaker after all my efforts), but I will try to get through this review:

http://de.brilliantclassics.com/2015/12/various-500-years-of-organ-music/
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Cato on June 29, 2016, 02:12:00 AM
Just received the Cornet 2 CD set (Arnaud Van de Cauter), recommended in this thread, and am enjoying it a great deal. Also, today, I stumbled across this set, which looks very intriguing. Does anyone have this?

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51TeqjueVgL._SX425_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41XMUSsrNZL.jpg)

My German is crap (I'm barely an A2 speaker after all my efforts), but I will try to get through this review:

http://de.brilliantclassics.com/2015/12/various-500-years-of-organ-music/

It is not really a review, but more of a promotion as to why you should buy the set.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 30, 2016, 10:44:14 PM
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Organ-Works-2-DISC-SET-Pamela-Tunder-Ruiter-Feenstra-1900-CD-New-/00/s/NTAwWDUwMA==/z/umEAAOSwv0tVb~JA/$_35.JPG)

 There is a revolution afoot in stylus fantasticus. Gone are the days when Buxtehude and Bruhns were seen as just writers of bravura. First William Porter for Bruhns, them Hans Davidsson for Buxtehude and now Pamela Ruiter-Feenstra for Tunder present a stylus fantasticus which is sweet, soft, singing, introverted, reflective, rapt, humane, poetic, oneiric, mystical, hermetic, ecstatic, spiritual. Everything but virtuosic in fact. Que - avoid.

The organ, the Göteborg über-Schnitger,  mean-tone, is fabulous of course.

Part of the origin of Ruiter-Feenstra's vision lies in her having gone back to the oldest tablatures to create her own edition -- apparently previous editions were a dog's dinner. In some pieces, the combination of the organ and Ruiter-Feenstra's approach and the authenticity of the versions she uses produces something which is musical magic. An example is Was kann uns kommen un fur not version 1, The Lord is my Shepherd,  with its strange ending.

Are there any secret Tunder recordings by Walter Kraft?

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 10, 2016, 08:56:44 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81v1VW4DURL._SX522_.jpg)

Karl Maureen plays the Steigleder variations. The recording is organologically interesting because the instrument, Jörg Ebert/Innsbruck, is very much in the style that Steigleder would have been used to. Maureen is a performer/scholar who has specialised in South German music. There's nothing didactic or academic about his performance.

The performance uses voices and organ. Given the HIPness of the approach, I guess that that means that what Berben does isn't justifiable historically. Tuning is a modified meantone, and is attractive I think.  Karl Maureen prides himself on the historical authenticity of his interpretation. The booklet is exemplary, with extensive discussions of the composer, the music, the tabulature and the organ.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on July 10, 2016, 04:47:07 PM
Thanks for these recommendations. The Tunder CD is on my wish list--I will buy it soon--and eventually most of the other recommendations on this thread.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 15, 2016, 07:52:43 PM
Discussion of baroque temperament, and organ practice more generally, here.

https://list.uiowa.edu/scripts/wa.exe?A2=ind0301&L=HPSCHD-L&D=0&P=37504


It's an early music message board from Iowa University, if you search you'll find some interesting comments from David Moroney (on L. couperin organ music for example, which taught me that the area of attribution isn't something an amateur should ever get involved in: it's a job for the professionals. Maybe Glen Wilson is an amateur, who am I to say!

https://list.uiowa.edu/scripts/wa.exe?A2=ind1109&L=HPSCHD-L&P=R1050&1=HPSCHD-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4

And on Fugue,

https://list.uiowa.edu/scripts/wa.exe?A2=ind1208&L=HPSCHD-L&D=0&1=HPSCHD-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4&P=61909)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 17, 2016, 09:02:57 AM
(http://www.pieterdirksen.nl/Images/Tundercd.jpg)

Tunder, Dirksen/van Laar,, Groningen.

http://www.pieterdirksen.nl/Recordings/Tunder.htm

There are sample downloads here, which I haven't had the chance to hear yet.

http://www.groningenorgelland.nl/index.php?action=extra&extra=A_downloads_tunder_cd&lang=EN

Bought this issue last Saturday, and did the dishes today whilst listening to it: it's a great disc!
(And so are the downloads.)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 17, 2016, 11:00:42 AM
Discussion of baroque temperament, and organ practice more generally, here.

https://list.uiowa.edu/scripts/wa.exe?A2=ind0301&L=HPSCHD-L&D=0&P=37504


It's an early music message board from Iowa University, if you search you'll find some interesting comments from David Moroney (on L. couperin organ music for example, which taught me that the area of attribution isn't something an amateur should ever get involved in: it's a job for the professionals. Maybe Glen Wilson is an amateur, who am I to say!

https://list.uiowa.edu/scripts/wa.exe?A2=ind1109&L=HPSCHD-L&P=R1050&1=HPSCHD-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4

And on Fugue,

https://list.uiowa.edu/scripts/wa.exe?A2=ind1208&L=HPSCHD-L&D=0&1=HPSCHD-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4&P=61909)

Thanks for drawing attention to these interesting discussions and to the webpage in general, which I did not know.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 17, 2016, 11:07:19 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81v1VW4DURL._SX522_.jpg)
Karl Maureen plays the Steigleder variations.

Where did you find this unattainable recording??
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 17, 2016, 12:01:48 PM
Where did you find this unattainable recording??

Amazon in Germany, going for a song! I'll let you have it tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 17, 2016, 12:07:43 PM
Amazon in Germany, going for a song! I'll let you have it tomorrow.

That would be great.  :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 17, 2016, 12:10:32 PM
Bought this issue last Saturday, and did the dishes today whilst listening to it: it's a great disc!
(And so are the downloads.)

I shall buy it, I thought the phrasing, touch and the intimacy was unusual in Pieter Dirkesn's download.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 18, 2016, 10:27:36 PM
I shall buy it, I thought the phrasing, touch and the intimacy was unusual in Pieter Dirkesn's download.

I haven't done a thorough comparison with f.i. Ruiter-Feenstra or Flamme, but I really enjoyed Dirksen's approach, with a nice and delicate use of all kinds of beautiful 'Martini' stops.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 20, 2016, 05:19:19 AM
I haven't done a thorough comparison with f.i. Ruiter-Feenstra or Flamme, but I really enjoyed Dirksen's approach, with a nice and delicate use of all kinds of beautiful 'Martini' stops.

It's hard to order that CD because he doesn't respond to his emails and as far as I can see his website is the only source. Where did you get your copy from?

On the other hand I'm happy to announce that, after a certain amount of argy-bargy, I've managed to order Harald Vogel's Boehm CD.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 20, 2016, 07:26:58 PM
It's hard to order that CD because he doesn't respond to his emails and as far as I can see his website is the only source. Where did you get your copy from?
[...]

I bought it in the Martinikerk, in my hometown Groningen.

For another online possibility besides Dirksen's own website, maybe this link (again from the Groningen Orgelland website) might help:

http://www.groningenorgelland.nl/index.php?item=cd_s&action=page&group_id=10&page=3&lang=EN

Btw: their entire catalogue is yummy yummy... in my humble opinion, that is...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 20, 2016, 07:55:06 PM
I bought it in the Martinikerk, in my hometown Groningen.

For another online possibility besides Dirksen's own website, maybe this link (again from the Groningen Orgelland website) might help:

http://www.groningenorgelland.nl/index.php?item=cd_s&action=page&group_id=10&page=3&lang=EN

Btw: their entire catalogue is yummy yummy... in my humble opinion, that is...

Yes Groningen Organ Land (that sounds so cheesy in English) works. It didn't  come up when I typed Dirksen or Laar or Tunder in the search box, but if you scroll through the list it's there.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 25, 2016, 06:49:25 AM
with a nice and delicate use of all kinds of beautiful 'Martini' stops.

He really makes the music dance, light and colourful. Very good while doing the washing up.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 25, 2016, 09:13:38 AM
I suppose most of the organ aficionados here have already heard that on July 20th (exactly his 81st birthday and coincidentally exactly the day that my [scheduled] CD of the Week post of his Art of the Fugue went up) Andre Isoire died?!

Anyone have favorite non-Bach recordings of his?

Latest on Forbes:

Classical CD Of The Week: André Isoir's Art Of The Fugue

(http://blogs-images.forbes.com/jenslaurson/files/2016/07/Forbes_Classica-CD-of-the-Week_LA-DOLCE-VOLTA_Bach-Art-of-the-Fugue_Andre_Isoire_laurson_1200-1200x469.jpg) (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/07/20/classical-cd-of-the-week-andre-isoirs-art-of-the-fugue/#83b634a293d5)
Andre Isoire died the day this was posted. May he rest in peace; I think of him with warm gratitude; he has brought me many hours of listening-joy!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 25, 2016, 10:01:15 AM
I suppose most of the organ aficionados here have already heard that on July 20th (exactly his 81st birthday and coincidentally exactly the day that my [scheduled] CD of the Week post of his Art of the Fugue went up) Andre Isoire died?!

Anyone have favorite non-Bach recordings of his?

Yes, this one - but it never made it to CD:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ISOIR-DARASSE-TERRASSE-world-greatest-organ-france-vol-1-Box-Set-3-LP-VG/350912329747?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D37429%26meid%3D4f06b5215f5046f4b378499d5782dee0%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D4%26sd%3D231266176417

Other than that I have never been much convinced by his non-Bach recordings.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 25, 2016, 10:19:57 AM
Yes, this one - but it never made it to CD:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ISOIR-DARASSE-TERRASSE-world-greatest-organ-france-vol-1-Box-Set-3-LP-VG/350912329747?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D37429%26meid%3D4f06b5215f5046f4b378499d5782dee0%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D4%26sd%3D231266176417

Other than that I have never been much convinced by his non-Bach recordings.

I have the Isoir contribution on this Caliope  CD, or at least I think it's the same

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51n5t05oPvL.jpg)

He recorded Guilain twice, and the second one is worth catching, not least for the organ (L-A Cliquot/Houdan)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51fcbo-bC8L._SX450_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 25, 2016, 10:47:51 AM
I have the Isoir contribution on this Caliope  CD, or at least I think it's the same

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51n5t05oPvL.jpg)


I own both recordings (the Vox and the Calliope) and they are widely different in interpretation and recorded on two different organs. The Vox is by far the best. Caused by moving-mess I do not have the Vox at hand just now, but I shall send you the entire Vox LP as soon as I have settled myself in my new appartment (may take up to three weeks ).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 25, 2016, 10:51:36 AM
He recorded Guilain twice, and the second one is worth catching, not least for the organ (L-A Cliquot/Houdan)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51fcbo-bC8L._SX450_.jpg)

Yes, I forgot that one. This is actually a non-Bach Isoir favorite of mine, and now I recall one more non-Bach favorite:

 https://www.amazon.fr/Roberday-Fugues-Caprices-Pi%C3%A8ces-violes/dp/B0000634VN/ref=sr_1_14?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1469476277&sr=1-14&keywords=andre+isoir
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on July 25, 2016, 11:28:50 AM
You guys are going to make me go broke with all these recommendations.

Anyway, I would also be interested in recommendations for recordings (esp. complete sets) of Frescobaldi, Sweelinck, Siefert, Muffat, and Titelouze.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 26, 2016, 06:26:48 AM


Anyway, I would also be interested in recommendations for recordings (esp. complete sets) of Frescobaldi, Sweelinck, Siefert, Muffat, and Titelouze.

For Titelouze it's easy 'cause there's only one complete organ music. Bates. It's pretty good, the music is not played in alternatim though.

For Feedcobaldi I cannot recommend a complete set with any confidence. If you fancy a really OTT flamboyant organ recording on an outstanding instrument tuned properly then treat yourself to the CD by Edoardo Bellotti. It's quite a thrilling ride.

(http://prodimage.images-bn.com/pimages/8015203101289_p0_v1_s272x272.jpg)

My favourite Sweelinck is the NM set.

My favourite commercially available Muffat is probably Keleman.

Siefert I know nothing about.

 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 26, 2016, 08:14:17 AM
I own both recordings (the Vox and the Calliope) and they are widely different in interpretation and recorded on two different organs. The Vox is by far the best. Caused by moving-mess I do not have the Vox at hand just now, but I shall send you the entire Vox LP as soon as I have settled myself in my new appartment (may take up to three weeks ).

Hmm... I know the guys in charge of the rights to either catalogue. I think the Calliope has all been re-issued already; time to stimulate the Vox gentleman into action.  ;)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 26, 2016, 08:45:52 AM
For Titelouze it's easy 'cause there's only one complete organ music. Bates. It's pretty good, the music is not played in alternatim though.

For Feedcobaldi I cannot recommend a complete set with any confidence. If you fancy a really OTT flamboyant organ recording on an outstanding instrument tuned properly then treat yourself to the CD by Edoardo Bellotti. It's quite a thrilling ride.

(http://prodimage.images-bn.com/pimages/8015203101289_p0_v1_s272x272.jpg)

My favourite Sweelinck is the NM set.

My favourite commercially available Muffat is probably Keleman.

Siefert I know nothing about.

 

My recommendations are very similar.

Complete Titelouze: Bates (Loft)
 
Complete Frescobaldi: Most available sets are hit or miss. The safest recommendation concerning the keyboard music is probably Lorreggian (Brilliant Classics).

Complete Sweelinck keyboard music, yes the NM set. Berben and Koopman are both hit or miss.
I own the Glossa set, but have not yet had the time to listen to it.

Concerning Georg Muffat I also tend to prefer Kelemen among the available recordings.
Actually my preferred recording is by Heinz-Markus Göttsche (DaCamera LP), since long OOP.

Complete Siefert: Only one existing recording:

https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Paul-Siefert-1586-1666-S%E4mtliche-Werke-f%FCr-Tasteninstrumete/hnum/6781657

Not immediately exciting, but serviceable at least.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on July 26, 2016, 10:11:38 AM
Thanks very much gentlemen! I will look into these.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 26, 2016, 10:32:15 AM

Complete Sweelinck keyboard music, yes the NM set. Berben and Koopman are both hit or miss.

What's the "NM" set?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 26, 2016, 10:41:09 AM
What's the "NM" set?

https://www.amazon.de/Sweelinck-Keyboard-Works-Winsemius/dp/B000065618/ref=sr_1_7?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1469562014&sr=1-7&keywords=sweelinck
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 26, 2016, 10:42:45 AM
https://www.amazon.de/Sweelinck-Keyboard-Works-Winsemius/dp/B000065618/ref=sr_1_7?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1469562014&sr=1-7&keywords=sweelinck

Oh, yes. Silly me: I have it!  :D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on July 26, 2016, 12:15:11 PM
Well, definitely yes to the NM set for Sweelinck. Berben is nice but perhaps more attuned to the Baroque idiom.
It's amazing that it is still available (again) at a reasonable price.
The Glossa set I don't know but has a similar line up of performers and might be worthwhile as well....

Also concur with the recommendation of Joseph Kelemen's Muffat set:



I agree that the Frescobaldi sets (Tactus or Brilliant) are not an unqualified succes, though I prefer the latter.
This is an unqualified succes however:


Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 27, 2016, 01:46:21 AM
Well, definitely yes to the NM set for Sweelinck. Berben is nice but perhaps more attuned to the Baroque idiom.
It's amazing that it is still available (again) at a reasonable price.
The Glossa set I don't know but has a similar line up of performers and might be worthwhile as well....



I have a friend who thinks that NM and Glossa embody radically different approaches to Sweelinck. The former rather reverential and heavy - an attempt to bring Sweelinck closer to Bach. And the latter much lighter and more lyrical and less baroque.

I have listened to some of the Glossa set but honestly, I don't hear these different ideologies. I really should listen again more closely. I have found NM consistently rewarding I think, and there are bits of it which were real joys to discover for me, like Asperen's contribution, which helped me to see how fabulously alive counterpoint could sound.

But then Winsemius's contribution for Glossa is also very special.

I don't know the other two - Berben and Koopman -- well enough to comment with any confidence at all.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on August 09, 2016, 10:30:12 AM

Also concur with the recommendation of Joseph Kelemen's Muffat set:



Q

Just received this set and have been listening for the last few days. The organs--especially the Freundt organ at Klosterneuberg--are astounding. I don't think I've ever heard a more beautiful instrument. I have other (earlier) recordings of this instrument, but they did not make the impression this recording did. I will look for Kelemen's other recordings.
 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 19, 2016, 11:05:58 AM
(https://cdmarket.s3.amazonaws.com/system/20120417/81338/large.jpg)

This CD by Klaus Eichhorn, which had been rare and hence expensive, is now streaming on spotify and elsewhere.  It shows a particular side of  Scheidt and Scheidemann: full of joy, freshness, innocence, simplicity. Music which seems rooted in gay song and happy dance.

Eichhorn is outstanding at judging  how to move the music on so that the ear is constantly titivated by new ideas - essential because quite frankly, the music as presented is so modest and unpretentious that if you were given the chance to think about it too much you'd be bored.  But you're not given the chance and so boredom ain't on the horizon. It's like you're in an Aladdin's cave of coulours, sounds and tunes: every moment there's a new earful of something delightful. I had to stop myself from clapping and dancing round the room as it was playing.

In truth, it's no surprise that Scheidemann and Scheidt have a happy clappy side, because so does Sweelinck (it includes Scheidt's Frantzösisch Liedgen, based in Est-ce Mars?) But I'm so used to thinking of things like the Magnificats that I was really astounded by this collection.  We're very far from the baroque, far from stylus fantasticus, in this recording.  More like the book of folk songs and country dances. No intimations of Buxtehude and Bach at all.

Cool organ too - just right for the style of play. Someone should record Bohm on this organ - in fact Eichhorn may be just the chap.

I remember someone here, Florestan maybe, once saying he couldn't bear early keyboard music because there's no good tunes. Well, this is the CD - or rather download - for him.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on August 27, 2016, 01:10:47 PM
OK, have been listening to some Mendelssohn organ music (Vater unser im Himmelreich) lately, and am now interested in a complete set (or outstanding individual CDs)...Thanks.

EDIT: Peter Hurford CD looks very interesting, given how much I like his Bach.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 28, 2016, 10:17:08 PM
OK, have been listening to some Mendelssohn organ music (Vater unser im Himmelreich) lately, and am now interested in a complete set (or outstanding individual CDs)...Thanks.

EDIT: Peter Hurford CD looks very interesting, given how much I like his Bach.

I've got the 3CD-set of Vernet and I like it, even though it's been some time since I last listened to it.

http://www.olivier-vernet.com/fr/discography/felix-mendelssohn-integrale-de-loeuvre-pour-orgue-barenreiter/

https://www.amazon.com/lOeuvre-Pour-Orgue-Songe-mains/dp/B000P7VOY4/?tag=goodmusicguideco
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 29, 2016, 01:47:13 AM
OK, have been listening to some Mendelssohn organ music (Vater unser im Himmelreich) lately, and am now interested in a complete set (or outstanding individual CDs)...Thanks.

EDIT: Peter Hurford CD looks very interesting, given how much I like his Bach.

There is a  "great" organ recording with the Mendelssohn op 65 sonatas, it is magnificent. But it may not be possible to buy it any more. it is by Gerd Zacher and it includes the Brahms op 122 preludes, equally wonderful, bold and imaginative. The organ, by Karl Schuke in Essen, is magic, and the sound take puts you very convincingly in the body of the church, as it were. If you want I will let you have the files.

Gerd Zacher is a magnificent and creative organist, here, in Bach and in Schoenberg, Kagel and Ligeti.

(http://store.acousticsounds.com/images/large/CCYB_050502_SA__41619__01152009120613-5777.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 29, 2016, 06:37:39 AM
Gerd Zacher is a magnificent and creative organist, here, in Bach and in Schoenberg, Kagel and Ligeti.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerd_Zacher
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on August 29, 2016, 09:22:18 AM
Thanks. I can't find the Zacher anywhere on Amazon.com, but will try .de, .uk, and other sources later on. Among the available recordings, the Vernet looks good, and I would guess the Hurford is quite good as well (although it is far from complete). 

EDIT: Actually I tried different search terms and did find it available on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000LC4DBY/sr=1-4/qid=1472494898/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1472494898&sr=1-4
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 05, 2016, 05:44:46 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61CbzjaXHjL.jpg)

I dug this CD out because I was interested in exploring Marc Antonio Cavazzoni, Cavazzoni père. I know Liuwe Tamminga's  recording dedicated to the composer, and that left me with the impression that his best work was transcriptions. But here on this extraordinary recording by Sergio Vartolo we have a glorious Ricercar, full of the chiaroscuro that Tamminga's  performances lacked.

Just one thing by MAC. The rest is much more baroque, and is played with intensity, colour, flamboyance. In Vartolo's hands what these ricercari are searching for is variety of affect.

As if that's not enough the organ, Dallam/Lanvellec, is special and rarely recorded as far as I know. I have only two other CDs which use it - English music by Hadrien Jourdin and Froberger by Davit Maroney, and according to France-orgue.fr that's the lot apart from a very rare recording of English music by Kenneth Gilbert - can anyone upload it for me?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 06, 2016, 09:43:55 AM


As if that's not enough the organ, Dallam/Lanvellec, is special and rarely recorded as far as I know. I have only two other CDs which use it - English music by Hadrien Jourdin and Froberger by Davit Maroney, and according to France-orgue.fr that's the lot apart from a very rare recording of English music by Kenneth Gilbert - can anyone upload it for me?

Th Kenneth Gilbert English music CD at Lanvellec turns out to be cheaply and easily available from here

http://www.skolvreizh.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage_images.tpl&product_id=23&category_id=10&vmcchk=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=3

My copy arrived today, and it is  well recorded, it comes with what looks like a well researched and passionate book on the organ (though that is just a superficial impression from browsing it)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: vandermolen on October 07, 2016, 01:58:26 AM
I like Williamson's organ music:


There is a Naxos CD too.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on October 10, 2016, 04:29:30 PM
These look promising:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514ZbUZnbhL._SY355_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51727ABXtkL.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 13, 2016, 09:04:42 AM
These look promising:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514ZbUZnbhL._SY355_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51727ABXtkL.jpg)

I like vol 2, stylish modern organ, rare music and Payne's interpretations are good, sometimes more than good.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on October 13, 2016, 09:24:55 AM
I like vol 2, stylish modern organ, rare music and Payne's interpretations are good, sometimes more than good.

Yes, vol. 2 contains nice programming and serviceable playing, but vol. 1 is rather forgettable IMO, in part due to weak programming. However Payne would never become my first choice in this music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 13, 2016, 10:35:08 AM
Yes, vol. 2 contains nice programming and serviceable playing, but vol. 1 is rather forgettable IMO, in part due to weak programming. However Payne would never become my first choice in this music.

In vol 1 the mass by Gaspard Corrette is not uninteresting I think, but Payne doesn't do it justice.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Jo498 on December 29, 2016, 02:49:11 AM
Does anyone know if the Walcha "Orgelmeister vor Bach" 4-LP collection was ever on CD? There is a single anthology disc on eloquence but I have not seen any more.

Second question:
Recommend 5 Non-JS-Bach-Organ discs (or smallish anthologies, no huge boxes) you consider essential even for people only moderately into organ music!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 30, 2016, 06:05:44 AM
Does anyone know if the Walcha "Orgelmeister vor Bach" 4-LP collection was ever on CD? There is a single anthology disc on eloquence but I have not seen any more.

I've never seen the entire set being reissued.
There once was a 'Buxtehude only' in the DG Galleria series, (probably) also taken from that boxset.

(http://117.imagebam.com/download/JU3TP9r0EyIJQ--IiEZKDw/52356/523551607/0001368576_350.jpg)

https://www.amazon.com/Buxtehude-Organ-Works-Helmut-Walcha/dp/B00000E4C6/?tag=goodmusicguideco
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Jo498 on December 30, 2016, 06:24:47 AM
Yes, I saw the Buxtehude disc as well but forgot to mention it. The original anthology seems to have roughly two LPs Buxtehude, two LPs for the rest. The eloquence CD could probably have contained all the rest if they had not included several pieces by Buxtehude. Of course, it is natural to include some Buxtehude as he is the most famous of the bunch but OTOH his music is also far better covered than Boehm, Bruhns, Lübeck etc.



LP set on amazon.de: ASIN B00695DUFM
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 30, 2016, 06:45:07 AM
[...]
Recommend 5 Non-JS-Bach-Organ discs (or smallish anthologies, no huge boxes) you consider essential even for people only moderately into organ music!

I hope this one counts as a 'smallish anthology'... it's a great collection (6 discs) of historic organs in Spain, France, Italy and Germany, with pieces of f.i. Cabanilles, Sweelinck, Scheidemann, Muffat, Couperin, Frescobaldi, Pachelbel and Bruhns. Organists are Francis Chapelet, Michel Chapuis, René Saorgin and Helmut Winter.

