GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => General Classical Music Discussion => Topic started by: DavidW on July 14, 2009, 07:39:17 AM

Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 14, 2009, 07:39:17 AM
There seem to be two different approaches to the listening thread.  One is to do thread duty and let people know what you are currently listening to.  The other is to discuss what you're listening to.  Due to the high traffic on the thread latter is buried or ends up with replies separated by pages and pages.  I thought we might try something different.  If you want to post your thoughts and discuss them with others over current listening, reading or whatever is on your mind, post it here and it won't vanish.  You can then more easily talk about things with other posters.  I'll kick it off.

This morning I was listening to (from the Bernstein Mahler Columbia reissue) the interviews of performers that personally knew Mahler.  There is one thing that struck me in particular as interesting, and that is how particular he was about artistic choices depending on his mood.  He would even change employment of instruments from day to day as a result of that!  Being sensitive to mood he would conduct works differently, and didn't just have one style.  He might take Beethoven's 5th or a Schumann symphony with an angry, stormy passion but play a Schubert symphony or Beethoven's 6th with exuberant joy.  They even went so far as to contrast his approach to Beethoven's 6th with Toscanini, who "was clearly just waiting for the Storm". :D  That is one thing that I think is an issue with many conductors today (or perhaps always, how do I know?) is that they take too uniform of an approach to music.  Take Pinnock, his approach to Bach, Vivaldi etc seems the same whether it be a fast movement, a slow movement, German music, Italian music etc



----------------
Now playing: Hob. III:48 String Quartet Op. 50 No. 5  mvt. 2   
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on July 14, 2009, 10:00:51 AM
DavidW, I salute you, Sir. This is exactly the sort of place to put these thoughts as they arise from our listening; not set in stone, but of more than passing interest. Furthermore, I enjoyed reading your post and I don't believe I've ever significantly considered the extent to which composers may have conducted their work differently. I find myself wondering how Elgar was in this respect, and can't answer it myself by listening because I don't own any alternative recorded performances. Just the one, of each. And I can't recall, in all my reading, whether anyone has recorded their impressions of differing approaches he might have adopted. I may have to read all my Elgar books again.  :o

On a completely different tack, may I use this excellent new thread to record my own musings this lunchtime? This, copied over from the listening thread where it will, as you say, soon disappear without trace. Here goes:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410X1ZJN1FL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

I listened to this while eating lunch. This is the bargain I bought from Hyperion, which caused Lethe to issue timely warnings about the dangers of collecting light English music that no one else wants. When I was about 17 I'd have loved this - like finding an hour's worth of extra music from the Wasps suite that I didn't know about. I'd have dreamed dreams of cricket on the village green, white cumuli scudding over the downs, the watercolour landscape vision of England.

And sure it's still pleasant enough, but these days a little of it goes a long way, and I couldn't really give it my attention for long without drifting off somewhere - though to do it justice, it did keep pulling me back from time to time when a new piece started, and a new tune popped up. So why, I ask myself, would I want to listen to a Vaughan Williams derivative, instead of Vaughan Williams himself? Well, the dark side (which admittedly must be faced) doesn't have to be faced all the time. Sometimes I want Trumpton and Camberwick Green just to cut myself a bit of slack. But there's a bigger question here, to do with the changes that take place in us as we grow older, and the unrealistic tug that pulls backwards towards the less cynical times of our youth. And it's not just Gibbs with his watered-down Vaughan-Williamsism that's in question for me right now, but the whole of sprawling expressionistic formless 'romanticism' that seems a bit tiresome, and I find myself wondering, soaked in Handel as I am these days: 'If it can't be said in a 5 minute da capo aria (or 10 minutes if you must), is it really worth saying at all?'

I know this is a terrible thing to say, and yes I am the chap who used to listen to The Ring complete on four successive nights and still thought it too short, but that was a long time ago. I can't decide whether I know better now, whether I know worse now, or whether I just know differently. Or whether I'll wake up tomorrow and find it was all a dream.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: knight66 on July 14, 2009, 12:06:46 PM
I will join in when I get back home, I am being timed out here in Sunny Carlisle, North of England.

Mike
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on July 14, 2009, 12:22:24 PM
(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/034571172866.png)

Have you heard this?

http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/al.asp?al=CDA67286&f=handel%20coronation%20george (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/al.asp?al=CDA67286&f=handel%20coronation%20george)

Just found it on the Hyperion website, and I'm listening to the large number of samples (about 20 minutes' worth) - King's recreation of the Coronation of George II. Blimey! Bells, drums, shouts, trumpets, fanfares, thrilling choral singing - this is Handel at full pelt, taking no prisoners. I'm not much of a monarchist really, but this takes the biscuit, and my goodness, to have been there, with all this going on, must have been utterly awesome. I mean, just listening to the samples is hugely entertaining, and I'm very tempted to buy one of these just so I can march around the living room with an imaginary drum. Or maybe a real drum, neighbours permitting.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 14, 2009, 02:02:10 PM
It's an interesting disc, based on the clips (if Paulb sees this I'm doomed >:D ) it veers from bombastic to sublime, and the different composers work well with each other, there is unity to the music even though there are multiple composers.  I was a bit embarrassed though when they started King George! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on July 14, 2009, 10:55:37 PM
there is unity to the music even though there are multiple composers.

I thought so too. The seemingly coherent ebb and flow of the thing is remarkable, really.

I know what you mean about the 'King George' stuff, but one of the advantages of hindsight is to be able to see all this in its cultural context; we can watch and enjoy without subscribing - like enjoying ancient Egyptian art without believing in the divinity of the Pharaoh.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on July 15, 2009, 06:17:13 AM
I've been saturating myself with Shostakovich's Fourth Symphony over the last week or so, having checked out the score from the library.  One thing I've found about my recording, the old Ormandy/Philadelphia one, is that as good as it is it's not perfect.  I had guessed that this 1963 record was a little murky-sounding, but there were lots of things in the score that I hadn't even heard!  And Ormandy, surprisingly, gets some of the tempo relationships wrong, although without the score you'd never have guessed.

But what has always angered me about that recording (I have it on a vinyl reprint from the '70s) are the program notes.  Credited to one David Johnson, they reveal an astounding lack of sympathy for not just this symphony but all radical contemporary music.  Most egregious is this statement about the first movement: "Thematic transformation, or the constructing of new themes out of old ones, is also avoided."  Multiple hearings had convinced me that Mr. Johnson didn't know what he was talking about, and the score makes it crystal clear that he was dead wrong.  All the musical material in that movement starts from either the sardonic opening theme or the nostalgic second theme.

Another strong impression from the score is how easy it was to read.  Shostakovich liked pure orchestral colors, not blends, so you don't have a lot of the divided strings or three-lines-on-a-part passages like you find in Mahler and R. Strauss; it's pretty much one, or two at the most, lines of music per staff, and everything lines up really nicely on the printed page.  That makes it far easier to read than, say, the Mahler symphonies or the Strauss tone poems, both of which I love but are not the easiest thing in the world for a score-reader to read through. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 06:19:48 AM
Delighted that you have made this enriched acquaintance with the Opus 43, jo!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 15, 2009, 07:00:16 AM
Jo, that was my first recording of the 4th and it does not disappoint.  I find that it actually had better sound than most of those essential classics as well.  Not spectacular but good enough.  Alot of forumites (well at least back then) were highly dissatisfied with Ormandy's interpretations of pretty much anything.  I don't know why, I think he is a fantastic conductor.  His Sibelius for example just opened up the music for me!

One thing I've heard attributed to the 4th is that it's the closest to being Mahlerian.  I never really understood that.  In sheer length maybe?  It's not exactly hysterical like a Mahler symphony would be.  Is it in the harmony?  Or maybe a just a melody? ???

Anyway is that David Johnson are David Johnson?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 07:16:52 AM
I've been saturating myself with Shostakovich's Fourth Symphony over the last week or so, having checked out the score from the library.  One thing I've found about my recording, the old Ormandy/Philadelphia one, is that as good as it is it's not perfect.  I had guessed that this 1963 record was a little murky-sounding, but there were lots of things in the score that I hadn't even heard!

Emphasis mine; q. for t.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 15, 2009, 08:24:02 AM
Jo, that was my first recording of the 4th and it does not disappoint.  I find that it actually had better sound than most of those essential classics as well.  Not spectacular but good enough.  Alot of forumites (well at least back then) were highly dissatisfied with Ormandy's interpretations of pretty much anything.  I don't know why, I think he is a fantastic conductor.  His Sibelius for example just opened up the music for me!
Is that the Japanese RCA Sibelius stuff that ArkivMusic is reissuing, or another recording?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 15, 2009, 08:37:29 AM
Is that the Japanese RCA Sibelius stuff that ArkivMusic is reissuing, or another recording?

Oh no nothing exotic, just essential classics.  That was back when every cd I bought by literally walking down to Tower Records. :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on July 15, 2009, 08:46:03 AM
I've been saturating myself with Shostakovich's Fourth Symphony over the last week or so, having checked out the score from the library.  One thing I've found about my recording, the old Ormandy/Philadelphia one, is that as good as it is it's not perfect.  I had guessed that this 1963 record was a little murky-sounding, but there were lots of things in the score that I hadn't even heard!  And Ormandy, surprisingly, gets some of the tempo relationships wrong, although without the score you'd never have guessed.

The Fourth is probably my favorite Shostakovich symphony at the moment, especially after hearing two blazing live performances of it in the last few years: first with Andrey Boreyko making his debut with the New York Philharmonic, and then with Haitink and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.  And interestingly, in the Boreyko evening, which was part of a series called "Inside the Music," it emerged that Shostakovich himself thought the Fourth might be finer than any of the symphonies that came afterward.  (I'm not necessarily agreeing, just reporting.  ;D)  

Last year Haitink and the CSO then released a recording taped from their concerts in Chicago, which I thought was one of the best recordings of 2008.  Both the performance and the sound quality (on CSO-Resound) are stunning.  I have yet to hear the Ormandy/Philadelphia one, but if you are looking for another version, I can't recommend this one highly enough.

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on July 15, 2009, 08:52:13 AM
first with Andrey Boreyko making his debut with the New York Philharmonic, and .  And interestingly, in the Boreyko evening, which was part of a series called "Inside the Music," it emerged that Shostakovich himself thought the Fourth might be finer than any of the symphonies that came afterward.  (I'm not necessarily agreeing, just reporting.  ;D)  

Bruce, as we have discussed before, Boreyko is returning for a guest conductor performance with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, for Shostakovich's 10th in the 2009/10 season.  I can't wait!  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on July 15, 2009, 08:54:04 AM
Bruce, as we have discussed before, Boreyko is returning for a guest conductor performance with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, for Shostakovich's 10th in the 2009/10 season.  I can't wait!  :)

That's right!  Yowza, you are in for a treat...

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 08:54:44 AM
Last year Haitink and the CSO then released a recording taped from their concerts in Chicago, which I thought was one of the best recordings of 2008.  Both the performance and the sound quality (on CSO-Resound) are stunning.  I have yet to hear the Ormandy/Philadelphia one, but if you are looking for another version, I can't recommend this one highly enough.

That disc is certainly on the wish list, Bruce;  I am only waiting for some slight increase in the revenue stream  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 08:55:17 AM
That's right!  Yowza, you are in for a treat...

Worth a trip up to the 'peg, eh, Bruce?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on July 15, 2009, 08:56:01 AM
Worth a trip up to the 'peg, eh, Bruce?

Bring a parka!  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on July 15, 2009, 08:57:26 AM
That disc is certainly on the wish list, Bruce;  I am only waiting for some slight increase in the revenue stream  8)

(I'll keep my eyes open for a used one at Academy.  ;))

Worth a trip up to the 'peg, eh, Bruce?

It definitely would be!   8)  "Will Travel For No. 10"  ;D

(And I love cold weather, so not a problem...)

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 08:57:51 AM
 ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 15, 2009, 09:46:06 AM
Bruce, as we have discussed before, Boreyko is returning for a guest conductor performance with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, for Shostakovich's 10th in the 2009/10 season.  I can't wait!  :)
JEALOUS! How much are plane tickets to Winnipeg these days?  :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on July 15, 2009, 09:56:58 AM
AND...just looked at the rest of the program--excellent!

Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra
Andrey Boreyko, conductor
Gwen Hoebig, violin

Rimsky-Korsakov: Russian Easter Overture
Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No. 2
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10

And actually the entire season is pretty impressive.  Mickelthwaite is offering some unusual programming, including a 7-night contemporary music festival in February, in addition to better-known fare like Beethoven's Missa Solemnis and Haydn's The Creation.

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 10:00:34 AM
Great program! Road-trip!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 15, 2009, 10:01:52 AM
AND...just looked at the rest of the program--excellent!

Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra
Andrey Boreyko, conductor
Gwen Hoebig, violin

Rimsky-Korsakov: Russian Easter Overture
Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No. 2
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10
Wow ... what day was this again?  ;D ;D

EDIT: Rice professor alert! Looks like Cho-Liang Lin is opening the WSO season with the Sibelius concerto in a really terrific program!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on July 15, 2009, 10:03:58 AM
The concerts are Feb. 19 and 20.  We should have a "GMG Meet-Up!"  (And/or, storm Ray's house.  ;D)

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 15, 2009, 10:05:59 AM
The concerts are Feb. 19 and 20.  We should have a "GMG Meet-Up!"  (And/or, storm Ray's house.  ;D)

--Bruce
Maybe I'll pilfer his Ormandy/Shostakovich CDs while we're there.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 10:06:46 AM
While we're plying him with Stoli!  :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 15, 2009, 10:09:21 AM
Wow, Ray, the WSO season looks terrific. I'd happily go to just about every concert! And there's even a great kids' program narrated by Lemony Snicket, called "Who Killed the Composer?" in which every orchestra member is a suspect ... adorable!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 15, 2009, 10:16:45 AM
Had to be the second bassoonist!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on July 15, 2009, 10:40:24 AM
...One thing I've heard attributed to the 4th is that it's the closest to being Mahlerian.  I never really understood that.  In sheer length maybe?  It's not exactly hysterical like a Mahler symphony would be.  Is it in the harmony?  Or maybe a just a melody? ???
It's more in the overall construction and his methods of theme development.  The orchestra is actually very Mahlerian in size and proportion, and the first movement follows a Mahlerian version of sonta-allegro form.  Other Mahler-like touches include the third movement's opening funeral march and the bird calls from high clarinet and solo violin in the first movement.  Its ending is very like the ending of Das Lied von der Erde, even down to the celesta arpeggios.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on July 15, 2009, 01:09:27 PM
Maybe I'll pilfer his Ormandy/Shostakovich CDs while we're there.  ;D

B, you'll have to wait until I pilfer the copy from the Library first.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on July 15, 2009, 01:14:34 PM
And actually the entire season is pretty impressive.  Mickelthwaite is offering some unusual programming, including a 7-night contemporary music festival in February, in addition to better-known fare like Beethoven's Missa Solemnis and Haydn's The Creation.

--Bruce

The WSO's New Music Festival is popular, especially by some of the younger audience, which is a great thing!  Some of the music isn't necessarily "brand new" per se, but music that hasn't been performed in Winnipeg before (ie. Messaien's Turangilia Symphony last year).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 15, 2009, 03:43:42 PM
It's more in the overall construction and his methods of theme development.  The orchestra is actually very Mahlerian in size and proportion, and the first movement follows a Mahlerian version of sonta-allegro form.  Other Mahler-like touches include the third movement's opening funeral march and the bird calls from high clarinet and solo violin in the first movement.  Its ending is very like the ending of Das Lied von der Erde, even down to the celesta arpeggios.

Thanks for the insight, with that in mind I'll give the symphony a fresh listen! :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 17, 2009, 06:29:47 AM
Well I'm not really into the Wuorinen (that I recently purchased).  SQ #2 is not bad, in fact I like the first movement, that goofy tune amused me and following it's transformation and splitting across the movement is pretty neat.  But that's still not a gut emotional reaction to the music.

I didn't know if it was an anti-contemporary music, not in the mood, my time of the month, I have a headache sort of reaction ;D so I popped in Carter string quartets, but that music was so powerful, tense, driven so I don't know.  But I feel like there is no tension in Wuorinen's music, nor is it really rhythmically driven.

How does one get into and enjoy the new music anyway?  I still can't help but think that it's my failing.  My listening gear needs to be recalibrated as Karl would say.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 17, 2009, 11:43:07 AM
I'm going to pull a Paulb and say that Wuorinen's music is growing on me, I'll take back what I said before.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on July 17, 2009, 12:08:34 PM
How does one get into and enjoy the new music anyway?  I still can't help but think that it's my failing.  My listening gear needs to be recalibrated as Karl would say.

Noticed your three posts on Wuorinen and Carter, and I'd offer one small friendly correction: replacing the word "failing" with something like "unfamiliarity with the language."  If you are exploring, to me that is hardly failing, it's just...exploring!

When I was baffled by Carter--and I've been a contemporary music fan for some 40 years--I decided to take just one piece and listen to it over and over.  To make the exercise easy, I chose a short one, Esprit Rude/Esprit Doux (1984) for flute and clarinet, just 4 minutes long.  I'd heard it live once, maybe twice, but just didn't get it.  So I listened to it once, twice, four times, ten times...and somehow, finally, it just "clicked."

There must be something in the brain that begins to make sense out of complex systems after awhile, if a listener a) is exposed to them in a healthy dose, and b) keeps an open mind to allow reactions to occur in whatever way they happen, without passing judgement.  (PS, I am reading a book chosen specifically because it may shed some light on this process, called Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation by David Huron.) 

Just your second reaction to the Wuorinen is, to me, a sign that something happened in your head that helped you make some sense out of the piece, even if you have no idea what that is at the moment.

