GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: david johnson on February 15, 2008, 04:16:05 PM

Title: Georges Enescu
Post by: david johnson on February 15, 2008, 04:16:05 PM
got favorite romanian rhapsodies recordings?

over the years, i've wound up with ormandy/philly, dorati/lso, the stokowski rca, and a slight fave -
josif conta/romanian broadcast orchestra.
i've also found variant spellings - enesco, enescu, enescou.

the romanian performance has some flair and heavy trumpet tongueing..i feel it's the local flavor enescu enjoyed.

dj
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Brian on February 15, 2008, 04:34:07 PM
got favorite romanian rhapsodies recordings?

over the years, i've wound up with ormandy/philly, dorati/lso, the stokowski rca, and a slight fave -
josif conta/romanian broadcast orchestra.
i've also found variant spellings - enesco, enescu, enescou.

the romanian performance has some flair and heavy trumpet tongueing..i feel it's the local flavor enescu enjoyed.

dj
I completely agree - Conta's Romanian Rhapsodies on Marco Polo are just the best.  :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: david johnson on February 15, 2008, 04:41:05 PM
mine is on stradivari classics.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Brian on February 15, 2008, 04:56:05 PM
Hm, what are the timings? On Marco Polo, with the Romanian Radio and Television Orchestra, the First Rhapsody takes 12:22 and the Second 11:48.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: david johnson on February 15, 2008, 05:09:31 PM
Hm, what are the timings? On Marco Polo, with the Romanian Radio and Television Orchestra, the First Rhapsody takes 12:22 and the Second 11:48.

#1 - 12:13
#2 - 11:46

the cd also contains the 'romanian poem, op. 1'

dj
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Brian on February 15, 2008, 05:22:45 PM
#1 - 12:13
#2 - 11:46

the cd also contains the 'romanian poem, op. 1'

dj
Yep! Must be the same. :)

What I love most is the flute duel in the First Rhapsody - how many recordings really differentiate the two flutes in the sound space? It creates a special "dueling" quality that I love...
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: val on February 16, 2008, 01:43:25 AM
The Rhapsodies are nice, but Enescu made much better works for orchestra. The 3 Symphonies and, above all, the Chamber Symphony.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: david johnson on February 16, 2008, 02:19:28 AM
i've not heard the symphonies.

 :(
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: lukeottevanger on February 16, 2008, 03:41:39 AM
The Rhapsodies are nice, but Enescu made much better works for orchestra. The 3 Symphonies and, above all, the Chamber Symphony.

Just what I was going to say! The (quite early) RRs are pretty standard fare, but the symphonies (2 and 3 mostly) and the orchestral suites (no 3 above all!) are really extraordinary and very individual. The very best that late Romanticism has to offer, sophisticated, ultra-complex and detailed, otherworldly orchestration pre-empting the shifting, detailed textures of much later composers by decades. The Chamber Symphony is an incredibly compressed, high quality work, very late, but I think one would need to know the earlier symphonies first. Among the other very fine, mature orchestral piece is also Vox Maris, another wondrous work.

All the above, plus all Enescu's other orchestral pieces, are available at bargain prices on Arte Nova (a set of 6 discs I've plugged many times); Arte Nova also have a couple of chamber discs (Dixtuor/Octet; Cello Sonatas). Naxos and Olympia between them have most of the other important chamber works. Then there are the violin sonatas,Impressions d'enfance and the piano works - various recordings but the hard-to-find Enescu-Lipatti is the one to have. Finally, his masterpiece is the opera Oedipe. The EMI setis what I have, and I can't imagine it bettered
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Todd on February 16, 2008, 08:29:16 AM
Must agree that the symphonies and Oedipe (in Foster's recording) are Enescu's best works.  The Arte Nova discs are very good for the orchestral music, but as if by some miraculous timing for this thread, Lawrence Foster's reissued set of the symphonies and Vox Maris is being released in the US on March 4th.  I shall be getting a copy as soon as possible.


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Z1JXEV37L._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: lukeottevanger on February 16, 2008, 08:39:45 AM
I don't know those discs, but they are always recommended and I must assume they are very fine. My reason sfor recommending the Arte Novas, for what they are worth, is:

1) price - can't be beaten! more importantly:
2) performances - very good indeed, I think. And Romanian, for those who think that matters, which in this case is more plausible than in some
3) completeness - the set includes everything that can reasonably be performed, IIRC, including unfinished works and concertante/vocal pieces
4) wonderful music that you miss elsewhere - things like the Third Orchestral Suite are every bit as fine as the symphonies. In fact, with its extraordinary orchestral colour, wild and memorable invention, and generally potent magic, this piece might well be my favourite Enescu orchestral work.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Josquin des Prez on February 16, 2008, 05:56:57 PM
Must agree that the symphonies and Oedipe (in Foster's recording) are Enescu's best works.

I'm partial to the chamber works. The first string quartet alone has to be the most fiercely difficulty piece in the history of the repertory. The Voces recording is my favored.

Personally though, i think the best introduction to Enescu is the recording of the String Octet + Piano Quintet issued by Gidon Kremer, and after that, the third Violin Sonata performed by the man himself.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 07, 2008, 08:01:56 AM
George Enescu (1881-1955) - Violin & Piano Works, Vol. 1 w/ Remus Azoitei & Eduard Stan (both Romanian) on Hanssler - thought that I'd 'rejuvenate' this Enescu thread (rather than just post in the 'listening' one) - this is only my fourth or so CD of this composer's works (own one w/ Symphony No. 3 - Todd's post is of interest to me, Rhapsodies, and chamber works, including the Octet & Quintet) - now listening to the disc shown below, apparently a Vol. 2 should be released shortly in the USA.

The opening paragraph in the liner notes on this composer is amazing to read, e.g. 'Pablo Casals considered him the greatest musical phenomenon since Mozart', 'admitted to the Viennese Conservatory at the age of 7', 'offered the position as Toscanini's successor in New York', 'one of the most prominent violinists of his time & a highly esteemed pianist whose technique Alfred Cortot envied', 'an artist', and 'greatly admired by his pupil, Yehudi Menuhin' - I've read this stuff before, but never ceases to impress me!

So, any thoughts & recommendations - thanks all!  :)

(http://shop.castleclassics.co.uk/acatalog/HAN098239.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Josquin des Prez on June 07, 2008, 05:34:39 PM
I actually own a small biography of Enescu written by a certain Noel Malcolm, an admirer of the composer. Fascinating read. A lot of composers have a reputation for having prodigious and precocious talents but Enescu is the real deal. To get a glimpse of his mnemonic abilities alone, consider that he had every single of Bach's cantatas memorized and could perform them on the spot when asked. Fancy that.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 08, 2008, 05:32:41 AM
I actually own a small biography of Enescu written by a certain Noel Malcolm..........To get a glimpse of his mnemonic abilities alone, consider that he had every single of Bach's cantatas memorized and could perform them on the spot when asked. Fancy that.