(http://117.imagebam.com/download/922-PGDq0iDjEys6xDOQzA/52356/523556537/2901225.30_G.jpg)

http://www.harmoniamundi.com/#!/albums/1120

And, for a winter's day, this one is perfectly well suited:

(http://117.imagebam.com/download/CNoXdUD1ORK2XlENrv011g/52356/523556552/jb-jvo_s.jpg)

Jacques van Oortmerssen playing Brahms.

https://www.amazon.com/Brahms-Complete-Setterquist-Kristine-Church/dp/B0000016GD/?tag=goodmusicguideco
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: kishnevi on December 30, 2016, 10:16:41 AM
Does anyone know if the Walcha "Orgelmeister vor Bach" 4-LP collection was ever on CD? There is a single anthology disc on eloquence but I have not seen any more.

Second question:
Recommend 5 Non-JS-Bach-Organ discs (or smallish anthologies, no huge boxes) you consider essential even for people only moderately into organ music!

It was included (3 CDs, I think the entirety of the four LPs) in this


Of course, that's a solution only if you want at least some of the other stuff in that box (and of course, no liner notes).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 30, 2016, 11:37:12 AM

Second question:
Recommend 5 Non-JS-Bach-Organ discs (or smallish anthologies, no huge boxes) you consider essential even for people only moderately into organ music!

The box with 5 organ CDs played by Leonhardt; Alessandrini's 150 years of Italian Music; Payne's 2 CDs for VOX of music from the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book; The box of organ music from the New world with Norbert Broggini and others;  The Sweelinck box on NM.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 30, 2016, 02:05:31 PM
It was included (3 CDs, I think the entirety of the four LPs) in this
Of course, that's a solution only if you want at least some of the other stuff in that box (and of course, no liner notes).

And this is why I have passed it by.

Another solution is to digitize the Walcha LPs. I have done this.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 30, 2016, 02:21:10 PM
The box with 5 organ CDs played by Leonhardt; Alessandrini's 150 years of Italian Music; Payne's 2 CDs for VOX of music from the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book; The box of organ music from the New world with Norbert Broggini and others;  The Sweelinck box on NM.

There is a substantial part of harpsichord music in most of these boxes, though,

Quote from: Mandryka
The box of organ music from the New world with Norbert Broggini and others;

Which box do you think of? I only know one individual CD with Norbert Broggini.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 30, 2016, 10:41:24 PM

Which box do you think of? I only know one individual CD with Norbert Broggini.

This one

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51G9U%2BF%2BOcL.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 31, 2016, 01:12:06 AM
Second question:
Recommend 5 Non-JS-Bach-Organ discs (or smallish anthologies, no huge boxes) you consider essential even for people only moderately into organ music!

The NM Sweelinck set is not exactly a smallish collection, but a feast nonetheless....  8) (the Glossa set might be a good alternative)

A selection of other organ discs/ sets I cherish:




(Or any of the other recordings Andrea Marcon made for Divox)



(Many other recordings by Joseph Kelemen are gemms)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51sSqaxJxQL.jpg)
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51ivY9YO8cL.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 31, 2016, 01:44:18 AM
This one

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51G9U%2BF%2BOcL.jpg)

Thanks. I realize that I have ovned this for more than 10 years-
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Jo498 on January 01, 2017, 08:43:28 AM
Thanks! Some of them are unfortunately rather expensively oop, others are too much or too specialized for me (I have one Merulo-disc on Aura that is quite strange to my ears and I am not sure I am sufficiently into such early stuff yet).
I have most of Buxtehude's as well as single disc anthologies some of them recommended here. The Walcha I linked above, Ablitzer's "école du nord", one disc of Schoonbrodt playing Sweelinck, one Leonhardt/Frescobaldi, one Tachezi recital (Ossiach) and a few more.

Is nobody interested in 19th+20th century organ music? I got one twofer with romantic organ music but not much really grabbed me therefore I hesitated to get Brahms, Mendelssohn or Rheinberger although I like their non-organ music and the French romantics

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: kishnevi on February 13, 2017, 08:45:42 PM
Bump for the sake of


I have it as part of a Membran box (Spirales), but can certainly suggest this CD as proof that late 20th century composers could still find something to say on the organ.

Works performed
Frode Bitsch
Fantasia on "De levendes Land" pour grand orgue (1994)
Bo Gronbech
Three Liturgical Dances (1981)
Svend Erik Tarp
Four Organ Pieces Op. 87 A-D (1983)
Jesper Madsen
Praetorius Variationer (1983/1989)

Organ used: Poul-Gerhard Andersen organ, Sankt Markus Church Arhus
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 19, 2017, 11:24:19 AM
I'm listening to this one, played on a reconstruction of a 16th-century Niehoff organ like the one Sweelinck played on.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/129/MI0001129545.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

I have to say that the opening Fantasia Chromatica is stunning - probably my favorite version, since it uses the full plenum of the organ. I've always thought that the ending of the Fantasia, juxtaposing descending and ascending chromaticism, is one of the most satisfying endings to a piece I've ever heard.

The other fantasies and toccatas are also magnificent - I really like how he starts the D-minor Echo fantasy off with a full plenum, an approach that is rare among organists, but it's a tad bit too fast for my taste.

As for the variation sets, Schoonbroodt seems to have a penchant for "dirty" flutes like quintadenas and plena built on them. I don't know how much I share this penchant, though - I like cleaner flutes and principals.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 19, 2017, 12:17:52 PM
The combination of speed and a slightlly resonant recording ambience is the weakness of that CD, but the sense of spontaneity and enthusiasm is very memorable. I have a few things by Schoonbroodt and I've seen him in concert. There's an excellent Boyvin CD, he's a bit of a specialist in real minor french composers! And I have some Couperin by him but I can't remember anything about it.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 19, 2017, 01:38:12 PM
The combination of speed and a slightlly resonant recording ambience is the weakness of that CD, but the sense of spontaneity and enthusiasm is very memorable. I have a few things by Schoonbroodt and I've seen him in concert. There's an excellent Boyvin CD, he's a bit of a specialist in real minor french composers! And I have some Couperin by him but I can't remember anything about it.

I didn't have a problem with the recording, and thought that it was quite clear even at that speed. I did have reservations about the speed, though, in some pieces.

I also enjoyed his Chaumont on Spotify, and might seek out the other discs. Do please tell me how the Couperin sounds!

His discography (many French composers distributed across different labels, some defunct?)
http://www.sergeschoonbroodt.be/index.php/discographie
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 20, 2017, 12:25:05 AM
I've gone off François Couperin's music completely I'm afraid.

Thanks for pointing out his website, I didn't know he had recorded some Grigny. I've just ordered it.

Schoonbroodt also has a Titelouze CD with some de Cauroy interleaved - apparently there's a connection between the two composers. I like it, it's a fun listening experience not least because the singing is sympathetic and there seems to be a good rapport between organ and voice. And because Schoonbroodt's passion for the music is very palpable in the final verses of the hymns - where Titelouze is at his most inventive. For some reason he's left it out of his discography.

The other French composers he's recorded  don't much interest me at the moment.

Has anyone heard those Bach recordings?


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 20, 2017, 11:23:26 AM
Is it this one? Seems very interesting.
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/410Q216GMFL.jpg)

I do remember that Ablitzer also recorded a Titelouze disc with interwoven hymns - a friend lent me the disc but I wasn't too impressed by it, and gave it back.

(http://e.snmc.io/lk/f/a/9ead021de7f456561885b9215850d2d2/2294172.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 20, 2017, 02:11:19 PM
Have you heard this one?

(http://www.lesmeslanges.org/images/titelouze.jpg)

Quote
Dans le premier tiers du XVIIe siècle furent publiés, aux quatre coins de l'Europe, d'extraordinaires chefs-d'oeuvres pour clavier. Les pièces pour orgue de Jehan Titelouze, « Chanoine & Organiste de l'Eglise de Rouën », appartiennent à cette floraison miraculeuse : ses Hymnes de l'Eglise sont imprimées en 1623 chez Ballard (Paris), bientôt suivies d'un second livre consacré au Magnificat ou cantique de la Vierge (1626). Pour célébrer le 450e anniversaire de la naissance du "père de la musique d'orgue française", l'ensemble Les Meslanges a choisi de faire entendre ces pages d'orgue jouées par François Ménissier en alternance avec les voix et autres "instrumens musicaulx" comme le cornet et serpent, instruments indispensables dans les cathédrales comme celle de Rouen au XVIIe siècle. Ce concert aura aussi l'originalité de présenter ce compositeur en relation avec les musiciens de son époque dans le lieu où il a évolué: la cathédrale de Rouen. On entendra ainsi de superbes pages de Henri Frémart, maître de musique à la cathédrale de Rouen puis de Notre Dame de Paris, de Jean de Bournonville qui remporta à Rouen et à Evreux le Puy de Sainte Cécile, concours de musique fort réputé à l'époque...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 20, 2017, 03:28:34 PM
Have you heard this one?

(http://www.lesmeslanges.org/images/titelouze.jpg)

Listening to it on Spotify - initial reactions are very good; the organ is powerful and brilliant and I enjoy the cornetti accompanying the voices.

Now that I think of it, I don't listen to enough French Organ music. The discs that I have and listen to more often are Leonhardt's Couperin and Marchand on the Dom Dedos, an earlier one of his with Bouyvin and Chaumont, and also Titelouze by Bates.

Edit: I'm thinking of getting the Titelouze by Goecke - are you familiar with it?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 20, 2017, 11:38:36 PM
 Goecke is Apollo and Bates is Dionyssus.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 20, 2017, 11:44:34 PM
Now that I think of it, I don't listen to enough French Organ music. The discs that I have and listen to more often are Leonhardt's Couperin and Marchand on the Dom Dedos, an earlier one of his with Bouyvin and Chaumont, and also Titelouze by Bates.



Four French organ recordings I like are Jan Willem Jansen's Louis Couperin, Gillian Weir's Roberday, Bernard Coudurier's Grigny (both of them) and Freddy Eichelberger's Marchand.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 21, 2017, 05:54:50 PM
Four French organ recordings I like are Jan Willem Jansen's Louis Couperin, Gillian Weir's Roberday, Bernard Coudurier's Grigny (both of them) and Freddy Eichelberger's Marchand.

Thanks - I'll shamefully admit that the only one I've listened to before is Coudurier, so there's lots to explore here.

Goecke is Apollo and Bates is Dionyssus.

Nice to know that I've been having strong mead for all this time!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 22, 2017, 11:29:50 AM
Goecke is Apollo and Bates is Dionyssus.

What would you in this terminology call Darasse, Prefontaine, Schoonbroodt and Ablitzer?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 22, 2017, 12:53:41 PM
What would you in this terminology call Darasse, Prefontaine, Schoonbroodt and Ablitzer?

Darasse - Iris
Prefontaine - Krishna
Schoonbroodt - Mercury
Ablitzer - He's not God of anything.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on February 22, 2017, 01:11:01 PM
Just ordered this Vierne Missa Solennelle from Germany. None available in the U.S.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/21GF1D0V4JL.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 22, 2017, 04:02:26 PM
Darasse - Iris
Prefontaine - Krishna
Schoonbroodt - Mercury
Ablitzer - He's not God of anything.

I have to think about this....

Iris (rainbow), do you mean colorful?

Krishna (the creator) do you mean perfect?

Mercury (god of trade) do you mean commercial?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 23, 2017, 08:49:03 AM


Iris (rainbow), do you mean colorful?


Yes


Krishna (the creator) do you mean perfect?



I think Krishna is a bit like Loge in the ring, a sort of uncontrollable and highly spontaneous life force. I think Prefontaine is particularly  flamboyant and wild sounding sometimes, more so that Bates. You can here an Italian side to Titelouze in Prefontaine.



Mercury

Fast. Winged sandals.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 23, 2017, 05:17:46 PM
I think Krishna is a bit like Loge in the ring, a sort of uncontrollable and highly spontaneous life force. I think Prefontaine is particularly  flamboyant and wild sounding sometimes, more so that Bates. You can here an Italian side to Titelouze in Prefontaine.

Really? I know the Prefontaine set, but didn't bother listening to it after finding the Ad coenam rather indifferently trotted through. Bates takes a similar fast pace, but at least his heavier, reedier registrations give it a sense of grandeur and urgency.

There's something intensely religious in Bates' performance that just reminds me of the atmosphere of Ablitzer's Praetorius.

I'll have to revisit Prefontaine though - there's probably something that I didn't pick up on.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 24, 2017, 02:17:43 PM
Really? I know the Prefontaine set, but didn't bother listening to it after finding the Ad coenam rather indifferently trotted through. Bates takes a similar fast pace, but at least his heavier, reedier registrations give it a sense of grandeur and urgency.

There's something intensely religious in Bates' performance that just reminds me of the atmosphere of Ablitzer's Praetorius.

I'll have to revisit Prefontaine though - there's probably something that I didn't pick up on.

Yes I'm very glad to have Prefontaine's Titelouze.

Another thing I really appreciate by him, maybe more than his Titelouze, is a sequence of fugues by D'Anglebert, in a recording of music from the Livre de Montreal. These fugues are very much like Roberday's fugues and caprices, maybe they're better, I don't know. I  think I hear the  influence of Frescobaldi in all these composers' organ music  - D'Anglebert, Roberday and even Titelouze.  It's a shame that Prefontaine hasn't recorded Roberday.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 24, 2017, 07:27:30 PM
Yes I'm very glad to have Prefontaine's Titelouze.

Another thing I really appreciate by him, maybe more than his Titelouze, is a sequence of fugues by D'Anglebert, in a recording of music from the Livre de Montreal. These fugues are very much like Roberday's fugues and caprices, maybe they're better, I don't know. I  think I hear the  influence of Frescobaldi in all these composers' organ music  - D'Anglebert, Roberday and even Titelouze.  It's a shame that Prefontaine hasn't recorded Roberday.

Just listened to the Fugues, which I am already quite familiar with. Quite nice!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 24, 2017, 10:57:25 PM
Just listened to the Fugues, which I am already quite familiar with. Quite nice!

You mean the D'Anglebert fugues? Do you know any other recordings?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 24, 2017, 11:50:56 PM
You mean the D'Anglebert fugues? Do you know any other recordings?

I don't think that I have any other recordings of the fugues with me, but I've heard the fugues before somewhere (a friend? I don't go to concerts in organ-barren California) and really liked them. Thought they were Roberday at first, though.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 25, 2017, 06:42:42 AM
I bet their attribution is problematic.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 25, 2017, 08:42:27 AM
I bet their attribution is problematic.

Probably not. They were included in his Pièces de clavecin publication, after all.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 25, 2017, 11:33:09 PM
Probably not. They were included in his Pièces de clavecin publication, after all.

Ah, I didn't know that.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 25, 2017, 11:39:05 PM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_1080/MI0001/119/MI0001119615.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Georg Friedrich Kauffmann wanted to be organist in Leipzig's Tomaskirche, but they gave the job to J S Bach instead. His music is attractive enough, easy to listen to, contrapuntally simple but not banal, harmonically unadventurous but far from dull, melodically catchy. I thought this was an entertaining recording  from Maurizio Conti, and I appreciated finding out more about what sort of music was being made in Leipzig in 1723.  The organ he uses, the Treutmann at Grauhof, is very nice indeed.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 26, 2017, 05:45:05 PM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_1080/MI0001/119/MI0001119615.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Georg Friedrich Kauffmann wanted to be organist in Leipzig's Tomaskirche, but they gave the job to J S Bach instead. His music is attractive enough, easy to listen to, contrapuntally simple but not banal, harmonically unadventurous but far from dull, melodically catchy. I thought this was an entertaining recording  from Maurizio Conti, and I appreciated finding out more about what sort of music was being made in Leipzig in 1723.  The organ he uses, the Treutmann at Grauhof, is very nice indeed.

Quite a fun recording, but didn't stand up to many listens for me.
I guess when it comes to chorale-based works, I'm more of a 17th century person - I'd rather listen to a 2nd-rate 17th century composer (e.g. Duben) than a 2nd-rate 18th century one.
I did, however, really enjoy his "German organ music" disc, and also his recent "Bach mirrored" - very lively playing!

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/149/MI0001149985.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

(http://frabernardo.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/fb_1611911_bach_croci_COVER.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on February 28, 2017, 12:47:56 AM
And now for something completely different:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81ZzFEIwniL._SY450_.jpg)

I have some of these on LP but want to complete my set. Aboot as far from HIP as you can get I suppose; still some unforgettable performances IMO.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on February 28, 2017, 12:53:53 AM
I just FLAC-ed this LP, hence my re-awakened interest in Dupré. A Cavaillé-Coll instrument is not a Bach organ, but the performances are magesterial, deeply felt, and serene.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51hdVg-uFoL._SX300_QL70_FMwebp_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on March 02, 2017, 05:51:56 PM
I'm listening to an excellent broadcast by Deuschlandfunk of Sietze de Vries playing the beautiful Renaissance organ in Westerhusen. Listen to that tinkly mixture stop!
http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/krummhoerner-orgelfruehling-2016-alte-meister-neue.1988.de.html?dram:article_id=376757
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on March 06, 2017, 06:25:20 PM
Another "Guess the performer" for you guys:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMNO7VGcyt0

This is one of my favorite interpretations of Frescobaldi's Toccata Quarta, which is also one of my favorite Frescobaldi pieces.
But who's playing it? The title isn't helpful here (and I could care less if nothing is real and everything is an illusion). But at least we know it's played on the 1565 Graziadio Antegnati in Santa Barbara, Mantua.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 06, 2017, 11:40:28 PM
Another "Guess the performer" for you guys:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMNO7VGcyt0

This is one of my favorite interpretations of Frescobaldi's Toccata Quarta, which is also one of my favorite Frescobaldi pieces.
But who's playing it? The title isn't helpful here (and I could care less if nothing is real and everything is an illusion). But at least we know it's played on the 1565 Graziadio Antegnati in Santa Barbara, Mantua.

Loreggian maybe.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on March 07, 2017, 12:24:12 AM
Loreggian maybe.

By Loreggian, I'm assuming that you mean the Tactus Frescobaldi set. The piece on it is played by Vartolo, and it's not the one I'm looking for (no idea which organ it is).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK6seoB9i1A

I looked through the recordings available on Spotify and didn't find it (Unless, of course, I'm not looking).

Edit: Yep, I'm not looking. It's Loreggian, in the Brilliant Frescobaldi set. Thanks! Now tell me - is this set a worthwile investment?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 07, 2017, 01:58:41 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/dw2lfN_Knn4


Jonathan Giblin, Reincken An wasserflussen babylon, Taylor and Boody Cincinnati. The nice thing about this is that we see the manuscript Bach made under Boehm.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 07, 2017, 02:04:09 AM

Edit: Yep, I'm not looking. It's Loreggian, in the Brilliant Frescobaldi set. Thanks! Now tell me - is this set a worthwile investment?

Well you can hear it all for yourself on spotify. I only know Bk 2. It's more sensual than Vartolo, who is my favourite probably. Not keen on Aymes in Bk 2. Loreggian has some very nice instruments.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 10, 2017, 09:45:15 PM
Flamboyancy could be a virtue.....

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 11, 2017, 06:09:20 PM
I saw Bruhns have been discussed several times but not Lubeck.  I find his compositions quite penetrating while only few of his works have survived. I like the recordings below. The both are virtuoso performances though the Coudurier disc has a better recording sound.  Does anybody know about these organs?? Any opinions?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on March 11, 2017, 09:34:43 PM
I saw Bruhns have been discussed several times but not Lubeck.  I find his compositions quite penetrating while only few of his works have survived. I like the recordings below. The both are virtuoso performances though the Coudurier disc has a better recording sound.  Does anybody know about these organs?? Any opinions?

Massive organ nerd here!

The organ in the 1st disc is the organ in St. Ludger's Church (Ludgerikirche) in Norden, Germany. It's an exceptional, but quirkily shaped organ, since the church itself is so strangely shaped and if it were to be placed in a "standard" position, half of the congregation wouldn't be able to hear it!
It started out as a Rennaissance instrument built in 1618 incorporating 16th-century pipework, but was extensively rebuilt by the famous Northern German maker Schnitger (who monopolized organ-building, an industry of scale, in Northern Germany, built Lubeck's organs in Hamburg and Stade, and whom Buxtehude knew well). After being mindlessly altered in the 19th century, it was restored back to full glory by the Ahrends.
Here's a video featuring it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmQ2OIMYsjs

Some other excellent recordings featuring it I can think of are Foccroulle's Tunder, Bob van Asperen's Froberger, Leonhardt's disc "Northern German organ works," and of course MDG's series featuring this organ.

The other organ is the Treutmann in Grauhof, an organ that was built later in the 1730's. This is the Central-German (as opossed to Schnitger's Norther German) type that Bach, but not Lubeck, would be familiar with -- compared to the relatively conservative Northern Organs, it has many more string stops and strove for a milder, more colorful sound. It also shows influences of different organ schools; there are french influences and also Italian ones (the Oberwerk, played through the 3rd manual, sounds like an Italian organ!) But this can be a hit-or-miss in Lubeck's works - sometimes, I like the gravitas and color it has, but other times, I miss the screaming, blinding mixtures of a great Northern organ.

Can't think of recordings played on this organ that impress me too much, but Messori's Bach played on this organ is quite nice. So are the few All-of-Bach selections played on it
http://allofbach.com/en/bwv/bwv-615/

As for the playing, Coudurier is quite nice and uses the organ well, although there are some clunky moments here and there. For Vincent Lubeck, I think I like Bocker's double album of his works (May be OOP), or Kelemen, who plays on Lubeck's own Schnitger organ in Stade. (I don't usually tend to like Kelemen, but he is pretty darn exciting in this disc!). Jacques van Oortmerssen has an excellent recording of the C Major Prelude on his recording "The Arp Schnitger organ at the St. Cosmae Church in Stade" on denon.

Flamme's playing can be a hit-or-miss, although I like this Lubeck disc. His Schildt is also pretty cool, too.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 11, 2017, 10:52:26 PM
The only Lubeck piece I've explored really is Ich ruf zu dir.

Leon Berben's probably my favourite from commercial recordings, I think it has all the vitality of Coudurier and Chapuis, and I appreciate Berben's extra grandeur and  spirituality. Walter Kraft 's recording probably influenced my expectations of the music. But Kraft's recordings aren't available and anyway the sound's not very good.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on March 11, 2017, 11:41:33 PM
The only Lubeck piece I've explored really is Ich ruf zu dir.

Leon Berben's probably my favourite from commercial recordings, I think it has all the vitality of Coudurier and Chapuis, and I appreciate Berben's extra grandeur and  spirituality. Walter Kraft 's recording probably influenced my expectations of the music. But Kraft's recordings aren't available and anyway the sound's not very good.

Berben's mighty fine, but hard to find....

Good news: it's on Spotify! Woohoo!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 12, 2017, 02:57:41 AM
Walter Kraft's Lübeck remains my favorite even if the sound is somewhat dated and mono (Vox ca 1956). Other than this I agree about Böcker and Coudurier. But most of the few existing Lübeck sets are worth a listen, f.i. this:

https://www.amazon.de/Orgelwerke-Hansen-S%C3%B6ren-Gleerup/dp/B000ICM2FG/ref=sr_1_8?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1489316133&sr=1-8&keywords=vincent+l%C3%BCbeck

If somebody wants to hear the Kraft recording, send me a PM.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 12, 2017, 08:20:24 AM
Thank you for the valuable info. I like the organ Coudurier played.  Kelemen is on Spotify too. Hansen is on YT. I will look for Bocker.

Bocker:  https://youtu.be/19l9ypvsFUA
Hansen: https://youtu.be/Zk17wbZvXeM
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on March 12, 2017, 02:59:06 PM
Thank you for the valuable info. I like the organ Coudurier played.  Kelemen is on Spotify too. Hansen is on YT. I will look for Bocker.

Bocker:  https://youtu.be/19l9ypvsFUA
Hansen: https://youtu.be/Zk17wbZvXeM

I didn't know Hansen, but the organ he used gave me a bad "neo-baroque" aftertaste. Anyone know which one it is?

Funny that Bocker's holding the same post at St. Cosmae at Stade that Lubeck held 300 years ago.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 12, 2017, 06:32:12 PM
They are on YT.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0-pevKlo6lKCYqb_soBMACZN21wOwSHR

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPzbGzcWoNFo_fiFRsqRoy7MswsLgYMpG

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLeYmSJofT2BcoKl7NrED799a3CSuYZY8X

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNfNpC82zjVigPW6JoeyDrD3Vl5pvyGXe









Just received the Cornet 2 CD set (Arnaud Van de Cauter), recommended in this thread, and am enjoying it a great deal. Also, today, I stumbled across this set, which looks very intriguing. Does anyone have this?