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on July 17, 2009, 04:16:03 PM
Strangely, I have never actually heard any of Wuorinen's music.  I think I'm going to have to remedy that lack ASAP! ;D

My next score-study project: Mahler 6. :D I've read through the first movement and Scherzo.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 17, 2009, 04:31:01 PM
That's good advise Bruce, I'm doing just that now (well earlier today and soon later this evening).  I've narrowed my focus to just SQ #2.  It's opening up more for me.  I guess I just got too cocky about feeling like I would warm up to a piece with one careful listen, this is not Clementi here! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on July 17, 2009, 04:43:01 PM
I guess I just got too cocky about feeling like I would warm up to a piece with one careful listen, this is not Clementi here! :D

Sometimes that happens--a piece strikes you immediately on first hearing, and it's good to be open to that possibility--but sometimes it takes more time.  I have yet to warm up to Milton Babbitt, although I'm cracking the code to a few of his pieces.  A composer friend helped me by drawing a diagram on a napkin: a square filled with dozens of squiggly lines.  He said, "You don't need to start at any specific point, just enter the square and the (musical) lines wherever you want."  Somehow that really helped.  It released me from having to experience Babbitt the same way he or anyone else did.  (Which of course, is really true for experiencing the work of any composer.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 23, 2009, 08:24:30 PM
BEETHOVEN | Symphony No 7

Performed by whom, you might ask? Good question. First I did back-to-back movement-by-movement auditions of John Eliot Gardiner and Christopher Hogwood, first playing Gardiner's take on each movement and then Hogwood's. Kind of an interesting experience having everything repeated. Gardiner's performance is with a bigger band in much more "present" sound, but I found that, when I cranked the volume up for Hogwood, it did indeed reveal a more individual, colorfully period-instrument sound. The problem was that I also felt in Hogwood as if there was a rather rustic, rough-and-ready touch: the orchestral details that get highlighted often seem to be accidental, as if the horn player just spontaneously decided to pipe up or the oboes just felt like getting their spunk on for a minute. Gardiner's orchestra is a polished, professional group, no doubt about it. But I think my previous inclination toward Gardiner was not really a product of his life-force really so much as the fact that the recording doesn't require a volume jolt.

Now, however, I've put on a third recording of the Seventh. It is one I have championed here before, but since have gone several months without listening to it. The big question: was it anything as good as I remembered?

The answer is, unequivocally, yes. Thomas Dausgaard's recording with the Swedish Chamber Orchestra is a "HIP Hybrid" - olden stylings on modern instruments. And it is stunning. The funny thing about this recording is that after I listened to it once, back in March, it instantly adopted a mythical status in my brain. Since then I have returned each time with some skepticism, as if it can't be so, or I must have just been in a particular mood. Why the doubt? Not sure. This listen has been just as riveting as the prior ones: music-making that totally bankrupts my ability to throw adjectives at it. It is big, bold, driven, powerful, propulsive, intimate, chamber-like, immediate, it's in my room here with me; it's charming, stern, eternal, mortal, alive, fantastical, earthy, and, if I can use the word again, mythical. That's a soup of contradictions. But this performance is no soup of contradictions.

When I first posted about it here, I used a phrase that may have hinted at what I'm trying and failing spectacularly to say. Here it is: listening to this Dausgaard recording of the Beethoven Seventh, I really feel not merely as if I am listening to this music for the first time - but as if it is being played for the first time.

The timpani is pounding out the big drum rolls in the third movement trio right now. And now the bass' last line before the scherzo explodes back onto the scene - strictly in tempo. This music is alive. Wow.

DISCLAIMER: This was written after midnight, so it may contain fancies and flights of purple prose.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on July 23, 2009, 11:31:06 PM
listening to this Dausgaard recording of the Beethoven Seventh, I really feel not merely as if I am listening to this music for the first time - but as if it is being played for the first time.

That's a perfect description of how I felt when I listened to Immerseel's 5th a couple of days ago.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 24, 2009, 04:43:13 AM
BEETHOVEN | Symphony No 7 [....]

Outstanding contribution, Brian!

The Seventh was an instant favorite . . . and then, from time to time I would hear a recording broadcast on the radio, and I'd think, How can they suck all the juice out of this great piece, like that?

Incidentally, I am a little nonplussed at all the love the Fifth is not getting these days . . . but it's another piece I have an ineradicable sentimental attachment to;  first I knew of it was not the ta-ta-ta-TAA 'Fate' bit, but—curiously—the last movement, which we played in transcription in my junior high band (heavily edited, it must have been, of course).  So the Opus 67 has always been joy and energy, to me.

The other (much later) sentimental tie to the Fifth is:

At Wooster, each year we had an end-of-year drop-the-needle test (somewhere, I may possibly still have the run-down of the required listening for each year . . . essentially, a list of "what pieces from the literature would it be a complete embarrassment to send a music graduate out into the world, without his familiarization?").  Needless to say, we music majors in general (and we hot music jocks in particular) couldn't be bothered to do any more than 'remedial' listening to the list (you see Mendelssohn's 'Italian', and you check it right off, e.g.)

For the test, you were played a minute (I think) of each, and you were asked to identify (1) piece, (2) composer, (3) genre, and (4) period.  And if recollection serves, if you correctly identified genre and period for all ten, and perhaps piece and/or composer for at least half, you passed (reasonably easy threshold, which was another reason not to invest more time than strictly necessary in the listening lab).  Nonetheless, as easy as a 'pass' would be to earn, there was a geeky contingent among us who would scorn any of the others who missed a piece ident (all in fun).

The list for Freshman year was especially cake-ish, so my buddy (fellow composition student) Wayne and I probably did next to zero listening;  and true to expectations, as we sat down to the test, piece by piece went by which were an effortless breeze to identify.

Except one.  It was slow and quiet, nothing stood out as a telltale identifier.  Wayne and I glanced at one another, we were each puzzled.  Then there was a crescendo, and the teacher pulled off the needle just before the big chord at the downbeat—and both Wayne's pencil and mine sprang to the page in at-last-knowledgeable relief.  For that chord that we just missed hearing, we both knew for the fortissimo C major chord at the start of the fourth movement of the Beethoven Fifth.

And we both really enjoyed the teacher's coy tricksiness in playing such an obscure passage from such an obviously well-known work.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on July 24, 2009, 07:08:21 AM
The answer is, unequivocally, yes. Thomas Dausgaard's recording with the Swedish Chamber Orchestra

The entire cycle sounds (reads rather, I haven't heard any of it) great. Most of the discs are rated 10/10 at the Hurwitzer's place. But this slight slight has me worried (because I love the horn):

The horns, so important in this music, are not so forward as they are in recordings by Wand, Bernstein, and Barenboim (and this tells at the end of the first movement), but you do hear them play entire tunes (including the first movement's main theme) when they get them, not just "highlights", as with the Berlin Philharmonic under Karajan or Abbado.

So, Brian, are the horns really that backward in the mix (I'm a huge fan of Barenboim's recording)? Something I should worry about?

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on July 24, 2009, 07:48:52 AM
Incidentally, I am a little nonplussed at all the love the Fifth is not getting these days . . .

Overexposure? Familiarity breeds contempt? I know when I want to hear a Beethoven symphony I'm more likely to play 2, 4 or 8 rather than 5, 6, 7, 9. I can still enjoy them but seldom feel the need to listen: maybe I've heard them once too often? Especially the Fifth, which is drilled into all our heads from infancy  ;D  The Eroica never grows old, though...perhaps because that was the one symphony I struggled with for so long.

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 24, 2009, 07:51:49 AM
Overexposure? Familiarity breeds contempt?

Bet you're right there, Sarge.  Happily, the Opus 67 is fiery enough, that it's one piece WCRB (the soundtrack to dentists' waiting rooms in Boston) never overplays  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on July 24, 2009, 07:54:33 AM
Happily, the Opus 67 is fiery enough, that it's one piece WCRB (the soundtrack to dentists' waiting rooms in Boston) never overplays  8)

 ;D :D ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 24, 2009, 11:42:59 AM
The entire cycle sounds (reads rather, I haven't heard any of it) great. Most of the discs are rated 10/10 at the Hurwitzer's place. But this slight slight has me worried (because I love the horn):

The horns, so important in this music, are not so forward as they are in recordings by Wand, Bernstein, and Barenboim (and this tells at the end of the first movement), but you do hear them play entire tunes (including the first movement's main theme) when they get them, not just "highlights", as with the Berlin Philharmonic under Karajan or Abbado.

So, Brian, are the horns really that backward in the mix (I'm a huge fan of Barenboim's recording)? Something I should worry about?

Sarge
Ah, good, an excuse to listen again.  ;D

The horns sound like they're in the back, to be sure, but they're also dead center in the 'sound picture'. This is a chamber orchestra, and really their part, like everyone else's, is crystal clear - one feels like, with this size ensemble and this recording, one can hear everything. Just putting on Barenboim for comparison - the big capping horn call at the very end of the movement is definitely more of a standout on Barenboim's, but that's really about it.

For what it's worth, Barenboim is a favorite of mine too. Absolutely love his cycle - would have to take both Barenboim and a HIPster to my desert island, though.  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 27, 2009, 03:00:44 AM
Well I made my way through the box set of Handel's orchestral works performed by Pinnock and the English Concert in record time, about a week.  Every morning I ended up starting it with one of the cds in the set.  It was an inexpensive way to hear some great works again.  The set is mostly concerned with Handel's Water Music, Music for the Royal Fireworks and the Op 6 Concertos.  Some might disagree, but I feel that they are great works even if are not at the same level of sheer artistry exemplified in Bach's Brandenburg Concertos, and they don't have the light, rhythmic drive of Vivaldi's numerous concertos.  It was wonderful to reacquaint myself with these exceptional works of Handel.

But, the thing is that the performances disappoint.  Whenever a beautiful melody presents itself the phrasing is just screwed up.  It's played through emphasizing the wrong elements, and then it just falls apart.  It's as if Pinnock is attempting to force Handel to have that same sprightliness that Vivaldi has, but he goes about it all wrong.  Now Handel can sound lively yet still retain that beautiful, austere sound.  I've heard it in Manze.  I've heard it in other recordings as well.  I just don't think that the Pinnock set has the magic. 

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on July 27, 2009, 11:31:48 PM
Gardiner's performance is with a bigger band in much more "present" sound, but I found that, when I cranked the volume up for Hogwood, it did indeed reveal a more individual, colorfully period-instrument sound.

      This is interesting, because I've been reading a textbook recently, and one of the aspects of classical era composers it touches on is the size of the orchestra, and especially how they enjoyed it when they had a larger orchestra than usual. Mozart, for example, once wrote home about how thrilled he was when there were twenty first violins, and double wind parts at a particular performance of his. While composers certainly expected their music to be played by smaller ensembles, I question whether or not they wrote specifically with a chamber sound in mind, and whether that affects balance and subtle color issues as much as people think, given anecdotes like the one above Yet most conductors today go for a reduced orchestration in Mozart and Beethoven, even when they have the forces available to put on a big performance.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on July 27, 2009, 11:38:13 PM
      Listened to Brahms Clarinet Quintet by the Borodin Quartet and Mozgovenko last night. I never used to play favorites, but after two years of knowing this work, I gotta say that if I could only listen to one work of music for the rest of my life on continuous loop, this would be it, especially the 2nd and 4th movements. I wonder if this work (especially the ending) is a result of Brahms' relationship with Clara Schumann?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: secondwind on July 28, 2009, 01:35:17 AM
The Brahms Quintet is a ravishingly beautiful work.  (Of course, as a clarinetist, I'm a little biased. ;))  What do you think of this particular rendition?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on July 28, 2009, 03:20:31 AM
     Listened to Brahms Clarinet Quintet by the Borodin Quartet and Mozgovenko last night. I never used to play favorites, but after two years of knowing this work, I gotta say that if I could only listen to one work of music for the rest of my life on continuous loop, this would be it, especially the 2nd and 4th movements.

Great.....thanks a lot Dana.  Now I have to listen to the Clarinet Quintet today.  ;D  I brought it along with me at work when I read your post this morning.  :)

Performance:  Amadeus Qt w/ Karl Leister, clarinet

BTW - the four late clarinet works by Brahms are all beautiful, wonderful works (Trio and two sonatas).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on July 28, 2009, 04:22:21 AM
Chambernut, that recording of the Clarinet Quintet I listened to just two days ago! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on July 28, 2009, 06:48:49 AM
BTW - the four late clarinet works by Brahms are all beautiful, wonderful works (Trio and two sonatas).

I know, thank God for Muhlfeld, right? ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on July 28, 2009, 08:08:07 AM
I know, thank God for Muhlfeld, right? ;D

No doubt!  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 03, 2009, 07:08:13 AM
Does anyone feel that there is some sort of "connection" between Mozart's C minor string quintet (No. 2) and Beethoven's piano concerto in the same key (No. 3)? The last movements especially. I was playing the quintet (Movt. III) in my head this afternoon -- yes, it's started to work again, though not as prodigiously as it used to -- and subconsciously the music transitioned into Beethoven's.

I have read that B. modelled his concerto after Mozart's No. 24, but I have never come across anything about the quintet in this regard.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on August 03, 2009, 08:04:45 PM
      There's certainly a lot of similarity between the two works in terms of the way they treat the key - with an incredible amount of gravity that one rarely finds anywhere else in their music. Also, in the thematic treatment in the first movements - both opening simply enough with a presentation of the minor triad: simple, and to the point. I can't comment on the specifics though, since it's been years since I was acquainted with the quintet.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on August 04, 2009, 02:37:22 AM
Does anyone feel that there is some sort of "connection" between Mozart's C minor string quintet (No. 2) and Beethoven's piano concerto in the same key (No. 3)? The last movements especially. I was playing the quintet (Movt. III) in my head this afternoon -- yes, it's started to work again, though not as prodigiously as it used to -- and subconsciously the music transitioned into Beethoven's.

I have read that B. modelled his concerto after Mozart's No. 24, but I have never come across anything about the quintet in this regard.

Did you also know that the string quintet is actually a reworking of the Serenade for Winds in C minor, K.388?  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 04, 2009, 03:56:28 AM
      There's certainly a lot of similarity between the two works in terms of the way they treat the key - with an incredible amount of gravity that one rarely finds anywhere else in their music. Also, in the thematic treatment in the first movements - both opening simply enough with a presentation of the minor triad: simple, and to the point. I can't comment on the specifics though, since it's been years since I was acquainted with the quintet.

Thanks for the input, Dana. :)

Did you also know that the string quintet is actually a reworking of the Serenade for Winds in C minor, K.388?  :)

Yes, sir. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on August 22, 2009, 03:55:42 PM
This week I've listened to Bach's Cantatas bwv 140 and 147 several times and it's great music by Bach... but... the performance is a too drab, kind of romantic style phrasing and very poor microphone placement, the arias (which has some of the best musical parts) sound muted while the choruses are WAY TOO LOUD.  I am happy to have the music to listen to, but overall dissatisfied with the recording.

I decided to cross post on here since I posted actual thoughts and not just a picture. Roll Eyes

It is perhaps useful to note that the recording I'm talking about is NOT from the newer issue, it's a reissue of an older.  What do you look for in a performance of Bach cantatas?


Edit: I'm talking about Gardiner/Monteverdi.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on August 24, 2009, 06:47:41 AM
      Been browsing through the early Shostakovich string quartets lately, via the original Borodin Quartet. You know, as much as people admire the late quartets for their unique expressive language, I find the early quartets just as impressive. Where the late quartets are almost symphonies for string quartet, the early quartets, while more conventional, are very tightly constructed, and well voiced (with the exception of the 3rd quartet).
      On another note, I've really begun to appreciate these Borodin recordings more than the Fitzwilliam Quartet recordings, which was my first set. Somehow, it sounds more Russian to me.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on August 24, 2009, 08:21:45 AM
      Been browsing through the early Shostakovich string quartets lately, via the original Borodin Quartet. You know, as much as people admire the late quartets for their unique expressive language, I find the early quartets just as impressive. Where the late quartets are almost symphonies for string quartet, the early quartets, while more conventional, are very tightly constructed, and well voiced (with the exception of the 3rd quartet).
      On another note, I've really begun to appreciate these Borodin recordings more than the Fitzwilliam Quartet recordings, which was my first set. Somehow, it sounds more Russian to me.

Dana, I agree on what you are saying regarding the early quartets.  SQ# 4 has just recently blown me away, now one of my faves.

Although I only have the Eder/Naxos set, by far the set I've enjoyed listening to the most is the Fitzwilliam set, more so than either the Emersons or Borodins.  I do also really love the Eder set I have.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Bulldog on August 24, 2009, 08:32:02 AM

It is perhaps useful to note that the recording I'm talking about is NOT from the newer issue, it's a reissue of an older.  What do you look for in a performance of Bach cantatas?

More than anything else, I look for a celebration of God, not supplication.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 24, 2009, 11:09:03 AM
Has it always been standard practice to price solo instrumental and orchestral releases the same? It seems to have always been the case for CDs at least. I can sort of see how orchestras often being nationally subsidised to some extent can allow some of the recording costs negated, but it can't be the whole story (among non-"superstar" musicians). Are pianophiles effectively underwriting the 'greedy' people who only listen to symphonies? ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on August 24, 2009, 03:10:05 PM
Well I'm sure most of the performer's pay just goes to the conductor anyway. ;D  Those large symphony orchestras perform ALOT though, so hopefully the musicians aren't starving. :-\

I hope Jo, one of our resident musicians, will pipe up and tell us what's going on. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on August 24, 2009, 07:17:30 PM
Well I'm sure most of the performer's pay just goes to the conductor anyway. ;D  Those large symphony orchestras perform ALOT though, so hopefully the musicians aren't starving. :-\

I hope Jo, one of our resident musicians, will pipe up and tell us what's going on. :)
I couldn't say; I have next-to-no experience with studio recording, at least not for classical music.  But I would guess that, first, orchestral recordings sell a lot more than soloist recordings, and second, the record companies get most of the money anyway. ::)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on August 24, 2009, 07:21:09 PM
More score study: Sibelius Symphonies #4 and #7, and Rachmaninoff's Isle of the Dead. 8)  The Sibelius scores are pretty easy to read, but it's eye-opening to see exactly what rhythms he wrote.  Those places where it seems the melodic rhythm just sort of flows naturally without strict time--they're actually written very precisely but with lots of offbeat entrances, syncopations and other rhythmic peculiarities; some sections of these symphonies actually remind me of Varèse in their avoidance of a strong downbeat. :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 27, 2009, 10:39:52 AM
A new found admiration for Mahler's 6th.

When I caught the performance somewhere in the middle of the first movement, on T.V., it was about a quarter-of-an-hour past eleven P.M.* I did not want stay up too late watching it for that might have some not-so-good repercussions in the morning, but it was infectious. I somehow made it to the andante, and what glorious music it was! (I've always had a special spot for that movement. Oh, and it was Scherzo-Andante, BTW.) Now I had to watch the hammer blows 0:), so I stayed up and watched and listened until the last note faded away. (Actually, some fellow began shouting "Bravo" even before that could happen. ::))

Usually when I listen to this symphony or some other equally long work, I'm working at the computer sitting in the same chair. But this time, I was able to concentrate completely on the symphony in the comfort of the living room. It yielded a lot of good things. And close to midnight, which is likely not the hour for Mahler when you have neighbours around, I switched to headphones. It was just me and the music. Incredible! And surprisingly, I never felt the exhaustion associated with a Mahler symphony.