That last statement above is phenomenal!  :o   Just checked Amazon USA - book (shown below) published in 1990 - seems OOP (not a surprise) w/ 'used' copies goin' for $100+ - think I'll try a library loan; I've obtained a number of these older 'rarer' OOP books via 'interlibrary' loans - thanks for the bio suggestion -  :)


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410R6BDSQ6L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: val on June 09, 2008, 12:18:31 AM
In his book about Enescu, Alain Cophignon describes another example of Enescu's incredible memory. Travelling with Bartok, by train (they were going to play one of Bartok's violin Sonatas in Wien) Enescu, that didn't know the work, studied it during that night on the train, and played it the next day with no problems. Bartok, himself, was astonished because he couldn't play his own work (the piano part) without the score in front of him.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: The new erato on June 09, 2008, 01:06:46 AM
According to a booklet in one of my Enescu discs (Aie; piano sonatas 1&3), something similar happened with Ravels violin sonata. Enescu received the manuscript from the composer, read through it a few times and played the violin part from memory.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Est.1965 on June 09, 2008, 02:04:24 AM
I am in severe buying mood, and today I'm going to get some Maiskovsky and Enescu's Symphonies 1-6.  I have only heard Enescu on Radio Three (UK) and that was a while back, Symphony 1 I think, and I liked what I heard.  This post has been an interesting reminder and a good prompt for me. 8)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Todd on June 09, 2008, 05:26:26 AM
I am in severe buying mood, and today I'm going to get some Maiskovsky and Enescu's Symphonies 1-6.



Do let us know how symphonies 4-6 sound.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Est.1965 on June 09, 2008, 06:17:51 AM
I will indeed Todd  :) , and I will also learn how to spell Miaskovsky properly  >:( .
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 09, 2008, 06:55:02 AM
This morning, listened to the two discs below from the Ottavo label - I've had them for a while, includes:

Romanian Rhapsodies 1 &2, Suites 1 & 3, and Symphony No. 3 w/ Lascae & Philharmonia Moldova.

Not totally pleased w/ the performances nor sound of these recordings - definitely want to obtain the 'Symphony' package posted by Todd earlier - excellent review on MusicWeb (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2005/May05/enescu_foster_724358660425.htm) w/ a comment that the Ottavo offerings were 'inferior'!  ::)

Now, just need to find a replacement for the Rhapsodies & Suites -  :D

For a comprehensive list of Enescu's compositions check HERE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_George_Enescu) -  :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/310007563_Vau49-S.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/310007492_5L9rc-S.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on June 09, 2008, 03:26:38 PM
I will indeed Todd  :)

Err...you're on the butt end of a joke, bro.

There are no symphonies 4-6.



Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Est.1965 on June 09, 2008, 04:01:07 PM
 ::)  Yep.  Shows how much I know about Enescu. I might buy his Symphonies 7 - 102 instead.  Deserves me right for not reading the thread more thoroughly...  Despite my gaffe and subsequent suckering, Enescu is clearly worth looking into, so I will seek out that EMI release Todd posted below. ;D
I think also I will get Enscu's forty hour long 'Symphony for Dafties' which should help reveal my ignorance of compsers on my undiscovered list. :P
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 09, 2008, 04:03:33 PM
Concerning my previous post on the Ottavo discs, I decided to 'improve' & expand on my orchestral works of George Enescu, so ordered the CDs below (posted this already in the listening thread but wanted to include the information here):

Rhapsodies & Suites on a 2-CD Ultima Erato - had to go w/ a 'used' set, so hope that the discs play?  :D

Symphonies, Nos. 1-3 w/ Lawrence Foster directing several French orchestras - reviewed HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2005/May05/enescu_foster_724358660425.htm) -  :D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41RFRW6ZV6L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Z1JXEV37L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 09, 2008, 04:08:04 PM
::)  Yep.  Shows how much I know about Enescu. I might buy his Symphonies 7 - 102 instead.  Deserves me right for not reading the thread more thoroughly...

Not to worry - I was a little more subtle & posted a link to his list of compositions; only 3 Symphonies w/ Opus numbers; but, interestingly, a lot of non-Opus works - take a LOOK (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_George_Enescu) -  :D
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on June 09, 2008, 04:32:31 PM
Despite my gaffe and subsequent suckering, Enescu is clearly worth looking into, so I will seek out that EMI release Todd posted below. ;D

Oh, I agree with that! Enescu is a really fine talent.

Two discs I really enjoy are these:


(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/2c/e9/becb828fd7a0f33f800d1110.L.jpg)


(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/95/505495.jpg)

Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Est.1965 on June 10, 2008, 01:30:11 AM
Thank you SonicMan and donwyn.  My faith has been restored.  I won't be making a mistake like THAT again.  I'm away now to look up your recommendations... :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Harry on June 10, 2008, 01:34:20 AM
Thank you SonicMan and donwyn.  My faith has been restored.  I won't be making a mistake like THAT again.  I'm away now to look up your recommendations... :)

John, good afternoon! May I direct you to the excellent Chandos recordings, all three Symphonies in well recorded and performed renderings. They are very detailed recordings, and you can see through the thickly scored structure quite easily! :)
Something which is necessary with Enescu's music.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 12, 2008, 04:25:52 PM
Well, today in the mail, the 2-CD Erato Ultima set of Enenscu's non-symphonic works (shown below) - this was a surprise discovery for me on the Amazon Marketplace - Lawrence Foster, conductor w/ the Orch Philharm de Monte-Carlo (never heard of them before but the same group recommended highly in the Symphonies, also ordered by me) - well, this is an absolutlely wonderful set of CDs - ordered as a 'used' set but came in excellent condition and played w/o a problem - quite pleased!  :D

As to the music, Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, No. 1 & 2; Poeme Roumain, Op. 1, Suites, Nos. 1-3, & Symphonie for Cello, Op. 8 - these were recorded in 1983-84, but great sound reproduction & wonderful performances - I'm quite happy w/ this purchase, and doubt for the number of works & quality of the playing/recording that they can be duplicated currently - assume these are OOP, but if interested in a nice 2-CD combo w/ the symphony selection recommended by Todd (w/ the same conductor & orchestra), a no-brainer for me at least -  :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41RFRW6ZV6L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 28, 2008, 09:20:06 AM
Well, about half way through the book on George Enescu mentioned previously; quite an interesting read - contains a lot of pictures (many rather poor quality, esp. after scanning), but four are posted below (scanned in 4 others from the book, which I'll post next) - these seem to be hard to find:

Solo portrait from 1904 (so early 20s); image w/ him & the violin from 1918; Pablo Casals & Enescu, also from 1904; and Marie Cantacuzino (known as Maruca), a Romanian princess, love of his life, whom he eventually married.  :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413383_C7TYX-M.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413389_6VLPB-M.jpg)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413395_GkaZr-M.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413751_9KkD5-M.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 28, 2008, 09:27:10 AM
And the remaining 4 scanned pics from the book:  Enescu w/ a young Dinu Lipatti (1921); Enescu w/ an older but still young Yehudi Menuhin; Menuhin w/ Enescu later in life (1952); tomb of Enescu (French spelling of his name) in Paris -  :)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413402_zc5vM-M.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413756_xSVP7-M.jpg)

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413760_Y4MgL-M.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/photos/321413764_MAzS2-M.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Christo on June 28, 2008, 09:51:07 AM
Now I discover this thread, I remember to have visited an impressive villa / city palace in Bucharest, back in the year 2000, a former home of Enescu and now/then his museum:

                            (http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en-commons/thumb/2/26/200px-Cantacuzino-Enescu_1.jpg)

Anybody been there too? And how is it nowadays?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 28, 2008, 12:17:03 PM
Well, today in the mail, the 2-CD Erato Ultima set of Enenscu's non-symphonic works (shown below) - this was a surprise discovery for me on the Amazon Marketplace - Lawrence Foster, conductor w/ the Orch Philharm de Monte-Carlo (never heard of them before but the same group recommended highly in the Symphonies, also ordered by me) - well, this is an absolutlely wonderful set of CDs - ordered as a 'used' set but came in excellent condition and played w/o a problem - quite pleased!  :D

As to the music, Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, No. 1 & 2; Poeme Roumain, Op. 1, Suites, Nos. 1-3, & Symphonie for Cello, Op. 8 - these were recorded in 1983-84, but great sound reproduction & wonderful performances - I'm quite happy w/ this purchase, and doubt for the number of works & quality of the playing/recording that they can be duplicated currently - assume these are OOP, but if interested in a nice 2-CD combo w/ the symphony selection recommended by Todd (w/ the same conductor & orchestra), a no-brainer for me at least -  :)

I listened to this a few days ago - my first introduction to Enescu. And I agree whole-heartedly with your assessment. Great set, great music.