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51TeqjueVgL._SX425_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41XMUSsrNZL.jpg)

My German is crap (I'm barely an A2 speaker after all my efforts), but I will try to get through this review:

http://de.brilliantclassics.com/2015/12/various-500-years-of-organ-music/
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 12, 2017, 06:57:05 PM
Any review/opinion on the Great European Organs Series by Kimberly Marshall, Gerard Brooks, etc?  Thanks.

http://prioryrecords.co.uk/index.php?route=product/category&path=59_66

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 12, 2017, 10:59:59 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51TeqjueVgL._SX425_.jpg)

Proper review: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2016/Apr/Organ_500_years_95310.htm

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 12, 2017, 11:38:23 PM
This one might be interesting, too: a twofer filled with North German baroque organ music, played on beautiful Schnitgers in the Niedersachsen region. It's a nice selection of works by Sweelinck, Scheidt, Scheidemann, Tunder, Buxtehude, Lübeck, Böhm, Bruhns et al.

https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/arp-schnitger-in-niedersachsen/hnum/5196053

http://www.nomine.net/arp-schnitger-in-niedersachsen
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 13, 2017, 01:18:21 AM
This one might be interesting, too: a twofer filled with North German baroque organ music, played on beautiful Schnitgers in the Niedersachsen region. It's a nice selection of works by Sweelinck, Scheidt, Scheidemann, Tunder, Buxtehude, Lübeck, Böhm, Bruhns et al.

And it can be added, that most of Vincent Lübeck's organ works are included in this twofer.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 13, 2017, 08:05:48 AM
This one might be interesting, too: a twofer filled with North German baroque organ music, played on beautiful Schnitgers in the Niedersachsen region. It's a nice selection of works by Sweelinck, Scheidt, Scheidemann, Tunder, Buxtehude, Lübeck, Böhm, Bruhns et al.

https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/arp-schnitger-in-niedersachsen/hnum/5196053

http://www.nomine.net/arp-schnitger-in-niedersachsen

The site states that "Harald Vogel, Hans Davidsson, and Prof. Roland Dopfer are the other guarantors for quality, choice of music and appropriate choice of organ stops." Wow.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 13, 2017, 07:26:15 PM
Walter Kraft's Lübeck remains my favorite even if the sound is somewhat dated and mono (Vox ca 1956). Other than this I agree about Böcker and Coudurier. But most of the few existing Lübeck sets are worth a listen, f.i. this:

https://www.amazon.de/Orgelwerke-Hansen-S%C3%B6ren-Gleerup/dp/B000ICM2FG/ref=sr_1_8?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1489316133&sr=1-8&keywords=vincent+l%C3%BCbeck

If somebody wants to hear the Kraft recording, send me a PM.

I would appreciate your review, perhaps negative one, on Flamme work.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 13, 2017, 11:45:40 PM
The site states that "Harald Vogel, Hans Davidsson, and Prof. Roland Dopfer are the other guarantors for quality, choice of music and appropriate choice of organ stops." Wow.

Prof. Harald Vogel.
And Prof. Hans Davidsson.

Prof. Prof. Prof.
(Herr Professor. Welcome in Germany.)

Seriously: I have the predecessor of this set (gone OOP now) and it's a great collection.
Dunno why they replaced some of the performances in this re-issue, maybe because Prof., Prof. and Prof. did not agree with the choice of organ stops... :P
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 14, 2017, 11:51:58 AM
Prof. Harald Vogel.
And Prof. Hans Davidsson.

Prof. Prof. Prof.
(Herr Professor. Welcome in Germany.)


My former organ teacher once told a story about one of Karl Richter's recordings for DG. Unfortunately the producers name was also Richter and even the engineers name was Richter. So they adressed each other in this way:

Professor Richter (Karl Richter)
Doctor Richter (the producer)
Hr. Richter (the engineer)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 14, 2017, 12:12:03 PM
My former organ teacher once told a story about one of Karl Richter's recordings for DG. Unfortunately the producers name was also Richter and even the engineers name was Richter. So they adressed each other in this way:

Professor Richter (Karl Richter)
Doctor Richter (the producer)
Hr. Richter (the engineer)

Did DG ever record Bach's 'piano' concertos with S. Richter, accompanied by the Münchner Bach-Orchester (et al)?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 14, 2017, 12:56:45 PM
I would appreciate your review, perhaps negative one, on Flamme work.

My greatest concern is about the organ (Treutmann / Grauhof) which I think is an unfortunate choice for V. Lübeck's organ works. It would be natural to choose a Schnitger-type instrument. But the Treutmann organ does not sound really North German, rather somewhere between Thüringean and South German. Generally its plenum seems to have a fat sound, which does not blend too well (this is also my impression from other recordings of this organ - I have not heard it live)  but on the other hand there are a number of nice solo stops, which however generally are of little use in Lübeck's works. I think it might be well suited for Pachelbel. Flamme's registrations tend to be too full and the spacious acoustics are of no help to clarify the details. Otherwise Flamme's ideas about Lübeck's music are not bad, f.i. he displays a relevant sense of the Stylus Phantasticus which is so important in this music. And there can be a lot of drive in his playlng, the effect of which unfortunately is damped by the reverberation.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 14, 2017, 01:00:29 PM
Did DG ever record Bach's 'piano' concertos with S. Richter, accompanied by the Münchner Bach-Orchester (et al)?

Fortunately not.

BTW Karl Richter in München often used a basoon player called Fritz Henker.

Richter means judge
Henker means hangman
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 14, 2017, 02:15:35 PM
My greatest concern is about the organ (Treutmann / Grauhof) which I think is an unfortunate choice for V. Lübeck's organ works. It would be natural to choose a Schnitger-type instrument. But the Treutmann organ does not sound really North German, rather somewhere between Thüringean and South German. Generally its plenum seems to have a fat sound, which does not blend too well (this is also my impression from other recordings of this organ - I have not heard it live)  but on the other hand there are a number of nice solo stops, which however generally are of little use in Lübeck's works. I think it might be well suited for Pachelbel. Flamme's registrations tend to be too full and the spacious acoustics are of no help to clarify the details. Otherwise Flamme's ideas about Lübeck's music are not bad, f.i. he displays a relevant sense of the Stylus Phantasticus which is so important in this music. And there can be a lot of drive in his playlng, the effect of which unfortunately is damped by the reverberation.
I appreciate the insightful critique. I did not know the historical context for organ choice. Largey I agree with your analyses about the organ sound, reverb, and his able execution. Thank you.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 14, 2017, 02:19:34 PM
My former organ teacher once told a story about one of Karl Richter's recordings for DG. Unfortunately the producers name was also Richter and even the engineers name was Richter. So they adressed each other in this way:

Professor Richter (Karl Richter)
Doctor Richter (the producer)
Hr. Richter (the engineer)
Professors do not have to have doctoral degree though most of them at major universities do. In this case, the producer may appear to have a higher positin than KR.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on March 20, 2017, 06:07:34 PM
How do people think of CPO's Pachelbel organ series?
(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Jul14/Pachelbel_organ_v1_7775562.jpg)
It seems that most performances are just solid, nothing amazing or extremely convincing, but I wonder if there are any gems in there.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 21, 2017, 02:40:53 AM
How do people think of CPO's Pachelbel organ series?
(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Jul14/Pachelbel_organ_v1_7775562.jpg)
It seems that most performances are just solid, nothing amazing or extremely convincing, but I wonder if there are any gems in there.

Yes, I mean no, I mean you're right, even though there are lots of different organists they're all a bit too solemn and earthbound - they never escape orbit and fly to the stars. The second instalment has been released but I have haven't heard it.

(I'm still enjoying Albert Bolliger's Pachelbel.)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: ahinton on March 21, 2017, 03:15:46 AM
https://goldrush.uiowa.edu/project/5439

For further information on this historic event and the plans for this music, please write to me at sorabji-archive@lineone.net .
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on April 01, 2017, 10:53:12 AM
The only Lubeck piece I've explored really is Ich ruf zu dir.

Leon Berben's probably my favourite from commercial recordings, I think it has all the vitality of Coudurier and Chapuis, and I appreciate Berben's extra grandeur and  spirituality. Walter Kraft 's recording probably influenced my expectations of the music. But Kraft's recordings aren't available and anyway the sound's not very good.

Follow-up: Berben's Lubeck sounds solid and colorful. I love it. Thank you for the info, ladies and/or gents.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 20, 2017, 07:17:05 AM
Not totally uninteresting article here on touch sensitivity

http://www.pykett.org.uk/touchsens.htm

Quote
Attempts have been made for centuries to develop a keyboard instrument having something of the qualities which make, say, a violin seem to be part of the player (when played well, that is).  The unity of the instrument and the performer is demonstrated by the enormous variety of tone colours, dynamics and subtle articulations which almost approach the human voice in expressive power.  The invention of the forte-piano was the first major breakthrough enabling a keyboard player to have direct control over the way the notes are sounded, and the expressive capability of a modern grand piano is elegant testimony to the developments that followed. . . a number of transient effects occur with organ pipes, and that some of these at least are under the control of the performer at a suitable instrument.  Invariably this has to have a mechanical action designed according to sound engineering principles.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 23, 2017, 01:51:16 AM
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/575/MI0003575908.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)  (http://www.heinrichvontrotta.eu/Seon/_LP/1977-Organo-Norddeutsche-300.jpg)

There's a little recorded choral partita by Scheidemann called Herr Christ der einig Gottes sohn. Leonhardt seems to have had a special penchant for it, because there are at least two recordings, one at the old church in Amsterdam, one at Marienhafe. In addition there is recording from Bernard Coudurier (I think a bit glib, but others may enjoy the simplicity. I enjoy the simplicity, but not when I've not Leonhardt ringing in my head! ) and one from Julia Brown on Naxos (to me the registrations sound unusual, but the performance is "deeply felt")

Leonhardt in Amsterdam benefits from the best organ - the best gravitas - and it inspires him to give a fabulous performance, one that convinces me that the music is a mini-masterpiece. Leonhardt's "deeply felt" like Julia Brown, but Leonhardt's deep feeling is less romantic, if you know what I mean. I think this is my favourite.

The organ in Marienhafe (Saxony) is less imposing, but is maybe a bit more interestingly astringent from the point of view of harmonies (I think that the Amsterdam church organ was equally tuned when Leonhardt made the recording.) The performance he gives there seems slightly more improvised, more flamboyant, more like a precursor of  Stylus Fantasticus - it's interesting to hear the two together, to hear how the musician adapted to the instrument at his disposal.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on April 30, 2017, 05:08:02 AM
Fun recording by Eric Lebrun. Lively and bright.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on June 15, 2017, 09:44:23 AM
What are the essential Bernard Couderier disks? I was listening to him play Bach on French organs on Spotify, and, while, very different and interesting, I would not say it is a must-have for my collection. There are many other albums to explore however--which are your favorites?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on June 15, 2017, 11:44:07 AM
What are the essential Bernard Couderier disks? I was listening to him play Bach on French organs on Spotify, and, while, very different and interesting, I would not say it is a must-have for my collection. There are many other albums to explore however--which are your favorites?

I would say:

Grigny - 2CDs
Lübeck
Bruhns
Scheidemann

They can be found at Amazon.de and Amazon.fr

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on June 15, 2017, 02:54:44 PM
Thanks. It is too bad they are not available on Amazon.com. Perhaps I will have to bite the bullet pay shipping from Europe, or bite the bullet and settle for MP3s (Why doesn't AMAZON get into the 21st century and offer FLAC!?!?). Maybe I'll be able to find them in Ireland when I visit later this summer.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 15, 2017, 07:26:47 PM
What are the essential Bernard Couderier disks? I was listening to him play Bach on French organs on Spotify, and, while, very different and interesting, I would not say it is a must-have for my collection. There are many other albums to explore however--which are your favorites?



I love the  Scheidemann, the Norden Schnitger is wonderfully recorded and the style is sometimes like chamber music, intimate and lyrical.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on June 16, 2017, 12:49:51 AM
Thanks. It is too bad they are not available on Amazon.com. Perhaps I will have to bite the bullet pay shipping from Europe, or bite the bullet and settle for MP3s (Why doesn't AMAZON get into the 21st century and offer FLAC!?!?). Maybe I'll be able to find them in Ireland when I visit later this summer.

I did not know, that you live overseas.

The Bruhns and the Grigny are available at Amazon.com: (MP)

https://www.amazon.com/Lorgue-Baroque-En-Allemagne-D/dp/B00008LOPA/ref=sr_1_6?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1497606251&sr=1-6&keywords=bernard+coudurier

https://www.amazon.com/Loeuvre-Dorgue-BERNARD-COUDURIER-ENSEMBLE/dp/B00008LOPE/ref=sr_1_5?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1497606251&sr=1-5&keywords=bernard+coudurier

https://www.amazon.com/Hymnes-Vol-Cintegabelle-Alternatim/dp/B000025B1K/ref=sr_1_14?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1497606561&sr=1-14&keywords=bernard+coudurier
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on June 16, 2017, 10:32:07 AM
Thanks! I searched for Bernard Couderier yesterday and nothing came up.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 17, 2017, 07:33:36 AM
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/SHcAAOxyXDhSmh0U/s-l300.jpg)

This recording by Wolfram Syré on the label Motette is possibly the best sounding, best engineered, organ recording I've heard. I mean, there may be some SACDs but really this is pretty special!

I wonder if there are any other good things on Motette. Most of their stuff is later music than interests me, but I noticed one thing, a recording by Felix Friedrich in Vogtland.

Wolfram Syré is clearly an outstanding musician, and his website is chockablock with free recordings, but all on midi organs!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on June 17, 2017, 11:32:49 PM
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/SHcAAOxyXDhSmh0U/s-l300.jpg)

This recording by Wolfram Syré on the label Motette is possibly the best sounding, best engineered, organ recording I've heard. I mean, there may be some SACDs but really this is pretty special!

I wonder if there are any other good things on Motette. Most of their stuff is later music than interests me, but I noticed one thing, a recording by Felix Friedrich in Vogtland.

Wolfram Syré is clearly an outstanding musician, and his website is chockablock with free recordings, but all on midi organs!

I listened to some of his recordings on Contrebombarde, and was mostly less than impressed - most of them had pretty stodgy tempos and execution, and the sheer amount of pieces makes me wonder whether he's looking for quantity over quality here  :(

Although the Tunder disc does seem interesting, judging from JPC sound samples.
How do you think of Foccroulle? He's the one who impressed me enough with the Christ lag in Todesbanden to get me into Tunder.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 18, 2017, 12:21:38 AM
I listened to some of his recordings on Contrebombarde, and was mostly less than impressed - most of them had pretty stodgy tempos and execution, and the sheer amount of pieces makes me wonder whether he's looking for quantity over quality here  :(

Although the Tunder disc does seem interesting, judging from JPC sound samples.
How do you think of Foccroulle? He's the one who impressed me enough with the Christ lag in Todesbanden to get me into Tunder.


It was Syré's Christ lag in Todesbanden which made my jaw drop to the floor, when the pedals come in it's like . . . so unbelievably grand and noble.  I like what Foccroulle does with it but I think at the end of the day he's too introverted. There's another thing, Syré handles the transitions more naturally. Basically Syré's Christ lag in Todesbanden is wicked.


(I like Flamme in this piece too!)

I'll put the recording in symphonyshare next week, I've got just 100000MB left to upload to Backblaze so it should be done tomorrow sometime, that'll leave me free to do some sharing.

I haven't heard any of his midi recordings, but he's a bit slow and careful it's true, he reminds me of Götz.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on June 19, 2017, 03:20:26 AM
You mean the D'Anglebert fugues? Do you know any other recordings?

I dug up Andreas Staier's "Pour passer la melancolie" to listen again, after unfairly neglecting it for a while. Was pretty surprised to hear the 1st fugue on this disc, albeit played on the harpsichord.

Actually I like it better on the harpsichord because everything sounds cleaner and of course freer, but paradoxically the conterpoint is clearer on an organ. On harpsichord it sort of degenerates into an unmeasured-prelude sort of swirl of notes. Or, perhaps I just shouldn't be expecting a nice clean Bach-like fugue out of a French composer?

There's something very Sweelinckian about the fugue, too, that I can't put my finger on.


One random question - between the NM Sweelinck Box (now thankfully on Spotify) and the Glossa box, which one do you prefer?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 19, 2017, 05:15:37 AM
I dug up Andreas Staier's "Pour passer la melancolie" to listen again, after unfairly neglecting it for a while. Was pretty surprised to hear the 1st fugue on this disc, albeit played on the harpsichord.

Actually I like it better on the harpsichord because everything sounds cleaner and of course freer, but paradoxically the conterpoint is clearer on an organ. On harpsichord it sort of degenerates into an unmeasured-prelude sort of swirl of notes. Or, perhaps I just shouldn't be expecting a nice clean Bach-like fugue out of a French composer?

There's something very Sweelinckian about the fugue, too, that I can't put my finger on.


One random question - between the NM Sweelinck Box (now thankfully on Spotify) and the Glossa box, which one do you prefer?

I quite like that performance by Staier, it is a swirl of notes and I like it.

I thought that NM was more consistently satisfying than Glossa.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on June 19, 2017, 05:20:26 AM
I quite like that performance by Staier, it is a swirl of notes and I like it.

I thought that NM was more consistently satisfying than Glossa.

I'm curious what you mean by that, because I liked the Glossa more, but am trying to get into the NM.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 19, 2017, 06:56:16 AM
Well there were some things on NM which really had a big impact on me: Asperen and Matter and Winsemius come to mind. Nothing quite got to me in the same way on Glossa as far as I remember, apart from Leonhardt.

I have a friend who HATES the NM, he things it's too solemn, that they play Sweelinck like Bach. And he thinks that Glossa is better and the musicians kind of saw the error of their ways, that's why they rerecorded it. I don't agree by the way.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on June 19, 2017, 08:44:58 AM
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/SHcAAOxyXDhSmh0U/s-l300.jpg)

This recording by Wolfram Syré on the label Motette is possibly the best sounding, best engineered, organ recording I've heard. I mean, there may be some SACDs but really this is pretty special!

I wonder if there are any other good things on Motette. Most of their stuff is later music than interests me, but I noticed one thing, a recording by Felix Friedrich in Vogtland.

Wolfram Syré is clearly an outstanding musician, and his website is chockablock with free recordings, but all on midi organs!


Thanks for that!  :) Definitely going to check that one out...

Good things on Motette...a superb organ music label indeed...  :)

Personal favourites:



Q


 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on June 20, 2017, 12:41:36 AM

It was Syré's Christ lag in Todesbanden which made my jaw drop to the floor, when the pedals come in it's like . . . so unbelievably grand and noble.  I like what Foccroulle does with it but I think at the end of the day he's too introverted. There's another thing, Syré handles the transitions more naturally. Basically Syré's Christ lag in Todesbanden is wicked.

I've gotten the recording (thank you!  :) ), and am listening to it.

First impressions of Christ lag
The registration is very interesting and he isn't afraid of plena, I've listened to ~6 versions of Christ lag (it's my favorite Tunder piece, aside from the cheeky Canzona!), but this one sounds much rawer and more primitive. I can imagine this being very authentic, especially on the large late-gothic organ that Tunder played. Almost reminds me of Hofhaimer's Salve Regina , perhaps. It's also much more forceful, and you're right Foccroulle lacks cojones when compared to this.

There's something about the articulation here that I love-hate - it's how it's so clear, and even doesn't hesitate to make some breaks as if taking a breath when singing a hymn. I think Wim Winters does that a bit in Bach's partitas.

The notorious chromatic part is marched through without any change in demeanor. Some, like van Laar, soften it with playfulness, or like Foccroulle or Flamme leaven it with a sense of sorrow.
But nope, Syre just plows through it with rather intimidating aplomb and stoicism.

This seems like cold, authoritarian Tunder, one that's never smiles - or errs. More barren tundra than Tunder, even. But I guess it's beautiful in how Brutalist architecture is beautiful.
I like it. Don't know where it places compared to Foccroulle (spotify is down now?!) but it's great in a radically different way. As you say, wicked, perhaps.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 20, 2017, 02:31:50 AM
I've gotten the recording (thank you!  :) ), and am listening to it.

First impressions of Christ lag
The registration is very interesting and he isn't afraid of plena, I've listened to ~6 versions of Christ lag (it's my favorite Tunder piece, aside from the cheeky Canzona!), but this one sounds much rawer and more primitive. I can imagine this being very authentic, especially on the large late-gothic organ that Tunder played. Almost reminds me of Hofhaimer's Salve Regina , perhaps. It's also much more forceful, and you're right Foccroulle lacks cojones when compared to this.

There's something about the articulation here that I love-hate - it's how it's so clear, and even doesn't hesitate to make some breaks as if taking a breath when singing a hymn. I think Wim Winters does that a bit in Bach's partitas.

The notorious chromatic part is marched through without any change in demeanor. Some, like van Laar, soften it with playfulness, or like Foccroulle or Flamme leaven it with a sense of sorrow.
But nope, Syre just plows through it with rather intimidating aplomb and stoicism.

This seems like cold, authoritarian Tunder, one that's never smiles - or errs. More barren tundra than Tunder, even. But I guess it's beautiful in how Brutalist architecture is beautiful.
I like it. Don't know where it places compared to Foccroulle (spotify is down now?!) but it's great in a radically different way. As you say, wicked, perhaps.

Stoicism is a good word. I've grown to like the plenum approach, and like less the more colourful way of playing,
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 21, 2017, 10:21:16 AM
Has anyone heard this one? Dvorak's 9th arranged for Organ?

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71AEuiAxbeL._SX355_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 24, 2017, 07:41:52 AM
I've gotten the recording (thank you!  :) ), and am listening to it.

First impressions of Christ lag
The registration is very interesting and he isn't afraid of plena, I've listened to ~6 versions of Christ lag (it's my favorite Tunder piece, aside from the cheeky Canzona!), but this one sounds much rawer and more primitive. I can imagine this being very authentic, especially on the large late-gothic organ that Tunder played. Almost reminds me of Hofhaimer's Salve Regina , perhaps. It's also much more forceful, and you're right Foccroulle lacks cojones when compared to this.

There's something about the articulation here that I love-hate - it's how it's so clear, and even doesn't hesitate to make some breaks as if taking a breath when singing a hymn. I think Wim Winters does that a bit in Bach's partitas.

The notorious chromatic part is marched through without any change in demeanor. Some, like van Laar, soften it with playfulness, or like Foccroulle or Flamme leaven it with a sense of sorrow.
But nope, Syre just plows through it with rather intimidating aplomb and stoicism.

This seems like cold, authoritarian Tunder, one that's never smiles - or errs. More barren tundra than Tunder, even. But I guess it's beautiful in how Brutalist architecture is beautiful.
I like it. Don't know where it places compared to Foccroulle (spotify is down now?!) but it's great in a radically different way. As you say, wicked, perhaps.

Interesting also to compare what Flamme and Syré do with the massive Was komm uns kommen an fur not. They're like chalk and cheese, Syré static, Flamme dynamic. I shall dig out Ruiter - Feenstra later.

Flamme's organ is anachronistic unfortunately. I wonder why he chose it.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: kishnevi on July 20, 2017, 05:39:10 PM
The last week or so I have been going through the Spang-Hanssen set of Buxtehude organ works, and a possibly silly question occurred to me.

When were those "freeform" organ works performed.  All those toccatas, preludes and preludiums, canzonas, pastorales and of course fugues:. Bach was not the only one to write such things.  But when were they played? As mood music while the congregation settled into the pews or left after service? Or while the clergy processed up and back? At little recitals during the week?

What function did they have?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on July 20, 2017, 08:40:15 PM
The last week or so I have been going through the Spang-Hanssen set of Buxtehude organ works, and a possibly silly question occurred to me.

When were those "freeform" organ works performed.  All those toccatas, preludes and preludiums, canzonas, pastorales and of course fugues:. Bach was not the only one to write such things.  But when were they played? As mood music while the congregation settled into the pews or left after service? Or while the clergy processed up and back? At little recitals during the week?

What function did they have?

I think that the church (as a building) had a much broader (social) function in those days. Doors were almost always open, one could walk in to relax, talk with other people, make a (business) deal or two. The organist was sometimes there to accompany those social churgoers, and probably to astonish them from time to time, either with free works or with hymn-based stuff (and improvisation). In short: promenade concerts. ;)
Apart from that, I guess that even then organists already organized organ concerts.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Jo498 on July 20, 2017, 09:56:34 PM
Buxtehude's "Abendmusik" took place in church although they were basically concerts without a service. At such and similar occasions even long and elaborate pieces could be played.
Shorter Toccatas (or the like) could be played as "intrata" before the church service began and at the end. And while many festive occasions had even choral music (like Bach's cantatas for the inauguration of the new city council, "Ratswechselkantaten") I think that there were other festive services where one would not bother with a whole cantata but be happy about any additional splendour an organ could give to the occasion.
There are so many fairly big organs even in small towns and villages all over (northern/central) Europe. This was a considerable expense for the community, so I think they found many ways to make use of them.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on July 29, 2017, 11:54:42 AM
What about the older generation of organists? It seems there is very little mention of these performers here. I realize they often played instruments that are not historically appropriate and had styles that are far removed from modern HIP mentality. Nevertheless, I enjoy some of their recordings a great deal

Thoughts and recommended recordings of:

Marcel Dupré (and his student Michael Murray)
Karl Richter
Anton Heiller
Albert Schweitzer
Pierre Cochereau

??



Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Cato on July 29, 2017, 02:05:39 PM
What about the older generation of organists? It seems there is very little mention of these performers here. I realize they often played instruments that are not historically appropriate and had styles that are far removed from modern HIP mentality. Nevertheless, I enjoy some of their recordings a great deal

Thoughts and recommended recordings of:

Marcel Dupré (and his student Michael Murray)
Karl Richter
Anton Heiller
Albert Schweitzer
Pierre Cochereau

??

Check out the Mercury Living Presence recordings of Marcel Dupre' !  He was no slouch as a composer either!

https://www.amazon.com/Marcel-Dupre-Remastered/dp/B0113A5ANW/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8 (https://www.amazon.com/Marcel-Dupre-Remastered/dp/B0113A5ANW/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8)

Michael Murray has some excellent recordings of the organ symphonies of Louis Vierne.



Along with Dupre', the "go to" organist in the good ol' days (my good ol' days at least) was E. Powers Biggs !'

I found this recording from the good ol' days of QUADRAPHONIC STEREO!!!

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71dfI5qbGFL._SX425_.jpg)

Now on an SACD:

https://www.amazon.com/Power-Biggs-Rheinberger-Concertos-Orchestra/dp/B01N2126KT/ref=sr_1_15?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1501369014&sr=1-15&keywords=E.+Power+Biggs (https://www.amazon.com/Power-Biggs-Rheinberger-Concertos-Orchestra/dp/B01N2126KT/ref=sr_1_15?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1501369014&sr=1-15&keywords=E.+Power+Biggs)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 29, 2017, 09:30:27 PM

Thoughts and recommended recordings of:

Pierre Cochereau

??

BWV 686, there used to be a really crazy over the top one on YouTube , here

https://www.youtube.com/v/EFw1QlCM35I
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 29, 2017, 11:39:55 PM
And anyone who can enjoy Cochereau's Aus Tiefer Not may well enjoy Virgil Fox's organ rendition of Stokowski's orchestral transcription of Komm süsser Tod on the Wanamaker in Macy's department store in Philadelphia.


https://www.youtube.com/v/Xje4OYalB5Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on July 31, 2017, 04:08:00 PM
I like baroque works played romantically  :)

Some Sweelinck in St. Suplice. (although a bit fast to be called romantic)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyhZaSso414
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on July 31, 2017, 05:03:14 PM
B@stard probably pours ketchup over his Boeuf Bourguignon  :laugh:

Seriously, I love his videos; he looks as if he's having such a great time. (although so much talking through the music). I would like to get some of his CDs.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 01, 2017, 01:53:50 AM
I like baroque works played romantically  :)

Some Sweelinck in St. Suplice. (although a bit fast to be called romantic)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyhZaSso414

You know I never realised that fantasy was based on a real hymn tune before, it's a revelation to hear it played with someone singing along like that. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on August 01, 2017, 07:30:00 AM
You know I never realised that fantasy was based on a real hymn tune before, it's a revelation to hear it played with someone singing along like that.

I didn't know about the hymm, which one? I thought it was simply the chromatic lament bass.

I've been playing this fantasia a lot lately (on the piano); at lots of places I'm tempted to hum along. It's indeed very sing-able. Easy to sightread, hard to play well.

Some Vincent Lubeck (!) on a Ladegast organ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewUgG8B2gbg
(Although I would say that the registration makes it sound more baroque than the organ is)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 01, 2017, 11:21:32 AM
I didn't know about the hymm, which one? I thought it was simply the chromatic lament bass.


I just assumed it was a hymn, there's some bloke singing his head off at St Sulpice.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on August 01, 2017, 03:22:33 PM
I know very little about the mechanisms of couplers, but is it possible to couple the upper octaves of a manual to a different manual, while leaving the lower octaves uncoupled--or vice versa? He only plays the lowest manual here, but the other manuals seem to replicate either upper or lower octave notes... Or does he have the pedals coupled to some manuals as well?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on August 01, 2017, 04:17:54 PM
I know very little about the mechanisms of couplers, but is it possible to couple the upper octaves of a manual to a different manual, while leaving the lower octaves uncoupled--or vice versa? He only plays the lowest manual here, but the other manuals seem to replicate either upper or lower octave notes... Or does he have the pedals coupled to some manuals as well?

It looks like the pedal coupler.

I'm guessing that the Hymn was because it was played as part of a service? I would doubt that Sweelinck would compose on a Catholic hymn. Never mind, Sweelinck did write quite a few Catholic motets, and the Christmas tune "Een kindeken is ons geboren"

(Not quite related, but I read somewhere, I think in Glen Wilson's liner notes, that Sweelinck may have been a closeted Catholic like Bull and Byrd.)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: kishnevi on August 01, 2017, 04:36:31 PM
Wikipedia says he wrote music for Calvinist, Lutheran and Catholic liturgies.

But I am skeptical that a man who spent over four decades as the musician of an important Calvinist church in Amsterdam was a secret Catholic. Catholics in the Netherlands were not quite as oppressed as those in England (like Bull and Byrd), and unlike their English brethren, would have had more opportunity to physically relocate to Catholic territory. And even if relocation was not an option, wouldn't he have at least found another way to make a living?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on August 01, 2017, 08:26:02 PM
Wikipedia says he wrote music for Calvinist, Lutheran and Catholic liturgies.

But I am skeptical that a man who spent over four decades as the musician of an important Calvinist church in Amsterdam was a secret Catholic. Catholics in the Netherlands were not quite as oppressed as those in England (like Bull and Byrd), and unlike their English brethren, would have had more opportunity to physically relocate to Catholic territory. And even if relocation was not an option, wouldn't he have at least found another way to make a living?

He wasn't a church organist, but a city organist.
If it were up to Calvinism, all the organs would have been destroyed during the so-called Beeldenstorm, the outburst of destruction of religious images that occurred in (a.o.) the Netherlands half-way the 16th century. Calvinists called the organ "des Satans fluytenkast" (the flute case of Satan). Thanks to city governments, the organs were saved. Sweelinck wasn't a servant of any church/religion, he was a servant for the city government as well as the city organist of Amsterdam.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on August 01, 2017, 10:41:48 PM
He wasn't a church organist, but a city organist.
If it were up to Calvinism, all the organs would have been destroyed during the so-called Beeldenstorm, the outburst of destruction of religious images that occurred in (a.o.) the Netherlands half-way the 16th century. Calvinists called the organ "des Satans fluytenkast" (the flute case of Satan). Thanks to city governments, the organs were saved. Sweelinck wasn't a servant of any church/religion, he was a servant for the city government as well as the city organist of Amsterdam.

There's a fun article here about the Calvinists' "War on Organs", illustrated with some colorful quotes.
https://books.google.com.tw/books?id=xbRMAwAAQBAJ&lpg=PA112&ots=k5r9tS7A-z&dq=des%20Satans%20fluytenkast&pg=PA107#v=onepage&q=des%20Satans%20fluytenkast&f=false

Calvinists initially saw organs as too Popish to be used in church, some going as far as to see them as a form of idolatry. But when congregational singing was introduced, it was hard to make people learn the Psalter tunes. That's why city councils employed people like Sweelinck to play variations on the Psalms while service was not in session so people could learn the Psalter. (alongside with variations on secular songs just for entertainment - like Est ce Mars, which was a big hit in 1615)
Later, in 1640, Constantijn Huygens published an essay advocating the use of the organ to accompany the singing (as opposed to only playing it before and after the service). Suddenly you get large organs like the ones in the Leiden Pieterskerk (one of my favorite Dutch organs  ;D ), Amsterdam Nieuwekerk, or Alkmaar Laurenskerk that could meet these new demands.

Sietze de Vries playing Sweelinck's P.23 on my favorite little organ, the organ in Uttum.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyVpBUtXep4

Another fun Sweelinck fact is that in 1604, Sweelinck was sent to Antwerp on a business trip to buy the city a Ruckers harpsichord, probably his only sojourn outside Holland. Someone discovered the lid of this harpsichord, and now it's in the Rijksmuseum! https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4947
But I wonder if the soundboard may have made its way into a still extant large French harpsichord or something?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on September 22, 2017, 05:08:40 AM
(https://is4-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Music69/v4/ef/e0/68/efe06844-d926-f4c2-0c2d-cc051f209efd/source/200x0w.jpg)

There's a new Pachebel hexachordum (I'm assuming a re-release, as the style of playing seems rather antiquated?) that's very nice on Spotify. Does anyone have more info on the performer or recording? What organ was used in it? Sounds like a Southern German organ correct for Pachelbel's period, but that's all I can deduce.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 24, 2017, 04:49:12 AM
Does anyone know if people used organs to accompany the ordinary of the mass in renaissance times or before? Has anyone heard a mass sung like this?

We have many performances which use brass instruments to accompany the mass ordinaries, presumably partly on the basis of regional practices. But the organ seems a priori a more likely instrument, especially given that there's evidence that it was used in alternatim in the place of sung propers.  Rebecca Stewart has written about this.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 16, 2017, 02:16:39 PM
(http://e-cdn-images.deezer.com/images/cover/65af85ba661e91b9918e77597f271283/200x200-000000-80-0-0.jpg)

This contains a very fine performance of Anthoni van Noordt's Psalm 24 by Peter van der Kooy. I don't know what the organ is, it may even be digital. Can anyone find any details about the series? It comes out of Holland and features Dutch organists, it's from a Dutch producer called JQZ, here's their website, but I can't find any details on it.

http://www.jqz.nl/shop_winkel.php?genre=orgel

Anyway this van Noordt is one among the best I've heard of his music - having said that I can only remember hearing Doeselaar!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 24, 2017, 10:00:37 AM
What's the word on this new issue?  :)



The first recording of the complete organ works by Valeri. 
Gaetano Valeri (1760-1822) was born in Padua, Italy, bred and raised in the “Keyboard School of the Veneto region”. A true “classical” composer he absorbed the style of Haydn and Mozart, while still under the influence of the Galant Style of Galuppi, Alberti and Turini. 
Valeri’s organ works contain indications of the use of certain stops, which were specific of the organs built in his time in the Veneto, by for instance the famous organ builder Callido. 
Valeri’s organ works form a happy mix of the Classical and Galant, strict forms containing beautiful cantabile melodies and lavish ornamentation. 
Italian organist Paolo Bottini chose two beautiful historic organs from Valeri’s time, the full specification of which are included in the booklet, which also contains scholarly written liner notes by the artist.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 27, 2017, 01:11:18 AM
Eyeing this new issue:

(https://www.aeolus-music.com/var/shop_site/storage/images/alle-tontraeger/ae11131-muethel-johann-gottfried-complete-fantasies-choral-preludes/45748-1-eng-GB/AE11131-Muethel-Johann-Gottfried-Complete-Fantasies-Choral-Preludes.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 27, 2017, 11:54:44 PM
(https://www.music-bazaar.com/album-images/vol32/1346/1346160/3216344-big/In-Nomine-Les-Harpies-cover.jpg)

A recording with Freddy Eichelberger at the organ of Saint-Savin-en-Lavedan, a finely built modern reconstruction of a long-gone 16th century organ in its original case -- which means a maximum dose of those flatulent little renaissance reeds! Interesting juxtapositions of dignified Rennaissance polyphonic pieces with rather more vulgar-sounding dances, both nicely executed by Eichelberger and his band.

I think the organ is one of the few modern reconstructions I've heard that actually have a "soul", as in that it has character like old organs do.

Interestingly, a panel on the side of the organ sports a rather graphic painting of a man nonchalantly jerking himself off. I wonder why it's there -- perhaps a male version of Sheela na gig, a cautionary image, or just a bit of 16th century French mischief?

Another performance, an improvisation by Sietze de Vries at the same organ, not shy of bells and whistles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rIBHK7McF0
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 28, 2017, 01:14:42 AM
(https://www.music-bazaar.com/album-images/vol32/1346/1346160/3216344-big/In-Nomine-Les-Harpies-cover.jpg)

A recording with Freddy Eichelberger at the organ of Saint-Savin-en-Lavedan, a finely built modern reconstruction of a long-gone 16th century organ in its original case -- which means a maximum dose of those flatulent little renaissance reeds! Interesting juxtapositions of dignified Rennaissance polyphonic pieces with rather more vulgar-sounding dances, both nicely executed by Eichelberger and his band.

I think the organ is one of the few modern reconstructions I've heard that actually have a "soul", as in that it has character like old organs do.

Interestingly, a panel on the side of the organ sports a rather graphic painting of a man nonchalantly jerking himself off. I wonder why it's there -- perhaps a male version of Sheela na gig, a cautionary image, or just a bit of 16th century French mischief?



Know it well and I like it, I'm sure I wrote something about it here. There's also this (not recommended)

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61uuR2FIWyL.jpg)

In France I've seen those sort of pagan images in churches, i remember drunken scenes in Fréjus cathedral.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 28, 2017, 02:24:46 AM
Know it well and I like it, I'm sure I wrote something about it here. There's also this (not recommended)

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61uuR2FIWyL.jpg)

In France I've seen those sort of pagan images in churches, i remember drunken scenes in Fréjus cathedral.

I've seen that cover before but not the disc. Is it still available? (never mind; missed your un-recommendation)

I really dig those recordings that have ensembles playing with historical organs. Like this one, which I've listened to the samples of but haven't actually gotten. It's with the 1467/1637 transept organ of St. Jacobi, Lubeck. The sound of the Savin organ very much reminds me of the principals of this organ.
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61wow1VIOnL._SS500.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 28, 2017, 03:39:21 AM
(http://e-cdn-images.deezer.com/images/cover/65af85ba661e91b9918e77597f271283/200x200-000000-80-0-0.jpg)

This contains a very fine performance of Anthoni van Noordt's Psalm 24 by Peter van der Kooy. I don't know what the organ is, it may even be digital. Can anyone find any details about the series? It comes out of Holland and features Dutch organists, it's from a Dutch producer called JQZ, here's their website, but I can't find any details on it.

http://www.jqz.nl/shop_winkel.php?genre=orgel

Anyway this van Noordt is one among the best I've heard of his music - having said that I can only remember hearing Doeselaar!

It could be a re-issue of this disc:

(https://images2.imgbox.com/38/83/YP3gJ4ZY_o.jpg)

http://www.deezer.com/nl/album/13195588
http://www.deezer.com/nl/album/12591718

Btw: I doubt if organist Peter van der Kooy exists. It's probably a mix-up of 2 familiar names: bass Peter Kooij and organist Jos van der Kooy.

Organist (most likely): Theo Visser.
Organ: De Swart/Van Hagerbeer/Ahrend, Hooglandse Kerk, Leiden, NL.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 28, 2017, 03:45:38 AM
It could be a re-issue of this disc:

(https://images2.imgbox.com/38/83/YP3gJ4ZY_o.jpg)

http://www.deezer.com/nl/album/13195588
http://www.deezer.com/nl/album/12591718

Btw: I doubt if organist Peter van der Kooy exists. It's probably a mix-up of 2 familiar names: bass Peter Kooij and organist Jos van der Kooy.

Organist (most likely): Theo Visser.
Organ: De Swart/Van Hagerbeer/Ahrend, Hooglandse Kerk, Leiden, NL.

On Spotify they are identical. The part in question is indeed played by Jos van der Kooy.
I remember listening to this disc ages ago and liking it.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 28, 2017, 03:58:45 AM
On Spotify they are identical. The part in question is indeed played by Jos van der Kooy.
I remember listening to this disc ages ago and liking it.

No mentioning of Van der Kooy on the original issue by Tulip Records.

Tulip Records CD TUR 1850001

Sweelinck, Van Noordt, Froberger, Bovet, Byrd, Purcell, Bull, Blow, Tomkins, De Heredia, Canabiles, De Arauxo
Leiden–NL–Hooglandse Kerk
Theo Visser
(2008)

(https://images2.imgbox.com/86/62/EBXLPlw9_o.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 28, 2017, 03:59:49 AM
No mentioning of Van der Kooy on the original issue by Tulip Records.

Tulip Records CD TUR 1850001

Sweelinck, Van Noordt, Froberger, Bovet, Byrd, Purcell, Bull, Blow, Tomkins, De Heredia, Canabiles, De Arauxo
Leiden–NL–Hooglandse Kerk
Theo Visser
(2008)

(https://images2.imgbox.com/86/62/EBXLPlw9_o.jpg)

Very odd. I remember it not having Jos van der Kooy too, but the 2nd half of it was tagged with JvdK on Spotify. Error most likely.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 28, 2017, 04:00:14 AM
Very odd. I remember it not having Jos van der Kooy too, but the 2nd half of it was tagged with JvdK on Spotify. Error most likely.

I think so, too.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 28, 2017, 06:51:36 AM
Very pleasant recital, very pleasant organ, very pleasant music. I mean the Leiden one)

I'm listening to it in London, looking out of the window of my study. It's very cold out, and the sky is clear, blue and sunny. There's a log fire going.  In front of my house is a huge Plane tree which has been occupied by a flock of green parrots, birds which are becoming increasingly common here. The scene: green birds, blue sky, the slight smell of burning wood, seems to fit the music nicely.

John Blow's Double Voluntary is unexpectedly interesting, as is the Tomkins Ground.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 28, 2017, 08:16:56 AM
There's also this (not recommended)
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61uuR2FIWyL.jpg)
I do not know it, but why do you write "not recommended"?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 28, 2017, 08:17:58 AM
No mentioning of Van der Kooy on the original issue by Tulip Records.

Tulip Records CD TUR 1850001

Sweelinck, Van Noordt, Froberger, Bovet, Byrd, Purcell, Bull, Blow, Tomkins, De Heredia, Canabiles, De Arauxo
Leiden–NL–Hooglandse Kerk
Theo Visser
(2008)

(https://images2.imgbox.com/86/62/EBXLPlw9_o.jpg)

Is this recording available in practice? And where?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 28, 2017, 09:10:54 AM
I do not know it, but why do you write "not recommended"?

I think he doesn't like it. ;)

Is this recording available in practice? And where?

This is the jqz/tulip website:

http://www.jqz.nl/shop_cdinfo.php?id=9

And this is a Christian bookshop that sells cd's:

https://www.hertog.nl/artikel/TURE185001/z/

I do not know whether they sell abroad, though.
(Mandryka knows how difficult that can be.)

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 28, 2017, 09:20:35 AM
Oh, and there's this one, but it's out of stock:

https://www.amazon.com/Hooglandse-Kerk-Leiden-Theo-Visser/dp/B001MVYUAC/?tag=goodmusicguideco
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 28, 2017, 09:26:51 AM
Very pleasant recital, very pleasant organ, very pleasant music. I mean the Leiden one)

[...]

Unfortunately Theo Visser had to retire earlier this year due to the lasting effects of a cerebral infarction.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 28, 2017, 09:32:23 AM
You MUST get the Leiden recording Premont, I've played it twice today. You can download it here in the UK, but if they won't let you do it in Denmark let me know and I'll get it for you.

https://www.qobuz.com/gb-en/album/leiden-netherlands-hooglandse-kerk-various-artists/8716758003331

The Jean Pierre Lecot CD seemed heavy to me, there's a lot of singing and I didn't think the  voice was appealing. In the Sweelinck Balletto he does something I've never heard before - at the end he makes the sound of a drum beating the pulse more or less, I don't know if it's his feet, a drummer, or some sort of special stop.

(Having said that, he's very good in the du Caurroy.)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 28, 2017, 09:33:36 AM
Unfortunately Theo Visser had to retire earlier this year due to the lasting effects of a cerebral infarction.

Thanks for letting me know that, I was wondering why there was no more on record from him.

Carpe Diem I say!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 28, 2017, 09:41:26 AM
Thanks for letting me know that, I was wondering why there was no more on record from him.

I think there are dozens (and dozens more ;)) of good organists who do not make any record at all.
Just doing their duty during services, teaching, giving concerts.

Carpe Diem I say!

That's right.
(Sitting on my fat ass and listening to music all day. 8))
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on December 28, 2017, 11:39:23 AM
You MUST get the Leiden recording Premont, I've played it twice today. You can download it here in the UK, but if they won't let you do it in Denmark let me know and I'll get it for you.

https://www.qobuz.com/gb-en/album/leiden-netherlands-hooglandse-kerk-various-artists/8716758003331

Qobuz has sent me a general notification, that the service is unavailable in Denmark.
So I am unable to use it.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 28, 2017, 12:18:01 PM
The Jean Pierre Lecot CD seemed heavy to me, there's a lot of singing and I didn't think the  voice was appealing. In the Sweelinck Balletto he does something I've never heard before - at the end he makes the sound of a drum beating the pulse more or less, I don't know if it's his feet, a drummer, or some sort of special stop.

(Having said that, he's very good in the du Caurroy.)

I'm guessing it's the wooden chompers that de Vries uses in the latter part of his improvisation I linked?
I mean these bad guys: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rIBHK7McF0
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 28, 2017, 12:24:26 PM
Eyeing this new issue:

(https://www.aeolus-music.com/var/shop_site/storage/images/alle-tontraeger/ae11131-muethel-johann-gottfried-complete-fantasies-choral-preludes/45748-1-eng-GB/AE11131-Muethel-Johann-Gottfried-Complete-Fantasies-Choral-Preludes.jpg)

Q

Found the acoustic (?) to make the playing sound a bit gauche. But otherwise it's a mighty fine organ.
source: samples on Soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/aeolus-music/sets/johann-gottfried-muthel-complete-fantasies-choral-preludes
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 28, 2017, 04:13:28 PM
(http://www.pieterdirksen.nl/Images/lcouperin.jpg)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvhcK2TLTPM
Louis Couperin's organ music has been terra incognita for me (as for most French Baroque organ music), and I hope that this recording remedies that. It's on my ipod so I can familiarize myself with it, and I've already made my first runthrough. Haven't noticed many things though.
For those familiar, anything to look for, or opinions on the recording?
Nice Flemish instrument, lightweight but delivers.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 28, 2017, 11:55:07 PM
I don't enjoy that one as much as Beyhurst or Jansen in Louis Couperin I'm afraid. It may be a reflection of the choice of the music that Dirksen makes, the organ seems a bit uncharacterful (how much of it is old? ) and the performances are a bit inexpressive if I remember right. But if you notice anything remarkable about it let me know and I'll happily give it another shot.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 29, 2017, 12:09:01 AM
I'm guessing it's the wooden chompers that de Vries uses in the latter part of his improvisation I linked?
I mean these bad guys: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rIBHK7McF0

Lol, it's the sort of thing which may come off better in the church where you can see it than on a CD where you can't!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 29, 2017, 04:06:09 AM
I don't enjoy that one as much as Beyhurst or Jansen in Louis Couperin I'm afraid. It may be a reflection of the choice of the music that Dirksen makes, the organ seems a bit uncharacterful (how much of it is old? ) and the performances are a bit inexpressive if I remember right. But if you notice anything remarkable about it let me know and I'll happily give it another shot.
You're right, I looked up the stoplist and only most of the Hauptwerk is original. And indeed a bit of a generic Frenchy organ sound, although I'll admit that I've heard so little French organ music that most of the organs sound the same (unlike Dutch or Northern Germans, where lots of times I can tell the instrument just by hearing it).
I can't claim to have more insights than you (this is my 2nd run) but I have a gut feeling that Dirksen is playing L. Couperin like it's Sweelinck. I'll compare it with his playing in the Glossa/NM Sweelinck later.
But I don't dislike his playing, it's a good contrast to all the extravagant harpsichord performances a la Skip Sempe.

Now, I can't find anything about Beyhurst or Jansen. (although I do know Jan Jansen - is he the one you mean - through a middling Clavier Ubung and a potentially good Trio sonatas) Which recordings are you referring to?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on December 29, 2017, 04:42:01 AM
(https://i.scdn.co/image/87c923a7a0bf91c473f6874848df21763d383e1e)

Organ: Saint-Michel-en-Thiérache, France 

I believe it’s on Spotify, iTunes, etc....
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 29, 2017, 07:03:41 AM
You're right, I looked up the stoplist and only most of the Hauptwerk is original. And indeed a bit of a generic Frenchy organ sound, although I'll admit that I've heard so little French organ music that most of the organs sound the same (unlike Dutch or Northern Germans, where lots of times I can tell the instrument just by hearing it).
I can't claim to have more insights than you (this is my 2nd run) but I have a gut feeling that Dirksen is playing L. Couperin like it's Sweelinck. I'll compare it with his playing in the Glossa/NM Sweelinck later.
But I don't dislike his playing, it's a good contrast to all the extravagant harpsichord performances a la Skip Sempe.