*Orchestre de Paris; Christoph Eschenbach. This was the same concert I saw a year or two ago, prior to my listening of Mahler's symphonies. Then, I followed, or at least tried to do so, from the middle of the andante and was wondering what a Dr. Evil-look-alike was conducting. And why was this madman at the back of the stage wielding a hammer?! It would be a few months before I would discover the 'Resurrection.'
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 28, 2009, 12:17:53 PM
More score study: Sibelius Symphonies #4 and #7, and Rachmaninoff's Isle of the Dead. 8)  The Sibelius scores are pretty easy to read, but it's eye-opening to see exactly what rhythms he wrote.  Those places where it seems the melodic rhythm just sort of flows naturally without strict time--they're actually written very precisely but with lots of offbeat entrances, syncopations and other rhythmic peculiarities; some sections of these symphonies actually remind me of Varèse in their avoidance of a strong downbeat. :D
I've actually recently finished a superb book by David Hurwitz (of all people) about the way that Sibelius wrote for orchestra. Hurwitz was actually a marvelous and very perceptive guide; he pointed out Sibelius' fondness for bizarre phrase lengths and tunes comprised of irregular numbers of bars, used as means to keep the music rhythmically interesting and always unexpected. He also talked about the way that phrases overlap or "interlock" in Sibelius' music, such that you can't tell where one begins and the other ends. His example here was the first entrance of the trombone in the Seventh Symphony, in which the soloist's first note is sustained for so long behind the string section before taking the forefront that, although they're very obviously playing two different ideas, the whole thing seems of a piece. Really fascinating...  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on August 28, 2009, 01:13:38 PM
      More Shostakovich Quartet listening, the 12th with the Fitzwilliam Quartet. My quartet put a recital on with another University of Michigan quartet last December, and this was our half of the recital. This late Shostakovich repertoire is beastly in a way no other repertoire I've encountered is. With his late quartets to find a perfect unity of form. Observe - 12 is a two movement work in which the first is basically a prologue to the second movement, 13 is in a single movement, and 15, six movements all played continuously, almost like a baroque sonata. These attempts to unify the string quartet in a Wagnerian sense makes them absolute behemoths to play, and they require a lot of endurance to get through, both as a performer, and as a listener.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on August 28, 2009, 01:22:48 PM
I've actually recently finished a superb book by David Hurwitz (of all people) about the way that Sibelius wrote for orchestra. Hurwitz was actually a marvelous and very perceptive guide; he pointed out Sibelius' fondness for bizarre phrase lengths and tunes comprised of irregular numbers of bars, used as means to keep the music rhythmically interesting and always unexpected. He also talked about the way that phrases overlap or "interlock" in Sibelius' music, such that you can't tell where one begins and the other ends. His example here was the first entrance of the trombone in the Seventh Symphony, in which the soloist's first note is sustained for so long behind the string section before taking the forefront that, although they're very obviously playing two different ideas, the whole thing seems of a piece. Really fascinating...  :)
Yes.  And having finished the "checking out from the library," I am also very impressed by how sensitively Sibelius writes dynamic markings.  On any number of occasions he uses ppp or sometimes even pppp, but rarely do you see ff for the brass, and many times, as in Mahler, different instruments are playing completely different dynamics.  In both symphonies, Sibelius indicates fff exactly once! :o All a conductor has to do is to tell the orchestra to play exactly what's written, and you have a very, very dynamic and perfectly voiced performance. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on September 03, 2009, 12:25:40 PM
More scores:

Poulenc: Concerto for Organ, Timpani and Strings
Varèse: Ionisation.

If anybody still thinks Poulenc is a lightweight, I'd recommend this concerto; serious, well-crafted, and with an overall feeling of sorrow that prefigures Dialogues des Carmelites. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 17, 2009, 07:42:32 PM
      I've been listening to the romantic nationals lately, and am struck by just how frank and enjoyable it is. Aside from the anticipation of the Sibelius smorgasbord which will occur as soon as my Maazel cycle arrives (tomorrow? Please?), I've been listening to Grieg orchestral music through the ears of the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, and Dvorak chamber music. I'm playing the op.77 Bass Quintet with a chamber group in Rochester, which has been a very pleasant surprise. Dvorak really deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as Brahms more often, especially when it comes to chamber music. It's really nice to listen to music that doesn't care whether or not it matters, it just wants to be good.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on September 19, 2009, 02:28:23 AM
Dvorak really deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as Brahms more often

QFT
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: WI Dan on September 19, 2009, 10:26:12 AM
     I've been listening to the romantic nationals lately, and am struck by just how frank and enjoyable it is. Aside from the anticipation of the Sibelius smorgasbord which will occur as soon as my Maazel cycle arrives (tomorrow? Please?), I've been listening to Grieg orchestral music through the ears of the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, and Dvorak chamber music. I'm playing the op.77 Bass Quintet with a chamber group in Rochester, which has been a very pleasant surprise. Dvorak really deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as Brahms more often, especially when it comes to chamber music. It's really nice to listen to music that doesn't care whether or not it matters, it just wants to be good.

Well said.

 Na zdravi! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8QhaBQ7Dbg) :D

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on September 19, 2009, 05:34:00 PM
There is nothing quite like Bruckner's Adagios.  0:)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on September 19, 2009, 05:50:52 PM
There is nothing quite like Bruckner's Adagios.  0:)

And there is also nothing like Bruckner's Te Deum, it is truly one of a kind. 0:)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on September 20, 2009, 03:47:16 PM
So I listened to Bach's Cantatas bwv 198 and 110.  The first is a pretty terrific work, but those lutes were just so overwhelming in the recording that I listened to that I felt really pushed out of my comfort zone. :-\  Anyway and then the second one started and I was like WOW! :o  I know this!  It's an orchestral suite!  What the heck is it doing here? ;D  And I looked it up afterwards to see that it was #4.  And Leusink played it so slow that it sounded regal like a Handel suite.  And for once I wasn't offput by the singing, the whole thing worked and I will grudgingly accept a slow tempo in this case. :)

You know I like the sound of the lute, by how they did it in that recording, where it was so forward miked that it overwhelmed everything else was really off putting.  Don't ya just hate that?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 20, 2009, 08:09:00 PM
      PS I'm hearing a LOT of Beethoven Op.132 in the opening movement of the Dvorak bass quintet. There are sudden pangs of dissonance, it sticks really hard, and there is formal de-composition (yes, I made up that term) going back into the recapitulation. It's like Dvorak was channeling his inner Beethoven.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on September 21, 2009, 02:04:43 AM
I think you've motivated me to give that bass quintet a fresh listen Dana. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on September 21, 2009, 03:42:04 AM
Bass Quintet??  Was this a string quartet with a double-bass as the fifth instrument?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 21, 2009, 04:32:50 AM
      Yup! It's really young Dvorak too. The op.77 was reassigned to the work after it was edited (it originally had an additional slow movement between the sonata movement and the scherzo) - it's actually op.18. The inclusion of the bass means for a thicker, bigger sound, and it's usually used to double the cello as a melody instrument, or the viola as a blending instrument, or to add Brahmsian rhythmic support. While none of this is really ground breaking, it does make the ensemble a bit more versatile, and allows Dvorak to get creative with textures.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on September 21, 2009, 05:33:12 AM
Okay I guess in my cd sets Op. 77 is probably what I'll find then but Op. 18 is the actual composition?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 21, 2009, 05:59:10 AM
      It's always referred as op.77, so far as I know. I found out what I wrote above by reading the preface to a mini-score.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on September 27, 2009, 10:35:29 AM
'Offbeat' asked for some comments on this recent purchase:

(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/034571171852.png)

I thought I'd put them here, if no one objects, rather than in the 'Today's purchases' thread, where it'll soon be swept away by the tidal flood of posts announcing recent newcomers.

As I suspected it would be, for me the highlight of this disc is the string concerto. Its character is quite quite typical of what you'd expect of an English pastoral strings piece. It doesn't rise to the heights of Elgar's Intro and Allegro, nor RVW's Tallis Fantasia - it mostly lacks their dark, savage side - but its roots are in the same place, or thereabouts. I was also reminded quite often of Parry (eg second symphony), in the somehow masculine jauntiness of the Scherzo, and the sweet melodic-ness of the slow movement. This is not to say it's some kind of pastiche of Parry, Elgar or RVW - it isn't; but those are its reference points. Or at least, those are my reference points, while listening to this.

I found it very easy to like. Might be a little too rosy in its outlook for some (though it doesn't entirely avoid looking into the dark), and if you wanted something to remind you of a day's walk through Wiltshire along the Ridgeway, this might well be it. At £5.60 in Hyperion's sale, I'm very pleased to have it. At its usual full price .... well, I think I'd not have rushed into buying it.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 27, 2009, 02:07:47 PM
It doesn't rise to the heights of Elgar's Intro and Allegro, nor RVW's Tallis Fantasia - it mostly lacks their dark, savage side - but its roots are in the same place, or thereabouts.

I'm not sure I buy that word... I think I know what you mean but...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on September 28, 2009, 05:49:42 AM
I'm not sure I buy that word... I think I know what you mean but...

Possible alternatives might be 'rawness', or 'bleakness', though they don't quite hit the feeling I was trying for. One might describe a sudden rush of cold wind and sleeting rain as 'savage' in the sense I mean.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on September 28, 2009, 07:25:35 AM
Aye, 'tis no ungawa sort of savage.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 28, 2009, 08:34:03 AM
      Ugh, I'm in trouble. My Sibelius Maazel set came in late last week, and all I want to do is listen to the 7th symphony (my favorite), but I'm also committed to listening to the symphonies in chronological order, and I can't even get off of the first symphony yet. What a gorgeous 2nd movement, and compelling finale! This recording has me convinced that this is one of the most overlooked symphonies of the century, and I can't wait to dig into the rest... Once I'm done with the first.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on September 28, 2009, 08:42:13 AM
      Yup! It's really young Dvorak too. The op.77 was reassigned to the work after it was edited (it originally had an additional slow movement between the sonata movement and the scherzo) - it's actually op.18. The inclusion of the bass means for a thicker, bigger sound, and it's usually used to double the cello as a melody instrument, or the viola as a blending instrument, or to add Brahmsian rhythmic support. While none of this is really ground breaking, it does make the ensemble a bit more versatile, and allows Dvorak to get creative with textures.
The Op. 77 is one of my favorite Dvorak pieces. There's a tune about a minute into the scherzo that knocks me out every time.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on September 28, 2009, 09:20:29 AM
Aye, 'tis no ungawa sort of savage.

Exactly. There's absolutely no hint of swinging from tree to tree in my use of the word.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 28, 2009, 09:43:54 AM
Possible alternatives might be 'rawness', or 'bleakness', though they don't quite hit the feeling I was trying for. One might describe a sudden rush of cold wind and sleeting rain as 'savage' in the sense I mean.

      Rawness comes close. It's a kind of heart-on-sleeve emotion, but I'm not really sure what the emotion is, come to think of it. Perhaps awe or fealty.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on September 28, 2009, 10:15:14 AM
      Rawness comes close. It's a kind of heart-on-sleeve emotion, but I'm not really sure what the emotion is, come to think of it. Perhaps awe or fealty.

Perhaps it's one of those things that Wittgenstein said needed to be shown, not said. We're shown it through the music, and we both know what we're discussing, but there's no accurate way of saying it.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: offbeat on September 28, 2009, 11:11:18 AM
'Offbeat' asked for some comments on this recent purchase:

(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/034571171852.png)

I thought I'd put them here, if no one objects, rather than in the 'Today's purchases' thread, where it'll soon be swept away by the tidal flood of posts announcing recent newcomers.

As I suspected it would be, for me the highlight of this disc is the string concerto. Its character is quite quite typical of what you'd expect of an English pastoral strings piece. It doesn't rise to the heights of Elgar's Intro and Allegro, nor RVW's Tallis Fantasia - it mostly lacks their dark, savage side - but its roots are in the same place, or thereabouts. I was also reminded quite often of Parry (eg second symphony), in the somehow masculine jauntiness of the Scherzo, and the sweet melodic-ness of the slow movement. This is not to say it's some kind of pastiche of Parry, Elgar or RVW - it isn't; but those are its reference points. Or at least, those are my reference points, while listening to this.

I found it very easy to like. Might be a little too rosy in its outlook for some (though it doesn't entirely avoid looking into the dark), and if you wanted something to remind you of a day's walk through Wiltshire along the Ridgeway, this might well be it. At £5.60 in Hyperion's sale, I'm very pleased to have it. At its usual full price .... well, I think I'd not have rushed into buying it.
tks for that Elgarian - impression i had from ImmortalHour was music that was very romantic and very englishmaybe a combination of elgar and delius - will look forward to hearing this  :)


Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on September 28, 2009, 11:19:28 AM
I think you've motivated me to give that bass quintet a fresh listen Dana. :)

Smallmouth
Largemouth
Striped
Spotted
Demented sea bass
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on September 28, 2009, 12:44:12 PM
Demented sea bass

Sounds like one of these!

(http://diztopia.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/11152004.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on September 29, 2009, 08:35:13 PM
Sibelius 1st Symphony. Again. For the 8th time in less than a week. Is it time for an intervention yet? I hope not.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on September 30, 2009, 02:16:36 AM
Sibelius 1st Symphony. Again. For the 8th time in less than a week. Is it time for an intervention yet? I hope not.

I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one that does that! :)  Obsessed repeated listenings that is... I did the same thing with Shostakovich's SQs a couple of years back.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on September 30, 2009, 02:43:11 AM
I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one that does that! :)  Obsessed repeated listenings that is... I did the same thing with Shostakovich's SQs a couple of years back.

I also have that obsessive repeated listenings behavior.  Time to start a support group.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 02, 2009, 02:02:17 PM
Sibelius 1st Symphony. Again. For the 8th time in less than a week. Is it time for an intervention yet? I hope not.
There are worse works to be obsessed with. :D

More scores: Just finished with Janacek's Sinfonietta and Scriabin's Poem of Ecstasy. :D Now on Varèse's Arcana.  That one's massive! :o ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on October 03, 2009, 05:32:21 PM
What's the difference between lento and largo?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on October 03, 2009, 05:59:39 PM
What's the difference between lento and largo?

One is a Celibidache Allegro movement, and the other is a Celibidache Allegro con brio movement.  :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 03, 2009, 06:19:14 PM
I think lento tends to have more of a pulse to it, while largo tends to be more songful. I say that without doing the slightest iota of work.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on October 04, 2009, 12:14:48 AM
Gian Francesco Malipiero’s violin concero of 1932. I’ve found myself playing this repeatedly lately. An extremely beautiful concerto with only one recording that I’m aware of, this:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/SU39042.jpg)

And very successful it is as well! A recording from 1972.

It starts with a lively Allegro con Spirito, full of southern European lyricism and warmth, punctuated by lively rhytms. The second movement is one of my favorites ever, quite the equal of Bruch’s g minor, cantabile and melancholic with some heartrendering modulations midways, a quiet, lyrical song like a provencal “Lark Ascending” with the Mediterranean in the hazy distance.

The final Allegro is again lively, almost baroque (no surprising thing for a man involved in Monteverdi and Vivaldi editorial research) with folkloristic dancing and a resolute cadenza before the Mediterranean lyricism reappears and an energetic episode closes the concert at 21 minutes.

I’ve owned this recording since the 70-ies on LP, where it was very appropriately coupled with Milhaud’s equally Mediterranean and beautiful 2nd violin concerto. On CD , which I recently reaquired, it is coupled with Casella, a logical choice perhaps, but I find Malipiero concerto more akin to Milhaud than Casella in style and general outlook, and the recoupling robs us of a very fine account af the Milhaud, which doesn’t seem to be available on Supraphon currently. They ought to do a Gertler edition, he did Hartmann, Hindemith and tons of Bartok, and probably other stuff as well, and he did it very well!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on October 06, 2009, 06:40:01 AM
Figuring out my favorite Shostakovich quartets proves to be harder and harder, not easier.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on October 06, 2009, 08:02:22 AM
Figuring out my favorite Shostakovich quartets proves to be harder and harder, not easier.

Don't bother figuring that out. Just enjoy listening to them. 0:)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on October 06, 2009, 08:04:18 AM
Don't bother figuring that out. Just enjoy listening to them. 0:)

Force of habit.  I can't help it!  This is how my brain works.  :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on October 06, 2009, 08:09:05 AM
OCDNut. :P ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 06, 2009, 08:11:29 AM
I had that same OCDNut treatment of WTC I(1), now when I listened to WTC I(2) I just let it wash over me and I find it sublime and moving.  Try less and you'll enjoy more. :)

 :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 06, 2009, 11:12:28 AM
Each one, with some overlap, appeals to a different facet of your brain.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 06, 2009, 11:39:54 AM
Each one, with some overlap, appeals to a different facet of your brain.

Yup that makes sense. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 06, 2009, 09:13:33 PM
      After finally getting unstuck from the 1st symphony, and listening once or twice to the 2nd, I've gotten stuck again on Sibelius' 3rd Symphony (Maazel again). It's slightly forced - I'm having to work at it - but there's still a lot of good stuff (especially the second movement!). It's just really understated.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 06, 2009, 09:21:47 PM
      After finally getting unstuck from the 1st symphony, and listening once or twice to the 2nd, I've gotten stuck again on Sibelius' 3rd Symphony (Maazel again). It's slightly forced - I'm having to work at it - but there's still a lot of good stuff (especially the second movement!). It's just really understated.

Those symphonies are difficult for me, I'm not completely drawn in until #4-7. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 07, 2009, 05:09:39 AM
Hey this thread has been stickied! :)

I've been listening to some of Haydn's songs and I really like them.  A few years ago listening to songs in classical music would be like pulling teeth! :D  What happened? I wondered what's the difference?  I find them to be lovely, moving music now.  And I realized the difference is that I was used to singing in pop/rock context, which was very different.  And even when I put on vocal music, it would be huge chorus, and then they become another wall of sound like the violins which is not the same thing.

The thing that changed was I wanted to hear lots of Bach, and his vocal works can't be avoided.  And so I decided to listen anyway to the strangeness and it grew on me.  And now I can here it as beautiful singing.


I think it's time that I revisit Schubert now. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 07, 2009, 05:16:21 AM
Hey this thread has been stickied! :)

I bet it's going to get to 2000 pages long and unmanageable now, and then we'll have to start a Classical Conversation Thread...  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 07, 2009, 05:19:37 AM
I bet it's going to get to 2000 pages long and unmanageable now, and then we'll have to start a Classical Conversation Thread...  ;D

Yeah and on that thread the rules will have to be at least one page long posts with references and a proper bibliography or it goes in the chat thread instead. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on October 07, 2009, 07:24:02 AM
Those symphonies are difficult for me, I'm not completely drawn in until #4-7.