Thanks for the pics!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Josquin des Prez on June 28, 2008, 04:20:58 PM
and Marie Cantacuzino (known as Maruca), a Romanian princess, love of his life, whom he eventually married.  :)

Biggest mistake of his life, too.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 29, 2008, 07:51:58 AM
Rhapsodies & Suites on a 2-CD Ultima Erato - had to go w/ a 'used' set, so hope that the discs play?  :D

Symphonies, Nos. 1-3 w/ Lawrence Foster directing several French orchestras - reviewed HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2005/May05/enescu_foster_724358660425.htm) -  :D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41RFRW6ZV6L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Z1JXEV37L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Well, I've listened to these 4 discs several times over now - Foster does a great job w/ this music (comments & links to reviews given previously) - if interested, these CDs really provide a nice collection of Enescu's major orchestral output (and at a good price) -  :D
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 29, 2008, 07:55:05 AM
Biggest mistake of his life, too.

Well, just getting through the last third of the biography - not much said about her up to this point, but the relationship was certainly a complicated one (as many of these 'romances' can be!) - now, looking forward to the remainder of the book -  :D
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: eyeresist on June 29, 2008, 05:30:13 PM
I'm a fan of cello concertos , so reading for the first time of a Symphonie for Cello Op. 8 intrigues me - can anyone give me some detail or description on this work?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: david johnson on June 29, 2008, 07:00:32 PM
sonicman:

thank you very much for those fine pix!

dj
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on June 30, 2008, 05:30:52 PM
sonicman:

thank you very much for those fine pix!


Hello David - no problem, and thanks for starting this thread!  :D  I was goin' to start one but found yours already -  :)

Biggest mistake of his life, too.

Well, just finished the book and agree - she was a TRIP!  ::) 

But, just for those who might be interested in this story - the bio contains only scattered references (would have enjoyed to have more details!) - but his 'love' interest was a Romanian 'princess' - married name was Marie Cantacuzino, husband Michael & her both from higher nobility families; Enescu & her met before the start of WWI - the first marriage seemed to have been a failure and the two lived apart, but not much detail on her relationship w/ Enescu in these 'early years'.  Michael C. died in the late 1920s, and Marie (known as Maruca) had a 'severe illness' in 1933 (likely a mental breakdown?) - in 1939, Enescu and Maruca were married - she was a 'burden' before & after the marriage.  After WWII, the couple were virtually broke (properties confiscated in Romania - Enescu never returned to his country) - Enescu despite increasing ill health, had to 'make a living' performing, teaching, conducting, all of which took its toll.  The 'money' he made was not spent wisely by his wife, Maruca (still thinking that she was a princess!) - toward the end, she even sold off his Guarnerius violin and many of his manuscripts, likely to satisfy her own extravagant needs - BOY, what a woman!  A very sad ending to such a glorious 'human being', i.e. George Enescu -  :'(
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 02, 2008, 08:51:06 AM
Well, finished the biography on Enescu shown on the previous page of the thread - an astounding human being - as reading, I jotted down some amazing statements about his performance skills and his remarkable memory - below are just a half dozen of many mentioned (some may have already been quoted previously):

Yehudi Menuhin:  "..he remains for me the most extraordinary human being, the greatest musician and the most formative influence I have ever experienced."

Noel Malcolm:  "He could sit down at a piano and begin at any point in The Ring, or a Beethoven quartet, or The Rite of Spring, or any of of at least 150 Bach cantatas, and play from memory, bringing out every nuance of the writing."

Alfred Cortot:  "Why is it, he once complained, that you, a violinist, have a better technique at the piano that I do?"

Leopold Stokowski:  "I have known very many great musicians, and very few geniuses.  Enescu was a genius"

Alexandru Radulescu: "once asked him..that if the works of Beethoven were destroyed, would he be able to reconstruct them all from memory.  Oh no, said Enescu - only the Symphonies, Quartets and Trios, the Missa Solemnis and Fidelio."

Pablo Casals:  "Enescu was, in the depth and range of his gifts, the greatest musical phenomenon since Mozart."
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: ChamberNut on July 02, 2008, 09:37:28 AM
Personally though, i think the best introduction to Enescu is the recording of the String Octet + Piano Quintet issued by Gidon Kremer, and after that, the third Violin Sonata performed by the man himself.

Josquin,

This is the one I've been listening to yesterday and today.  I need to listen to the Octet again to get a better sense of it, but I instantly fell in love with the Piano Quintet.  Gorgeous!  :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 08, 2008, 10:52:30 AM
Small order from Caiman arrived today which included the CD below:

Octuor for Strings, Op. 7 & Dixtuor for Winds, Op. 14 w/ Viotta Ensemble, who are members of the famous Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra; youthful works from Enescu, which were well received at the time -  these are wonderfully performed 'large-scale' chamber works; I particularly liked the wind piece; Ottavo did an excellent job recording this group - highly recommended -  :D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41X0NV1SK0L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 11, 2008, 01:31:12 PM
Well, I've finally completed the book on George E. - quite good; he was such a marvelous composer, but the unfortunate circumstance is that he was a superb violinist (and pianist), teacher, & conductor - just not enough time in his life to do or complete all the compositions floating around in his head - sad!  :'(

Below is a 'shortened' list that I jotted down from one of the appendices in the book; these are many of his instrumental works w/ their corresponding Opus numbers - some are missing (many of the vocal works) - check HERE (http://www.geocities.com/enesco_georges/enescu_works.html) for a more complete numerical listing - but the ones shown below are many that are on disc and available (I probably own at least half of these works - all wonderful!).

Finally, keep in mind that Enescu had numerous works that were not completed or partially done that were never assigned Opus numbers - these are also included in the appendix mentioned; not even sure 'how many' of these are extant and/or recorded.  :D

Cello Sonatas, Op. 26 (No. 1/2)
Chamber Symphony, Op. 33
Dixtuor, Op. 14
Impressions d'Enfance, Op. 28
Intermede Strings, Op. 12 (No. 1/2)
Octet Strings, Op. 7
Orchestral Suites, Op. 9, 20, & 27
Piano Quartets, Op. 16 & 30
Piano Quintet, Op. 29
Piano Sonatas, Op. 24 (Nos. 1 & 3)
Piano Suites (Nos. 1 & 2), Op. 3 & 10
Piano Variations, Op.5
Pieces Impromptues (Suite No. 3), Op. 18
Poeme Roumain, Op. 1
Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11 (Nos. 1/2)
String Quartets, Op. 22 (Nos. 1/2)
Symphonie Concertante, Op. 8
Symphonies (1-3), Op. 13, 17, & 21
Trois Melodies, Op. 19
Violin Sonatas, Op. 2, 6, & 25
Vox Maris, Op. 31
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 11, 2008, 01:53:06 PM
Sorry about these serial postings but would welcome any other contributions or comments -  :D

Last few days, I've been spending some 'listening' time w/ Luiza Borac and George's solo piano music:

Three Piano Suites, Nos. 1-3, Op. 3, 10, & 18 on the Avie label, recorded (beautifully in 2003).