Now, I can't find anything about Beyhurst or Jansen. (although I do know Jan Jansen - is he the one you mean - through a middling Clavier Ubung and a potentially good Trio sonatas) Which recordings are you referring to?

(https://www.ledisquaire.com/8599-home_default/louis-couperin-1626-1661-henri-dumont-clairs-obscurs-pieces-dorgue.jpg)    (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51LEzFzVxTL._SY355_.jpg)

Both may be hard to find, I don't know, let me know if you want them.

There's a debate about whether this music is by Louis Couperin, Glen wilson thinks it isn't, I once saw something Davitt Moroney wrote where he said that there's more secure  evidence that the organ music is by LC than there is that the harpsichord music is by LC!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 29, 2017, 09:08:19 AM
[...]

Now, I can't find anything about Beyhurst or Jansen. (although I do know Jan Jansen - is he the one you mean - through a middling Clavier Ubung and a potentially good Trio sonatas) [...]

Jan Jansen (father of violinist Janine Jansen) is the former organist of the Domkerk, Utrecht, NL.

AFAIK, he's not related to Jan Willem Jansen. The latter was a pupil of a.o. Wim van Beek and Ton Koopman. Since already the 1980s, Jansen has been working in Toulouse. I heard him once at a recital in the Martinikerk of Groningen, NL, playing a Renaissance/Early Baroque programme, and I thought he was very good. I guess his Couperin is worth checking out.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 30, 2017, 09:34:14 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTsEncFYZAI

Franz Tunder's "In dich hab ich gehoffet, Herr" played by Cor de Jong on the organ of the Leiden Pieterskerk. Brisk, but breathtaking playing, love how he starts with the chorale, amazing contrast between the ruckpositiv plenum and the vox humana. Reminds me of Wolfram Syre's Tunder (which I've grown to love).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on December 30, 2017, 11:07:36 PM
Thanks for that. What a noisy organ! i think that's a brilliant, rapid, virtuosic and incisive performance. I love the way he makes the transitions so natural - I especially love the way he makes Tunder's music leap out of the hymn at the start!

I just discovered this Buxtehude/Hasse/Tunder CD on a Stellwagen organ. I'll listen to it properly later today.

(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/G9wAAOSwq19XCuR~/s-l500.jpg)

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on December 31, 2017, 01:52:27 AM
And now for something completely different...

(https://images2.imgbox.com/17/59/29UJLXtp_o.jpg)

Organ works of Puccini (sonatas, marches, waltzes), played by Liuwe Tamminga.

Been listening this morning, and it's good fun!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on December 31, 2017, 06:36:13 PM
Thanks for that. What a noisy organ! i think that's a brilliant, rapid, virtuosic and incisive performance. I love the way he makes the transitions so natural - I especially love the way he makes Tunder's music leap out of the hymn at the start!

I just discovered this Buxtehude/Hasse/Tunder CD on a Stellwagen organ. I'll listen to it properly later today.

(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/G9wAAOSwq19XCuR~/s-l500.jpg)

It seems like old tracker organs in general are very clickety-clackety. I heard a concert on this organ last summer played by Erwin Wiersinga and was very impressed.
Another fleet-footed Sweelinck Poolse dans on the organ: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zNUeFvRv6E
His playing's very Koopmanesque, in a way. I'd like to know what Koopman playing Tunder would sound like.

Have you seen Tomita Kazuki's videos of him playing on the Stellwagen organ? I think they're the finest playing on the Stellwagen organ I know, excluding possibly Jeremy Joseph's or Sietze de Vries' recordings that I haven't heard. (Harald Vogel's Buxtehude on it doesn't do anything for me, surprisingly, although I haven't really seriously listened to it) Also very well recorded; I think it's a very hard organ to record and was surprised how differently the real thing sounded from recordings when I heard it also last summer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bpoSRdCCuw

By the way, how do you think of Kraft's Totentanzorgel recordings on SS? I think they're remarkable, all the mysticism without the kitschy (incorrect expression?) neo-baroque registrations that he uses on later recordings.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2018, 02:33:02 AM
Quote from: bioluminescentsquid
l.. the finest playing on the Stellwagen organ I know, excluding possibly Jeremy Joseph's or Sietze de Vries' recordings that I haven't heard.

Would you mind to provide a link (or two) ?

Quote from: bioluminescentsquid
By the way, how do you think of Kraft's Totentanzorgel recordings on SS? I think they're remarkable, all the mysticism without the kitschy (incorrect expression?) neo-baroque registrations that he uses on later recordings.

What is SS?

And which recordings do you consider later? The ones he made on the great new Kemper main organ around 1970?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2018, 03:03:08 AM
Concerning the Stellwagen organ Sct Jacobi Lübeck these recordings are worth considering:

https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/Die-Orgeln-in-St-Jakobi-L%FCbeck/hnum/7341353

https://www.amazon.de/Orgelwerke-St-Jakobi-Lübeck-Armin-Schoof/dp/B000028BTS/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1514804333&sr=1-2&keywords=armin+schoof


And also Walcha's Bach recordings (Archiv 1947) even if they were made before the restoring of the organ by the Hillebrand brothers in 1978.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2018, 03:13:33 AM

I just discovered this Buxtehude/Hasse/Tunder CD on a Stellwagen organ. I'll listen to it properly later today.

(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/G9wAAOSwq19XCuR~/s-l500.jpg)

I think Armin Schoof is a very fine organist, but the problem with recitals of this kind is, that the programming is a misk-mask of everything.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 01, 2018, 07:51:37 AM
I think Armin Schoof is a very fine organist, but the problem with recitals of this kind is, that the programming is a misk-mask of everything.

mish-mash! in French it's micmac and I guess in Danish it's misk-mask -- it just seems surprising that so many languages have this bizarre turn of phrase/

I'm sure the squid will reply in due course but SS is a rather civilised place which I think you might enjoy

http://symphonyshare.blogspot.co.uk/

(I just did a terrible thing on a French forum where I confused la viole (viola da gamba) with le viol (rape)  :-[ )
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on January 01, 2018, 08:23:04 AM
Would you mind to provide a link (or two) ?

Jeremy Joseph: https://www.amazon.com/Deborah-Florian-Boesch-Ensemble-Delirio/dp/B01NADTV1Y
de Vries: https://www.jsbrecords.nl/product/lubeck/

Is that the Pieter Jan Belder I think it is? I wasn't aware that he played recorder.

And which recordings do you consider later? The ones he made on the great new Kemper main organ around 1970?

I was referring to recordings Walter Kraft did on the original Totentanzorgel in 1941 before the church was bombed out. They're mighty hard to find, Lubeck's city library issued a CD with them over 18 years ago that's obviously no longer available, so PM me (or join Symphonyshare!) if you want them. I think they're quite sensational, even without all the historical significance. The later recordings are the still available Vox Buxtehude set, which is admittedly also not bad.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on January 01, 2018, 10:03:22 AM
Jeremy Joseph: https://www.amazon.com/Deborah-Florian-Boesch-Ensemble-Delirio/dp/B01NADTV1Y
de Vries: https://www.jsbrecords.nl/product/lubeck/

Is that the Pieter Jan Belder I think it is? I wasn't aware that he played recorder.

 News for me as wel, but so it seems....  :)

http://www.ibizweb.nl/belder/belder_en.htm

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2018, 10:15:10 AM
News for me as wel, but so it seems....  :)

http://www.ibizweb.nl/belder/belder_en.htm

Q

He has made a number of recordings on recorder, among others the Brandenburg concertos II and IV and this;

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/7956535--the-art-of-the-recorder
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2018, 10:21:02 AM
Jeremy Joseph: https://www.amazon.com/Deborah-Florian-Boesch-Ensemble-Delirio/dp/B01NADTV1Y
de Vries: https://www.jsbrecords.nl/product/lubeck/

Thanks.

Quote from: bioluminescentsquid
I was referring to recordings Walter Kraft did on the original Totentanzorgel in 1941 before the church was bombed out. They're mighty hard to find, Lubeck's city library issued a CD with them over 18 years ago that's obviously no longer available, so PM me (or join Symphonyshare!) if you want them. I think they're quite sensational, even without all the historical significance. The later recordings are the still available Vox Buxtehude set, which is admittedly also not bad.

I did not know, that there were recordings of the original Totentanz organ in existence, Of course the Buxtehude set (1958) is later in relation to these, but he continued recording until around 1973.



Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 01, 2018, 10:37:47 AM
Here's the BWV 1004 chaconne played on the Groningen Schnitger!

https://www.youtube.com/v/aEArrg7Jp-Y
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on January 01, 2018, 10:47:36 AM
Here's the BWV 1004 chaconne played on the Groningen Schnitger!

https://www.youtube.com/v/aEArrg7Jp-Y

I like the comment "NO CLARITY, NO DEFINATION, ORGAN NOT THE RIGHT PERIOD FOR THIS MUSIC, IT SOUNDS MUDDY AND MURKY."
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on January 01, 2018, 10:58:14 AM
I like the comment "NO CLARITY, NO DEFINATION, ORGAN NOT THE RIGHT PERIOD FOR THIS MUSIC, IT SOUNDS MUDDY AND MURKY."

BUT THE ORGAN WAS BUILT IN 1692 HOW IS IT NOT THE RIGHT PERIOD FOR THIS MUSIC, LOVELY MUSIC LOTS OF FORCE, LOTS OF GRAVINTAS  :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 01, 2018, 11:07:12 AM

By the way, how do you think of Kraft's Totentanzorgel recordings on SS? I think they're remarkable, all the mysticism without the kitschy (incorrect expression?) neo-baroque registrations that he uses on later recordings.

I just listened to the two Bux pieces, I haven't heard the Bruhns yet, for the first time, I thought that the toccata, Buxwv 155, was fabulous, made my jaw drop.

the later recording of Buxwv 155 takes less time, and I think and isn't in the zone like the earlier recording, he's not in an alpha-state, if you know what I mean.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on January 01, 2018, 11:10:06 AM
BUT THE ORGAN WAS BUILT IN 1692 HOW IS IT NOT THE RIGHT PERIOD FOR THIS MUSIC, LOVELY MUSIC LOTS OF FORCE, LOTS OF GRAVINTAS  :)

That's why I like the comment. ;)

About the organ though, more specific: the organ was built around 1450, rebuilt around 1480, expanded in 1542, 1564 and around 1630.
In 1692 Arp Schnitger did a 'grande baroque' rebuilt and added the 32 ft pedal towers.
Further expansion in 1728 (Franz Caspar Schnitger) and in 1740 (Albertus Anthoni Hinsz).

Rebuilt and 'ruined' in the 19th century and in the first half of the 20th century.
Almost destroyed, but, thanks to Cor Edskes, restored and rebuilt back to the '1740 state' by Jürgen Ahrend during the period 1977-1984.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2018, 12:34:09 PM
Here's the BWV 1004 chaconne played on the Groningen Schnitger!

https://www.youtube.com/v/aEArrg7Jp-Y

Well, Kollmannsperger plays exellent, buiilding this difficult piece up in a splendid way, I am however not that enthusiastic about the arrangement, which in many of the sections sounds rather un-Bachian.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 01, 2018, 01:40:05 PM
By the way, how do you think of Kraft's Totentanzorgel recordings on SS? I think they're remarkable, all the mysticism without the kitschy (incorrect expression?) neo-baroque registrations that he uses on later recordings.

Now I have listened to the Bruhns and the two Buxtehude pieces. I think Kraft not unexpectedly plays as a young man. I find his later style (Buxtehude 1958) more mature, considered and balanced even if his registrations was a tad too "full". Never-the-less highly interesting to hear how he played in his younger days, where he already was a pioneer as to North German Baroque music.

Concerning the organ I would never have spotted it, had I not known. It sounds not that Baroque to me, This may be due to recording technique with lack of higher partials, and that the organ probably wasn't in its original Baroque state (maybe "verschlimmbessert" in the 19th century), and it sounds conspicuously as if it is equally tuned. I have tried to find specific information about this old organ, but have not been successful so far. Paradoxically the reconstructed Totentanz organ Karl Kemper made after the war - based upon a description of the old organ, sounds more archaic and authentic Baroque to me, and it is also tuned in some modified meantone. Alas this Kemper organ was later dismantled and replaced by a horrible Führer organ totally without style.



Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on January 01, 2018, 09:56:55 PM
Now I have listened to the Bruhns and the two Buxtehude pieces. I think Kraft not unexpectedly plays as a young man. I find his later style (Buxtehude 1958) more mature, considered and balanced even if his registrations was a tad too "full". Never-the-less highly interesting to hear how he played in his younger days, where he already was a pioneer as to North German Baroque music.

Concerning the organ I would never have spotted it, had I not known. It sounds not that Baroque to me, This may be due to recording technique with lack of higher partials, and that the organ probably wasn't in its original Baroque state (maybe "verschlimmbessert" in the 19th century), and it sounds conspicuously as if it is equally tuned. I have tried to find specific information about this old organ, but have not been successful so far. Paradoxically the reconstructed Totentanz organ Karl Kemper made after the war - based upon a description of the old organ, sounds more archaic and authentic Baroque to me, and it is also tuned in some modified meantone. Alas this Kemper organ was later dismantled and replaced by a horrible Führer organ totally without style.

Built by Johannes Stephani in the 1477, Ruckpositiv added by Jacob Scherer in 1558, Brustwerk and new reeds added by Henning Kroger in 1622, rebuilt by Stellwagen in 1655 (that's the state Buxtehude played it in), altered slightly but not too radically (as in re-tuning, a few stops taken out of use) in the 19th century (I guess all the money was spent on the new grand organ), restored by Kemper in 1937.

A good stoplist here: https://books.google.com/books?id=qSXGOoambNcC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA81#v=onepage&q&f=false

For the sound...
I don't think we could say that the organ is in Romantic state, and if anything it would have sounded shriller than the typical transitional Rennaissance/Baroque organ due to Orgelbewegung tastes.

The "Sister" Stellwagen in the Jacobikirche also doesn't sound as shrill as organs built by Schnitger et al., I think they were aiming for a milder, more vocal sound (not to mention the fact that the Hauptwerk there is all Gothic up to the mixtures!).

But honestly the recording is poor, so we can't tell much at all. It does sound equally tuned (I think organs were restored equally tuned up until the Ahrends) and tuned at A~490 like its sister in the Jacobikirche.

But I do hear some very juicy reeds in there! (the Krummhorn by Kroger?)

I agree with the "young man" comment by the way, I was surprised by the speed at which Kraft took the Bruhns!

Meanwhile, I do think the Walcha recordings in St. Jacobi are interesting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEQVlGzusWQ
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 02, 2018, 06:41:00 AM
Built by Johannes Stephani in the 1477, Ruckpositiv added by Jacob Scherer in 1558, Brustwerk and new reeds added by Henning Kroger in 1622, rebuilt by Stellwagen in 1655 (that's the state Buxtehude played it in), altered slightly but not too radically (as in re-tuning, a few stops taken out of use) in the 19th century (I guess all the money was spent on the new grand organ), restored by Kemper in 1937.

A good stoplist here: https://books.google.com/books?id=qSXGOoambNcC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA81#v=onepage&q&f=false

Thanks for this, which also reminds me of the Snyder biography, which I since long have intended to acquire.

Quote from: bioluminescentsquid
For the sound...
I don't think we could say that the organ is in Romantic state, and if anything it would have sounded shriller than the typical transitional Rennaissance/Baroque organ due to Orgelbewegung tastes.

No I did not mean romantic state, but that it maybe had been repaired with no particular style in mind.

Quote from: bioluminescentsquid
But honestly the recording is poor, so we can't tell much at all. It does sound equally tuned (I think organs were restored equally tuned up until the Ahrends) and tuned at A~490 like its sister in the Jacobikirche.

There are many examples of unequally tuned more or less optimally restored organs before Jürgen Ahrend,

Quote from: bioluminescentsquid
But I do hear some very juicy reeds in there! (the Krummhorn by Kroger?)

Yes, in the middle of the Toccata. I think he plays this section on the Rp using the Trichterregal 8'. I have heard him play this piece in Vor Frelsers Kirke, Copenhagen, and he obviously used the Rp Krumhorn 8', even if the Bv has a suitable regal 8'.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on January 02, 2018, 02:29:00 PM
(http://direct.rhapsody.com/imageserver/images/Alb.157297306/500x500.jpg)

Finally a good recording for these composers that I've stayed away because of a lack of sympathetic recordings? Played on a very early 16th century swallow-nest organ in Lorris-in-Gâtinais.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 03, 2018, 12:02:09 AM
(http://direct.rhapsody.com/imageserver/images/Alb.157297306/500x500.jpg)

Finally a good recording for these composers that I've stayed away because of a lack of sympathetic recordings? Played on a very early 16th century swallow-nest organ in Lorris-in-Gâtinais.

Yes, I know it and like it very much, that was the recording that prompted me to explore Kerckhoven and Cornet. This whole period of Spanish Netherlands is interesting and I'd like to know much more about the music it inspired. By coincidence I've just finished reading a fabulous novel about it, called L'Oeuvre au Noir by Marguerite Yourcenar.

Colcomb did an excellent CD of Spanish organ music too.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 05, 2018, 11:46:23 AM

I really dig those recordings that have ensembles playing with historical organs. [/img]

I just thought of this comment while listening to Martin Gester's Steigleder CD - it's very good I think, both performance and music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on January 05, 2018, 07:46:16 PM
I just thought of this comment while listening to Martin Gester's Steigleder CD - it's very good I think, both performance and music.

Thanks, I wasn't aware of Martin Gester. It seems like he has quite a lot of CDs with him playing along an ensemble with grand organ. I just listened to his Bach and was quite impressed.

Edit: organ playing is a bit too brisk for me
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 05, 2018, 10:00:38 PM


Edit: organ playing is a bit too brisk for me

In the steigleder I thought you'd think he was too slow! Re his Bach on organ, the one I like most is the violin sonatas with Alice Pierot, but the are quite fast.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on January 06, 2018, 11:53:39 PM
After a lot of serious organ listening the last two years, I am at a bit of a loss as to where to go now...I have greatly enjoyed the French set (22 CD) from Marie-Claire Alain, the Radio Netherlands set of the complete Sweelinck, the complete Buxtehude (Harald Vogel), along with various single disks (CD and LP) of Tunder, Cornet, Mendelssohn, etc. I will likely pick up the complete Marcel DuPre Mercury recordings soon (anathema around here I guess, but I still like him). I am not sure whether it is time for another Bach set yet... Any suggestions?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 07, 2018, 12:07:08 AM
After a lot of serious organ listening the last two years, I am at a bit of a loss as to where to go now...I have greatly enjoyed the French set (22 CD) from Marie-Claire Alain, the Radio Netherlands set of the complete Sweelinck, the complete Buxtehude (Harald Vogel), along with various single disks (CD and LP) of Tunder, Cornet, Mendelssohn, etc. I will likely pick up the complete Marcel DuPre Mercury recordings soon (anathema around here I guess, but I still like him). I am not sure whether it is time for another Bach set yet... Any suggestions?

Just thinking of earlier music, What you've heard is a bit oriented towards the north, and mainland Europe. You didn't like Frescobaldi so we'll forget Italy. My suggestion is that you listen to some music from Spain and England. Maybe Ken Gilbert's The Golden Age of English Organ Music (if you search you'll see I explain somewhere how to get it) and Odile Bailleux Arauxo. Also some Pachelbel - try Rübsam on Naxos.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 07, 2018, 12:54:02 AM
Just had an idea for you, get Andrea Marcon's Domenico Scarlatti CD

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61dE1oE1kSL._SX425_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Jo498 on January 07, 2018, 01:12:38 AM
Reger. I hardly know his organ music but in Germany he is considered #2 after Bach.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 07, 2018, 01:44:34 PM
Well, Kollmannsperger plays exellent, buiilding this difficult piece up in a splendid way, I am however not that enthusiastic about the arrangement, which in many of the sections sounds rather un-Bachian.

Yes, I agree with this.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on January 07, 2018, 06:31:13 PM
Just had an idea for you, get Andrea Marcon's Domenico Scarlatti CD

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61dE1oE1kSL._SX425_.jpg)

Thanks for the suggestions. Despite not liking the Tactus (Vartolo, Lorregiain) Frescobaldi set, I would not rule out further explorations in Italian organ music. The Scarlatti CD looks good. I am not a big fan of the sound of the Spanish organs, tilted as they are to the brass stops. Much of the Spanish music for organ I have heard seemed a bit on the bombastic side. Still, I admit is a small sample, so maybe there are some gems I've missed.

Reger, yes, I have a few CDs and am going to get the complete Naxos set one of these days. His music really takes effort to enjoy, but the effort generally does pay off, in my experience.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: kishnevi on January 07, 2018, 07:06:31 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. Despite not liking the Tactus (Vartolo, Lorregiain) Frescobaldi set, I would not rule out further explorations in Italian organ music. The Scarlatti CD looks good. I am not a big fan of the sound of the Spanish organs, tilted as they are to the brass stops. Much of the Spanish music for organ I have heard seemed a bit on the bombastic side. Still, I admit is a small sample, so maybe there are some gems I've missed.

Reger, yes, I have a few CDs and am going to get the complete Naxos set one of these days. His music really takes effort to enjoy, but the effort generally does pay off, in my experience.

Re
Reger
I have the Naxos set and the Haas set on MDG. I prefer the latter, but not by much. Try listening to samples of both before you buy.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on January 08, 2018, 11:41:29 AM
Bach's Passacaglia played by Serge Schoonbroodt.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KBefZtaHoQ

The art installation reminds me of when I visited Amsterdam last year, since the Niewe kerk had several strange exhibitions going on at the same time, and the Oude Kerk had its floor covered in golden sheets!

But I like it a lot, the "plenum approach" on a romantic organ. Does anyone know of other performances like this?

Although at the end, I think because of the recording you can't hear the manual playing very well.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on January 08, 2018, 05:43:03 PM
After a lot of serious organ listening the last two years, I am at a bit of a loss as to where to go now... Any suggestions?

You might try a leapfrog into the twentieth century. I really enjoy Messiaen's organ music. I have the old Weir set below, long OOP but reissued piecemeal on Priory, although Priory's reissues don't seem be in print, either (but check BRO!).

I don't own any other organ discs of Messiaen so I can't compare but there's plenty on YouTube. That's where I got to know Weir.
 





Weir also recorded some Messiaen for Decca. I'm assuming this predated the Collins Classics sessions:



Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 09, 2018, 01:43:29 PM
(https://cdn3.volusion.com/3pvgr.scms9/v/vspfiles/photos/LRCD-1133-35-2.jpg)

IVe been listening to Hans Davidsson's new recording of Bohm's  Ach wie nichtig. He takes his time, and there's lots of space in the music (can't explain it better), there's often a "chamber music" feel I'd say. His gestures, phrases, are very incisive. Beautifully recorded, organ sounds great, registrations are more complementary and harmonious than contrasting. He goes deep into the music - what I mean is the inner voices are very lively and contribute a lot to the effect. He makes Bohm sound like no-one else, not like early Bach, he's found a Bohm-voice.

It certainly held my attention, it's different,  and I'm looking forward to getting to know the set.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on January 09, 2018, 02:17:03 PM
Sounds good!  :)

The set was already on the wishlist.

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 09, 2018, 02:56:40 PM
You might try a leapfrog into the twentieth century. I really enjoy Messiaen's organ music. I have the old Weir set below, long OOP but reissued piecemeal on Priory, although Priory's reissues don't seem be in print, either (but check BRO!).

I don't own any other organ discs of Messiaen so I can't compare but there's plenty on YouTube. That's where I got to know Weir.
 



At $6 I couldn't resist that (even though I already have Messiaen's organ music in the DG set).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on January 09, 2018, 04:58:33 PM
At $6 I couldn't resist that (even though I already have Messiaen's organ music in the DG set).

I haven't heard Latry on DG (although I may try and YouTube him) but I'm enamored with Weir. So, good catch, I'd say.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 09, 2018, 05:08:42 PM
I haven't heard Latry on DG (although I may try and YouTube him) but I'm enamored with Weir. So, good catch, I'd say.

I have to confess I also have Bate.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on January 09, 2018, 06:19:14 PM
I have to confess I also have Bate.

I've listened to Bate on YouTube. Apparently she had Messiaen's seal of approval for her renditions. But I'd wager she's not alone in that.

I found her playing very worthwhile, and will probably someday pick up her set. What's most attractive about Bate is she and Weir are polar opposites, at least based on my YouTube listening. Bate's organ is bathed in reverb, with a huge range, sounding like it would rattle the roof off its hinges.