Interesting comment, and fascinating choice of word. I love the first three, and then fade away (apart from a subdued enthusiasm for no. 5) because I find 4, 6 and 7 just too 'difficult'. I wonder what drives our notions of 'difficult'.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 07, 2009, 07:33:11 AM
Interesting comment, and fascinating choice of word. I love the first three, and then fade away (apart from a subdued enthusiasm for no. 5) because I find 4, 6 and 7 just too 'difficult'. I wonder what drives our notions of 'difficult'.

If it's not compelling so I'm not drawn into the music and have to work at focusing on it, then I consider it to be difficult. :)  So by that definition Carter is highly engaging (to me) and Dittersdorf is crazy difficult! :D  I find emotional resonance with the later ones, especially with 4 and 6 which are my favorites. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on October 07, 2009, 07:39:56 AM
If it's not compelling so I'm not drawn into the music and have to work at focusing on it, then I consider it to be difficult.

I think I'd say that too; but also I'd add something along the lines of not being able to discern the patterns clearly, so I'm continually losing my way and wondering where I am, where I'm going, and why. (Sounds a bit like my experience of life in general!)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 07, 2009, 07:46:35 AM
I think I'd say that too; but also I'd add something along the lines of not being able to discern the patterns clearly, so I'm continually losing my way and wondering where I am, where I'm going, and why. (Sounds a bit like my experience of life in general!)

Well my opinion based on listening is that as you progress into the 20th century the more you try to follow that complex music, the more it slips through your fingers.  Instead of focusing on the horizontal, I focus on the vertical, just what's happening right then in terms of harmony and rhythm.  Much more satisfying than following the melody.  That's also how I listen to Bach. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on October 07, 2009, 07:56:02 AM
Well my opinion based on listening is that as you progress into the 20th century ...

I think that probably explains the difference - musically speaking, I don't progress very far into the 20th century! (Rather alarmingly: as time goes on, I seem to be progressing backwards at ever-greater speed!)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 07, 2009, 08:13:52 AM
I think that probably explains the difference - musically speaking, I don't progress very far into the 20th century! (Rather alarmingly: as time goes on, I seem to be progressing backwards at ever-greater speed!)

Haha you're turning into Gurn! ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on October 07, 2009, 10:00:08 AM
Anyone else notice similarities between Schubert's String Quartet # 15 in G (Scherzo mvt.) and Brahms Piano Trio Scherzo mvt (can't remember if it's Piano Trio 1 or 2, but I think it's # 2)?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 07, 2009, 10:15:15 AM
Haha you're turning into Gurn! ;D

. . . and, like Gurn, he's going to dip his toes in the 21st century  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 07, 2009, 11:46:54 AM
. . . and, like Gurn, he's going to dip his toes in the 21st century  8)

Hopefully not with atonal honking! >:D ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 07, 2009, 11:49:30 AM
Oh, especially the atonal honking!

(And . . . MN Dave has been mysteriously quiet viz. the a. h. . . .)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on October 07, 2009, 11:50:08 AM
Hopefully not with atonal honking!

With heedless watermelons and things like that.

(1 listening so far, but I always need three for anything new.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 07, 2009, 11:54:04 AM
Ho capito!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 07, 2009, 11:54:51 AM
Oh, especially the atonal honking!

(And . . . MN Dave has been mysteriously quiet viz. the a. h. . . .)

I know and I’m sorry. I’ve been a busy little beaver lately, but never fear: I will use the disc to clean out the cobwebs before I start the next writing project.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on October 07, 2009, 12:07:45 PM
Ho capito!

[Little does he know ....]

Yesterday, after having been up all night with raging toothache, I gave that lecture I mentioned - with raging toothache. Afterwards I drove at 500 mph to my dentist with raging toothache, and he said 'That's got to come out!' And he took it out. And despite enduring this terrible day of fear and pain, I still made time in the evening to listen to your CD.

You see how I suffer for your art? Greater love hath no listener.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 13, 2009, 12:58:27 PM
What's the difference between lento and largo?
Lento means literally "slow," while largo means "broad."  Largo is usually considered to be a little slower.  Some musical commentators insist that largo is "the slowest tempo marking," but that's not strictly true.  It was the slowest indication on Maelzel's original metronome, but the slowest marking is actually grave (no translation necessary ;D).
Hopefully not with atonal honking! >:D ;)
beep beep beep!!! >:D ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 14, 2009, 05:52:27 AM
[Little does he know ....]

Yesterday, after having been up all night with raging toothache, I gave that lecture I mentioned - with raging toothache. Afterwards I drove at 500 mph to my dentist with raging toothache, and he said 'That's got to come out!' And he took it out. And despite enduring this terrible day of fear and pain, I still made time in the evening to listen to your CD.

You see how I suffer for your art? Greater love hath no listener.

I am touched, indeed!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 14, 2009, 05:52:54 AM
beep beep beep!!! >:D ;D

jo! I need to send you a disc . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on October 14, 2009, 06:16:22 AM
I am touched, indeed!

It could have inspired a Dental Duet for clarinet and drill.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 14, 2009, 06:57:38 AM
beep beep beep!!! >:D ;D

I love that work! It's one of my favorite by Varese!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 14, 2009, 07:03:35 AM
Oh, Dana! You mistook Gershwin for Varèse! How could you!?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 14, 2009, 07:14:34 AM
Oh, Dana! You mistook Gershwin for Varèse! How could you!?

Everybody does that eventually...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 22, 2009, 10:49:01 AM
Faure, Ravel, Debussy, Franck

All of these French composers, had serious, major flaws in their string quartets.


And that is.......they only composed one each.  :'(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 22, 2009, 11:07:05 AM
If we consider how Brahms hesitated at writing a symphony . . . and the irony that Beethoven had made sketches for an earlier symphony in the mid-1790s, but waited several years before introducing a full-scale symphony in 1800 . . . maybe it was some ineffable part of the French masters' quartets, that they concerned themselves only with writing one, with no thought for a set of quartets.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 22, 2009, 11:09:47 AM
If we consider how Brahms hesitated at writing a symphony . . . and the irony that Beethoven had made sketches for an earlier symphony in the mid-1790s, but waited several years before introducing a full-scale symphony in 1800 . . . maybe it was some ineffable part of the French masters' quartets, that they concerned themselves only with writing one, with no thought for a set of quartets.

Well, all four of those are below the green lemon!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 22, 2009, 11:12:07 AM
I certainly need yet to listen to that of either Franck or Fauré.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 22, 2009, 11:13:28 AM
I certainly need yet to listen to that of either Franck or Fauré.

Oh, Karl.  You must remedy this quickly!  The Faure, especially.  A true masterpiece.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 22, 2009, 12:53:03 PM
Faure, Ravel, Debussy, Franck

I'm not familiar with three of those - are they really on the same level as the Debussy?!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 22, 2009, 12:53:21 PM
Who came up with the term atonal honkings?   ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 22, 2009, 12:54:07 PM
I'm not familiar with three of those - are they really on the same level as the Debussy?!

Yes!  The Ravel is probably widely considered the best of these.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 22, 2009, 01:20:46 PM
Who came up with the term atonal honkings?   ;D

Apparently, Conrad Schnitzler. (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22atonal+honking%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a)  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 22, 2009, 01:36:32 PM
Apparently, Conrad Schnitzler. (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22atonal+honking%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a)  ;D

Oh, I thought it was Karl or MN Dave this whole time. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DFO on October 22, 2009, 01:44:38 PM
IMHO, Franck SQ is not only his best chamber work, but also one of the greatest of the 19th.century. Only Magnard's
is comparable.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 22, 2009, 04:10:42 PM
IMHO, Franck SQ is not only his best chamber work, but also one of the greatest of the 19th.century. Only Magnard's
is comparable.

I should give it a listen, I was actually shopping for a recording a couple weeks back but got distracted... :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 22, 2009, 04:47:03 PM
I should give it a listen, I was actually shopping for a recording a couple weeks back but got distracted... :)

Due next month:

(http://www.naxos.com/SharedFiles/images/cds/others/8.572009.gif)

The FAQ+Ortiz just released a great Faure album, so I expect good things.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 22, 2009, 05:11:43 PM
Due next month:

(http://www.naxos.com/SharedFiles/images/cds/others/8.572009.gif)

The FAQ+Ortiz just released a great Faure album, so I expect good things.

I have a Naxos recording of the Piano Quintet, paired w/ Chausson's String Quartet.  Not the same ensemble though.

The Franck's Piano Quintet is magnifique, right up there with his string quartet and violin sonata ! :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 22, 2009, 08:31:49 PM
Yes!  The Ravel is probably widely considered the best of these.

Oh duh, I've heard Ravel ::)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 23, 2009, 04:16:34 AM
Oh, I thought it was Karl or MN Dave this whole time. ;D

Well, DavidW introduced the phrase here in waggish reference to Heedless Watermelon  :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 23, 2009, 04:24:35 AM
Well, DavidW introduced the phrase here in waggish reference to Heedless Watermelon  :D

tehehehe

(http://www.tembersep.net/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/mumbly.gif)

 ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 23, 2009, 04:32:55 AM
Oh duh, I've heard Ravel ::)

Sorry Dana, I misunderstood your question.  I read it as if 'you had only heard the Debussy string quartet'.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 23, 2009, 04:42:53 AM
I always think Harry is listening to this.  :)

I keep forgetting it's part of his signature.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 23, 2009, 05:04:44 AM
I always think Harry is listening to this.  :)

I keep forgetting it's part of his signature.

Doesn't exactly make you want to listen to von Suppé, does it? 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 23, 2009, 05:11:21 AM
Doesn't exactly make you want to listen to von Suppé, does it? 8)

Oh no, that doesn't matter.  Although quite frankly, I don't think I'd be interested in any kind of 'operetta'.  Who knows?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 23, 2009, 05:15:24 AM
For good or ill, when I see an overlarge CD cover image as a signature, my response tends to be a little similar to that for 'saturation' ads in the subways stations and on the buses: "Their competition must be good, if they're willing to put THIS MUCH into pushing their product. Say, I'll check out the competition . . . ."
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 23, 2009, 05:35:53 AM
No kidding.  ::) I know forums where authors have big banners in their signatures.  :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 23, 2009, 06:34:24 AM
You can turn off sigs if it bothers you.  I rarely come across a sig here worth reading. :)  I don't mind Harry's pic though because it's a pretty cool cd cover.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 23, 2009, 06:36:04 AM
You can turn off sigs if it bothers you.  I rarely come across a sig here worth reading. :)  I don't mind Harry's pic though because it's a pretty cool cd cover.

Thanks David.  I don't mind the signatures, but it can be a little distracting at times.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 23, 2009, 06:36:32 AM
I don't mind text signatures. They add a little personality.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 23, 2009, 06:37:38 AM
I don't mind text signatures. They add a little personality.

I like the personal text under the avatar better.  They tend to be cute, while the sigs are just some pompous showy quote. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 23, 2009, 06:38:43 AM
I like the personal text under the avatar better.

How come you don't have a personal text under your avatar?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Harry on October 23, 2009, 06:44:15 AM
Oh no, that doesn't matter.  Although quite frankly, I don't think I'd be interested in any kind of 'operetta'.  Who knows?

O, that pains me to hear, honestly. ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Harry on October 23, 2009, 06:45:35 AM
For good or ill, when I see an overlarge CD cover image as a signature, my response tends to be a little similar to that for 'saturation' ads in the subways stations and on the buses: "Their competition must be good, if they're willing to put THIS MUCH into pushing their product. Say, I'll check out the competition . . . ."

For this recording of Suppe's operetta "Die Schone Galathee", there is no competition. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 23, 2009, 07:45:57 AM
For this recording of Suppe's operetta "Die Schone Galathee", there is no competition. 8)

8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 23, 2009, 07:48:56 AM
A little annoyed at Charles Munch that he recorded only two of Debussy's three Nocturnes (at least on this RCA reissue).  It's not like the Tanglewood Festival Chorus had not been available  ::)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: CD on October 23, 2009, 07:53:50 AM
Horribly Millennial Question: Who are some good Classical people to follow on Twitter?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: CD on October 23, 2009, 07:56:04 AM
For good or ill, when I see an overlarge CD cover image as a signature, my response tends to be a little similar to that for 'saturation' ads in the subways stations and on the buses: "Their competition must be good, if they're willing to put THIS MUCH into pushing their product. Say, I'll check out the competition . . . ."

Which is why I disabled signatures.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Harry on October 23, 2009, 08:02:05 AM
Which is why I disabled signatures.

Ohooo, a party pooper! ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 23, 2009, 08:05:04 AM
How come you don't have a personal text under your avatar?

Oh just don't have anything to say right now.  My classic is "Beethoven's Archduke Trio is magnificently sublime!" ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brewski on October 23, 2009, 08:05:57 AM
Horribly Millennial Question: Who are some good Classical people to follow on Twitter?

Your wish is granted!

http://mcmvanbree.com/dutchperspective/twitter/people.htm

--Bruce

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: CD on October 23, 2009, 08:14:08 AM
Your wish is granted!

http://mcmvanbree.com/dutchperspective/twitter/people.htm

--Bruce



Thanks! I saw that you had posted that, but I was looking to see if there were some that weren't on the list (I've already followed all the Chicago-related tweeters! :D).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: CD on October 23, 2009, 08:16:05 AM
They tend to be cute, while the sigs are just some pompous showy quote. :)

Guilty as charged! ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on October 23, 2009, 09:08:34 AM
Oh just don't have anything to say right now.  My classic is "Beethoven's Archduke Trio is magnificently sublime!" ;D

You could put, "I'm the new Bax man". ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 27, 2009, 05:47:17 PM
Okay, just because there's been so much talk about signatures, I added one.  The quote, as far as I know, originated with me. :) Take that! ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 27, 2009, 05:50:25 PM
Yesterday I checked out another score: Tchaikovsky's Manfred Symphony.  Not as complex as, say, the Varèse or Mahler works I've checked out, but it's got its own mysteries.  Most notably, the extreme dynamic markings!  Already in the first movement I've seen ffff not once, but several times. :o
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 28, 2009, 09:46:05 AM
It is Tchaikovsky, isn't it? I'm surprised you've not seen FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 28, 2009, 09:47:21 AM
I'm feelin' the love
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 28, 2009, 02:08:02 PM
It is Tchaikovsky, isn't it? I'm surprised you've not seen FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF! :D
A point. :) Pyotr Ilyich is known for extreme dynamic markings. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 30, 2009, 02:16:49 PM
I put up a new poster in my dorm room!  8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 31, 2009, 04:09:00 PM
 :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on October 31, 2009, 09:11:13 PM
(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ySZ-2oFCkdSmaM:http://leiter.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/shostakovich.jpg)(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:WodmVp9Tk4ExAM:http://www.ecopii.ro/desene%2520animate/harry_potter_wallpaper4-%2520mare.jpg)

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:DqFHObrZ_7cN5M:http://lh3.ggpht.com/_VM9yDJrkhoM/SO9SzRLi9kI/AAAAAAAAMIs/GKGWqyrEOAo/Cover.jpg)(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:xooWJM7UJrQ5zM:http://images.allmoviephoto.com/2005_Harry_Potter_and_the_Goblet_of_Fire/2005_harry_potter_and_the_goblet_of_fire_010.jpg)

Have they ever been photographed together??!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on November 01, 2009, 01:20:56 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51KK12AFD4L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Oh man, I had to giggle when I saw this unfortunate coupling. Take Dvořák's worst symphony, couple it with his worst one movement orchestral work, and what do you get? An unbuyable CD! I can put up with them in sets, but where they are the sole focus? :-X
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on November 01, 2009, 09:19:16 AM
(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ySZ-2oFCkdSmaM:http://leiter.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/shostakovich.jpg)(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:WodmVp9Tk4ExAM:http://www.ecopii.ro/desene%2520animate/harry_potter_wallpaper4-%2520mare.jpg)

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:DqFHObrZ_7cN5M:http://lh3.ggpht.com/_VM9yDJrkhoM/SO9SzRLi9kI/AAAAAAAAMIs/GKGWqyrEOAo/Cover.jpg)(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:xooWJM7UJrQ5zM:http://images.allmoviephoto.com/2005_Harry_Potter_and_the_Goblet_of_Fire/2005_harry_potter_and_the_goblet_of_fire_010.jpg)

Have they ever been photographed together??!

The resemblance is uncanny!

In fact, if any airheaded folks come in and ask who it is, maybe I'll tell them "It's an age-progression of Harry Potter." Last night a girl who hates classical music came in and asked who it was; I told her it was "a leader of the French resistance" and she believed me.  ;D

(It was a fun evening for making things up. I also convinced a bunch of drunk people that our rug was stolen from a movie set...)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on November 01, 2009, 09:40:44 AM
The resemblance is uncanny!

And they're both totally emo too!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 01, 2009, 10:46:15 AM
In fact, if any airheaded folks come in and ask who it is, maybe I'll tell them "It's an age-progression of Harry Potter."

Harry loses the scar when he's old! :o
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on November 01, 2009, 03:28:14 PM
The resemblance is uncanny!...
Amazing what a pair of glasses can do for a person's looks. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: greg on November 01, 2009, 06:12:46 PM
It is Tchaikovsky, isn't it? I'm surprised you've not seen FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF! :D
Actually, for Tchaikovsky, wouldn't it be pppppppppppppppppp?...   :-X :-\
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on November 01, 2009, 06:29:50 PM
Zing!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on November 03, 2009, 02:04:05 PM
I really dislike Santa Fe Listener, a reviewer on amazon.com. He seems to be a "review whore": the guy's covered just about every CD ever. And he's dead wrong on all of them, too. Just a few days ago I discovered that he had panned Gunter Wand's recording of Beethoven's Ninth, inspiring a firestorm of comments from people who have actually heard it. And today I found out that he had written up the new London Philharmonic Tchaikovsky Symphonies 1 and 6, with Vladimir Jurowski, and said that the performance of the Sixth was really light and emotionless and awful. He liked the First, but also called it light and balanced. What is this guy smoking? It actually irked me so much that I wrote a counter-review, even though I've already written a full-length piece on the recording for MusicWeb.
 :P
What a tin-ears.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Dana on November 08, 2009, 10:21:10 PM
      Hey! Sibelius' 6th (as I've heard from Lorin Maazel and the VPO) is really something! The string writing in the 1st movement really looks forward to the 7th symphony. How come people don't talk about it more often?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: CD on November 09, 2009, 05:41:45 AM
I've mentioned it a few times. That's one of the few pieces that gives me chills within the first few seconds (the thunderclap and torrent of strings at the beginning of Tapiola do the same).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: offbeat on November 09, 2009, 04:18:02 PM
      Hey! Sibelius' 6th (as I've heard from Lorin Maazel and the VPO) is really something! The string writing in the 1st movement really looks forward to the 7th symphony. How come people don't talk about it more often?
Agree. Sibelius sixth is magical - wat i would call a distant beauty especially in first movement and i love that heartrending coda at the end of the symphony  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Martin Lind on November 18, 2009, 12:41:49 AM
Such a classical chat thread is a great idea, never found this elsewhere. For myselve I am still discovering great music and doesn't come to an end. For example I know alot Beethoven, instrumental, piano, opera, masses, chamber - but there are still some string quartetts I don't know. Listen to the Guaneris. Had the Alexander but only with the Guaneris I realy discover this music.