Piano Sonatas & Other Works - 2CD set on same label; CLICK on the images for listings & MusicWeb reviews; she is wonderful!  :D

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/Oct03/Enescu_AV0013.jpg) (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/Oct03/Enescu_Piano_Suites_webber.htm)  (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classRev/2006/Mar06/Enescu_av2081.jpg) (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classRev/2006/Mar06/Enescu_AV2081.htm)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 12, 2008, 07:29:37 AM
Well, three months since the last Enescu posting (and mine @ that!) - just acquired the String Quartets on Naxos (recommended on an earlier page of this thread) - these works were composed three decades apart (i.e. completed in 1921 & 1951, respectively).

First, these are modern sounding 20th century quartets, like Bartok; second, the first quartet has denser & busier string playing w/ the instruments often challenging each other, but at other times a wonderful flood of melodic lines, many presumably w/ Romanian folk influences.  The much later second quartet seems simpler, but the melodies are still abundant. 

The performers, Quatuor Ad Libitum, know the music well; the group was formed in 1988 at the 'George Enescu Academy' in Romania.  A short but excellent review can be found at ClassicsToday (http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=3233) w/ a 9/8 rating (sound downgraded slightly for needing to 'up' the volume - not sure valid on my system!); there are also a lot of summary ratings of this disc on the Naxos website (http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.554721#), if interested.  :D


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51bMKBglUPL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Guido on October 12, 2008, 04:23:16 PM
All the above, plus all Enescu's other orchestral pieces, are available at bargain prices on Arte Nova (a set of 6 discs I've plugged many times); Arte Nova also have a couple of chamber discs (Dixtuor/Octet; Cello Sonatas). Naxos and Olympia between them have most of the other important chamber works. Then there are the violin sonatas,Impressions d'enfance and the piano works - various recordings but the hard-to-find Enescu-Lipatti is the one to have. Finally, his masterpiece is the opera Oedipe. The EMI setis what I have, and I can't imagine it bettered

I have the Cello Sonatas from Arte Nova - highly imaginative works - The first movement of the first sonata especially strikes me as having nothing else much like it in the cello repertoire.

I have also just ordered four of the Arte Nova orchestral CDs - for £8.50 on Amazon used and new! Looking forward to them. I have the Naxos recording of Oedipe (thanks to Sean!), but found it a rather dull affair when I listened to it. This was a couple of years ago, so it definitely deserves another listen (especially if it's his masterpiece).
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on October 20, 2010, 06:38:19 PM
For me, there are three recordings of Enescu that I can't live without and they are with Gennady Rozhdestvensky conducting the BBC Philharmonic on Chandos. They easily outshine the Arte Nova recordings, though the performance Mandeal conducted of Poeme Roumain was amazingly good. I wouldn't want to be without the Arte Nova recordings for the simple fact that they play some seldom heard works.
 
Enescu was someone that was introduced to me by Grandfather. He told me to listen to the Romanian Rhapsodies, so I did, and I was hooked. I love the folk-like idiom he composed his music in. It gave this very down-to-Earth feel. He wrote some great music no doubt about it.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Superhorn on October 22, 2010, 03:45:26 PM
   Don't miss the superb EMI recording of Oedipe, a retelling of the Oedipus myth which is vastly different from the more familiar Stravinsky, and possibly the greatest opera you've never heard.
  It's a strange and haunting work,and absolutely mesmerizing.
  It's also his only opera, and one he worked on for many years.
  The cast includes Jose Van Dam as Oedipus, with Lawrence Foster,who has done so much to champion this composer's music.
  Despite his name,Foster is an American conductor of Romanian parentage.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on December 17, 2010, 07:08:26 AM
During my absence here I have been listening, almost obsessively, to Mandeal's performances of Enescu's three symphonies and the Vox Maris. You are right if you think I have become a firm admirer. Enescu's First Symphony must be among the most assured essays in that form ever. The final movement of the Second is amazing - the music breaks its bounds, as if the composer was flooded by ideas and let it all rip. Very exhilarating. I bought the Arte Nova CDs of the symphonies, rhapsodies and the suites through eBay. I still have to find the time to listen to them, though. A nice assignment!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Harry on December 17, 2010, 07:50:56 AM
During my absence here I have been listening, almost obsessively, to Mandeal's performances of Enescu's three symphonies and the Vox Maris. You are right if you think I have become a firm admirer. Enescu's First Symphony must be among the most assured essays in that form ever. The final movement of the Second is amazing - the music breaks its bounds, as if the composer was flooded by ideas and let it all rip. Very exhilarating. I bought the Arte Nova CDs of the symphonies, rhapsodies and the suites through eBay. I still have to find the time to listen to them, though. A nice assignment!

I agree, I just listen to the whole set on Chandos, its plain good music.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on December 17, 2010, 07:57:58 AM
I agree, I just listen to the whole set on Chandos, its plain good music.


Hi, Harry! Still going strong, I see. As for Enescu - I must get my hands on that Chandos set, and also on the one by Foster on EMI. The music deserves many interpretations.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on December 17, 2010, 06:38:57 PM

Hi, Harry! Still going strong, I see. As for Enescu - I must get my hands on that Chandos set, and also on the one by Foster on EMI. The music deserves many interpretations.


Actually, it's not a set (yet). You have to buy them individually and they're quite expensive. I bought them last year.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on June 05, 2011, 10:13:15 AM
Well, I've finally completed the book on George E. - quite good; he was such a marvelous composer, but the unfortunate circumstance is that he was a superb violinist (and pianist), teacher, & conductor - just not enough time in his life to do or complete all the compositions floating around in his head - sad!  :'(

Below is a 'shortened' list that I jotted down from one of the appendices in the book; these are many of his instrumental works w/ their corresponding Opus numbers - some are missing (many of the vocal works) - check HERE (http://www.geocities.com/enesco_georges/enescu_works.html) for a more complete numerical listing - but the ones shown below are many that are on disc and available (I probably own at least half of these works - all wonderful!).

Finally, keep in mind that Enescu had numerous works that were not completed or partially done that were never assigned Opus numbers - these are also included in the appendix mentioned; not even sure 'how many' of these are extant and/or recorded.  :D

Cello Sonatas, Op. 26 (No. 1/2)
Chamber Symphony, Op. 33
Dixtuor, Op. 14
Impressions d'Enfance, Op. 28
Intermede Strings, Op. 12 (No. 1/2)
Octet Strings, Op. 7
Orchestral Suites, Op. 9, 20, & 27
Piano Quartets, Op. 16 & 30
Piano Quintet, Op. 29
Piano Sonatas, Op. 24 (Nos. 1 & 3)
Piano Suites (Nos. 1 & 2), Op. 3 & 10
Piano Variations, Op.5
Pieces Impromptues (Suite No. 3), Op. 18
Poeme Roumain, Op. 1
Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11 (Nos. 1/2)
String Quartets, Op. 22 (Nos. 1/2)
Symphonie Concertante, Op. 8
Symphonies (1-3), Op. 13, 17, & 21
Trois Melodies, Op. 19
Violin Sonatas, Op. 2, 6, & 25
Vox Maris, Op. 31

I'm lifting up the Piano Quartet No.2, a Masterpiece in my estimation.


btw- I so thought I had the coup on this Thread,... aaargh
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on June 05, 2011, 10:14:32 AM
What is the Enescu Thread doing here? I'm going right now to start an Official Ensescu Thread in the Composer Section :P!!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on June 05, 2011, 10:15:33 AM
There, that settles it! ;)

Now, talk amongst yourselves. 8)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 05, 2011, 11:57:41 AM
Feeling OK, Snyprrr?  ;D :o
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: cilgwyn on June 05, 2011, 01:09:19 PM
(More egg on my face! Enescu should have definately been on my 'list!') I have never heard the First Symphony. Which recording should be at the top of my list? The Arte Nova cd's are very good VFM,but would I be better off shelling out a little more for,say,the Chandos cd?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 05, 2011, 01:13:55 PM
I still have to listen to my Arte Nova discs I bought on eBay last year... But Andreescu is very good. I don't know the Chandos.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: DavidW on June 05, 2011, 01:26:01 PM
I have a couple of Enescu cds to listen to... liked hearing the third symphony on the radio. :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: cilgwyn on June 05, 2011, 02:25:55 PM
I had the Olympia cd's. Unfortunately I sold them. More fool me! I must say,I rather fancy the Arte Nova recordings. (What a label! They've even released Gernsheim!)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on June 05, 2011, 07:57:59 PM
Feeling OK, Snyprrr?  ;D :o

Mods are trying to make me look crazy. 8)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on June 05, 2011, 08:04:03 PM
So, what are Enescu's best pieces?