In contrast, Weir's organ has a sharper response, with a certain nimbleness to it: the complete opposite of Bate. The two would make perfect contrasting sets.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 09, 2018, 09:55:28 PM
Sounds good!  :)

The set was already on the wishlist.

Q

Yes it's very stimulating, full of ideas. A slow, staggering approach in which musical lines are deconstructed  >:D
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on January 10, 2018, 11:55:19 PM
Yes it's very stimulating, full of ideas. A slow, staggering approach in which musical lines are deconstructed  >:D

Well, that's not how I remember Hans Davidsson's style....  0:)

And it's not like any amount of restraint in tempo or any application of staggering as a phrasing technique (on the contrary) would amount to a post-modern "deconstructed" approach....  ;) IMMO of course.... I'm not an expert.

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 11, 2018, 03:34:23 AM
Yes it's very stimulating, full of ideas. A slow, staggering approach in which musical lines are deconstructed  >:D

Now I get curious. Fortunately the set is in my listening-to pile.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 11, 2018, 09:32:25 AM
Well, that's not how I remember Hans Davidsson's style....  0:)




You may be right
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 21, 2018, 08:58:34 AM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/f1/95/004995f1.jpg)

CPO's second installment of their complete Pachelbel contains something I've never come across before, some "psalmlieder" played by James David Christie, they're a sort of fantasy based on a psalm I suppose   -- am I wrong to think that no one else has recorded this music? Anyway here they are, and one of them at least is interesting enough (psalm 124 for example, a big set of variations on psalm 130 too, which I bet could be made very attractive.)  I can't find anything on the organ online either, and for some reason I can't download the booklet to see if there is a mention of them.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on January 21, 2018, 10:24:41 PM
Was just listening to some Purcell anthems today and realized I have virtually no English organ music.  :o  Spanish organ music has always put me off a bit because much of what I've heard seems a bit bombastic and I'm not a huge fan of the brass stops. Anyway, are there any good sets of English or Spanish organ music to be recommended to the curious listener (who loves the 22 CD French set with Marie-Claire Alain)?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 22, 2018, 01:05:50 PM
Well I mentioned Kenneth Gilbert's recording at Lanvellec to you before. In addition you may want to try to hear Christopher Stembridge's CD called Wondrous Machine. Another one to explore is Ton Koopman's recording from Addington Hall, and Colin Tilney at Knoll. For Blow specifically, I like Timothy Robert's CD. Leonhardt recorded quite a lot of Purcell and Blow - later in his career there's some Blow at the Dom Bedos in Bordeaux and earlier there's a whole CD dedicated to these two composers. A more old fashioned style, but nevertheless one I find very rewarding, is Thurston Dart's recording of English organ music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on January 22, 2018, 02:15:48 PM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/f1/95/004995f1.jpg)

CPO's second installment of their complete Pachelbel contains something I've never come across before, some "psalmlieder" played by James David Christie, they're a sort of fantasy based on a psalm I suppose   -- am I wrong to think that no one else has recorded this music? Anyway here they are, and one of them at least is interesting enough (psalm 124 for example, a big set of variations on psalm 130 too, which I bet could be made very attractive.)  I can't find anything on the organ online either, and for some reason I can't download the booklet to see if there is a mention of them.

In the index of the booklet the different arrangements of Lutheranian chorales are grouped according to the words of the Psalmes , e.g. Psalm 103: Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren or Psalm 137: An Wasserflüssen Babylon. In this way the words of the Lutheranian hymn refer to the respective Psalm in the Bible (Old Testament), the former being a paraphrase of the latter.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on January 23, 2018, 10:12:41 PM
In the index of the booklet the different arrangements of Lutheranian chorales are grouped according to the words of the Psalmes , e.g. Psalm 103: Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren or Psalm 137: An Wasserflüssen Babylon. In this way the words of the Lutheranian hymn refer to the respective Psalm in the Bible (Old Testament), the former being a paraphrase of the latter.

The organ sound is a bit lightweight in some of those psalmlieder  - this maybe be Christie's approach, or it may be a consequence of the organ. I think a bit more depth and power would have sounded good  in Psalm 124 / 3 for example. The music reminds me a bit of Scheidt - "Da Jesu an dem Kreuze stund" for example.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 03, 2018, 10:29:36 AM
I've just found out that Michel Chapuis died in November last year. I have just one recording by him which I cherish, with music by Dumage and Clerambault, and I like his Boyvin too. I vaguely recall there was someone who posted here saying how much they loved his Bach, I can't remember who. I did recently listen to some of his Leipzig Chorales and remember thinking how secular it seemed, and that in itself makes it an interesting reflection of the spirit of his times in Paris maybe. This is, after all, the 50th anniversary year of May '68!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 03, 2018, 11:47:09 AM
I've just found out that Michel Chapuis died in November last year. I have just one recording by him which I cherish, with music by Dumage and Clerambault, and I like his Boyvin too. I vaguely recall there was someone who posted here saying how much they loved his Bach, I can't remember who. I did recently listen to some of his Leipzig Chorales and remember thinking how secular it seemed, and that in itself makes it an interesting reflection of the spirit of his times in Paris maybe. This is, after all, the 50th anniversary year of May '68!

The Chapuis fan, you think of, is James.

IMO Chapuis' Du Mage/Clerambault CD is the best recording he ever made, far surpassing his Grigny, F. Couperin, L. Couperin, Bach and Buxtehude. I have not heard his Boyvin though.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 03, 2018, 01:01:45 PM
(https://i.scdn.co/image/376ec9ac16883c6cb43f820f6b095aaf4e4781c7)

Well I put on his Leipzig Chorales, and around BWV 657 the thing warms up, I feel as I'm listening to Bach through the lense of Django Reinhardt and the Hot Club de France.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on February 07, 2018, 12:17:02 AM
Frescobaldi Elevation Toccata played fast on a 18th century Portugese organ with a full plenum! It goes against everything I know (not much) about historical practice, but I like it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6UozTUQfVI
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on February 15, 2018, 06:34:51 PM
I had a hankling to listen to Franck's organ music this afternoon. I thought what I wanted was one of the chorales, but it happened to be the Pièce Héroïque, not a usual choice. I listened to 5 interpretations: Germani, Guillou, Murray, Dupré, and Torvald Torén. Not surprisingly to me, the Torén swept the field.

For those of you unfamiliar with the Torén set, it was recorded in 1978 and released on the Lyricon label. It has long been my favourite recording of Franck's works. The performances range from amazing to ultimately satisfying. The recording of the organ in the 2 churches in Stockholm are in the demonstration class with true weight in the pedals, which is uncommon even in the digital age--- a bonus for those of us with full range speaker systems.

While Bach is still my alpha and omega for organ music, I urge those of you fancy Franck and have a turntable to give these recordings a try if you can source them.

There are also later recordings of Torén's Franck that are available to download (http://torvaldtoren.bluemusicgroup.com/), but I have not heard them though I plan to.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 21, 2018, 02:11:11 PM
Are there any recordings with substantial amounts of organ music by Matthew Locke? I have Terence Charlston's CD, and I like it, and I also have Kenneth Gilbert's English music CD, which has a couple of excellent pieces. France orgue lists a couple of interesting looking things, but they seem to have disappeared. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on February 21, 2018, 06:06:01 PM
Are there any recordings with substantial amounts of organ music by Matthew Locke? I have Terence Charlston's CD, and I like it, and I also have Kenneth Gilbert's English music CD, which has a couple of excellent pieces. France orgue lists a couple of interesting looking things, but they seem to have disappeared.

I do not think he left other organ music than the seven voluntarys from Melothesia (and the two pieces from manuscript sources). Charlston's CD contains them all, but some of them (only a few pr. CD) are contained in the CDs below. OBS that Leonhardt recorded three of the voluntarys.

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8035082--organ-music-robert-woolley

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8027741--the-excellent-art-of-voluntary-early-english-organ-music

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Purcell-Anthems-Hymns-Locke-Voluntaries/dp/B00Y24FPYQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1519264535&sr=8-1&keywords=locke+leonhardt

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/7988735--the-elusive-english-organ
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on February 21, 2018, 11:55:11 PM
I do not think he left other organ music than the seven voluntarys from Melothesia (and the two pieces from manuscript sources). Charlston's CD contains them all, but some of them (only a few pr. CD) are contained in the CDs below. OBS that Leonhardt recorded three of the voluntarys.

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8035082--organ-music-robert-woolley

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8027741--the-excellent-art-of-voluntary-early-english-organ-music

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Purcell-Anthems-Hymns-Locke-Voluntaries/dp/B00Y24FPYQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1519264535&sr=8-1&keywords=locke+leonhardt

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/7988735--the-elusive-english-organ

Thank you, I'd forgotten about Leonhardt.

I played the Pavans and Galiards on Charlston's Byrd CD last night, I like it, I especially like the sound of his harpsichord, the supple rhythms, the way he doesn't pound the pulse out.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 05, 2018, 12:01:33 AM
(http://www.grooves-inc.com/images/cover/618/195/f7sh5xjr.j32)

An astonishing recording by Bruno Forst here, relaunced by Brilliant. Clemencic has shown that this sort of matierial can make fascinating  music to listen to.

According to this review of the first edition of the recording, Bruno Forst's notes are good. Does anyone know of Brilliant have issued them in translation?

Quote from: http://www.clicmusique.com/arte-tanger-nouvelle-methode-clavier-gonzalo-baena-frost-p-100350.html?language=en
En 1540 parut le premier livre espagnol consacré à la musique pour instruments à clavier. L’auteur, Gonzalo de Baena, un castillan au service du roi du Portugal, obtint en 1536 un privilège royal qui lui permit d’éditer son ouvrage quatre ans plus tard. Il semble que son œuvre n’ait connu qu’une diffusion très limitée, voire inexistante, l’exemplaire subsistant étant peut-être le seul jamais imprimé. Acquis au début du XIXème siècle par la Bibliothèque du Palacio Real à Madrid, l’ouvrage connut un sort tragi-comique : lors de son inscription dans le registre d’entrée, l’employé distrait ou amoureux, au lieu du titre « Arte novamente inventada para aprender a TANGER « (Méthode nouvellement inventée pour apprendre à toucher - les instruments à clavier -), inscrivit « Arte de TEJER » (Méthode pour tisser) !!! L’ouvrage, classé hors de sa catégorie, disparut jusqu’en…1992, redécouvert par l’organiste passionné de musique ibérique Bruno Forst. Outre une partie théorique, où Baena expose sa méthode (en fait, la mise en tablature de la musique pour orgue, censée permettre même à des non-initiés de pouvoir jouer sans autres connaissances préalables…), sont présentées 45 pièces qui illustrent son propos et constituent la plus grande part du livre. Les œuvres choisies sont essentiellement des transcriptions d’œuvres vocales certainement appréciées par l’auteur, qui révèle ainsi un goût nettement passéiste, la majorité des compositeurs choisis vivant une, deux, voire trois générations plus tôt (tel Ockeghem, né en 1410). Seules les pièces dues à l’auteur lui-même, et à son fils Antonio (vers 1500, après 1562), présentent une musique contemporaine de la publication de l’ouvrage. Il est à noter que l’écrasante majorité de ces compositeurs sont des franco-flamands, reflétant le goût de Charles Quint puis de son fils et successeur Philippe II. Les pièces, disposées dans un but didactique par difficulté croissante, vont de simples duos à une polyphonie complexe à quatre voix. Bruno Forst utilise pour ces deux CDs deux instruments différents, un petit orgue baroque de 1658, situé dans l’église de Brea de Aragon (province de Saragosse), et un instrument de dimensions similaires construit en 2007, mais selon la tradition de l’école de facture d’orgue madrilène du XVIIème siècle, dans l’église San José de Navalcarnero (Province de Madrid). Ces instruments au son clair et précis font entièrement justice à ces pièces méditatives, parfois colorées par les jeux d’anches, grâce à l’exécution nerveuse et précise du jeune organiste. Un régal raffiné pour aficionados. (Jean-Michel Babin-Goasdoué)

This word tisser (weave I think, though I'm not well up in this sort of vocabulary, maybe it's spin ) is amusing.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 14, 2018, 04:53:45 PM
Falcioni's recording is not bad, but it is plastic and faceless. Any good recording on Georg Muffat??
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 14, 2018, 10:49:10 PM
Falcioni's recording is not bad, but it is plastic and faceless. Any good recording on Georg Muffat??

Confirms by own impressions.

This one is awesome - both sonically as in interpretation:



Also included in this box set, which offers 4 more great recordings for the same price...


Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 15, 2018, 02:38:36 AM
Falcioni's recording is not bad, but it is plastic and faceless. Any good recording on Georg Muffat??

There are not many available recordings of Apparatus Musico-organisticus at the moment. I also find, that Kelemen's recording is the most attractive of these.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 15, 2018, 06:08:24 PM
The Chapuis fan, you think of, is James.

IMO Chapuis' Du Mage/Clerambault CD is the best recording he ever made, far surpassing his Grigny, F. Couperin, L. Couperin, Bach and Buxtehude. I have not heard his Boyvin though.
What are you guys' opinion on his recordibg of Lubeck if you have heard? Thank you
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 15, 2018, 06:09:51 PM
Thanks a lot. I ordered the box set.
Confirms by own impressions.

This one is awesome - both sonically as in interpretation:



Also included in this box set, which offers 4 more great recordings for the same price...


Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 15, 2018, 10:43:06 PM
What are you guys' opinion on his recordibg of Lubeck if you have heard? Thank you

1969 was the time when recreational drugs started to become popular in Paris and this is Lubeck on speed. It was recorded at the same time as his Bach and I think it incarnes the same aesthetic ideas - fresh and vigorous, with very little grandeur or emotional sensitivity.

The Klapmeyer organ was an interesting choice and I wonder if the booklet essay, which are often excellent for Astrée, discusses it.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 15, 2018, 11:11:55 PM
(https://i1.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/6138G98RHWL._SS500_.jpg)

I'll just take the opportunity to mention Friedhelm Flamme's Lubeck, which I find very rewarding. He gives us a Lubeck whose music is like a bold exploration of symphonic organ colours. Flamme lets the music take all the time it needs to express a vision of enormous poetry, there's grandeur and emotional sensitivity in spades. The Treutmann organ may or may not be ideal (just as some people (not me!) also have reservations about Chapuis' organ) - but the Treutmann sounds wonderful and is totally complementary to Flamme's profound vision.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 16, 2018, 09:22:28 AM
1969 was the time when recreational drugs started to become popular in Paris and this is Lubeck on speed. It was recorded at the same time as his Bach and I think it incarnes the same aesthetic ideas - fresh and vigorous, with very little grandeur or emotional sensitivity.

The Klapmeyer organ was an interesting choice and I wonder if the booklet essay, which are often excellent for Astrée, discusses it.

Yes, I agree very much with this. Other than that I find his approach pretentious and ostentatious - maybe the works had not yet matured in his mind, he was about 40 years old. What bothers me the most however, is the strange and often tasteless registrations (reeds with tremulant or too little 8') he uses, when the music asks for a normal plenum. I think he might have made a much more memorable integral, if he had got the chance some 25 years later.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 16, 2018, 11:29:53 AM
Funny and insightful comment. Thanks a lot.  I will stick with Coudurier and Flamme.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 17, 2018, 08:48:47 AM
The description corresponds to what I think about Jean-Yves Thibaudet, a French pianist.
Yes, I agree very much with this. Other than that I find his approach pretentious and ostentatious - maybe the works had not yet matured in his mind, he was about 40 years old. What bothers me the most however, is the strange and often tasteless registrations (reeds with tremulant or too little 8') he uses, when the music asks for a normal plenum. I think he might have made a much more memorable integral, if he had got the chance some 25 years later.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on March 17, 2018, 09:06:56 AM
Funny and insightful comment. Thanks a lot.  I will stick with Coudurier and Flamme.

My favourite:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5125a9ybymL._SY500_.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: ahinton on March 17, 2018, 09:18:18 AM
Date for the diary...

The term "organ spectacular" has undoubtedly been so widely used as to have become something of a cliché, but it's certainly one that would fit the event taking place on 20 May 2018 in the Great Hall of Hamburg's prestigious Elbphilharmonie, commencing at 18.00, in which the three-movement Organ Symphony No. 2 by Kaikhosru Shapurji Sorabji will be performed by Kevin Bowyer, the only organist ever to have played it. Completed some 86 years ago, its première did not take place until 2010 and it has received two further performances since; it's one of the most challenging works in the organ repertoire. There will be intervals of c.30 minutes between the first and second movements and c.50 minutes between the middle movement and the finale. The performance is likely to end between 03.45 and 04.00 the following morning. The Theme and Variations middle movement plays for around 4 hours and the fugue that closes the finale alone occupies some 2 hours.

When I say "a date for the diary", that will only be for anyone who's able to get returns, as the 2,000+ seat venue has already been sold out for this concert for almost four months!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 17, 2018, 09:56:14 AM
Falcioni's recording is not bad, but it is plastic and faceless. Any good recording on Georg Muffat??

Saorgin uses a nice old French organ (Malaucène) and  I think the music sounds good. There's a feeling of improvised virtuosity in his recording, as you'd expect from someone who has specialised in Stylus Fantasticus.

Having said that, I agree with the opinion that there's a lot to enjoy in Kelemen's CD.

Has anyone heard Tobias Lindner'a Muffat CD?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 17, 2018, 11:04:18 AM
Saorgin uses a nice old French organ (Malaucène) and  I think the music sounds good. There's a feeling of improvised virtuosity in his recording, as you'd expect from someone who has specialised in Stylus Fantasticus.

Having said that, I agree with the opinion that there's a lot to enjoy in Kelemen's CD.

Has anyone heard Tobias Lindner'a Muffat CD?
Thanks a lot. I will look for the Saorgin recording.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 17, 2018, 11:10:05 AM
My favourite:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5125a9ybymL._SY500_.jpg)

Q
Thanks to the members' recommendation months ago, I listen Berben on Spotify, probably it is my fav now.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 17, 2018, 11:56:27 AM
When I was looking for Kelemen's Muffat, I saw these. The north German box set includes Lubeck and Bruhns. Probably I will buy it unless you senior members oppose it. Have any of you checked his Bach set? Any opinion?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 17, 2018, 01:01:06 PM
When I was looking for Kelemen's Muffat, I saw these. The north German box set includes Lubeck and Bruhns. Probably I will buy it unless you senior members oppose it. Have any of you checked his Bach set? Any opinion?

Kelemen's North German box is excellent.

His Bach CD arrived to me yesterday, I expect to listen to it in the nearest future.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 17, 2018, 01:05:34 PM
The description corresponds to what I think about Jean-Yves Thibaudet, a French pianist.

I do not think these traits are reserved for Frenchmen.  :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 17, 2018, 04:03:59 PM
Has anyone heard Tobias Lindner'a Muffat CD?

It is in my "awaiting listening" pile.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on March 17, 2018, 10:33:37 PM
Very good idea to issue north and south German box sets, separately. Hate to sound ignorant, but is the north-south musical difference largely tied to Protestant-Catholic division? Were these North compositions played in Protestant churches, and the south compositions in Catholic churches?   
Kelemen's North German box is excellent.

His Bach CD arrived to me yesterday, I expect to listen to it in the nearest future.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 18, 2018, 02:15:58 AM
Very good idea to issue north and south German box sets, separately. Hate to sound ignorant, but is the north-south musical difference largely tied to Protestant-Catholic division? Were these North compositions played in Protestant churches, and the south compositions in Catholic churches?

In fact, I've only ever seen work linking theological ideas and musical style in the case of Bach, maybe the work still needs to be done for some other composers.

Snyder argues that the biggest shaping force on Buxtehude was the nature of the organs he played -- and of course the music that he had heard. The extent to which Frescobaldi's music was known about may have been a bigger influence on organ music style that anything coming from church teaching.

I know that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but from my position of ignorance Bach seems uniquely theological/philosophical -- as if his music is sometimes a text in sound, an  articulation of his beliefs. I think this is one of his main areas of genius.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 18, 2018, 06:21:24 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61rd3EuwhJL._SY355_.jpg)

Matthew Owens, Frobenius Edinburgh, Pachelbel, really nice playing, sober and intense and poetic, and a very attractive organ too. It does not sound like equal tuning to me, but I can't be totally sure. Either the selection of pieces, or Owen's performances, or my mood, has me convinced that Pachelbel was a very great writer of organ music.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 18, 2018, 11:10:31 AM
Matthew Owens, Frobenius Edinburgh, Pachelbel, really nice playing, sober and intense and poetic, and a very attractive organ too. It does not sound like equal tuning to me, but I can't be totally sure. Either the selection of pieces, or Owen's performances, or my mood, has me convinced that Pachelbel was a very great writer of organ music.

The organ is equally tuned. Information here:

http://www.canongatekirk.org.uk/organ/

I acquired Owens' Pachelbel vol.1 (on another organ). Found him a bit earthbound and matter of fact (like so many Pachelbel interpreters - Payne, Christie e.g.). Pachelbel's music is obviously difficult to play in an engaged way, and I have not considered vol.2., but now I wonder if I should download it from Presto.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 18, 2018, 11:15:32 AM
Very good idea to issue north and south German box sets, separately. Hate to sound ignorant, but is the north-south musical difference largely tied to Protestant-Catholic division? Were these North compositions played in Protestant churches, and the south compositions in Catholic churches?

Both North German and South German organ composers wrote music for use at services at their respective churches. Concerning the style I think the most influential factor was local composing traditions, more than how the music was used.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on March 18, 2018, 12:08:05 PM
I ordered 'something completely different' today:

(https://images2.imgbox.com/05/e8/p2CpgWnh_o.jpg)

It's got Stanford, and Kitson, and Wood, and... Widor... and... Bach. ;)

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Maestro267 on March 19, 2018, 07:34:57 AM
I picked up a disc the other day that included two organ works by Ligeti: Volumina and Harmonies.

Insane! That is all.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on March 19, 2018, 08:17:45 AM
I ordered 'something completely different' today:

(https://images2.imgbox.com/05/e8/p2CpgWnh_o.jpg)

It's got Stanford, and Kitson, and Wood, and... Widor... and... Bach. ;)

One more BWV 565  played with at least some dexterity   :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 19, 2018, 08:32:30 AM
The organ is equally tuned. Information here:

http://www.canongatekirk.org.uk/organ/

I acquired Owens' Pachelbel vol.1 (on another organ). Found him a bit earthbound and matter of fact (like so many Pachelbel interpreters - Payne, Christie e.g.). Pachelbel's music is obviously difficult to play in an engaged way, and I have not considered vol.2., but now I wonder if I should download it from Presto.

Let me listen to v 1 first. I'll post my impressions here.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 19, 2018, 11:16:38 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/Tm8lMfr1NIs

It's nice to see the bellows working in this restrained and dignified performance of Lady Carey's Dompe Kimberly Marshall.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on April 09, 2018, 07:30:50 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyhZaSso414

I think this has been mentioned on here before, but I have really been enjoying watching this one, although I'm sure some cringe at hearing Sweelinck's music played on a Cavaillé-Coll instrument. I cannot find this one on my Radio Netherlands 10 CD set (Van Doeselaar, Dirksen, et al., purple cover), and am confused about the numbering system/catalog for Sweelinck's works.

(In any case, looks as if Daniel Roth would have been a great teacher. I would love to take lessons from someone like him)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 09, 2018, 08:01:22 PM
Sweelinck numbering is mysterious.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on April 24, 2018, 04:04:22 AM
(https://dutchbaroquerecords.nl/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Cover-Van-Noordt.jpg)

I just want to alert people that the two Anthoni van Noordt CDs in this set seem fabulous to me: organ, music, voices, sound engineering - all fabulous. The distributors are friendly, anglophone, responsive. The packaging is all in Dutch.

The third CD is mostly music by various van Noordts, one or two pieces by Anthoni but mostly others, and I haven't had a chance to hear it yet properly.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on April 24, 2018, 08:49:27 AM
(https://dutchbaroquerecords.nl/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Cover-Van-Noordt.jpg)

I just want to alert people that the two Anthoni van Noordt CDs in this set seem fabulous to me: organ, music, voices, sound engineering - all fabulous. The distributors are friendly, anglophone, responsive. The packaging is all in Dutch.

The third CD is mostly music by various van Noordts, one or two pieces by Anthoni but mostly others, and I haven't had a chance to hear it yet properly.

Good to hear!  :)

That everything is in Dutch, I mean...  ;) 

:D

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on May 05, 2018, 01:48:23 PM
(https://www.organroxx.com/theme_organroxx/static/artwork/4c1072f6-e4ad-11e7-ac22-52540026e203.jpg)
Just heard this on the radio (https://www.organroxx.com) My goodness, this is beautiful! Anyone know where I can find this CD?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Alek Hidell on May 05, 2018, 06:19:05 PM
Just heard this on the radio (https://www.organroxx.com) My goodness, this is beautiful! Anyone know where I can find this CD?