A lot things somehow stopped. For example I have the Bax symphonies but haven't heard everything, haven't heard everything from the Mjaskovskisymphonies, listened only partly to Shostakowitschs string quartetts and so in a way there is alway music before me to explore. Didn't listen to all Puccini operas yet.

In the moment I am also a bit into baroque music to explore more baroque composers. D. Scarlatti is a discovery for example, Rameau was a discovery some months ago.

Classical music is really I wide field and you simply can't know everything and will miss even valuable things. But I am especially glad for the Beethoven string quartetts.

Regards
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on November 18, 2009, 01:48:14 AM
Rameau was a discovery some months ago.
Same for me. When I tiptoed cautiously into the room marked 'Baroque', I found a huge party going on that I'd been completely unaware of. Couperin, Charpentier, Rameau and Lully set me off on a journey that seems to have no end.

Have you tried Rameau's Les Indes Galantes? I'm always looking for excuses to post this youtube excerpt:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3OIdv9jrFY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3OIdv9jrFY)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Martin Lind on November 18, 2009, 05:04:18 AM
Hi Elgarian,

Yes the Indes Galantes is included ( at least in excerpts) in my CD. Splendid. But I think I will buy more of Rameau in some time. There are some Naxos CDs, I will watch out. Rameau has a lot vitality which I sometimes miss in other Baroque composers. But elegance and beauty too. A really nice listening.

Regards
Martin
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on November 18, 2009, 12:19:26 PM
More scores: Carl Nielsen's Fourth Symphony and Mahler's Second.  Last night I listened to the historic Oskar Fried M2, and I was really amazed at how much of it came through the terribly limited recording techniques they had then.  (For those who may not know, Fried's was the first complete M2 recording, made in 1924 with acoustic recording horns--no electronic anything! :o The orchestra and chorus had to be much reduced from the concert halls because the horn simply couldn't "hear" sounds very far away.)  Fried, too, was very scrupulous about following Mahler's written tempo and style indications, though he added a few major changes of his own.  At one time Fried was a fairly close associate of Mahler himself. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: offbeat on November 19, 2009, 08:12:00 AM
Same for me. When I tiptoed cautiously into the room marked 'Baroque', I found a huge party going on that I'd been completely unaware of. Couperin, Charpentier, Rameau and Lully set me off on a journey that seems to have no end.

Have you tried Rameau's Les Indes Galantes? I'm always looking for excuses to post this youtube excerpt:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3OIdv9jrFY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3OIdv9jrFY)
tks elgarian - that rameau was new to me too - totally brill  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 19, 2009, 08:32:54 AM
Have you tried Rameau's Les Indes Galantes? I'm always looking for excuses to post this youtube excerpt:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3OIdv9jrFY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3OIdv9jrFY)

Oh yes, I have, on the radio. A memorable tune, certainly... and it was just an orchestral suite, as I don't remember hearing any vocals. (I quite didn't expect that choreography, though. ;D Thanks for the video.)

But I have always found these Baroque ballets sounding the same. Lully comes to mind. I can just imagine him keeping the beat -- the same one, to please his employer; one tap at a time, eventually leading that last fateful tap. :-\
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: UB on November 19, 2009, 11:22:05 AM
A Critic's Guide (http://www.earbox.com/posts/40#post) Funny stuff by John Adams.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 20, 2009, 10:36:28 AM
Just like in professional sports, where many teams are going back to their 'retro jerseys', perhaps composers and orchestras should do the same?  :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on November 20, 2009, 10:37:53 AM
At first, I always think this is "The Classical Cat Thread".  :-\
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 20, 2009, 10:38:57 AM
At first, I always think this is "The Classical Cat Thread".  :-\

Obviously, those threads should be merged.  0:)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: greg on November 20, 2009, 03:54:47 PM
(http://www.inquisitr.com/wp-content/classical-cat.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on November 21, 2009, 08:25:43 AM
But I have always found these Baroque ballets sounding the same.

I'd have said the same myself not so long ago. Perhaps it's the same with any art form that hasn't quite 'clicked' for one reason or another. The differences between swimming pools might seem less significant than the similarities until we've learned to dive in and bathe in them. (Oh, what rubbish I talk, sometimes!)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: secondwind on November 21, 2009, 09:16:54 AM
. . . The differences between swimming pools might seem less significant than the similarities until we've learned to dive in and bathe in them. . . .

Or until we dive in the shallow end one time and learn the difference between "wading pool" and "diving pool"!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on November 21, 2009, 02:44:08 PM
Or until we dive in the shallow end one time and learn the difference between "wading pool" and "diving pool"!

"Beware! Baroque ballet enthusiasts have been injured at this end of the pool!"
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: secondwind on November 22, 2009, 10:52:27 AM
Ah, you lily-livered liberals want a warning label on everything!  Let 'em learn by experience, is my motto!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: secondwind on November 22, 2009, 11:00:01 AM
At first, I always think this is "The Classical Cat Thread".  :-\
(http://)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on November 22, 2009, 12:30:31 PM
Funny review-ender in the current issue of Fanfare:

"This CD should be taken out and shot."

 ;D

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on November 22, 2009, 04:15:45 PM
Just like in professional sports, where many teams are going back to their 'retro jerseys', perhaps composers and orchestras should do the same?  :D
Hey, a jersey would be a nice change from a tuxedo. :-\ ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on November 23, 2009, 02:43:45 PM
Mendelssohn's 2nd takes up a whole disc in the Karajan box?  :o

Who new?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 27, 2009, 10:28:24 AM
How come operas don't go by basic chronological titles, like symphonies, sonatas and quartets, et al?

Opera # 1
Opera # 2

Not as exciting, huh?  :(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 27, 2009, 10:33:11 AM
They have libretti, you know. ::)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 27, 2009, 10:38:55 AM
Anyone else recognize a theme from the Grosse Fuge and Muss es sein? theme from the Op.135 quartet in the C sharp minor Op.131 finale?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on November 30, 2009, 02:53:04 PM
Anyone else recognize a theme from the Grosse Fuge and Muss es sein? theme from the Op.135 quartet in the C sharp minor Op.131 finale?

Don't know the quartets yet, but I certainly recognize a theme from Op. 125 in the finale of Op. 111...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on December 01, 2009, 02:48:57 PM
Mendelssohn's 2nd takes up a whole disc in the Karajan box?  :o

Who new?
Well, it's a big piece, Mendelssohn's attempt at emulating Beethoven's Ninth.  I've heard it once or twice, and much as I like most of the Mendelssohn siblings' music, this one lacks a little--something...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 01, 2009, 05:45:40 PM
Well, it's a big piece, Mendelssohn's attempt at emulating Beethoven's Ninth.

Aye.  I haven't quite fallen for it, but I do want to re-visit it.  It's the Reformation I'm not mad over ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on December 28, 2009, 03:42:26 AM
Is Scott Joplin's music something I should look into? I'm not a great fan of jazz and related forms, but this is supposedly a hybrid?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Drasko on December 28, 2009, 04:14:52 AM
Is Scott Joplin's music something I should look into? I'm not a great fan of jazz and related forms, but this is supposedly a hybrid?

I love Joplin's piano rags but it is something you'd ultimately need to hear in order to figure out whether you like the style or don't. Thankfully there is a guy on youtube who plays them marvelously, in my opinion:
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=FB7AC4F189BD2C2F

Joplin also wrote an opera Treemonisha which I haven't heard.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on December 28, 2009, 04:32:04 AM
Hmm, those are neat, danke!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: 12.tone on January 03, 2010, 12:01:07 AM
Hmm, those are neat, danke!

I've posted four videos in a series of Joplin I did on my Youtube page.  Check them out.  Scroll down the list of uploads and you'll see it listed.  Let me know what you think:

http://www.youtube.com/user/ClassicsHouse (http://www.youtube.com/user/ClassicsHouse)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 04, 2010, 06:36:33 AM
First Impressions

Variations on Waltz by Anton Diabelli, Op. 120 - Ludwig van Beethoven


I have just finshed listened to the Diabelli Variations by Beethoven for the first time. I feel that I need to listen to it many more times to 'grasp' it fully. And that's just from a lay listener's viewpoint. I forgot how the waltz theme went after the first few variations. ;D Perhaps it was a result of the maiden voyage, or, perhaps, Beethoven managed to disguise it masterfully from the get-go. An extreme case of this is variation no. 31, which I found to be such a beautiful piece of music typical of late Beethoven, and far removed from the simple dance that got the ball rolling. I have not even slightest idea of how he got there, but there he did go: a perfectly valid variation that has been accepted for nearly 200 years! And all of this was done "logically" (i.e. based on musical principles) even though the music is all miraculous -- which makes me want to learn music even more. :) Other highlights for me include the variations nos. 14 and 24. The mood of the music seemed to shift after no. 14. Oh, and the double fugue, of course; although presently it does not  seem to pose a challenge to the likes featured in Op. 106.


P.S.: The recording was Kovacevich's first, on Philips.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on January 04, 2010, 06:46:31 AM


Joplin also wrote an opera Treemonisha which I haven't heard.
Don't expect anything traditional, and neither anything profound (IMO); but it's very fun stuff that I spin occasionally.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on January 04, 2010, 10:14:55 AM
First Impressions

Variations on Waltz by Anton Diabelli, Op. 120 - Ludwig van Beethoven



P.S.: The recording was Kovacevich's first, on Philips.

That's the recording I have.  There are some great 'variations', or I call them 'movements'.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on January 05, 2010, 10:26:23 AM
I'm trying to figure out why, in my listening log book, I write down String Quartet # X, while I write down Symphony No. X

 :-\
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on January 05, 2010, 10:32:42 AM
I'm trying to figure out why, in my listening log book, I write down String Quartet # X, while I write down Symphony No. X

 :-\

I'm trying to figure out why you manage to keep a listening log book, while I can't. Have thought about it for 30 years.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on January 05, 2010, 10:35:43 AM
I'm trying to figure out why you manage to keep a listening log book, while I can't. Have thought about it for 30 years.

Something I've been doing for two years now.  I just enjoy doing it, and I'll jot down some notes too from time to time. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 05, 2010, 10:51:37 AM
Something I've been doing for two years now.  I just enjoy doing it, and I'll jot down some notes too from time to time. 

I like that.

I've no clue on the variant typography, though, Ray . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 05, 2010, 11:08:11 AM
I'm trying to figure out why you manage to keep a listening log book, while I can't. Have thought about it for 30 years.

Is your pen out of ink?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on January 05, 2010, 11:15:35 AM
Is your pen out of ink?
Something like that. Or rather, a general lack of structure when it comes to relaxing with music. I'm inked out when I've finished work and other chores.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 05, 2010, 12:39:13 PM
And I thought that Moscow orchestra names were confusing...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of_London_Sinfonia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinfonia_of_London
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Sinfonietta

I've posted four videos in a series of Joplin I did on my Youtube page.
Hey, thanks, this is ridiculously happy music :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on January 05, 2010, 12:44:49 PM
And I thought that Moscow orchestra names were confusing...
Wow, that is really ridiculous. It's like the People's Front of Judea, almost!

I did a MusicWeb review of a Naxos CD back in July (Khachaturian Cello Concerto). The orchestra was called the "Russian Philharmonia," which Dundonnell told me was formerly known as the "TV6 Orchestra" (I think). Well, now the Naxos website has changed the CD entry, so that the orchestra is the "Moscow City Symphony Orchestra," which according to its bio page, bears the additional nickname "Russian Philharmonic."
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 18, 2010, 04:52:24 PM
Let every listener choose that which interests him. I have nothing against one person liking Mozart or Shostakovich or Leonard Bernstein, but doesn't like Górecki. That's fine with me. I, too, like certain things. -- Henryk Górecki
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 20, 2010, 06:30:58 AM
Would some explain to me in simple terms what the following means?

Quote
The completed score was dated 15 August 1905, and the orchestration was finished in 1906

That line was taken from the entry for Mahler's 7th symphony in Wikipedia. Specifically, I would like to know the difference between completing a score [for a work] and orchestrating it.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 20, 2010, 06:32:32 AM
I'm not a composer but my amateur guess is that all the notes are in place, now which instruments to play them?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 20, 2010, 06:36:14 AM
I'm not a composer but my amateur guess is that all the notes are in place, now which instruments to play them?
Aha. Thank you, David. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 20, 2010, 07:25:53 AM
It is confusingly stated.  If the writer meant that the piano score was completed on 15 August 1905, it were clearer to say piano score rather than completed score.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 20, 2010, 07:31:19 AM
So I was wrong? Do composers ever write notes without thinking of particular instruments for them?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 20, 2010, 07:33:50 AM
So I was wrong? Do composers ever write notes without thinking of particular instruments for them?

No, you were on the right track, Dave.  The notes were (if we are reading the confusing text aright) in place on a piano grand-staff score*;  and later the composer did the actual orchestration.
 
* Or a so-called "short score" of three or four staves.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 20, 2010, 07:54:31 AM
No, you were on the right track, Dave.  The notes were (if we are reading the confusing text aright) in place on a piano grand-staff score*
 
* Or a so-called "short score" of three or four staves.

And is this what people refer to usually when they say, "I was following the score as I was listening..."?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 20, 2010, 09:11:30 AM
Could be following any score, I suppose;  but generally, I think people follow the full score.  The piano score is normally the composer's intermediate tool, and may not necessarily be released for publication.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 20, 2010, 09:13:28 AM
I've never followed a score except when playing an instrument.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 20, 2010, 09:30:34 AM
Then you probably weren't following the score; you were playing a part.

(You might consider that a technical quibble . . . score in general speech tends to be used as a synonym for, well, any music notation.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 20, 2010, 09:31:52 AM
Oy.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 20, 2010, 10:47:39 AM
Could be following any score, I suppose;  but generally, I think people follow the full score.  The piano score is normally the composer's intermediate tool, and may not necessarily be released for publication.

The clarification is appreciated. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 20, 2010, 10:48:34 AM
Karl shoots!

He SCOOOOORES!!!  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 21, 2010, 06:18:52 AM
Ugh.

I purchased some Brahms violin sonatas forgetting I already have two or three versions. I hate when I do that. And it proves I buy too much music.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 21, 2010, 06:21:58 AM
Got to curb that Brahmslust!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 21, 2010, 06:23:22 AM
Indeed.

I was actually just testing out Arkiv's download feature and I got a bit hasty. It was late and I was out of it. At least I didn't download the same recording again.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 21, 2010, 06:28:02 AM
Ugh.

I purchased some Brahms violin sonatas forgetting I already have two or three versions. I hate when I do that. And it proves I buy too much music.

Look on the brighter side: you won't feel like leaving GMG again for sometime. ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 21, 2010, 06:38:18 AM
Yeah, I pretty much listen to all classical these days.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on January 21, 2010, 05:42:15 PM
Import from the listening thread:

PROKOFIEV | Alexander Nevsky Cantata
Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra
Karel Ancerl

For me this piece will always be inextricably linked with my first listen - in live performance. As hugely enjoyable as this is at home, hearing the Nevsky Cantata live was just a mind-blowing experience. There's a lot of 20th-century music that's that way. Two of my favorites, Janacek's Sinfonietta and Sibelius' Fifth, are also pieces I heard for the first time at a live concert. It's a pretty interesting coincidence - except that I don't think it's a coincidence. When I heard the First Symphonies of Barber and Mahler live a couple weekends ago, I had heard them before on record and enjoyed them, but they, too, offered a whole new level of impact live. By contrast, with Beethoven or something like that (even the romantics), for as awesome as they are in concert, I can pretty much crank up the volume in my room to con blasto levels and love them just the same. The same broad pattern holds true for my parents; my mother was totally sold on Shostakovich and Prokofiev by live concerts, but she doesn't even think of listening to them at home. Is there something about 20th century music that makes it more enjoyable, more visceral, more follow-able live?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 21, 2010, 07:51:55 PM
When you are present in the space, the experience is much richer.  Interestingly, I was having a similar conversation with the chap in the classical section of a cd shop this morning (when I snaffled the Boulez & Chávez discs).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 22, 2010, 09:49:01 AM
If I were rich, I'd totally hire one of you as my Music Purchaser; that way I wouldn't have to make any decisions.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 24, 2010, 06:53:36 AM
I was looking at the booklet in my Audite Furtwangler set and saw that the LvB 5th and 6th were meant to be complementary, and that the 6th was written first. I don't think I knew that before.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 24, 2010, 08:55:30 AM
I was looking at the booklet in my Audite Furtwangler set and saw that the LvB 5th and 6th were meant to be complementary, and that the 6th was written first. I don't think I knew that before.
Indeedie - in the first concert where the 5th and 6th premiered, their numbers were the other way around to how we currently know them. The 4th was composed after both of them too :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on January 24, 2010, 09:03:12 AM
The 4th was composed after both of them too :D

I'm no Beethoven expert, but according to Wiki sketches of the 5th and 6th predate the 4th, but the 4th was completed 2 years before the 5th and 6th were completed.  Point taken, however.  My personal theory is that the 4th was actually written by a Viennese stable boy and mistakenly attributed to Beethoven.   ;D

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 24, 2010, 09:12:14 AM
Indeedie - in the first concert where the 5th and 6th premiered, their numbers were the other way around to how we currently know them. The 4th was composed after both of them too :D

There are two radio concerts on the discs I mentioned in which Furtwangler plays 6 first and then 5 for both dates.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 24, 2010, 10:32:56 AM
My personal theory is that the 4th was actually written by a Viennese stable boy and mistakenly attributed to Beethoven.   ;D
Beethoven was far too crude to have written such a beauty. It could perhaps have been written by the precocious Fanny Mendelssohn, already well into her first year at the time, and who later would have her work all published under the name of her brother Felix :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 24, 2010, 02:28:49 PM
What was the deal with Knappertsbusch's hair and giant trousers?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 26, 2010, 10:48:40 AM
Classical blah blah violins blah movement blah blah blah C minor blah blah blah blah sublime.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on January 26, 2010, 02:02:48 PM
Classical blah blah violins blah movement blah blah blah C minor blah blah blah blah sublime.