All I have is the VS3, which is wowzy zowzy,... and the aforementioned Piano Quartet No.2 I heard.

Guido makes the CSs sound good,... I'm thinking of CSs by Ginastera for some reason??


I remember hearing the famous Octet, though, and wondering what all the fuss what about. Obviously we need to get to the bottom of this Composer!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: eyeresist on June 05, 2011, 08:13:12 PM
I have the Arte Nova box, which I haven't listened to for a while but which didn't make a very positive impression. I recall the sound being mostly quite distant and reverberant, which wouldn't have helped. Can anyone give a direct comparison with the other recordings of the symphonies and suites?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: cilgwyn on June 06, 2011, 02:57:02 AM
'Distant and reverberant'? Not sure I like the 'sound' of that. I must say the Olympia performances sounded pretty good to me,with the benefit of authenticity. I only sold them because I was a bit hard up at the time. I suppose they're deleted and expensive now. Herrenberg appears happy with them and I get the feeling he's usually a pretty good judge.
Wait a minute. Are the Arte Nova cd's reissues of the Olympia recordings?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: eyeresist on June 06, 2011, 04:25:34 PM
Wait a minute. Are the Arte Nova cd's reissues of the Olympia recordings?

No.
 
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 06, 2011, 11:26:29 PM
The (very good) Andreescu performances are on a label called Electrecord. But I got the symphonies in digital form from a friend...


http://www.cduniverse.com/sresult.asp?style=music&HT_Search=xlabel&HT_Search_Info=Electrecord (http://www.cduniverse.com/sresult.asp?)

Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 26, 2011, 10:22:47 AM
(More egg on my face! Enescu should have definately been on my 'list!') I have never heard the First Symphony. Which recording should be at the top of my list? The Arte Nova cd's are very good VFM,but would I be better off shelling out a little more for,say,the Chandos cd?

Well, I have the 2-CD set that was recommended at the beginning of this thread - a review from MusicWeb HERE (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2005/May05/enescu_foster_724358660425.htm) - cannot personally make any 'comparison' comments having not hear the others.



(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Z1JXEV37L._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 26, 2011, 10:45:11 AM
Well, I've not added to my Enescu collection in a while, but a 'new' arrival shown below:

Piano Quartets 1 & 2 w/ the Tammuz Piano Quartet (Oliver Triendl on piano) (recorded 2008 & 09) - composed about 35 yrs apart (1909 & 1944) but both serious and virtuosic works clocking in at 65+ minutes.  My purchase was prompted by an excellent review by Jerry Dubins in Fanfare, reprinted HERE (http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Name/Tammuz-Piano-Quartet/Ensemble/216494-4) - his bottom line was a candidate for the 2011 Want List!  Scott Morrison on his Amazon review left a 4*/5* review HERE (http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Quartets-1-2-Enescu/dp/B00475Q1SY/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1314387245&sr=1-1), not liking the earlier work as much.  The music indeed is serious in both works but George E. not only one of the most famous violinists of his time was also a superb piano playing - obvious from these recordings.

Also as expected from CPO, superb sound & liner notes - another great quote (a few I left a couple of pages ago) mentioned from his pupil Menuhin ".. reports that during a lesson with Enescu, Maurice Ravel arrived with his freshly composed Violin Sonata.  After reading through the piece on sight, Enescu put the music aside and played it from memory."  Continually amazed by the genius of this human being -  :)


(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-LSSzRS3/0/O/EnescuPianoQuartets.jpg)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on August 26, 2011, 07:50:16 PM
Well, I've not added to my Enescu collection in a while, but a 'new' arrival shown below:

Piano Quartets 1 & 2 w/ the Tammuz Piano Quartet (Oliver Triendl on piano) (recorded 2008 & 09) - composed about 35 yrs apart (1909 & 1944) but both serious and virtuosic works clocking in at 65+ minutes.  My purchase was prompted by an excellent review by Jerry Dubins in Fanfare, reprinted HERE (http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Name/Tammuz-Piano-Quartet/Ensemble/216494-4) - his bottom line was a candidate for the 2011 Want List!  Scott Morrison on his Amazon review left a 4*/5* review HERE (http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Quartets-1-2-Enescu/dp/B00475Q1SY/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1314387245&sr=1-1), not liking the earlier work as much.  The music indeed is serious in both works but George E. not only one of the most famous violinists of his time was also a superb piano playing - obvious from these recordings.

Also as expected from CPO, superb sound & liner notes - another great quote (a few I left a couple of pages ago) mentioned from his pupil Menuhin ".. reports that during a lesson with Enescu, Maurice Ravel arrived with his freshly composed Violin Sonata.  After reading through the piece on sight, Enescu put the music aside and played it from memory."  Continually amazed by the genius of this human being -  :)


(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-LSSzRS3/0/O/EnescuPianoQuartets.jpg)

Tell me about No.2. I heard some esoteric movement on YouTube that had harmonic sleights of hand that were sheer misty rocks.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 27, 2011, 05:09:26 AM
Tell me about No.2. I heard some esoteric movement on YouTube that had harmonic sleights of hand that were sheer misty rocks.

Hi Snyprrr - well, I can't do much better than Dubins & Morrison - did you check out my links?  Scott's 2nd paragraph is quite descriptive; he also recommends a Naxos recording (check HERE (http://www.amazon.com/Enescu-Piano-Quintet-Quartet/dp/B00008IHW4/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1314453916&sr=1-2)) w/ the Piano Quartet No.2/Piano Quintet w/ further discussion (some of the other comments might be of interest).  Dave :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on August 27, 2011, 05:44:51 AM
Hi Snyprrr - well, I can't do much better than Dubins & Morrison - did you check out my links?  Scott's 2nd paragraph is quite descriptive; he also recommends a Naxos recording (check HERE (http://www.amazon.com/Enescu-Piano-Quintet-Quartet/dp/B00008IHW4/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1314453916&sr=1-2)) w/ the Piano Quartet No.2/Piano Quintet w/ further discussion (some of the other comments might be of interest).  Dave :)

That last one you mentioned, that's the one I'd like to try.

I was just listening to VS 3, the famous one. Wow, you will most certainly OD on the gypsy thing here, haha. All that ornamentation is pretty 'OldWorld' sounding,... I like it, but it iS very rich!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on June 02, 2012, 07:40:03 PM
Interestingly, a new Enescu orchestral cycle begins:



Am I the only one looking forward to it?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Sammy on June 02, 2012, 07:47:21 PM
Interestingly, a new Enescu orchestral cycle begins:



Am I the only one looking forward to it?

No, I'll be getting it also.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: BrianSA on June 05, 2012, 02:04:12 PM
I don't suppose anybody would know if the new Ondine series will include the Pascal Bentoiu completions of the fourth and fifth symphonies?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on June 05, 2012, 06:05:12 PM
I don't suppose anybody would know if the new Ondine series will include the Pascal Bentoiu completions of the fourth and fifth symphonies?