You might start here: http://www.orgelnieuws.nl/recensie-de-vrolijke-zwanenzang-van-jan-jansen/ (http://www.orgelnieuws.nl/recensie-de-vrolijke-zwanenzang-van-jan-jansen/)

I don't read Dutch, but I let my browser translate the page and it looks like there's a link to order the CD.

Found out something while looking this up. Jan Jansen is the father of violinist Janine Jansen.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on May 07, 2018, 01:09:23 PM
(https://cdn.naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedfiles/images/cds/hires/WAONCD-250.jpg)

Perfectly unconventional and beautiful :)
Who would have guessed, Pachelbel, Scheidt, Bruna, Frescobaldi along with some Buxtehude and Bach on a reed organ!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on May 07, 2018, 04:12:30 PM
As always, great intel. Jansen as well. I will check both the discs. Weird, Toyama is very country. Thanks a lot.
Quote from: bioluminescentsquid link=topic=5263.msg1147909both #msg1147909 date=1525730963
(https://cdn.naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedfiles/images/cds/hires/WAONCD-250.jpg)

Perfectly unconventional and beautiful :)
Who would have guessed, Pachelbel, Scheidt, Bruna, Frescobaldi along with some Buxtehude and Bach on a reed organ!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 08, 2018, 01:38:33 AM
[...]
Found out something while looking this up. Jan Jansen is the father of violinist Janine Jansen.

Yep, and there are more musicians in this family. (A.o. her uncle Peter Kooij.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janine_Jansen

Here are Jan & Janine in Bach's BWV 1017 (partly):

https://dewerelddraaitdoor.bnnvara.nl/media/301811

(Apologies for getting a bit off-topic.)

Jan Jansen was organist of the Utrecht Domkerk; his successor is Jan Hage.

These links could be useful:
http://www.domkerk.nl/nl/muziek/cds-en-publicaties/cds
http://www.domkerk.nl/contact-us
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on May 08, 2018, 02:13:21 AM
Perfectly unconventional and beautiful :)
Who would have guessed, Pachelbel, Scheidt, Bruna, Frescobaldi along with some Buxtehude and Bach on a reed organ!

In my country this instrument is called a psalm bike. I do not think I would stand the sound of it that long, even if Yoko Matsubara plays in an exemplary manner.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on May 08, 2018, 06:23:57 AM
In my country this instrument is called a psalm bike. I do not think I would stand the sound of it that long, even if Yoko Matsubara plays in an exemplary manner.

In my country it's called a harmonium.
In earlier days, probably the most popular calvinist/protestant home instrument. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on May 08, 2018, 10:22:20 AM
Makes me think of this sort of thing

(https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/coronationstreet/images/9/91/Mission_service.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150507183013)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on May 16, 2018, 05:13:17 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0004/376/MI0004376960.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

One of the high points for me of Foccroulle's Frescobaldi CD was the music for organ and cornet, this CD, which is really enjoyable, is more of the same sort of thing.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on May 16, 2018, 11:10:30 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0004/376/MI0004376960.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

One of the high points for me of Foccroulle's Frescobaldi CD was the music for organ and cornet, this CD, which is really enjoyable, is more of the same sort of thing.
Very good, any information on the organ used in the disc?
How did you think of Foccroulle's Frescobaldi CD, other than the cornetti music?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on May 16, 2018, 12:53:02 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Paxp2weMy8

A beautiful portrait of a courtly 16th century organ in Innsbruck played by Reinhard Jaud
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on May 16, 2018, 08:04:53 PM
Very good, any information on the organ used in the disc?

I don't. There's an interview with Foccroulle about it here, but if haven't had time to listen to it. It starts at about 1h11m. Foccroulle  talks about two organs, though it's not clear to me if he uses both on the disc, Rome Sta-Barbara, and somewhere called something like  Mombris or Nombrille further south, it's hard for me to make it out exactly.   The commentator says that the booklet for the recording is well researched.

https://www.francemusique.fr/emissions/musique-matin/bernard-foccroulle-et-lambert-colson-nous-conduisent-sur-les-traces-de-la-musique-pour-cornet-rome-entre-1500-et-1700-38150


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on May 22, 2018, 09:07:10 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfAtSK9EQ2c

This is a surprisingly good Tunder Christ lag in Todesbanden played on a 1966 Austin organ. Not stellar or magical, but I think it does take a lot to make Tunder work on a typical American organ.
(Sorry for the "inauthentic" spree I'm going on!)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on May 24, 2018, 11:53:44 AM
https://youtube.com/v/hRmK1kW8948

Frederic Munoz has uploaded some interesting material on YouTube, for example this satisfying performance of the Big Reincken fantasy on a modern organ (1987) - but inspired by early organs and  I think it has a characterful timbre. There's a lot of Odile Baillot there to explore, including some interviews. She's very good.

And in a different vein,  this is a rather enjoyable concert of music at Montelimar, another organ from the 1980s, with Fredric Munoz and friend. At about 6,30 there's some chant alternating with organ, French, it works well. I can't identify it, Boyvin maybe. The whole concert is full of fun unidentifiable music in fact, it must have been a super event to have been at.

https://youtube.com/v/L0QisjbxRxo
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on May 26, 2018, 07:55:33 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxaJMSAZfcM

Just found out that Piet Kee died yesterday...
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 08, 2018, 10:02:39 PM
(http://www.cddiffusion.fr/catalogue/images/6641.jpg)


I've been playing this for a few days and I'm not sure what to make of it. The organ is characterful, but somehow it sounds like I'm in one room and the organ's playing in another. It's also the sort of dusky french character which I'm not used to hearing in Muffat. The interpretations are on the slow side, and I have the impression that it's more a matter of some fabulous moments than of coherent and integrated pieces -- but that's often the case with toccatas. I also have the impression that this is the sort of recording which will grow on you, rather than knock you out on first listening, but I could be wrong about that. Anyway worth having for me given the paucity of interesting recordings of these pieces.

Here's the organ specification -- what sort of temperament is that?

(https://preview.ibb.co/bHwZCo/Pallaud1.jpg)

The CD is unobtainable if you don't know how to get it, amazon and Fnac didn't work.  As far as I can see the only way is to order it is from here


http://www.cddiffusion.fr/catalogue/fiche.php?SID=fTrbqiGd&tc=2&CID=6641


They take a card, they are very quick to send out the order, they are good to deal with.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 16, 2018, 12:02:36 PM
Here’s something that sounds nice by a composer I know nothing about, Samuel Marckfelner

https://youtube.com/v/Lvw_TalxJSs
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on June 17, 2018, 04:42:50 PM
Many pages ago, a writer asked whether a sub-woofer were necessary for the playback of organ music, and another answered no, to which the first replied that that saved him a lot of coin.

Having read these pages on organ music at least twice, I note that many, if not most, of you are concert goers (I’m envious of all the instruments you have had the opportunity to hear and the scope of you musical knowledge of the organ repertoire). That being the case, those lovely, deep tones from the open Cs up from 16’ pipes must be missed when playing CDs on most speaker systems. Granted, the majority of the music is within the capabilities of those speakers, but the authority of deep pedals is glorious, and I would not willingly be without them and am fortunate to have subs able to produce lows to the E below.

I hope this doesn't sound peevish. It is merely a preference I am willing to afford for the sake of my pleasure.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 17, 2018, 08:01:27 PM
Many pages ago, a writer asked whether a sub-woofer were necessary for the playback of organ music, and another answered no, to which the first replied that that saved him a lot of coin.

Having read these pages on organ music at least twice, I note that many, if not most, of you are concert goers (I’m envious of all the instruments you have had the opportunity to hear and the scope of you musical knowledge of the organ repertoire). That being the case, those lovely, deep tones from the open Cs up from 16’ pipes must be missed when playing CDs on most speaker systems. Granted, the majority of the music is within the capabilities of those speakers, but the authority of deep pedals is glorious, and I would not willingly be without them and am fortunate to have subs able to produce lows to the E below.

I hope this doesn't sound peevish. It is merely a preference I am willing to afford for the sake of my pleasure.

I’d be curious, elk, if your subwoofer makes the sound of the Leipzig Chorales on this recording acceptable, I find it painful on my ESLs and Gradients. I’m not sure if I just have a duff disc, or whether it’s a badly engineered recording or what. Generally I can enjoy recordings on the Groningen Schnitger, it’s maybe that Nordstoga is unusually fond of the 32’ stop.

(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/JgkAAOSwmwtaJUkX/s-l300.jpg)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on June 17, 2018, 08:27:57 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxaJMSAZfcM

Just found out that Piet Kee died yesterday...

Yes. I saw the announcement in the newspapers.
Never heard him life, but his recordings are very worthwhile. He was also a knowledgeable scholar (Bach/Buxtehude) and a well-known composer in NL (though less than his father Cor Kee).
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Marc on June 17, 2018, 08:34:23 PM
Many pages ago, a writer asked whether a sub-woofer were necessary for the playback of organ music, and another answered no, to which the first replied that that saved him a lot of coin.

Having read these pages on organ music at least twice, I note that many, if not most, of you are concert goers (I’m envious of all the instruments you have had the opportunity to hear and the scope of you musical knowledge of the organ repertoire). That being the case, those lovely, deep tones from the open Cs up from 16’ pipes must be missed when playing CDs on most speaker systems. Granted, the majority of the music is within the capabilities of those speakers, but the authority of deep pedals is glorious, and I would not willingly be without them and am fortunate to have subs able to produce lows to the E below.

I hope this doesn't sound peevish. It is merely a preference I am willing to afford for the sake of my pleasure.

Why should it sound peevish?
It's great to enjoy music the way you prefer it.

Personally, I have thought of buying one, but since I live in a rather noisy flat appartment I've decided to spare my neighbours the E below. ;)
In general: I'm able to accept lesser circumstances when listening to music. It makes the live concerts even more festive and enjoyable. :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on June 18, 2018, 04:47:24 AM
Mandryka, thanks for the tip, mention of this recording that is. It is fantastic. Rarely, do recordings of organ music do justice to the low bass. The low pedals here are what drew me to organ music in the first place and what I experience in churches here in London, Ontario, Canada. Admittedly, the low bass may be a bit fat on this recording, but nothing judicious use of tone controls might alleviate. One might use this recording to search for a suitable sub though a dealer might not appreciate the deficiencies it reveals.

Playing back organ music is difficult for most speakers. A simple 2 way system, while sounding awesome on most program material, may be asked to reproduce C1 (double pedal C) at the same time as G4 (G above middle C). The great woofer movement in reproducing the C1 muddies the G4, or the woofer might just flap around rather uncontrollably--- not a very pleasant experience. It is called Frequency Modulation. The benefits of a sub, or subs, are not only extending the bass response of the system, but also reducing FM distortion.

I have been looking for a finer version of the Leipzig Chorales to go along with the Kibbie and Rogg Zurich recordings I have, and this might be it.

Marc, I am lucky to live in a house with a largish recreation room at distance from the living room in which I can play music rather louder than my wife fancies and can generate low frequencies. Ain't life grand?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 18, 2018, 05:08:38 AM
Mandryka, thanks for the tip, mention of this recording that is. It is fantastic. Rarely, do recordings of organ music do justice to the low bass. The low pedals here are what drew me to organ music in the first place and what I experience in churches here in London, Ontario, Canada. Admittedly, the low bass may be a bit fat on this recording, but nothing judicious use of tone controls might alleviate. One might use this recording to search for a suitable sub though a dealer might not appreciate the deficiencies it reveals.

Playing back organ music is difficult for most speakers. A simple 2 way system, while sounding awesome on most program material, may be asked to reproduce C1 (double pedal C) at the same time as G4 (G above middle C). The great woofer movement in reproducing the C1 muddies the G4, or the woofer might just flap around rather uncontrollably--- not a very pleasant experience. It is called Frequency Modulation. The benefits of a sub, or subs, are not only extending the bass response of the system, but also reducing FM distortion.

I have been looking for a finer version of the Leipzig Chorales to go along with the Kibbie and Rogg Zurich recordings I have, and this might be it.

Marc, I am lucky to live in a house with a largish recreation room at distance from the living room in which I can play music rather louder than my wife fancies and can generate low frequencies. Ain't life grand?

Outside of the complete sets (Alain, Foccroulle, Weinberger, Kooimann, Koopman)  I think the Leipzig Chorales to get is this one, the more I listen to it the more I love it.

(https://www.boeijengamusic.com/media/catalog/product/cache/2/image/650x650/c02b730cab454942d65375f640b056d1/v/c/vc2500.jpg)

https://www.boeijengamusic.com/nl/j-s-bach-leipziger-choraele.html

Tone controls for Nordstega is a good idea and I shall play around with mine soon.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on June 21, 2018, 07:21:11 AM
Thanks for the tip, though for twice the amount for that set, I might more likely get a complete works like Alain2 or the Foccroulle. What I've heard of the Beekman on youtube pleases me. Alain3 not so much. I've also sampled the Weinberger. Maybe I'm not attuned to HIP performances. I'm tempted by the Kooiman, but find it hard to ante up.

You recommended Zacher's Mendelssohn/ Brahms. I've only sampled the Mendelssohn, but the Brahms betters the other 4 recordings I have of the Chorales. The Mendelssohn sounds good too, but it is competing with Hurford's incomplete CD, which is magnificent. Hurford is often maligned. I'm puzzled because his performances are enjoyable and usually the recorded sound is in the demonstration class. There do seem to be some heliocentric views here, but maybe, they are simply more informed than mine.

Speaking of being maligned and heliocentricity, performances which usually elicit a big yawn from me are those of Michael Murray. However, one, Bach recording he made on a Gabriel Kney organ in St, Paul, Minnesota, bears repeated listening. It is a very well recorded recital on a favourite organ of mine, built here in London, Ontario.

More on Romantic music and beyond on a future post.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 28, 2018, 05:03:38 AM
(https://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/45/18/3850126071845_600.jpg)

Interesting recording here I think from Ljerka Ocic. The organ is big and heavy, and she tries to fit the Hexachordum Apollinis on it. She varies touch and ornamentation imaginatively. I don’t know whether I like it, but I do know it’s interesting.

Well recorded, too well, big thundering bass, this is not a chamber organ so it doesn’t easily fit in the living room.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on June 28, 2018, 09:15:02 AM
Interesting recording here I think from Ljerka Ocic. The organ is big and heavy, and she tries to fit the Hexachordum Apollinis on it. She varies touch and ornamentation imaginatively. I don’t know whether I like it, but I do know it’s interesting.

Well recorded, too well, big thundering bass, this is not a chamber organ so it doesn’t easily fit in the living room.


Thanks. Ordered. BTW I can't see any information about which organ, she uses.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 28, 2018, 12:36:18 PM

Thanks. Ordered. BTW I can't see any information about which organ, she uses.

Nor could I, but hopefully it'll be in your booklet. She's recorded a lot of music, I briefly dipped into this most unusual recording for example



(https://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/00/94/3850126049400_600.jpg)

I did find this, and used Google translate to understand it

https://shop.crorec.hr/crorec.hr/vijest.php?OBJECT_ID=830100

Quote
Ljerka Očić also celebrated a significant anniversary, 25 years of discographic creation. Branko Magdić, music editor and critic, spoke about the "Sounds of Croatian Historical Organ" and the art work of Ljerka Očić. The value of the notes on the new cycle Ljerka Očić is emphasized, not only because of the artistic value, but also by the fact that the sound of these organs, which are part of Croatian cultural heritage, has been recorded for the first time.

Ljerka Ocic says of these valuable instruments: "My wish was to best present their personality with the music that was born and lived in the times when they were built." The presentation also shows the video of Ljerk's sister Dubravka, who with his picture and text depicted the cross section of our celebrated organist career.

The latest CD "Southern German Organ Baroque" from the edition of the Sounds of Croatian Historical Organ can be purchased online at shop.crorec.hr . . .

Quote
"This cycle of sound carriers is conceived as a small chronicle of the Croatian organist tradition, a testimony to the needs of the inhabitants of this country for music that throughout history has lived and spread to the sacred spaces of exceptional beauty, this cycle is designed as a" hommage "to regional features, workshops, their differences, and at the same time subtle virtues, which, with their individual aesthetics, obscure the atmosphere of old times, while simultaneously sound vibration links past the present, "wrote Ljerka Očić.

It is a continuation of the cycle of the CD "Sounds of Croatian Historical Organs" by Ljerka Ocic with the collaboration of Lidija Horvat Dunjko on the album "Johann Sebastian Bach - Book of Annan Magdalen Bach (1725) - Choice".
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on June 29, 2018, 06:08:20 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61sxOQNcF7L._SX355_.jpg)

What looks like another fabulous recording from the great Ljerka Očić, in fact I’ve only heard G Bohm’s nichtig/fluchtig, but I can already tell that it’s a completely rethought through performance, and seems to capture that elusive combination of dance and prayer and song. Where Očić is so good is in the variety of attack, which makes the music sound always so fresh. The rest of the CD has music by Cabezon, Byrd, Scheidemann and other usual suspects. Characterful organs in Croatia, I guess all of them old. Well recorded to boot.

There’s more by her - a recording of a lot of Frescobaldi, for example.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 09, 2018, 01:50:59 AM
(https://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/45/18/3850126071845_600.jpg)

Interesting recording here I think from Ljerka Ocic. The organ is big and heavy, and she tries to fit the Hexachordum Apollinis on it. She varies touch and ornamentation imaginatively. I don’t know whether I like it, but I do know it’s interesting.

Well recorded, too well, big thundering bass, this is not a chamber organ so it doesn’t easily fit in the living room.


Additional information about the organ used:

Antonius Weiner 1737 (Fransiscus church of Bv Mary's assumption, Samobor). A relatively small 8' organ with 16 ranks on two manuals and pedal. Most of the pipes seem to be original. Restored by Heferer Company 2005. Tuned a=440,7 and Kirnberger III modified.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 09, 2018, 08:57:45 AM

Additional information about the organ used:

Antonius Weiner 1737 (Fransiscus church of Bv Mary's assumption, Samobor). A relatively small 8' organ with 16 ranks on two manuals and pedal. Most of the pipes seem to be original. Restored by Heferer Company 2005. Tuned a=440,7 and Kirnberger III modified.

Thanks, I like that and the Renaissance and Baroque one even more, probably because it isn’t as heavy! the latter with music by Byrd and Frescobaldi and Böhm. I shall have to sample her Sweelinck recording soon.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: king ubu on July 09, 2018, 11:35:40 PM
posted this in the upcoming concerts thread, but I guess I'd rather get a reply or two over here:

I'm planning to catch some of the more casual organ concerts run in summer at Grossmünster, right around the corner from my (still fairly new) workplace ... whom should I consider, other than Molardi?

https://www.grossmuenster.ch/documents/142/Orgelprogr-2018Web.pdf

Kay Johansen doing Reubke I should not miss, I guess?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on July 10, 2018, 08:44:18 AM
(http://www.fagott-online.com/shop/contents/media/39059.jpg)

Alexander Koschel is an organ scholar who records for Fagott and who seems to have made a special study of the Weissenfels Schlosskapelle organ, which to me sounds wonderful. The recording features music by old friends like Scheidt and Pachelbel and Bach, but mostly music by composers I know very little about like J.R. Ahle, J.F. Alberti, G.C. Wecker, J.Ph. Krieger, Ch.G. Witte, J. Kuhnau, J.H. Buttstett, F.W. Zachow, A. Armsdorf, N. Vetter, G.F. Kaufmann. I shall certainly be exploring more of Koschel recordings, I get the feeling there’s a lot of buried treasure there.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 10, 2018, 11:47:48 AM
(http://www.fagott-online.com/shop/contents/media/39059.jpg)

Alexander Koschel is an organ scholar who records for Fagott and who seems to have made a special study of the Weissenfels Schlosskapelle organ, which to me sounds wonderful. The recording features music by old friends like Scheidt and Pachelbel and Bach, but mostly music by composers I know very little about like J.R. Ahle, J.F. Alberti, G.C. Wecker, J.Ph. Krieger, Ch.G. Witte, J. Kuhnau, J.H. Buttstett, F.W. Zachow, A. Armsdorf, N. Vetter, G.F. Kaufmann. I shall certainly be exploring more of Koschel recordings, I get the feeling there’s a lot of buried treasure there.

He also recorded vol. four of the Fagot Scheidt series.

By chance I put his new recording and its compagnion :

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8461504--j-s-bach-middle-german-organ-music-of-the-16th-18th-centuries-vol-2

on my wishlist two days ago.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 10, 2018, 11:49:45 AM
Another one on my wishlist is this one with Nordstoga on the organ of St. Johannis, Lüneburg:

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8459934--j-s-bach-toccatas-preludes-and-fugues
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on August 08, 2018, 03:57:21 PM
How do we make of this Tunder? Played on the Lubeck Jakobi organ.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gymz1l7q_-4
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 09, 2018, 03:23:51 AM
How do we make of this Tunder? Played on the Lubeck Jakobi organ.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gymz1l7q_-4


Video unavailable, at least to me. Who is playing?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on August 10, 2018, 02:10:58 AM
Johannes Unger. The link worked for me. Nice playing of music I've never heard.

Mandryka, did adjusting the volume level on your subs solve the bass problem on the Nordstoga Leipzig Chorales?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 10, 2018, 02:37:56 AM
Johannes Unger. The link worked for me. Nice playing of music I've never heard.

Mandryka, did adjusting the volume level on your subs solve the bass problem on the Nordstoga Leipzig Chorales?


He (Johannes Unger) is the present organist in Marienkirche, Lübeck.

Strange, that the link doesn't work for me.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 10, 2018, 03:00:00 AM


Mandryka, did adjusting the volume level on your subs solve the bass problem on the Nordstoga Leipzig Chorales?

Not totally satisfactorily.

I’ve heard four other recordings on the Waltershausen Trost - Bonegas (Leipzig Chorales), Sluys (Bohm), Messori (parts of CU3) and Kay Johanssen (Neumeister Chorales). They are all much better sounding than Weinberger playing the Leipzig Chorales. I can’t say if the problem is my system, my ears, the record engineering or Weinberger’s performance. For all I know, the Weinberger recording may be more truthful.

I have just ordered a “new” amp which his come recommended for driving subs. Apparently you need a lot of power (surprisingly for me) and this very powerful studio amp is highly regarded for its bass. I put new in inverted commas because it is very much in my style of “classic” equipment - this

(https://www.prosoundweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/OpenCrownDC300Image.jpg)

A Crown/Amcron DC300a

If it arrives (and the vendor is showing some unusual behaviour, so I’m not 100% confident it will arrive) then I’ll let you know if things change for the Weinberger.

Mutatis mutandis for Nordstoga’s Leipzig Chorales.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 10, 2018, 03:28:53 AM

I’ve heard four other recordings on the Waltershausen Trost - Bonegas (Leipzig Chorales), Sluys (Bohm), Messori (parts of CU3) and Kay Johanssen (Neumeister Chorales). They are all much better sounding than Weinberger playing the Leipzig Chorales. I can’t say if the problem is my system, my ears, the record engineering or Weinberger’s performance. For all I know, the Weinberger recording may be more truthful.


Truthfulness is a relative concept in the recording of organs, because the sound may change considerably if one changes the listening/recording position in the church. For that reason the Weinberger may be as truthful as the others you mention. You have to be in the church and listen from different positions to judge.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on August 10, 2018, 12:25:41 PM

Truthfulness is a relative concept in the recording of organs, because the sound may change considerably if one changes the listening/recording position in the church. For that reason the Weinberger may be as truthful as the others you mention. You have to be in the church and listen from different positions to judge.

Is there any (near) agreement as to where the best place in the church is? I suspect a center-rear position, and that the performer's location is not a good location for auditing. Just guessing.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on August 10, 2018, 12:27:28 PM
Not totally satisfactorily.

I’ve heard four other recordings on the Waltershausen Trost - Bonegas (Leipzig Chorales), Sluys (Bohm), Messori (parts of CU3) and Kay Johanssen (Neumeister Chorales). They are all much better sounding than Weinberger playing the Leipzig Chorales. I can’t say if the problem is my system, my ears, the record engineering or Weinberger’s performance. For all I know, the Weinberger recording may be more truthful.

I have just ordered a “new” amp which his come recommended for driving subs. Apparently you need a lot of power (surprisingly for me) and this very powerful studio amp is highly regarded for its bass. I put new in inverted commas because it is very much in my style of “classic” equipment - this

(https://www.prosoundweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/OpenCrownDC300Image.jpg)

A Crown/Amcron DC300a

If it arrives (and the vendor is showing some unusual behaviour, so I’m not 100% confident it will arrive) then I’ll let you know if things change for the Weinberger.

Mutatis mutandis for Nordstoga’s Leipzig Chorales.