This could be extremely useful to steal and use as a standard fill-in whenever I can't think of anything else to say. May I?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 26, 2010, 02:53:28 PM
This could be extremely useful to steal and use as a standard fill-in whenever I can't think of anything else to say. May I?

I would be honored.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on January 27, 2010, 02:23:54 PM
I would be honored.  ;D
Oh good, thanks. Look out for it in unexpected places ....
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 27, 2010, 04:46:30 PM
Classical blah blah sackbuts blah chaconne blah blah blah D major blah blah blah blah sublime.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on January 27, 2010, 05:07:01 PM
Blah blah blah Modern blah blah blah atonal blah blah blah avant garde blah blah blah gerbil wheel.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on January 27, 2010, 05:15:04 PM
Blah blah blah Modern blah blah blah atonal blah blah blah avant garde blah blah blah gerbil wheel.

I think that's actually the name of Karl's new piece! :D  Requiem for a Gerbil Wheel. ;D  He spends about 90 hours thinking up the clever name for his musical piece, and then ten hours composing it.  I kid Karl, I kid! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on January 27, 2010, 05:26:10 PM
There can be too blah blah blah much of a blah blah good thing blaah blaah y'know, guys blaaah.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on January 27, 2010, 08:37:49 PM
Gerbil Wheel & Potatoes of the Couch
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 01, 2010, 11:00:12 AM
The one-recording-a-week plan is going into implementation here at the Beethovenian household. Three reasons: space, waste and savings. I need more space. Too many CDs is a waste (IMO). And I might need some extra money should I live long enough to retire.

It’s also an exercise in discipline. It will be good for me. Won’t it? And I’ll listen more to what I already own.

I’m not sure how I’ll work it. The recording should not be a box set that costs $100.00; that’s for sure. Maybe a single recording with a $20/week limit—including postage. It will force me to be careful with my shopping dollar.

Anyone else here do anything like this?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on February 01, 2010, 11:05:43 AM
The one-recording-a-week plan is going into implementation here at the Beethovenian household. Three reasons: space, waste and savings. I need more space. Too many CDs is a waste (IMO). And I might need some extra money should I live long enough to retire.

It’s also an exercise in discipline. It will be good for me. Won’t it? And I’ll listen more to what I already own.

I’m not sure how I’ll work it. The recording should not be a box set that costs $100.00; that’s for sure. Maybe a single recording with a $20/week limit—including postage. It will force me to be careful with my shopping dollar.

Anyone else here do anything like this?

Yes, but not as strict.  I also try to sell off things I don't like at all.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 01, 2010, 11:06:52 AM
Yes, but not as strict.  I also try to sell off things I don't like at all.

Yeah, me too. I've even been known to sell things I sorta like.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on February 01, 2010, 11:08:39 AM


Anyone else here do anything like this?
Yep. Already this year, my calendar have passed 2019, thanks partly to abeille. With the new 23 label offer on mdt, I predict to safely fly by 2025 during February.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 01, 2010, 11:09:23 AM
Yep. Already this year, my calendar have passed 2019, thanks partly to abeille.

Another rule then! No foreign purchases!  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 01, 2010, 11:32:16 AM
Another rule then! No foreign purchases!  ;D

But, thanks to the Web, the world is a global village.

(The last good thing I do before hitting the sack. >:D)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 01, 2010, 11:33:33 AM
But, thanks to the Web, the world is a global village.

(The last good thing I do before hitting the sack. >:D)

Nothing that is shipped from overseas!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 01, 2010, 02:09:07 PM
The one-recording-a-week plan is going into implementation here at the Beethovenian household. Three reasons: space, waste and savings. I need more space. Too many CDs is a waste (IMO). And I might need some extra money should I live long enough to retire.

It’s also an exercise in discipline. It will be good for me. Won’t it? And I’ll listen more to what I already own.

I’m not sure how I’ll work it. The recording should not be a box set that costs $100.00; that’s for sure. Maybe a single recording with a $20/week limit—including postage. It will force me to be careful with my shopping dollar.

Anyone else here do anything like this?

Yes!!!!!  I am surprised to find someone else doing the same thing because I just told Gurn I was doing that too just last night because

TOO MANY CDS, I AM OVERWHELMED!!!! :o

I'm actually taking it to another level, all of my huge box sets and big cd wallets are going in the closet (actually put them there last night).  I'm starting over, fresh like it was in the beginning.  A modest collection that I listen to alot and I only buy a new cd after I've listened to one at least five times over.  And then relisten to everything I have.  By buying only one cd though, I can buy whatever I want (well make it under $20) to get the best in performance and sound quality.  I'm excited. :)

edit-- I started with Smetana chamber works and the Jarvi Beethoven.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on February 01, 2010, 02:15:26 PM
Yes!!!!!  I am surprised to find someone else doing the same thing because I just told Gurn I was doing that too just last night because

TOO MANY CDS, I AM OVERWHELMED!!!! :o

I'm actually taking it to another level, all of my huge box sets and big cd wallets are going in the closet (actually put them there last night).  I'm starting over, fresh like it was in the beginning.  A modest collection that I listen to alot and I only buy a new cd after I've listened to one at least five times over.  And then relisten to everything I have.  By buying only one cd though, I can buy whatever I want (well make it under $20) to get the best in performance and sound quality.  I'm excited. :)

edit-- I started with Smetana chamber works and the Jarvi Beethoven.

Soon you'll be moving to an apartment with a much bigger closet.   8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 01, 2010, 02:49:04 PM
Yes!!!!!  I am surprised to find someone else doing the same thing because I just told Gurn I was doing that too just last night because

TOO MANY CDS, I AM OVERWHELMED!!!! :o

I'm actually taking it to another level, all of my huge box sets and big cd wallets are going in the closet (actually put them there last night).  I'm starting over, fresh like it was in the beginning.  A modest collection that I listen to alot and I only buy a new cd after I've listened to one at least five times over.  And then relisten to everything I have.  By buying only one cd though, I can buy whatever I want (well make it under $20) to get the best in performance and sound quality.  I'm excited. :)

edit-- I started with Smetana chamber works and the Jarvi Beethoven.

Yay!!! It's a club.  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Martin Lind on February 01, 2010, 06:36:14 PM
A question but I didn't want to start a new thread because of that. Does anybody know a chatroom where you can chat about classical music? I tried hard to find something like that in the internet but couldn't find anything like that.

Regards
Martin
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on February 02, 2010, 11:15:15 AM
A question but I didn't want to start a new thread because of that. Does anybody know a chatroom where you can chat about classical music? I tried hard to find something like that in the internet but couldn't find anything like that.

Regards
Martin

Maybe...here?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: listener on February 02, 2010, 11:39:43 AM
I also have a lot of discs (LP and CD) that I heard only once, maybe did not listen to, (there's a difference).   They are out of order on several shelves, I play each disc now before re-shelving and find a lot of buried treasures I had forgotten.    I have two local retailers who have interesting delete, overstock and used bins so I look there first when I cannot resist the temptation to see what's new.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 02, 2010, 11:58:44 AM
A question but I didn't want to start a new thread because of that. Does anybody know a chatroom where you can chat about classical music? I tried hard to find something like that in the internet but couldn't find anything like that.

Regards
Martin

I've asked about that here. Didn't go over well.

You could always start one yourself and let us know.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 02, 2010, 12:44:14 PM
http://www.gotoquiz.com/what_brahms_symphony_are_you
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on February 02, 2010, 10:03:46 PM
In 11 of the last 12 days, and in the last 6 days in a row, I've listened to a work that I'd never heard before. First Listen Friday? Bring on First Listen February!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on February 03, 2010, 01:09:28 AM
I wonder why we're all experiencing heightened awareness of CD overload at about the same time? My daughter looked at my opera collection a couple of weeks ago, and said that if it was hers she'd find it scary. I kind of find it scary myself. I can understand in my case how it happened, because of the sudden discovery that I could enjoy (after a lifetime of thinking I couldn't) music from the baroque and classical eras. Life was pretty simple when I listened mostly to Elgar, RVW, Puccini and French C19th opera, because I owned most of the recorded music I needed. But when suddenly, after decades, you develop a passion for Handel, Vivaldi, French baroque and Mozart in the space of less than two years, the floodgates open and the CDs come pouring through because there's such a lot of it, and so little time left to listen to it all.

For instance: I bought the Sofronitski box of Mozart piano concertos and listened to most of them twice, and found myself getting more and more curious about the difference between these HIP performances, and the traditional post-Romantic approach. Then I saw that jpc were offering the set by Annerose Schmidt and Kurt Masur for next to nothing, so ordered one because it was so cheap; but I know they're regarded as worthy, rather than outstanding, and am wondering whether I should have bought Barenboim instead. Or - no, no, go away, thought - maybe as well??? And so it goes on. One serious problem is the affordability of so many of these sets. If I added up all the time left for listening (just once more) to the CDs that I have, can I actually live that long?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Wanderer on February 03, 2010, 01:14:58 AM
Gerbil Wheel & Potatoes of the Couch

Very avant-garde.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: secondwind on February 03, 2010, 05:38:00 AM
. . .there's such a lot of it, and so little time left to listen to it all. . . . If I added up all the time left for listening (just once more) to the CDs that I have, can I actually live that long?
Don't waste valuable listening time performing pointless mathematical computations! ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: secondwind on February 03, 2010, 05:44:23 AM
http://www.gotoquiz.com/what_brahms_symphony_are_you
It says I'm the 1st.  Hmmm.  Not sure about that.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on February 03, 2010, 05:51:40 AM
In 11 of the last 12 days, and in the last 6 days in a row, I've listened to a work that I'd never heard before. First Listen Friday? Bring on First Listen February!

Yes, my January was just such a one, nor do I see February shaping much different!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on February 03, 2010, 05:56:59 AM
It says I'm the 1st.  Hmmm.  Not sure about that.

I was hoping I'd be the Fourth, but no, not even close. I'm the Third: "When you decide you want something, you take it, but occasionally are stricken by bouts of deep sadness. You tend to polarize those around you."

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on February 03, 2010, 06:00:59 AM
The one-recording-a-week plan is going into implementation here at the Beethovenian household.

Very wise. I've done a similar thing in the Rock household: limit myself to one CD a day.  ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on February 03, 2010, 09:58:47 AM
Don't waste valuable listening time performing pointless mathematical computations! ;D

That's what I was hoping someone would say. To heck with the maths. Now then, what's new at Presto Classical .....?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on February 03, 2010, 10:41:06 AM
That's what I was hoping someone would say. To heck with the maths. Now then, what's new at Presto Classical .....?
23 new offers at mdt   ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: offbeat on February 03, 2010, 03:40:02 PM
In 11 of the last 12 days, and in the last 6 days in a row, I've listened to a work that I'd never heard before. First Listen Friday? Bring on First Listen February!
[/quote
Yes thats a very good strategy - my problem is i can get a bit lazy and listening to something new requires an effort -but yr idea is a good one - actually today got Kenneth Leighton cello concerto/Symphony 3 and listening now for first time  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on February 03, 2010, 03:51:19 PM
It says I'm the 1st.  Hmmm.  Not sure about that.

Can we trade?  It says that I'm overwhelmingly the 3rd Symphony.  I'd rather be the first.  :(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 03, 2010, 07:07:28 PM
I, like Sarge, was going for 4, but got 3.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: secondwind on February 03, 2010, 07:13:40 PM
You aspire to greatness and always give it your best effort no matter the endeavor. This perfectionist tendency earns you much respect and admiration, except from whom you most desperately need it: yourself. At times you could benefit from a little relaxation, or perhaps some downright laziness, but you get more satisfaction from hard work. Congratulations!

This is what is says about the 1st.  I'm just not at all sure it's "me".  :-\ So, what do I get in a trade? (I kind of wanted the 4th, too. . . )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 03, 2010, 07:14:53 PM
You aspire to greatness and always give it your best effort no matter the endeavor. This perfectionist tendency earns you much respect and admiration, except from whom you most desperately need it: yourself. At times you could benefit from a little relaxation, or perhaps some downright laziness, but you get more satisfaction from hard work. Congratulations!

This is what is says about the 1st.  I'm just not at all sure it's "me".  :-\ So, what do I get in a trade? (I kind of wanted the 4th, too. . . )

Together, we can make a 4.  :-*
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 03, 2010, 07:33:02 PM
I would have liked to be the 3rd but I am the 4th. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 03, 2010, 07:37:01 PM
I would have liked to be the 3rd but I am the 4th. :)

Ah, someone to trade with.  0:)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on February 04, 2010, 04:47:27 AM
The BSO are playing the Fourth this weekend.  (Not quite the topic, I know . . . .)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 12, 2010, 06:42:18 PM
Ugh.

On iTunes, I just purchased what I thought was Reiner's Living Stereo recording of LvB 5 & 7 and what it actually was was just the 5th and an overture (the covers are identical except for the wording), and you can hear the needle drop in the groove of the "record" and everything. Some company named Hallmark put this travesty out.

I must look more closely at what I'm purchasing from now on.  ;D

I asked for my money back.  >:(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Est.1965 on February 12, 2010, 06:56:55 PM
Took part in that Brahms Symphony quiz thing and it turns out I am the first symphony.
Well, must have been re-written a few times, mind you.   ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on February 13, 2010, 01:01:12 AM
you can hear the needle drop in the groove of the "record" and everything.

Lucky fellow. Some people pay large amounts of money to get that good old genuine 'vinyl sound'.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on February 13, 2010, 05:50:07 AM
Lucky fellow. Some people pay large amounts of money to get that good old genuine 'vinyl sound'.

It was so strange...  ::)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Elgarian on February 13, 2010, 07:50:17 AM
It was so strange...
I have a CD set of Massenet's Sapho that's like that:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51EPSNN454L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

The blurb blathers on about the remastering they've done, but the first thing that's noticeable is the rumble of the turntable as a background to  the spits and pops of the dust jammed in the grooves. (In the bad old days when I had a turntable, I never did actually hear any rumble at normal listening levels, so in this case they must've tried extra hard to preserve it.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: George on February 13, 2010, 01:59:35 PM
I was hoping I'd be the Fourth, but no, not even close. I'm the Third: "When you decide you want something, you take it, but occasionally are stricken by bouts of deep sadness. You tend to polarize those around you."

Sarge

Me too.

(bet you're not surprised)  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on February 14, 2010, 02:13:57 PM
Me too.

(bet you're not surprised)  8)

Mon frère  ;)

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 17, 2010, 05:12:27 AM
Do you ever find yourself struggling with a work or even a whole genre from a composer whose output you usually love?  I find that the case with Bach.  His concertos and suites are wonderful, his cantatas, oratorios, masses etc are sublime yet I'm not moved by Musical Offering.  Perhaps it's like the WTC and I just need to listen alot more (like ten times instead of five times).

But still there's that thing that some works are effortless to enjoy, and others take work.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 17, 2010, 11:04:46 PM
Do you ever find yourself struggling with a work or even a whole genre from a composer whose output you usually love?  I find that the case with Bach.  His concertos and suites are wonderful, his cantatas, oratorios, masses etc are sublime yet I'm not moved by Musical Offering.  Perhaps it's like the WTC and I just need to listen alot more (like ten times instead of five times).

But still there's that thing that some works are effortless to enjoy, and others take work.

I don't enjoy MO in the same way as I do some of the other works you mention, but I like it as a piece filled with a lot of counterpoint. The only part where I find it actually feels like a single piece of work -- as opposed to a set of loosely-strung canons on a theme, is in the trio sonata. Try, perhaps, listening to one or two parts alone (like just the Riecercare a 6, the trio sonata) or maybe changing the order of some of the pieces in your recording.

And FWIW, I didn't struggle with das WTC. :) (Although listening to it as a single piece or work, when it was not actually intended to be one, can be very exhausting, I confess.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 18, 2010, 05:19:36 AM
I don't enjoy MO in the same way as I do some of the other works you mention, but I like it as a piece filled with a lot of counterpoint. The only part where I find it actually feels like a single piece of work -- as opposed to a set of loosely-strung canons on a theme, is in the trio sonata. Try, perhaps, listening to one or two parts alone (like just the Riecercare a 6, the trio sonata) or maybe changing the order of some of the pieces in your recording.

The opening and ending Ricercare are the only parts that I like right now so you might be on to something...

Quote
And FWIW, I didn't struggle with das WTC. :) (Although listening to it as a single piece or work, when it was not actually intended to be one, can be very exhausting, I confess.)

I struggled with WTC as a whole, but then once I stopped seeing it that way and focused on individual bits the struggle ended. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on February 18, 2010, 05:47:16 AM
My preferred Bach work for purposes of asking Just why did he bother, again? is the B Minor Mass ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 18, 2010, 05:53:18 AM
My preferred Bach work for purposes of asking Just why did he bother, again? is the B Minor Mass ; )

Yes a great masterpiece.  I actually plan on buying yet another recording of it sometime in the next few weeks.  I'm thinking Marc Minkowski. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 19, 2010, 05:54:18 AM
Well I've figured out what bugs me-- it's not the music, it's the performance.  It's just too fast.  You can't follow the harmony, and there is no sense of melody, just clanging and banging as fast as possible.  That is also what made the solo keyboard works so hard for me-- just crappy performances.  I've listened to (Paulb style) clips on Müchinger, and it sounded much, much, much, much better.  It actually sounded like Bach.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on February 19, 2010, 06:31:09 AM
Clips do serve a good purpose, for those who know how to use the tool.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 19, 2010, 06:40:37 AM
Well I've figured out what bugs me-- it's not the music, it's the performance.  It's just too fast.  You can't follow the harmony, and there is no sense of melody, just clanging and banging as fast as possible.  That is also what made the solo keyboard works so hard for me-- just crappy performances.  I've listened to (Paulb style) clips on Müchinger, and it sounded much, much, much, much better.  It actually sounded like Bach.

Another factor that may have had an (adverse) effect is instrumentation. Since historians are not clear on exactly which instruments (apart from the flute, possibly) Bach specified for the work, the musicians take an artistic decision on the issue. For example, I noticed that the Koopman recording has two versions of Ra6, one after the other bringing the work to a close, while the Harnoncourt recording has just one version, and that on a single harpsichord.