Highly unlikely, Brian, but, then again, Ondine has been known to pull a few surprises out of its hat from time to time. I just hope we get a better performance of Poème Roumain. I wasn't too fond of the performance on Arte Nova. It was serviceable, but so much more could be done with it.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on August 22, 2013, 05:40:10 PM
I don't suppose anybody would know if the new Ondine series will include the Pascal Bentoiu completions of the fourth and fifth symphonies?

Sorry I didn't respond to your post earlier, Brian. Yes, I, too hope Ondine records those Bentoiu completions as well his four Study Symphonies. Olympia recorded the first and fourth Study Symphonies and I found the latter to be a very fine work with nothing "academic" or juvenilia" about it. In case you weren't aware, the completions of nos. 4 and 5 (which I haven't listened to yet, for some reason) can be found on YouTube, but, of course, they're no replacement for a CD recording.

P.S. Just curious, are you BrianA from the Art-Music Forum? Forgive me if you're not. :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: BrianSA on August 23, 2013, 03:24:15 AM
I am he, Kyle, like you a hopeless addict just looking to get my musical fix wherever and when ever I can.  I do indeed have downloaded performances of the Bentoiu completions of nos 4 & 5, but as per another discussion on AMF I am seldom able to pass up the opportunity of replacing a downloaded performance, however good, with a decent studio performance.  I think I've read somewhere recently that one of the unrecorded student symphonies may in fact be lost?
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on August 23, 2013, 05:58:04 AM
I am he, Kyle, like you a hopeless addict just looking to get my musical fix wherever and when ever I can.  I do indeed have downloaded performances of the Bentoiu completions of nos 4 & 5, but as per another discussion on AMF I am seldom able to pass up the opportunity of replacing a downloaded performance, however good, with a decent studio performance.  I think I've read somewhere recently that one of the unrecorded student symphonies may in fact be lost?

Good to see you here, Brian. :) Yes, the Second and Third Study Symphonies may very well be lost, but I don't have any confirmation of that. We could definitely still use modern recordings of nos. 1 and 4, though!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on September 27, 2013, 03:01:51 PM
Due out soon from Ondine:



Should be interesting to hear another take on the masterful Symphony no. 3.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Joaquimhock on September 27, 2013, 10:57:46 PM
Yes, the Second and Third Study Symphonies may very well be lost, but I don't have any confirmation of that. We could definitely still use modern recordings of nos. 1 and 4, though!

According to this excellent and comprehensive biography by Alain Cophignon (in French) http://www.fayard.fr/georges-enesco-9782213623214 study symphonies 2 is known by several fragments and it seems that symphony 3 exists but it is not analysed in detail in the book. A lot of work is still needed to make available the many unknown works by this extraordinary master of the 20th century.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on September 28, 2013, 02:05:09 PM
According to this excellent and comprehensive biography by Alain Cophignon (in French) http://www.fayard.fr/georges-enesco-9782213623214 study symphonies 2 is known by several fragments and it seems that symphony 3 exists but it is not analysed in detail in the book. A lot of work is still needed to make available the many unknown works by this extraordinary master of the 20th century.

Many thanks for this valuable information. :) And yes, Enescu was an extraordinary master of the 20th century, no doubt about it!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: amw on October 21, 2013, 12:28:14 AM
I do indeed have downloaded performances of the Bentoiu completions of nos 4 & 5,

I for one would be quite curious to hear these. Are they downloads of the free variety? >.>

Been looking through Enescu's worklist - http://imslp.org/wiki/List_of_works_by_George_Enescu - only 33 opus numbers (though presumably some of the much longer list of unpublished works have made their way into print by now) and "mature Enescu" doesn't really start until Op. 17. Though the earlier stuff is also very fine, just less characteristic. Somewhat of a shame to start discovering a composer and find that the 4 or 5 albums you already have are roughly 50% of his output. It could be worse (Dutilleux, Webern). I suppose his "rediscovery" in a big way will have to wait until his as-yet unpublished manuscripts enter the public domain in Romania circa 2026, unless someone wants to volunteer to smuggle them to Canada or New Zealand (Florestan???)

Still, I'm really liking everything I've heard (except the Romanian Rhapsodies, lol)—the Olympia set of orchestral works, Chamber Symphony, Octet, string quartets & piano quartets. Keeping an eye out now for good recordings of the Quintet & Violin & Cello Sonatas. And those unfinished works look really interesting, from a musicological point of view. Good candidate for "underappreciated" composer of the century lol
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: BrianSA on October 21, 2013, 06:40:39 PM
Ask and it shall be given...

No 4
 
http://www.mediafire.com/?qkwybj47hodrajh

No 5

http://www.mediafire.com/?zmfurcouy0e796x
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on October 21, 2013, 06:53:02 PM
They're also on YouTube if you experience MediaFire difficulties (I often do ::))!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 24, 2013, 04:02:16 AM
There is nothing for me to post about Enescu today, actually; so let's all talk about how great Stockhausen is, instead.  Can't get enough of that great, great, great man!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on October 24, 2013, 10:55:50 AM
There is nothing for me to post about Enescu today, actually; so let's all talk about how great Stockhausen is, instead.  Can't get enough of that great, great, great man!

I do hope you're joking, Karl! :-\
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on October 24, 2013, 02:01:22 PM
I do hope you're joking, Karl! :-\

Karl, I won't be able to sleep tonight unless you tell me what you said ain't true!!!!! You're driving me insane! ;D
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: amw on October 24, 2013, 04:26:44 PM
Ask and it shall be given...

No 4
 
http://www.mediafire.com/?qkwybj47hodrajh

No 5

http://www.mediafire.com/?zmfurcouy0e796x

Thanks! The downloads appear to have worked, presuming that my internet didn't fall into its occasional habit of deciding a file is smaller than it actually is and stopping the download halfway through, so I'll definitely take a listen.

There is nothing for me to post about Enescu today, actually; so let's all talk about how great Stockhausen is, instead.  Can't get enough of that great, great, great man!
When he was much younger, Karl tried to change his name to Karlheinz Stockhausen Henning out of admiration for the composer, but was forced to revert it due to lawsuit threats from the Stockhausen-Verlag. 100% absolutely true fact.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on October 30, 2013, 09:04:33 PM
Enescu fans rejoice! Lintu's cycle continues...

Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on September 14, 2015, 05:20:47 AM
Thought I would revive this thread since it's been two years since any activity. I bought many newer Enescu releases (the two CPO recordings with the completions of Symphonies 4 & 5, the complete violin/piano music and complete cello/piano music on Hanssler, and Lintu's Ondine series). Really looking forward to hearing these recordings. I have yet to listen to Lawrence Foster's traversal of Enescu on EMI or Erato. I need to get to these recordings soon.

Any news from anyone here? Anyone enjoying Enescu's music these days? I know ritter is quite a fan of his music and I owe much of his enthusiasm for this composer to my current rediscovery.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: pjme on September 23, 2015, 03:59:04 AM
I was recently in Bucharest and was able to attend one concert of the Enescu Festival:  Royal Liverpool PhO /Petrenko / Trpceski: Rachmaninov 3rd concerto and Enescu's Third symphony. Two impressive works in excellent performances!

Here is a short clip from that very concert on september 18th:

https://youtu.be/Ej3dGUusugM

And I did meet Florestan/Andrei! great guy.. who's busy being a father!