I am looking forward to reading your amp report.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 10, 2018, 08:16:16 PM
(https://img.cdandlp.com/2018/04/imgL/119142723.jpg)

Cyril Pallaud’s Muffat’s is like no one else’s Muffat. He likes quiet and colourful registrations, and plays rather slowly, the result is that large sections of toccatas sound what I think of as “impressionist” - this, combined with a somewhat distant recording, can make the music difficult to hear analytically. To take one example, the opening section of toccata 3 is an extraordinary - hushed, there’s clearly a lot of music going on in the low registers but it’s more suggested than confidently declaimed.


For recordings with complete  toccatas or large selections  I have access to

Kelemen
Gottsche
Saorgin
Hasselböck
Pallaud
Ullman
Hester
Tüma
Radulescu


Is there anything else I should hear?

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 11, 2018, 03:15:50 AM
Is there any (near) agreement as to where the best place in the church is? I suspect a center-rear position, and that the performer's location is not a good location for auditing. Just guessing.


No, not really. Organs and churches (and taste) differ too much. I prefer to sit relatively close to the organ in order to hear the details. 


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 11, 2018, 03:34:00 AM
Presumably when your playing a big organ in a big church, you have to be playing for a particular spot in the audience. What I mean is, the acoustics at audience level must be a factor which determines your articulation, relative timing of the voices (the lower voices reaching the audience after the higher ones - a phenomenon I’ve had to adjust for when setting up the subwoofers!), tempo  and registrations.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on August 11, 2018, 04:46:58 AM
So much to respond to.

Recordings of the organ vary greatly. First of all is the church. As you are all aware, the smaller the church the less the reverberation. As a listener in the church, the further back from the organ you are the 'wetter' the sound, the more reverberent. Most recording engineers would choose to record an organ fairly close to it, the mic on a tall stand. (I recently attended 2 concerts at the same church, the first in honour of the organ builder, who was in the audience. The organ didn't sound particularly good from my 2nd pew. At the second concert, I sat where the organ builder had sat at the first concert--- what an improvement! It was about a third back along the far wall from the organ. I figured he knew best, maybe even using that spot to voice the organ when it was being built.) I like walking around a church while tunes are played looking for the sweet spot.

Microphone frequency responses are also a major factor in the recording of big pipes. Many have a response slowly rolling off bass which is rather unrealistic on playback, the use of which may be intentional since very few playback systems have response low enough to do them justice and may cause those systems serious grief in the form of distortion (wildly flapping cone to no purpose). In the vinyl age, deep bass reproduction was very difficult to lay down and play back. I have recordings with 15 minute sides because of the effort to cut 32' pipes onto the disc. That in itself is a problem. A cartridge that ca remain in the groove while being asked to track such excursions is another.

Forgive me for adding a note for Mandryka from the thread on Bach on the Organ, I mentioned some cancellation of bass notes because the Gradient subs are dipole, meaning that they produce sound both in front and behind them. You said you use bass traps 1 m behind them. I'm sure they help. However, my point may have been missed. Bass fires omnidirectionlly. Therefore, the output of the rear wave from the subs will cancel some from the front when they are out of phase.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 11, 2018, 05:55:11 AM
So much to respond to.

Recordings of the organ vary greatly. First of all is the church. As you are all aware, the smaller the church the less the reverberation. As a listener in the church, the further back from the organ you are the 'wetter' the sound, the more reverberent. Most recording engineers would choose to record an organ fairly close to it, the mic on a tall stand. (I recently attended 2 concerts at the same church, the first in honour of the organ builder, who was in the audience. The organ didn't sound particularly good from my 2nd pew. At the second concert, I sat where the organ builder had sat at the first concert--- what an improvement! It was about a third back along the far wall from the organ. I figured he knew best, maybe even using that spot to voice the organ when it was being built.) I like walking around a church while tunes are played looking for the sweet spot.

Microphone frequency responses are also a major factor in the recording of big pipes. Many have a response slowly rolling off bass which is rather unrealistic on playback, the use of which may be intentional since very few playback systems have response low enough to do them justice and may cause those systems serious grief in the form of distortion (wildly flapping cone to no purpose). In the vinyl age, deep bass reproduction was very difficult to lay down and play back. I have recordings with 15 minute sides because of the effort to cut 32' pipes onto the disc. That in itself is a problem. A cartridge that ca remain in the groove while being asked to track such excursions is another.

Forgive me for adding a note for Mandryka from the thread on Bach on the Organ, I mentioned some cancellation of bass notes because the Gradient subs are dipole, meaning that they produce sound both in front and behind them. You said you use bass traps 1 m behind them. I'm sure they help. However, my point may have been missed. Bass fires omnidirectionlly. Therefore, the output of the rear wave from the subs will cancel some from the front when they are out of phase.

Someone has put me on to a man who does audio room consultancy, if he’s not too expensive I may ask him to come and take measurements of my room and advise me about treatment. Unfortunately, as I suspected, the Crown amp purchase is off! So I’m in the market again for a really good sub amplifier - given my system and interest (like, I’m not interested in playing reggae outside!)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on August 11, 2018, 05:57:54 AM
(https://img.cdandlp.com/2018/04/imgL/119142723.jpg)

Cyril Pallaud’s Muffat’s is like no one else’s Muffat. He likes quiet and colourful registrations, and plays rather slowly, the result is that large sections of toccatas sound what I think of as “impressionist” - this, combined with a somewhat distant recording, can make the music difficult to hear analytically. To take one example, the opening section of toccata 3 is an extraordinary - hushed, there’s clearly a lot of music going on in the low registers but it’s more suggested than confidently declaimed.


For recordings with complete  toccatas or large selections  I have access to

Kelemen
Gottsche
Saorgin
Hasselböck
Pallaud
Ullman
Hester
Tüma
Radulescu


Is there anything else I should hear?

Falcioni and Forni. I haven't listened the Forni disc though. What do you think about Kelemen and Haselbock recordings?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on August 11, 2018, 06:02:51 AM
So much to respond to.

Recordings of the organ vary greatly. First of all is the church. As you are all aware, the smaller the church the less the reverberation. As a listener in the church, the further back from the organ you are the 'wetter' the sound, the more reverberent. Most recording engineers would choose to record an organ fairly close to it, the mic on a tall stand. (I recently attended 2 concerts at the same church, the first in honour of the organ builder, who was in the audience. The organ didn't sound particularly good from my 2nd pew. At the second concert, I sat where the organ builder had sat at the first concert--- what an improvement! It was about a third back along the far wall from the organ. I figured he knew best, maybe even using that spot to voice the organ when it was being built.) I like walking around a church while tunes are played looking for the sweet spot.

Microphone frequency responses are also a major factor in the recording of big pipes. Many have a response slowly rolling off bass which is rather unrealistic on playback, the use of which may be intentional since very few playback systems have response low enough to do them justice and may cause those systems serious grief in the form of distortion (wildly flapping cone to no purpose). In the vinyl age, deep bass reproduction was very difficult to lay down and play back. I have recordings with 15 minute sides because of the effort to cut 32' pipes onto the disc. That in itself is a problem. A cartridge that ca remain in the groove while being asked to track such excursions is another.

Forgive me for adding a note for Mandryka from the thread on Bach on the Organ, I mentioned some cancellation of bass notes because the Gradient subs are dipole, meaning that they produce sound both in front and behind them. You said you use bass traps 1 m behind them. I'm sure they help. However, my point may have been missed. Bass fires omnidirectionlly. Therefore, the output of the rear wave from the subs will cancel some from the front when they are out of phase.
Insightful. Thanks.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 11, 2018, 06:17:35 AM
Falcioni and Forni. I haven't listened the Forni disc though. What do you think about Kelemen and Haselbock recordings?

It’s a while since I’ve heard Kelemen, I like Hasselböck, I’d forgotten about Falcioni, he’s not on Qobuz (but he is on Spotify). If you can find a link to Forni, that would be good. I also forgot Martin Gester.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on August 11, 2018, 06:36:19 AM
Digital Sound Processing (DSP) like the Anthem Room Correction (ARC) is probably the easiest solution and may obviate the need to replace your current amps. Another solution, though not as refined, rather amusing when you picture it, is to place your sub in your listening chair and do a crawl around the periphery of the room listening for the evenest bass . It works for finding a sub's optimum spot.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 11, 2018, 06:42:24 AM
Yes I’ve heard that trick, and I’ve seen it done with single sealed subs, but the gradients are designed to act as stands for the ESLs!

I would very much like to get miniDSP to explore, both as a crossover and as a room correction. If you know any idiot’s guide for using it, please say.

I haven’t heard of Anthem Room Correction before but I will look into it. At first glance it’s not quad friendly.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 11, 2018, 09:06:27 AM


For recordings with complete  toccatas or large selections  I have access to

Kelemen
Gottsche
Saorgin
Hasselböck
Pallaud
Ullman
Hester
Tüma
Radulescu


Is there anything else I should hear?


Yes, Falcioni and maybe Tobias Lindner and Hans Christoph Becker-Foss.

My favorite remains Göttsche.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 11, 2018, 11:09:14 AM
Your transfer of the Göttsche is really very successful. He is probably my favourite of the brightly lit ones, but there’s something dusky about Pallaud which is interesting, and I like the tempos,  even if he hardly does justice to the counterpoint, and Pallaud’s organ is characterful. Shame Göttsche didn’t record all 12.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 11, 2018, 11:17:20 AM
Your transfer of the Göttsche is really very successful. He is probably my favourite of the brightly lit ones, but there’s something dusky about Pallaud which is interesting, and I like the tempos,  even if he hardly does justice to the counterpoint, and Pallaud’s organ is characterful. Shame Göttsche didn’t record all 12.

He did record all 12, and the transfer should include the 12 toccatas and the passacaglia. I shall investigate that to morrow.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 11, 2018, 11:20:34 AM
I have 1,3,8,11,12, the passacaglia and a chaconne, I’m listening to him play 11 now, it’s outstanding. He’s very good at the transitions.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: (: premont :) on August 11, 2018, 11:33:12 AM
I have 1,3,8,11,12, the passacaglia and a chaconne, I’m listening to him play 11 now, it’s outstanding. He’s very good at the transitions.

That's the ones he recorded at Marmoutier. I shall upload the rest (recorded at Meissenheim) for you to morrow.


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on August 11, 2018, 11:35:21 AM
That's the ones he recorded at Marmoutier. I shall upload the rest (recorded at Meissenheim) for you to morrow.

Fabulous, I just listened to Pallaud's 11 and I take back my positive comments made 10 minutes ago, after Göttsche Pallaud just sounds dull!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Forever Electoral College on August 11, 2018, 04:10:59 PM
It’s a while since I’ve heard Kelemen, I like Hasselböck, I’d forgotten about Falcioni, he’s not on Qobuz (but he is on Spotify). If you can find a link to Forni, that would be good. I also forgot Martin Gester.

I was mistaken on Forni: He played only one Muffat. But the selection appears to be interesting anyway.

P.s. I'm afraid, I am not familiar with Pasquini though.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 06, 2018, 11:02:04 PM
I want to put together a list of recordings on Antegnati organs.

Here's what it says about them in An Organ Encyclopedia (Bush and Kassel)

Quote
The most remarkable builder of the Antegnati family was Graziadio Antegnati (b. 1525: d. after 1590). son of Giovanni Batista. He built organs at S. Maria Maggiore. Bergamo (1564-66). S. Spirit*. Bergamo (1566-67). S. Barbara. Mantua (1565). Avila Cathedral (1573-1575), and the Crema Cathedral (1586). His only extant organ. however, is at S. Giuseppe. Brescia (1581).

Costanzo Antegnati (b. Brescia. 9 Dec 1549; d. Nov 1624), son of Graziadio, is the best-known member of the family. He collaborated with his father (from 1570) before taking a post as organist at Brescia Cathedral. a position he held until 1604. His organs include those at S. Giorgio. Bagolino (1590). the Madonna della Steceata, Parma (1593). S. Maria Maggiore, Bergamo (1593-94). and S. Giorgio Maggiore. Venice (1612). His fame rests primarily on his L'arte Organica  (Venice. 1608). a treatise containing a list of 144 organs built by the family, rules in tuning organs. harpsichords. and monochords (basically advocating meantone tempera-ment). and suggestions on organ registration. In addition to twelve ricercars (published as L'Antegnata (1608) together with L'arte Organica, Costanzo also composed a number of madrigals, masses, and motets. Costanzo's son Giovanni Francesco Antegnati (b. 1587). serves as an "interlocutor" in L'arte Organica.

The last organ-building member of the Antegnati family was Graziadio Antegnati (b. Brescia. 1609: d. 1656). In 1636 he was the conservatore of the organ at S. Marco, Venice: he later became organist at the Padua Cathedral (where he maintained the organ. 1644-45). He also worked on instruments at S. Giorgio Maggiore, Venice. and Brescia. S. Carlo. attributed (1636: 1/12: rest. Maccarinelli, 1958)

The specifications of the Antegnati organ were uniform in style: a single manual, a pull-down pedal, an open flue chorus (Principals 8'). a few Flutes of wider scale, and a single ripieno stop. incorporating an Ottava (4), Quintadecima (2), and, depending on the site of the instrument. Decitnanona (I -1/3). Vigesimaseconda (I'), Vigcsimascsta (2131, Vigcsimanona (1/2'), and Trigesimaterza (1/31. Antegnati avoided reed stops and (unlike other Italian builders) double ranks for the ripieno and the Principale.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 13, 2018, 10:05:17 PM
This comment, taken from an essay by Jean Ferrard for Arnaud van der Cauter’s first Peter Cornet CD, made me stop and think

Quote
Si l’on considère que les deux œuvres datées de Peeter CORNET nous renvoient à 1624 et 1625, elles s’inscrivent dans ce qu’on peut sans aucun doute qualifier de “lustre le plus riche de l’histoire de la musique d’orgue”, puisqu’il voit la parution de pas moins de huit ouvrages imprimés de première grandeur:

1623: Hymnes de l’Eglise pour toucher sur l’orgue de Jehan TITELOUZE 1624: Tabulatura Nova de Samuel SCHEIDT
1624: Primo Libro di Capricci de Girolamo FRESCOBALDI
1624: Ricercar Tabulatura de Johann Ulrich STEIGLEDER
1626: Facultad Organica de Francisco CORREA DE ARAUXO
1626: Le Magnificat ou cantique de la Vierge pour toucher sur l’orgue de Jehan TITELOUZE
1627: Secondo Libro di Toccate de Girolamo FRESCOBALDI
1627: Tabulaturbuch darinnen das Vatter unser 40 mal variiert wird de Johann Ulrich STEIGLEDER

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 15, 2018, 06:19:12 AM
(https://assets.idol.io/2018/06/28/promo/photo/62683_large.jpg?1530190803)


Quote
Johann Gottfried Walther
 1 Ciacona sopra’l Canto Fermo O Jesu, du edle Gabe 5'23
Georg Böhm
2 Vater unser im Himmelreich 4'14
Johann Sebastian Bach
3 Adagio in d BWV 1001 3'59
4 Fuga in d BWV 539 5'26
5 Praeludium in A BWV 536 2'03
6 Fuga in A BWV 536 5'12
7 Ein fest Burg ist unser Gott BWV 720 3'50
8 Gute Nacht, o Wesen BWV 227 3'40
4'50 1'25
Sonate en trio n°6 BWV 530 14'49 11 Sonata VI – 1. Vivace 4'10
9 Præludium in G BWV 902 10 Fughetta in G BWV 902
12 Sonata VI – 2. Lento 6'56
13 Sonata VI – 3. Allegro 3'43
14 Præludium in C BWV 531 2'33
15 Fuga in C BWV 531 4'31

This is an Andréas Silberman organ at Sainte-Aurélie, Strasbourg, restored. Jérôme Mondesert writes in his notes

Quote
Il suffit de tirer le registre de la Montre de 8’ et de jouer une sobre transcription du premier mouvement de la sonate BWV 1001 pour violon de Bach, pour être trans- porté dans un jardin sonore envoûtant dont la porte est entr’ouverte. Puisse l’auditeur s’y promener paisiblement.

The key words here are “sobre” and “paisiblement”  and this recording will, I think, interest people with sobre peaceful tastes and an interest in organology. It’s not going to knock your socks off, but it’s a pleasant way to pass an hour or so, and a very colourful organ.  With one reservation.

The reservation is as follows. The organ has a deep 16’ pipe and Mondesert isn’t afraid to use it, I don’t think he makes a beautiful sound with it, especially in the Bohm  - or if he does it’s not so specially well recorded here. 
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 02, 2018, 05:01:07 AM
The organ is equally tuned. Information here:

http://www.canongatekirk.org.uk/organ/

I acquired Owens' Pachelbel vol.1 (on another organ). Found him a bit earthbound and matter of fact (like so many Pachelbel interpreters - Payne, Christie e.g.). Pachelbel's music is obviously difficult to play in an engaged way, and I have not considered vol.2., but now I wonder if I should download it from Presto.

I like the sounds he makes come out of the organ in vol 2 more than vol 1, basically I’m glad to have found vol 2.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: "Harry" on November 02, 2018, 05:08:07 AM
Its appropriate I think to post this forthcoming release with the music by Pachelbel.

Simone Stella/Pinchi-Skrabl-Organ Basilica San Giorgio fuori le mura, Ferrara, Italy


Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 02, 2018, 05:15:41 AM
Cheers Harry, I’d forgotten about it, I’ll hear it just as soon as it comes out.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: "Harry" on November 02, 2018, 05:21:56 AM
Cheers Harry, I’d forgotten about it, I’ll hear it just as soon as it comes out.

I know that organ quite well, been there, heard it live in a couple of visits, and liked it. I am curious how well it is recorded. High hopes on my side, for I dismissed the CPO recordings, they are simply no good.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 02, 2018, 11:23:45 PM
Yes I listened to some things played on it by Adriano Falcioni. Lovely clear well balanced organ. It sounds like it’s got some sort of circular temperament.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on November 03, 2018, 01:28:28 AM
Its appropriate I think to post this forthcoming release with the music by Pachelbel.

Simone Stella/Pinchi-Skrabl-Organ Basilica San Giorgio fuori le mura, Ferrara, Italy

I had noticed it as well...  :)

Was excited at first, but am now not getting my hopes up too much.....

Performing Pachelbel's entire organ output on a single organ, doesn't seem ideal to begin with.
Add to that a newly built (2012/13) organ "in German Baroque style" by an Italian and a Slovenian builder.

I need to hear it first, before getting close to any degree of excitement....  8)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: "Harry" on November 03, 2018, 01:55:37 AM
I had noticed it as well...  :)

Was excited at first, but am now not getting my hopes up too much.....

Performing Pachelbel's entire organ output on a single organ, doesn't seem ideal to begin with.
Add to that a newly built (2012/13) organ "in German Baroque style" by an Italian and a Slovenian builder.

I need to hear it first, before getting close to any degree of excitement....  8)

Q

I do not have so much trouble with one organ for a composer. Take for instance the CPO recordings. Different organs, but due to the way they are recorded  they all sounded as one miserable definition of Pachelbel's music. Plus the fact that the organists were in my view unsuitable.
I do not get my hopes up also, but by definition is has a better starting point. It is of no consequence or ackward that it is a new organ. If there is expertise and a thorough knowledge, and in this case there is, the outcome can be a successful one.
Italian influences are a good start and Slovenian organ builders were renowned throughout history, and therefore this merger did produce a beautiful sounding instrument, at least to my ears.
I may not be an expert as some on this forum, but during the live concertos I heard in this church, my impression was, that this organ sounds authentic, and has beautiful registrations. Thus my hopes are a bit higher. The only problem I fear, is how is it recorded. But I soon find out :)
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Que on November 03, 2018, 02:54:26 AM
I do not have so much trouble with one organ for a composer. Take for instance the CPO recordings. Different organs, but due to the way they are recorded  they all sounded as one miserable definition of Pachelbel's music. Plus the fact that the organists were in my view unsuitable.
I do not get my hopes up also, but by definition is has a better starting point. It is of no consequence or ackward that it is a new organ. If there is expertise and a thorough knowledge, and in this case there is, the outcome can be a successful one.
Italian influences are a good start and Slovenian organ builders were renowned throughout history, and therefore this merger did produce a beautiful sounding instrument, at least to my ears.
I may not be an expert as some on this forum, but during the live concertos I heard in this church, my impression was, that this organ sounds authentic, and has beautiful registrations. Thus my hopes are a bit higher. The only problem I fear, is how is it recorded. But I soon find out :)

The credentials of the Slovenian builder seem impeccable: http://www.skrabl.com/index.php?Itemid=54&id=54&lang=en&option=com_content&view=article

I agree that a newly built organ can sound as the real deal. 
My concern is that the result can often also sound rather generic...

But we will see, awaiting your report!  :)

Q
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 03, 2018, 05:04:09 AM
There are in fact a couple of things by Pachelbel already recorded by Stella, a chaconne on a CD called “Toccata and Fugue”, and a choral prelude on a CD called “A Christmas Organ” I’ve heard both and my guess is both are on modern organs tuned equally or close.

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 07, 2018, 10:20:05 PM
https://youtube.com/v/EKF34fl9LeQ


Léon Berben, recital at the Van Straten-Organ, Orgelpark, Amsterdam Friday 14 October 2016, 01.13 p.m.   
00:17 Anonymus -Estampie   
03:33 Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525-1594)  -Ricercata del Primo Tono   
06:12 Johann Jacob Froberger (1616-1667) -Canzona II   
10:35 Antonio de Cabezón (1510-1566) -Hosanna de la Missa de L'Homme armé   
14:57 Antonio de Cabezón -Benedictus de la Missa de L'Homme armé   
18:18 Adriaen Willaert (c. 1490-1562) -Ricercar   
22:55 Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643) -Capriccio sopra la Spagnoletta   
30:33 Johann Jacob Froberger -Toccata V, da sonarsi alla levatione, FbWV 105   
36:05 Antonio de Cabezón -Canción glosada Un gay bergier   
40:12 Antonio de Cabezón -Romance Para quién crié yo cabellos   
45:25 Buxheimer Orgelbuch  -Adieu mes tres belle   
49:48 Buxheimer Orgelbuch -Portugaler

Tough, harsh  music making!
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Elk on November 09, 2018, 03:09:06 AM
Mandryka, I played Mondésert's Bohm on both my main system and ear-phones cleanly and found the low bass, say, between low C and F above realistic if, perhaps, a bit plump, with much the same weight as I would hear in a church here, but not having heard the organ in Sainte-Aurélie, I have no idea how faithfully it is reproduced.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on November 09, 2018, 12:43:35 PM
I am interested in finding recordings of small organs--positifs, portatives, continuo/chamber organs. I would appreciate any suggestions.
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 09, 2018, 02:08:04 PM
I am interested in finding recordings of small organs--positifs, portatives, continuo/chamber organs. I would appreciate any suggestions.

I think this is an interesting question and one which takes you into some very cutting edge areas of experimentation in early music. Lots of new ideas are being tried out with organettos, apparently there's some guy in Holland, in Groningen I think, I forget his name, who has started to make very good ones, and that's helping make them hot, an area where things are moving rapidly. They're hand held, you pump them one hand and play keys with the other. Here's an example where you can see it in use by one of the pioneers in its revival, Guilliermo Peres

https://www.youtube.com/v/qtuAAC0JQt0

and here's one being played by Cataline Vicens, who's doing some interesting things with early keyboards

https://www.youtube.com/v/3jf6II2RSoo

At the other extreme there's Cameron Carpenter, who's got an electric "touring" organ

https://www.youtube.com/v/LOi1TucrG8M
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on November 11, 2018, 10:13:47 PM
Fascinating! But, I tend to prefer that last piece in mean tone tuning.  :laugh:

Can you recommend any CDs of these sorts of instruments?
Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 12, 2018, 08:19:41 AM
Tasto Solo have done three CDs, and Perez had recorded organetto for ClubMediéval, who have a recording of music by Paolo da Firenze. This is another one but maybe hard to find

(http://www.superlibrum.nl/images/superlibrum/CD/Intabulation.jpg)

I think this is rather good

https://soundcloud.com/jankees-braaksma/summum-sanctus

taken from a CD here

https://soundcloud.com/jankees-braaksma/summum-sanctus

I don't have it but I'll try to order it tomorrow from here, where I notice that they sat that you can order a copy of the 14th century intabulations CD, which I have already.

http://www.superlibrum.nl/index.php/media-hoofdmenu/cd-submenu

Title: Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 12, 2018, 09:24:24 AM
This article looks interesting if you're interested in small medieval organs

http://www.davidrumsey.ch/DIAP0513p20-25.pdf

Good picture here, part of the publicity for a concert in the Netherlands a couple of years ago, I get a very strong feeling that this is an area where things are really moving

(https://www.inhetwesterkwartier.nl/img/agenda/21179/21.4.2017_bovenaanzichtmetbraaksma__large.jpg)

and this for a concert last year, once again in Fresia

(http://www.superlibrum.nl/images/Cristina_Alis_Raurich.jpg)