A version I've enjoyed watching on YouTube (DVD Rip) is from the Kuijken ensemble. (Go here (http://www.youtube.com/user/OedipusColoneus#g/u) and search for '1079'.) Just four members play the work, and the instruments are quite clearly heard. I haven't heard Koopman to tell whether this is faster or not, but the Kuijkens' pace seem quite relaxed to me. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on February 19, 2010, 07:12:46 AM
One version which I enjoy (but which may be too specific, in its own ways, for general approbation) is Igor Markevich's 'deployment' of Das musikalisches Opfer.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 19, 2010, 07:25:24 AM
One version which I enjoy (but which may be too specific, in its own ways, for general approbation) is Igor Markevich's 'deployment' of Das musikalisches Opfer.

Oh nice, I'll sample it Paulb style this evening. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: George on February 19, 2010, 11:12:07 AM
Clips do serve a good purpose, for those who know how to use the tool.

QFT
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 20, 2010, 03:57:51 PM
Well Navneeth that youtube concert was swell.  And I've returned to give Koopman a fresh listen and you know what?  I like it now.  Sometimes I think you just have to give your brain a few days to mull it over. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 20, 2010, 11:36:27 PM
Well Navneeth that youtube concert was swell.  And I've returned to give Koopman a fresh listen and you know what?  I like it now.  Sometimes I think you just have to give your brain a few days to mull it over. :)

I'm glad that turned out well, David. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 04, 2010, 11:19:37 AM
Did Brahms borrow something from E minor fugue, BWV 855, for the last movement of his fourth symphony? I always found those fleeting moments in the fugue familiar but only now did I recognise the pattern.

First the fugue in E minor. It is the first three seconds that is of interest.

http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/kKdqwMTISos

Now, to Brahms. 2:00-2:03.

http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/WZGWB93-mmI
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on March 04, 2010, 11:21:48 AM
Well Navneeth that youtube concert was swell.  And I've returned to give Koopman a fresh listen and you know what?  I like it now.  Sometimes I think you just have to give your brain a few days to mull it over. :)

Sometimes, your brain just needs . . . space.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on March 04, 2010, 01:48:48 PM
Sometimes, your brain just needs . . . space.

Yup. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on March 04, 2010, 01:57:42 PM
Sometimes, your brain just needs . . . space.
Thinking is underrated.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on March 19, 2010, 10:54:13 AM
Why were so many of the most popular conductors of the 20th century Hungarian?

Szell, Solti, Ormandy, Reiner, Doráti...

I mean, any big-ish European country would produce a decent amount of talent, but was there something in the water over there or something?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 19, 2010, 11:11:12 AM
Why were so many of the most popular conductors of the 20th century Hungarian?

Szell, Solti, Ormandy, Reiner, Doráti...

I mean, any big-ish European country would produce a decent amount of talent, but was there something in the water over there or something?

Do you really think so? I mean, Germany, Austria and France, for instance, have produced their fair share of famous conductors in the last century. Perhaps, you could ask why it was mostly Hungarian conductors who were responsible in making many of America's orchestras some of the best in the world?

A question in a similar vein to which I have not yet found an answer: the HIPsters, at least the pioneers, and many today certainly, were either Dutch or English. Why?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on March 19, 2010, 11:40:16 AM
I suppose the popularity I mean stems from their recorded legacies, many of which were indeed with American orchestras.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on March 20, 2010, 07:16:28 AM
Why were so many of the most popular conductors of the 20th century Hungarian?

Szell, Solti, Ormandy, Reiner, Doráti...

I mean, any big-ish European country would produce a decent amount of talent, but was there something in the water over there or something?

I've often wondered that myself. Yeah, as Op 106 points out, all countries produced conductors, but something about Hungary ... Fricsay, too, and Arthur Nikisch, who made the first (?) Beethoven's Fifth recording, and Christoph von Dohnanyi barely missed the cut by being "of Hungarian descent." Crazy amount of talent in the conducting department. Especially, as you point out, with American orchestras (Nikisch, by the way, took the LSO on its first tour of America...or indeed, the first American tour of any big European orchestra)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on March 20, 2010, 07:45:51 AM
and Kertez, and a couple of Fischers...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 20, 2010, 07:55:44 AM
And wasn't it reported that Bernstein actually came from Hungary? As nonsensical as that may sound, I remember reading something to that effect in this forum.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on March 20, 2010, 01:53:52 PM
And wasn't it reported that Bernstein actually came from Hungary? As nonsensical as that may sound, I remember reading something to that effect in this forum.

It is not true.  Bernstein was born in the US of parents who came from the Ukraine.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on March 20, 2010, 02:13:54 PM
It is not true.  Bernstein was born in the US of parents who came from the Ukraine.


In Lowell, Mass, if memory serve.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on March 23, 2010, 12:14:36 PM
Why were so many of the most popular conductors of the 20th century Hungarian?
Szell, Solti, Ormandy, Reiner, Doráti...

and Kertez

Like the five conductors Lethe names, István Kertész almost led a major American orchestra too. After Szell died, he was a leading candidate to be Cleveland's next Music Director. He was the orchestra members overwhelming choice. When they voted,  Kertész received 76 votes, Abbado 13 , Frübeck de Burgos 4, Barenboim 3, Maazel 2, Leinsdorf and Haitink 0. The orchestra's board ignored the musicans and hired Maazel, of course, but Kertész had been in  the running for awhile.

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: knight66 on March 23, 2010, 11:22:51 PM
That appointment was 1972, most of that list are still active: long careers. Kertész died young, Leinsdorf was already elderly by 1972. I was in a performance of his in 76 and he was pretty infirm in terms of his grasp on the performers. Baremboim I was in chorus for in 76, his potential was clear, but he was no world beater at that point. Watching him grow and grow has been one of life's great musical pleasures.

Mike
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on March 29, 2010, 05:22:37 AM
I have a classical recording which consists of nine tracks, yet the CD case indicates there are eleven. What they did was list the works’ titles as actual tracks. D’oh! Nice work, Sony. You really care a lot.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on March 29, 2010, 05:26:37 AM
On several discs I have, especially where there is insufficient space to list all the tracks on the rear cover, works are listed entire.

Sometimes the track range is printed:


[1] - [3] Symphony in Three Movements

Sometimes just the track at which each work begins:

[1] Symphony in Three Movements

[4] Mass

[10] Threni
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 30, 2010, 11:59:55 AM
Something I didn't know, Mar 31, 2010 edition: Lorenzo Da Ponte died a U.S. citizen!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on March 30, 2010, 12:03:40 PM
Yes, he wound up a grocer in Hackensack, New Jersey. Oh, the humanity!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on March 30, 2010, 12:34:03 PM
Yes, he wound up a grocer in Hackensack, New Jersey. Oh, the humanity!

 ???

He came to the us to avoid a bankruptcy in London but he ended up a professor of Italian literature at Columbia University and an Opera Producer in New York City.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on March 30, 2010, 12:47:31 PM
Just an apocryphal story I once hoid.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 30, 2010, 12:53:29 PM
???

He came to the us to avoid a bankruptcy in London but he ended up a professor of Italian literature at Columbia University and an Opera Producer in New York City.

While selling veggies for a short while in Philly. That's according to Wiki P., anyway.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on April 06, 2010, 07:03:42 PM
I'm trying to figure out why you manage to keep a listening log book, while I can't. Have thought about it for 30 years.

Something I've been doing for two years now.  I just enjoy doing it, and I'll jot down some notes too from time to time.

Boy, I started keeping a listening log on January 9 and it's been a very fun, and very interesting, endeavor. I've noticed a lot about my own listening habits; for instance, that Beethoven and Dvorak are constants but that Sibelius and Shostakovich, my other favorite composers, come and go in very dramatic swings.

And I am VERY proud to see that, in the first 90 days (well, technically 88) of my log, I've listened to 140 pieces of classical music that I had never heard before, from Bach cello suites to music by at least a dozen living composers.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on April 07, 2010, 04:48:12 AM
Well done, Brian!

We need to get some more new Henning in that queue . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on April 08, 2010, 08:24:57 PM
Boy, I started keeping a listening log on January 9 and it's been a very fun, and very interesting, endeavor. I've noticed a lot about my own listening habits; for instance, that Beethoven and Dvorak are constants but that Sibelius and Shostakovich, my other favorite composers, come and go in very dramatic swings.

And I am VERY proud to see that, in the first 90 days (well, technically 88) of my log, I've listened to 140 pieces of classical music that I had never heard before, from Bach cello suites to music by at least a dozen living composers.

I've been doing something similar, off and on, for years.  If you don't want to sound like such a nerd, call it your listening diary.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on April 09, 2010, 04:30:40 AM
I've been doing something similar, off and on, for years.  If you don't want to sound like such a nerd, call it your listening diary.

But then I sound like a girl  ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on April 09, 2010, 04:32:06 AM
Just call it The Listening.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 09, 2010, 06:00:06 AM
Just call it The Listening.

That sounds like the name for a nu-metal band! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on April 09, 2010, 06:20:34 AM
That sounds like the name for a nu-metal band! :D

Or a horror novel.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 09, 2010, 06:22:30 AM
Or a horror novel.

When Brian's listening log was found little did he know that there was a hidden message in it warning of the ghosts... ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on April 09, 2010, 07:07:58 AM
The Logging of the Tunes.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 11, 2010, 04:18:09 PM
First listen Sunday ;D

Here are my thoughts on the Järvi/Bremen 9th:

It didn't floor me like the third, nothing unusual, experimental like he did in the third IMO, but perhaps it's there and my relative unfamiliarity with the 9th (I play it much less than the 3rd) left me drawing blanks.  But very sharp, incisive phrasing seems to drift between legato and staccato, in tune with the music.  It kind of works because usually when I hear a recording its just predominantly one or the other instead of smart, flexible choices based upon passage.  There is that patented ;D Järvi/Bremen ability to sound like a chamber ensemble one minute and then the next minute make an impossibly huge orchestral sound out of such a small ensemble, these guys can project.  I was also impressed by how fast it is (an hour) but it never feels rushed.  Can't figure out how he did that. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on April 14, 2010, 06:21:06 AM
DavidW, thanks for that review. I've got all the other Jarvi/Bremen recordings, so I'm going to pick up the 9th, but that writeup just makes me more excited.  :)

For my university's student magazine, I've just penned an article arguing that classical concerts should be a much more informal experience (http://www.ricestandard.org/classical-music-concert/). You know, clap between movements, don't dress up, don't sit still ...  ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 14, 2010, 08:40:57 AM
Brian cool article, I'm especially in agreement over applauding before they've even done anything. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on April 14, 2010, 10:56:29 AM
In Maria Lettberg's hands, the Opus 11 Scriabin Preludes nos. 2 & 4 run a few seconds past two minutes each.  I've been keen to hear these "as written," to compare with the Preludes as Chick Corea muses upon them on the Solo Piano: Originals CD.  Charming comparative listening!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 16, 2010, 06:52:13 AM
Is this a "Classical" [i.e. Mozart] chat thread or a "classical" [chatting about classical music] chat thread?

If the latter, this little essay on Paris, Alexandre Tharaud, and EMI should be a perfect fit:


Paris in Passing (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/04/paris-in-passing.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 16, 2010, 06:57:47 AM
Jens I think that a blog that long requires an abstract! :D  You kind of make Tharaud seem like Chopin himself as in "frail" sensitive artist. :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on April 16, 2010, 07:03:09 AM
I'll admit to continued bafflement over why Tharaud would jump from one of the most exciting record labels there is, to EMI. They must have been treating him very poorly at harmonia mundi.

And, on the bright side, maybe EMI will persuade him to record some chamber music with Reynaud and Gautier Capucon. Or the Faure piano quintets with the Quatuor Ebene - can you imagine how glorious an album that would be?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on April 16, 2010, 07:04:21 AM
Brian cool article, I'm especially in agreement over applauding before they've even done anything. :)

Actually, on that point, somebody just posted an excellent comment rebutting me: a performer who points out that "dead" audiences are disheartening and the applause just gets them energized and ready to go.  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 16, 2010, 07:06:33 AM
I'll admit to continued bafflement over why Tharaud would jump from one of the most exciting record labels there is, to EMI. They must have been treating him very poorly at harmonia mundi.

And, on the bright side, maybe EMI will persuade him to record some chamber music with Reynaud and Gautier Capucon.

Gawd, I hope not. I *hate* Gautier and Reynaud is boring me to tears. Neither of them musically up my alley. Let him continue to make music with Queyras and some fine violinist I haven't yet set my mind on.

Quote
Or the Faure piano quintets with the Quatuor Ebene - can you imagine how glorious an album that would be?

NOW we are talking!!!! A Trout with the Quatuor Ebene, Tharaud, and Olivier Thiery (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/09/last-exit-rota-ionarts-at-large-from.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 16, 2010, 07:08:59 AM
Jens I think that a blog that long requires an abstract! :D  You kind of make Tharaud seem like Chopin himself as in "frail" sensitive artist. :D

Abstracts are too concrete.

Frailty: I wasn't thinking about that connection, actually. Probably because that's neither my view of Chopin (the wilting flower, expiring romantically on the ivory), nor the way that Tharaud plays it. In fact, he doesn't play at all how he looks---if one lets those stereotypes of fragility and paleness roam free.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on April 16, 2010, 07:35:56 AM
Actually, on that point, somebody just posted an excellent comment rebutting me: a performer who points out that "dead" audiences are disheartening and the applause just gets them energized and ready to go.  :)

Oh, did you object to 'acknowledgement applause', when the musician(s) first step out on to the stage?  Sure, I'd be a little deflated if there was just dead silence.

(A little different in a venue like the West End branch of the BPL, where there is no Green Room . . . but then there's more intimacy with the audience there, anyway.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on April 16, 2010, 07:40:41 AM
Oh, did you object to 'acknowledgement applause', when the musician(s) first step out on to the stage?  Sure, I'd be a little deflated if there was just dead silence.

(A little different in a venue like the West End branch of the BPL, where there is no Green Room . . . but then there's more intimacy with the audience there, anyway.)


Yes, sir, I did, possibly to my regret? Link (http://www.ricestandard.org/classical-music-concert/)
Relevant excerpt:

Quote
Applause is a sign of gratitude; all they’ve done is walk on. For too long we have encouraged such stars to indulge their egos by bowing and generally basking in applause before they even do anything. I am reminded of Robin Williams’ stand-up comedy routine; he walks on the stage, says “Hello!” and is greeted by a cascade of cheers. Once the applause is finally over, he bows, says “Goodbye!” and pretends to leave. Williams is right: our desire to clap people walking onstage has gotten out of hand.

At a recent Houston Symphony concert, the orchestra played the Gustav Holst suite The Planets while a projector showed an HD video of satellite footage of each planet and its moons. There was a spoken video introduction with interviews of astronomers, and then, before the music could begin, the house lights came up so that the audience could clap as conductor Hans Graf walked onstage. I didn’t clap. Graf could have walked on unobtrusively, modestly, during the video and saved us the energy. But it is we, the audience, who enable people like Graf to forget their modesty.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on April 16, 2010, 07:55:36 AM
Under those circs, my call would have been to have the conductor be unobtrusive at the start.  So I have no quarrel to your quarrel ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 17, 2010, 06:06:49 AM
STUPID QUESTION NUMBER 492772:

In Rachmaninoff's Paganini Variations, why does the first variation come before the theme, and why doesn't that make the theme the first variation of the "first variation"?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: George on April 17, 2010, 06:15:36 AM
STUPID QUESTION NUMBER 492772:

In Rachmaninoff's Paganini Variations, why does the first variation come before the theme, and why doesn't that make the theme the first variation of the "first variation"?

Good question. I have never researched this, but I'd bet that the composer wrote it with the theme first and later decided that it didn't work well as an opening. A Music Theory professor told me when I was in school that it isn't a strict theme and variations, but more of a "fantasy" type variations. Perhaps this flexibility was part of the reason why the theme doesn't come first?   
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 17, 2010, 06:35:39 AM
That does sound feasable - I wonder why he didn't make a new bridge from the introduction section.

A final Rach-related question: which is most correct for the first movement of the 3rd PC: allegro ma non troppo, or allegro ma non tanto? It seems that record labels cannot decide - the Wikipedia article uses the former, but then reverts to the second to title the embedded clip on the page.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on April 17, 2010, 11:48:18 AM
STUPID QUESTION NUMBER 492772:

In Rachmaninoff's Paganini Variations, why does the first variation come before the theme, and why doesn't that make the theme the first variation of the "first variation"?

Not a stupid question at all, SaraRakhmaninov is picking up on a game that Beethoven started with the finale of the Sinfonia eroica . . . which similarly begins not with a full-dressed theme per se, but with the harmonic skeleton of the theme.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on April 17, 2010, 11:51:05 AM
A final Rach-related question: which is most correct for the first movement of the 3rd PC: allegro ma non troppo, or allegro ma non tanto? It seems that record labels cannot decide - the Wikipedia article uses the former, but then reverts to the second to title the embedded clip on the page.

The Boosey & Hawkes pocket score is engraved Allegro ma non tanto.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: George on April 17, 2010, 01:34:31 PM
The Boosey & Hawkes pocket score is engraved Allegro ma non tanto.

That is also the tempo indication on the Naxos and RCA masterings of the composers recording of this work.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 17, 2010, 03:13:24 PM
Hmm, thanks - I guess I'll override the decision of certain other labels and tag all of them with tanto.

At a glance, troppo does seem to be in a vast minority of all my copies, with Janis/Dorati/Minneapolis (Mercury) as one exception. Weird, but annoyingly typical that the WP article is wrong - generally classical music people are not keen on using that thing (which is a shame, as it is a potentially essential resource for this genre), so we have perfectly polished pop articles but junk ones on classical :( There are so many obscure composer articles using unorthodox spellings that can't really be changed by a single person as it requires a small group consensus, and there is no such group.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on April 18, 2010, 08:41:08 AM
Not a stupid question at all, SaraRakhmaninov is picking up on a game that Beethoven started with the finale of the Sinfonia eroica . . . which similarly begins not with a full-dressed theme per se, but with the harmonic skeleton of the theme.

You took the thought right out of my mind, Karl.  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 22, 2010, 06:22:28 AM
Until 3 minutes ago I thought Trevor Pinnock was born in Australia.