P.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Scion7 on September 23, 2015, 02:27:35 PM
Wow, that sounds like a very memorable experience!
My gf/sig other is Hungarian - we want to make a trip to Transylvania at some point.
Of course, that's a lot of $imolians to put down all at once.   :P
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: vandermolen on December 23, 2015, 02:09:30 PM
I read a review which compared Enescu's Fourth Symphony to that of Vaughan Williams, which greatly interested me. On first hearing it sounds nothing like Vaughan Williams and I was disappointed. However, I loved the darkly atmospheric and imaginative 'Autumn Clouds over the Forest' which is rather Baxian and worth having the CD for:

Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: mjwal on December 28, 2015, 03:53:10 AM
I too love some of what I have heard - the 3rd orchestral Suite "La villageoise" (Arte Nova); Oedipe (EMI); the amazing Vox Maris (an old performance by Rozdhestvensky I downloaded from somewhere); the two cello sonatas (Arte Nova) and two piano quartets (Chandos - the second of each pair much later than the first - a revealing contrast); Impressions d'enfance (Kremer Apex). The symphonies have for some reason - inferior performances on record? - not impressed me so much. My internal impression of 20th century music has been significantly modified - and enriched - by Enescu. I definitely need to hear more.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: ritter on December 28, 2015, 06:29:06 AM
I too love some of what I have heard - the 3rd orchestral Suite "La villageoise" (Arte Nova); Oedipe (EMI); the amazing Vox Maris (an old performance by Rozdhestvensky I downloaded from somewhere); the two cello sonatas (Arte Nova) and two piano quartets (Chandos - the second of each pair much later than the first - a revealing contrast); Impressions d'enfance (Kremer Apex). The symphonies have for some reason - inferior performances on record? - not impressed me so much. My internal impression of 20th century music has been significantly modified - and enriched - by Enescu. I definitely need to hear more.
That's a fine list of compositions you've posted, mjwal. Great to see you enjoy Enescu's music.

I would highlyrecoomend the Piano sonatas (No 3 particularly, No 2 not having ever been committed to paper by the composer--"it's all in my head" he's supposed to have said) and, as far as chamber music goes, the Piano quintet op. 29 is magnificent.

Cheers,
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Spineur on August 04, 2016, 08:55:56 AM
   Don't miss the superb EMI recording of Oedipe, a retelling of the Oedipus myth which is vastly different from the more familiar Stravinsky, and possibly the greatest opera you've never heard.
  It's a strange and haunting work,and absolutely mesmerizing.
  It's also his only opera, and one he worked on for many years.
  The cast includes Jose Van Dam as Oedipus, with Lawrence Foster,who has done so much to champion this composer's music.
  Despite his name,Foster is an American conductor of Romanian parentage.


I found this recording in my mailbox coming back from holidays and took a couple evening to listen to it.  It is indeed an extremely powerful and haunting opera.  I had forgotten how terrible a story Oedipe was.  And you get trap into an inescapable machinary to which there is no way out.  Oedipe fate, who never gets a chance to make a choice.  This preceeds Epicure who introduced the notion of "libre arbitre" (free choice) in European philosophy.

Anyway Enescu treats this tragedy with a lot of accuracy both through the text and his music.  The performance is superb as is the french diction which is cristal clear from.the begining to the end.  I never had to look at the libretto.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: listener on August 04, 2016, 09:10:53 AM
Symphony no. 1 is scheduled by the Vancouver (BC) S.O. October 1,2,3 this year.  Cristian Marcelaru is guest conducting.
http://www.vancouversymphony.ca/concert/16MUS01/
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: pjme on April 18, 2017, 12:57:04 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51trU4xWMHL._SY355_.jpg)

Found the cd for 1 euro at an Easter car boot sale. First listen to symphony nr 2. Almost 55 minutes. Made me think of "hypertrophied chamber music". The large, Straussian-orchestra very often gets shattered into smaller entities.
A difficult work that will take some time to discover & digest...

P.


 
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on April 18, 2017, 07:37:58 AM
I need to check some more out... just the Piano Qts.,... I've heard some great stuff...
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on April 18, 2017, 07:41:05 AM
Enescu is a composer that really hasn’t spoken to me yet, but I’m still trying. The only work I like right now is his Orchestral Suite No. 3, “Villageoise” and Rozhdestvensky recorded the best performance I’ve heard of this particular work.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: snyprrr on April 18, 2017, 01:37:52 PM
Enescu is a composer that really hasn’t spoken to me yet, but I’m still trying. The only work I like right now is his Orchestral Suite No. 3, “Villageoise” and Rozhdestvensky recorded the best performance I’ve heard of this particular work.

Don't like Violin Sonata 3? How can't one? But I agree otherwise, a lot of Enescu seemed pretty Individualistic to me, and his melodies are mostly just not up my alley. But, when he becomes "pure music time", then he can be mysterious... I think it's the Piano Quartet 2 I'm thinking about, maybe the Quintet...

Boy, I tell ya, CPO and Chandos have YOUR number, buddy ;)... Ondine... tsk tsk :laugh:
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Mirror Image on April 18, 2017, 05:31:38 PM
Don't like Violin Sonata 3? How can't one? But I agree otherwise, a lot of Enescu seemed pretty Individualistic to me, and his melodies are mostly just not up my alley. But, when he becomes "pure music time", then he can be mysterious... I think it's the Piano Quartet 2 I'm thinking about, maybe the Quintet...

Boy, I tell ya, CPO and Chandos have YOUR number, buddy ;)... Ondine... tsk tsk :laugh:

I’ll need to go back and listen to the Violin Sonata No. 3. Anyway, right now, Enescu isn’t a priority, but I’m sure I’ll swing back around to him at some point in the future.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Turner on October 01, 2017, 12:01:27 AM
My Enescu collection is a mixture of LPs - mainly Romanian ones - and CDs. Needless to say I don´t know all the music yet. There´s also a digital copy of "Oedipe" (including that strange Sphinx-scene) and the Piano Quintet, plus some scattered further recordings too.
I don´t have all the piano music or the earliest student symphonies, but that´s OK. The piano quartets probably also have better recordings elsewhere.

Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Turner on October 01, 2017, 12:02:42 AM
One of the most interesting items as regards historical recordings is an Everest LP with Lipatti and Enescu himself playing Violin Sonatas 2+3 - unusually moody and temperamental. There´s also a Constantin Silvestri recording of the Chamber Symphony.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SymphonicAddict on October 01, 2017, 01:25:16 PM
The String octet is one of his best creations. Passionate music of high caliber.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on October 01, 2017, 01:37:22 PM
The String octet is one of his best creations. Passionate music of high caliber.

+1 A truly remarkable work.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: SymphonicAddict on October 01, 2017, 02:29:16 PM
+1 A truly remarkable work.

I fell in love with it two months ago. How I had not heard it before!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on October 01, 2017, 02:41:50 PM
I fell in love with it two months ago. How I had not heard it before!

Interesting - I just heard it for the first time about two months ago as well ;D After listening I thought "what have I been missing all my life?"
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: vandermolen on October 01, 2017, 09:09:03 PM
Interesting - I just heard it for the first time about two months ago as well ;D After listening I thought "what have I been missing all my life?"
Must investigate this one!
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Rhymenoceros on October 09, 2017, 11:41:27 AM
I came across his Suite No. 2 in D, Op. 10 the other day.  I love the Bourree!  Keep playing it on repeat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=17m25s&v=N76nJzjUh8s&feature=youtu.be&app=desktop
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Florestan on November 06, 2017, 07:21:53 AM
got favorite romanian rhapsodies recordings?

Im(ns)ho, this is the best RR1 on record.

https://www.youtube.com/watch/v/fwxuMDxT9Dw
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Parsifal on November 26, 2017, 04:28:53 PM
Listened to the first symphony for the first time in a number of years. Not a long work but surprisingly hard to keep my bearings in the music. Themes tend to be introduced within an intricate texture and gradually evolve, never to be restated literally. I can’t imagine it would be easy to encounter this music for the first time at a concert and come away with a clear conception.

It strikes me Enescu had an eclectic set of influences, but the overall impression I get is French, such as Dukas or Chaussons, with some Brahms mixed in. The most impesssive thing about it was s the mastery of orchestration and the sophisticated harmonic progressions created.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kyjo on November 26, 2017, 05:00:30 PM
Yeah, I get the impression that much of Enescu's music is a bit too complex and eclectic for its own good. But, ironically, I find his ever-popular Romanian Rhapsody no. 1 to be a bit too simplistic! That said, he's still an interesting composer and I intend to explore his output further.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Florestan on November 27, 2017, 01:24:47 AM
I find his ever-popular Romanian Rhapsody no. 1 to be a bit too simplistic!

I don't think he meant it to be particularly complex. Take some catchy tunes (which are almost literal folkloric quotations), orchestrate them sumptuously and assemble them in a romp. The perfect concert opener, or encore.  :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Parsifal on November 27, 2017, 08:22:14 AM
Strange thing is, I listened to this piece (the First Symphony) more than ten years ago and remember being positively impressed. Now I can't imagine why. Now, having listened to the first movement five times (I think) I find nothing thematically memorable besides the opening statement by brass, which recurs in the central section and at the end. Other than that it seems like transitional movement with nothing to transition to. A sequence of bridges to nowhere. The use of orchestra is impressive, but in the service of what?

Wondering if I should listen to the second symphony or cut my losses.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: kishnevi on November 27, 2017, 08:44:36 AM
Strange thing is, I listened to this piece (the First Symphony) more than ten years ago and remember being positively impressed. Now I can't imagine why. Now, having listened to the first movement five times (I think) I find nothing thematically memorable besides the opening statement by brass, which recurs in the central section and at the end. Other than that it seems like transitional movement with nothing to transition to. A sequence of bridges to nowhere. The use of orchestra is impressive, but in the service of what?

Wondering if I should listen to the second symphony or cut my losses.

I gave the Chandos set a re-listen last week.  I liked all three better the second time around, but the First seemed the weakest.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Parsifal on November 27, 2017, 08:48:25 AM
I gave the Chandos set a re-listen last week.  I liked all three better the second time around, but the First seemed the weakest.

I think I also listened to all three years ago. Maybe my positive memories come from the second and third. Will give them a try, at least.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Florestan on November 27, 2017, 08:53:04 AM
All I remember from the 1st is finding the last movement too long. Just when you think it's over, another idea pops up, and this happens several times. With Haydn it works, though.  :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Parsifal on November 27, 2017, 09:02:26 AM
All I remember from the 1st is finding the last movement too long. Just when you think it's over, another idea pops up, and this happens several times. With Haydn it works, though.  :)

The finale of the first has the advantage of sounding like Brahms 3rd at the opening. That's all I remember of it, having listened yesterday. :)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: ritter on November 28, 2017, 04:02:10 AM
All I remember from the 1st is finding the last movement too long. Just when you think it's over, another idea pops up, and this happens several times. With Haydn it works, though.  :)
I am a great fan of Enescu (particularly his later works), but....he does have a tendency to extend the final movements of his works unnecessarily (at least, I see it so   :-[). I get this impression in, for instance, the Third Piano Sonata op. 24 - 3, and the Piano Quintet op. 29 (two works I admire very much). In both works, when you've thought the closing movements have come to an end, and that the thematic material has been exhausted, the music restarts, and we get into a sort of long-winded coda that seems to last forever and really does not add anything new. The end effect is that the formal balance of these works is (slightly) distorted.

You feel like screaming "Stop! You've nothing more to say here"!" at notre cher Georges.  ::)
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Florestan on November 28, 2017, 04:04:36 AM
I am a great fan of Enescu (particularly his later works), but....he does have a tendency to extend the final movements of his works unnecessarily (at least, I see it so   :-[). I get this impression in, for instance, the Third Piano Sonata op. 24 - 3, and the Piano Quintet op. 29 (two works I admire very much). In both works, when you've thought the closing movements have come to an end, and that the thematic material has been exhausted, the music restarts, and we get into a sort of long-winded coda that seems to last forever and really does not add anything new. The end effect is that the formal balance of these works is (slightly distorted).

You feel like screaming "Stop! You've nothing more to say here"!" at notre cher Georges.  ::)

Exactly.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: Parsifal on November 28, 2017, 08:25:45 AM
Still trying to recover my love of Enescu. If Symphony No 2 doesn't work the only path forward will be what I consider the three main works, the Chamber Symphony, the Decet and the Nonet.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: ritter on November 29, 2017, 12:18:22 AM
Still trying to recover my love of Enescu. If Symphony No 2 doesn't work the only path forward will be what I consider the three main works, the Chamber Symphony, the Decet and the Nonet.
Those are three great pieces IMHO...but I recommend the Piano Quintet op. 29 as well. Enescu at the top of his game (despite the wayward last movement).

Regards,

Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: amw on November 29, 2017, 12:57:48 AM
By my count (people will put the beginning of the coda at different places) the coda to the finale of the Piano Quintet lasts 128 bars, beginning with a deceptive cadence (no.57 in the Salabert score) which manages to hold off resolution until the tonic 6/4 finally arrives at 4 after no.64, and is then prolonged for 53 bars until finally cadencing onto a 15-bar tonic pedal that ends the piece. Also the dynamic level is fff for most of that time.

Another notable offender is the Violin Sonata No.3, which ends with a 72-bar tonic pedal (sometimes implied). Given how long he spent working on these pieces, Enescu must have been convinced that conclusions of great length were necessary to balance the works, but it's hard to hear why.
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: ritter on November 29, 2017, 02:00:22 AM
By my count (people will put the beginning of the coda at different places) the coda to the finale of the Piano Quintet lasts 128 bars, beginning with a deceptive cadence (no.57 in the Salabert score) which manages to hold off resolution until the tonic 6/4 finally arrives at 4 after no.64, and is then prolonged for 53 bars until finally cadencing onto a 15-bar tonic pedal that ends the piece. Also the dynamic level is fff for most of that time.

Another notable offender is the Violin Sonata No.3, which ends with a 72-bar tonic pedal (sometimes implied). Given how long he spent working on these pieces, Enescu must have been convinced that conclusions of great length were necessary to balance the works, but it's hard to hear why.
Very interesting, amw. Many thanks!

As you say, it is hard to hear why Enescu felt the need to have these conclusions drag on and on (and, yes, the fact that in the Quintet it's almost constantly at fff makes it even more unnerving). The real pity is that earlier in the movement, he transition between its two sections (or is it actually two movements played attacca?) is IMHO nothing short of magical. A long rising arch, slightly crescendo, with shimmering textures form the strings and with the piano meandering in the background. The thematic material is only tentatively exposed, to then be stated triumphantly by all the instruments. Stunning!

It's at the beginning of this video:

https://www.youtube.com/v/BimxfuaSn1I
Title: Re: Georges Enescu
Post by: ritter on July 27, 2018, 01:23:07 AM
Cross-posted from the New Releases thread:

Talking about Enescu, this certainly is new (announced for September):


Strigoii (“Ghosts”) is a fragmentary oratorio from 1916, “restored, rebuild (sic), orchestrated and prepared” by Gabriel Bebeșelea, on a text by Mihai Eminescu. The CD includes another rarity, the Pastorale-Fantaisie pour petit orchestre.