WTF did I get that idea from? :'(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 29, 2010, 06:20:54 AM
I've heard the 38th and the 41st symphonies of Mozart for the first time today. :)

Wait?  What!?  By that I mean though I've heard many recordings of those works, I did not realize how dynamic and expressive they should be.  From powerful crescendos to elegant minuet interruptions to transparent layered sound from the orchestra, the performance of Jacob and the Freiburger Orchestra showed me what Mozart's music really sounds like.  My eyes are opened, I have heard the definitive performance of these works, AND I LOVE IT!!! :) :) :) :)

 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DarkAngel on April 29, 2010, 08:16:47 AM
I've heard the 38th and the 41st symphonies of Mozart for the first time today. :)

Wait?  What!?  By that I mean though I've heard many recordings of those works, I did not realize how dynamic and expressive they should be.  From powerful crescendos to elegant minuet interruptions to transparent layered sound from the orchestra, the performance of Jacob and the Freiburger Orchestra showed me what Mozart's music really sounds like.  My eyes are opened, I have heard the definitive performance of these works, AND I LOVE IT!!!

I made a similar "definitive proclamation" in the HIP Mozart thread....... ;)

 Quote from: DarkAngel on March 25, 2010, 07:20:20 AM (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,232.msg401074.html#msg401074)
 
(https://secure.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/HMC901959.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41EBJNRWJEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
 
Extremely impressed with the new Jacobs 39,40 CD.......
One of the rare performances that makes you think you are hearing these standards fresh again for the 1st time, the music lines are so clarified and transparent you hear all kinds of little details obscured by other versions. Bold, exciting outer movements, charming overall with excellent modern sound from Harmonia Mundi. Comes in 3 panel digipak (2 panel digipak for 38,41 CD), similar in stye to Immerseel recent CD but even better overall
 
I have 15+ versions of Mozart 38-41 and it may seem impossible choose the best from so many great ones, but I will do it anyway and say Jacobs/HM are now my reference performances
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 29, 2010, 08:42:52 AM
Yeah DA that post that you had made pushed me over to buy it, and I absolutely do not regret it. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 29, 2010, 12:35:15 PM
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/abu-dhabi-festival-logo-c2.png)

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Key-to-the-Mosque-150x150.jpg)(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Bella-Mosque-1-150x150.jpg)(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Bella-Gardens-150x150.jpg)
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Bella-Mosque-2-150x150.jpg)(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/DSC04549-150x150.jpg)(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/DSC04364-150x150.jpg)
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Bella-Mosque-Detail-2-150x150.jpg)(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Bella-sunbathing-1-150x150.jpg)(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/DSC04375-150x150.jpg)

Classics in the Desert
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=1969 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=1969)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 29, 2010, 12:52:19 PM
I had a friend that came from Abu Dhabi, anyway interesting read Jens. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 30, 2010, 06:32:45 AM
DA where did you find your copy of the Jacobs 39 40?  I looked on amazon and it says that it won't release until May 11. :'(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DarkAngel on April 30, 2010, 07:21:57 AM
DA where did you find your copy of the Jacobs 39 40?  I looked on amazon and it says that it won't release until May 11.

UK vendor MDT:
 
http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/product//HMC901959.htm (http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/product//HMC901959.htm)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on May 17, 2010, 03:17:41 AM
What does Jean Françaix sound like? From what I read about him he seems extremely conservative - like Poulenc/Ravel - is there anything more to him than that?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 17, 2010, 07:01:55 AM

Braunfels is an Obligation to Me
a conversation with Manfred Honeck, a re-premiere of The Great Mass, and two recordings of the Te Deum.

http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2007 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2007)


(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Braunfels-am-Klavier.png)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Grazioso on May 20, 2010, 04:25:54 AM
What does Jean Françaix sound like? From what I read about him he seems extremely conservative - like Poulenc/Ravel - is there anything more to him than that?

What does Francaix sound like? Gallic  ;D Based on what I've heard, I'd say urbane, witty, light-hearted, clear. Fun chamber music.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on May 20, 2010, 05:58:11 AM
Hmm, I guess derivative or not, if it's good - it's good :) Thanks.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on May 20, 2010, 06:36:56 AM

I made a similar "definitive proclamation" in the HIP Mozart thread....... ;)

 Quote from: DarkAngel on March 25, 2010, 07:20:20 AM (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,232.msg401074.html#msg401074)
 
(https://secure.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/HMC901959.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41EBJNRWJEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
 
Extremely impressed with the new Jacobs 39,40 CD.......
One of the rare performances that makes you think you are hearing these standards fresh again for the 1st time, the music lines are so clarified and transparent you hear all kinds of little details obscured by other versions. Bold, exciting outer movements, charming overall with excellent modern sound from Harmonia Mundi. Comes in 3 panel digipak (2 panel digipak for 38,41 CD), similar in stye to Immerseel recent CD but even better overall
 
I have 15+ versions of Mozart 38-41 and it may seem impossible choose the best from so many great ones, but I will do it anyway and say Jacobs/HM are now my reference performances


I have the first issue, the one with 38 and 41, and have been trying to decide whether to get the second one with 39 and 40.  I probably will.  I find the recordings quite good, but they did not displace my favorite Harnoncourt/RCO from the top of my list of favorites. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 26, 2010, 03:30:49 AM
(http://insidecatholic.com/Joomla/templates/main_template/images/logo.png)

Classical Music and the 1st Amendment:

http://insidecatholic.com/Joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=8186&Itemid=48
More Biebls in the Classroom (http://insidecatholic.com/Joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=8186&Itemid=48)


Quote
...The move is superficially innocuous, but if thought through (which the district apparently didn't) it would have heinous consequences. What music is purely secular? If anything with a religious text is out, then Handel Oratorios, Bach Passions, all the requiems (Mozart, Verdi, Berlioz, Brahms, Faure, et al.) are disallowed, along with excerpts therefrom, even in instrumental transcriptions. Bernstein's Mass and "Kaddish" symphony are out. Haydn's "Creation" would be slashed. Spirituals couldn't be performed, and lots of Motown would be banned. If we combed through every instance of music that includes a reference to God or has a hint of Jesus in it, Western music would be slashed to a pitiful trickle. Might someone even suggest the Goldberg Variations could be "too Jewish"? They certainly sound suspicious...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 01, 2010, 12:42:12 PM
(http://www.playbillarts.com/images/logo.gif)


"I Always Wanted to be a Cellist"
Julian Rachlin In Interview
(http://www.playbillarts.com/features/article/8405.html)
http://www.playbillarts.com/features/article/8405.html (http://www.playbillarts.com/features/article/8405.html)

Quote
Actually, the main reason why I play viola is that my favorite instrument is not the violin, nor the viola, but the cello. It has always been the cello. It’s just that for some reason I didn’t become a cellist. My father is a cellist, and becoming a cellist was always my dream. And I was always saying as a child: ‘oh, this violin business is all very nice, but of course I’ll be a cellist one day.’ It just never happened. So the viola is the only way to approach the cello and I actually try to play ‘cello’ both on the viola and also on the violin. I don’t consider myself a classic… you know… completely a violin-violinist.”
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 27, 2010, 01:05:08 PM
AfriClassical (http://africlassical.blogspot.com/)

Bloody hell, this guy has written about 2000 entries to this blog. I ran into it looking for information on William Grant Still and it seems to be a goldmine in this niche.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Henk on August 18, 2010, 07:16:35 AM
Just listened at the local record store to this disc:

(http://multimedia.fnac.com/multimedia/images_produits/ZoomPE/3/2/2/0794881941223.jpg)

Sounds really refreshing! I will listen to this disc and give my comments.

Henk
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 25, 2010, 04:52:10 AM
I wish Brilliant Classics would put their 3CD sets into slimline boxes (like DG) does rather than those fold-out digipacks, which are flimsy and ugly :-\
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Henk on August 27, 2010, 07:15:41 AM
I wish Brilliant Classics would put their 3CD sets into slimline boxes (like DG) does rather than those fold-out digipacks, which are flimsy and ugly :-\

Their budget image justify ugly boxes. People probably think Brilliant Classics can be cheap because of that, so they buy it. At least that may be the marketing idea behind it. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 27, 2010, 07:26:55 AM
 ;D I can just imagine the conversation:

EMI: Okay, so you are offering to pay me money to licence my recordings on a short-term basis - just what will I get from this deal that I could not make by advertising my own product?*

Brilliant Classics: We will package it in such an ugly digipack that people will want to buy your version anyway!

EMI: Ah, nice, so we'll keep distributing them. It's a deal.

This is actually what I did with the Kempe/Strauss box on EMI. The Brilliant backaging was so ugly that I paid £1 and bought the EMI version.

*As if EMI would ever do such a crazy thing.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 27, 2010, 07:50:56 PM
I love the foldout digipacks. Those plastic boxes break so easily, and so often. I have purchased three "EMI Trio" offerings - or whatever they call the recent superbudget 3CD sets. Berwald symphonies, Rachmaninov/Jansons, and Mozart Don Giovanni. Two of the three arrived with broken prongs so the CDs just bounce around in there.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on August 27, 2010, 08:20:56 PM
I love the foldout digipacks. Those plastic boxes break so easily, and so often. I have purchased three "EMI Trio" offerings - or whatever they call the recent superbudget 3CD sets. Berwald symphonies, Rachmaninov/Jansons, and Mozart Don Giovanni. Two of the three arrived with broken prongs so the CDs just bounce around in there.

Yes, they can be strangely frail.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 28, 2010, 12:54:11 AM
I was ambiguous with my wording, I meant that I would prefer a cardboard clamshell box for the 3CDs. Some labels set the threshold to bring that in at 4 discs, but it worked well for Berman's Années de Pèlerinage on DG with 3 discs and makes me glad they didn't use those nasty wide 3CD cases.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 28, 2010, 05:57:32 AM
I was ambiguous with my wording, I meant that I would prefer a cardboard clamshell box for the 3CDs. Some labels set the threshold to bring that in at 4 discs, but it worked well for Berman's Années de Pèlerinage on DG with 3 discs and makes me glad they didn't use those nasty wide 3CD cases.

Oh, gotcha! Yes, I would too. Love me those cardboard boxes.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on August 29, 2010, 09:17:03 AM
Seen this documentary earlier today - fascinating to see this "background" work and that search for perfection.

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs266.ash1/19367_189944419986_189943164986_726142_2248558_n.jpg)

Trailer :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wx9SijTvL6Q&feature=player_embedded (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wx9SijTvL6Q&feature=player_embedded)

Write-up in the Guardian :

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/aug/16/pianomania-documentary-robert-cibis-interview (http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/aug/16/pianomania-documentary-robert-cibis-interview)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: George on August 29, 2010, 10:50:38 AM
Where'd you see it, Papy? I scoured the internet this morning and it doesn't seem to be playing anwhere near me, nor is it on DVD.  ???
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on August 29, 2010, 10:57:30 AM
Where'd you see it, Papy? I scoured the internet this morning and it doesn't seem to be playing anwhere near me, nor is it on DVD.  ???

It has only been released earlier this month in the UK at a very limited number of cinemas  -  the original release in Austria was only in February.

No details as yet for a release in the US (cinemas or dvd) on the official websites

http://oval-film.com/wordpressEN/?page_id=204 (http://oval-film.com/wordpressEN/?page_id=204)

http://www.pianomania.de/ (http://www.pianomania.de/)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: George on August 29, 2010, 10:59:28 AM
It has only been released earlier this month in the UK at a very limited number of cinemas  -  the original release in Austria was only in February.
No details as yet for a release in the US (cinemas or dvd) on the official websites
http://oval-film.com/wordpressEN/?page_id=204 (http://oval-film.com/wordpressEN/?page_id=204)
http://www.pianomania.de/ (http://www.pianomania.de/)

Thanks! Can't wait to rent it. The previews look wonderful.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 30, 2010, 09:14:53 AM
Cool thing #1: I just noticed that there are three classically-oriented Romantic symphonies by Mendelssohn, Parry and Stanford titled the "Scottish", "English" and "Irish".

Cool thing #2: All three of these are the "Symphony No.3".

Bad thing: Wales sucks so much that nobody has dared to name anything after it, to complete a potentially awesome British Isles symphonies 2 CD set :'(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on August 30, 2010, 09:21:09 AM
Cool thing #1: I just noticed that there are three classically-oriented Romantic symphonies by Mendelssohn, Parry and Stanford titled the "Scottish", "English" and "Irish".

Cool thing #2: All three of these are the "Symphony No.3".

Bad thing: Wales sucks so much that nobody has dared to name anything after it, to complete a potentially awesome British Isles symphonies 2 CD set :'(

This is the closest I could come up with:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51WT3V7T7EL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg)
 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 30, 2010, 09:48:39 AM
That is... awesome (http://img693.imageshack.us/img693/5103/emotmonocle.gif)

Perhaps the prospective symphony could be programmatic of a weekend visit there and thankful return.

I. Introduction: Allegro vivace - Allegro moderato - Allegretto - Andante - Lento assai - Larghissimo - Grave - Graver
II. Adventure through the valleys: Adagio interminablo w/ pibgorn solo
III. Scherzo "There's a dragon on our flag, isn't that cool (no)": Maestoso - Agitato (attaca:)
IV. Finale "At the Severn": (Miner's chorus) Nos da, boyo, nos da...

A composer was able to find a commission to get a "United Kingdom" symphony written (albeit the premiere conductor refused to perform it - it was in the news a few years ago but can't seem to find it on Google), so I'm sure somebody could give this a shot.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 31, 2010, 12:57:00 AM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/THwuoFnObHI/AAAAAAAABMM/LqRfBPZSfWA/s400/ard_2010_new_blankBG.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: From the 2010 ARD Competition, Day 9 - Cello, Semi Final
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/08/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_30.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/08/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_30.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 02, 2010, 04:12:51 AM

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/THwuoFnObHI/AAAAAAAABMM/LqRfBPZSfWA/s400/ard_2010_new_blankBG.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: From the 2010 ARD Competition, Day 10 - Piano Duo, Final
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard.html)
 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on September 02, 2010, 05:03:07 AM
A composer was able to find a commission to get a "United Kingdom" symphony written (albeit the premiere conductor refused to perform it - it was in the news a few years ago but can't seem to find it on Google), so I'm sure somebody could give this a shot.

Was that the Barry Wordsworth incident?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on September 02, 2010, 07:25:26 AM
Indeed, good memory :)

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/music/article1495066.ece
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 03, 2010, 09:50:47 AM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/THwuoFnObHI/AAAAAAAABMM/LqRfBPZSfWA/s400/ard_2010_new_blankBG.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: From the 2010 ARD Competition, Day 11 - French Horn, Semi Final
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_03.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_03.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: listener on September 03, 2010, 10:14:18 AM
Noted on the VSO's home page, but not seen elsewhere so this might be a first posting:
Pierre Simard, former Assistant Conductor of Calgary Philharmonic, has been appointed Assistant Conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orch.  It's not a very public position, he'll probably get a couple of the new music concerts and senior matinees that have not had a conductor assigned, and pre-concert talks.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 03, 2010, 10:56:52 AM
Noted on the VSO's home page, but not seen elsewhere so this might be a first posting:
Pierre Simard, former Assistant Conductor of Calgary Philharmonic, has been appointed Assistant Conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orch.  It's not a very public position, he'll probably get a couple of the new music concerts and senior matinees that have not had a conductor assigned, and pre-concert talks.

Hmm... could be a shadow-lurking position, unless he ekes out interesting repertoire performances, rather than just the 'strauss open air festival performances'. Will hear the VSO (under Mikko Franck w/Tzimon Barto) in October, as it happens.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 03, 2010, 12:55:20 PM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/THwuoFnObHI/AAAAAAAABMM/LqRfBPZSfWA/s400/ard_2010_new_blankBG.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: From the 2010 ARD Competition, Day 12 - Cello, Final
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_9779.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_9779.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mirror Image on September 03, 2010, 06:23:18 PM
Cool thing #1: I just noticed that there are three classically-oriented Romantic symphonies by Mendelssohn, Parry and Stanford titled the "Scottish", "English" and "Irish".

Cool thing #2: All three of these are the "Symphony No.3".

Bad thing: Wales sucks so much that nobody has dared to name anything after it, to complete a potentially awesome British Isles symphonies 2 CD set :'(

Lol...yeah I would like to hear a "Welsh Symphony."
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on September 04, 2010, 09:26:54 AM

Lol...yeah I would like to hear a "Welsh Symphony."

 :D  You could try Welsh symphonist, Daniel Jones.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on September 04, 2010, 09:52:38 AM
Does GMG have a thread for useful classical websites?

http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/ (http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/) (Also www.lieder.net (http://www.lieder.net))


This site houses an extensive, growing archive of texts to 84,448 settings of Lieder and other classical art songs (Kunstlieder, mélodies, canzoni, романсы, canciones, liederen, canções, sånger, laulua, písně, piosenki, etc.) and other classical vocal pieces such as short choral works, madrigals and part-songs, in over 90 languages, with 10,693 volunteer translations to English, French, Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and other languages.

In this collection there are currently 53,267 texts associated with musical settings. Of these, 19,155 have not yet been located and are placeholders for cross-referencing, and 3,088 are hidden due to copyright restrictions, leaving 31,023 entirely visible to visitors. When possible, first lines are shown.

This website was created in May, 1995 by Emily Ezust, and is offered as a free public service.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 04, 2010, 11:30:38 AM

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/THwuoFnObHI/AAAAAAAABMM/LqRfBPZSfWA/s400/ard_2010_new_blankBG.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: From the 2010 ARD Competition, Day 13 - Flute, Semi Final
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_04.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/ionarts-at-large-from-2010-ard_04.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 06, 2010, 03:39:15 AM
Scandal, at last!
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/THwuoFnObHI/AAAAAAAABMM/LqRfBPZSfWA/s400/ard_2010_new_blankBG.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: From the 2010 ARD Competition, Day 15 - Flute, Final
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/music-rules-not-from.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/09/music-rules-not-from.html)

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TITVPNVn05I/AAAAAAAABPI/A7q-7dAvuWQ/s320/IvannaMissing_4-webSM.png)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: 12tone. on October 09, 2010, 12:53:30 PM

Bad thing: Wales sucks so much that nobody has dared to name anything after it, to complete a potentially awesome British Isles symphonies 2 CD set :'(

What about a Welsh opera?

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 12, 2010, 07:58:27 AM
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2369 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2369)

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Christoph-Eschenbach_bw.jpg)
A Glimpse of Eschenbach
Impressions of an elusive conductor (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2369)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 06:22:10 AM
I love that sweet spot between pure classical and pure romantic. Something in the Beethoven to Brahms range. Classical loosened up a bit, I guess, but not overblown.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 20, 2010, 06:23:09 AM
Dude, you will be corn to Berlioz's sickle!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 06:26:38 AM
Dude, you will be corn to Berlioz's sickle!

I do enjoy some of his stuff but nothing has knocked me out yet.  :-[
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 06:34:40 AM
Beethoven - Schubert - Schumann - Chopin - Brahms. That sort of thing. :D Anyone missing from that bunch?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 20, 2010, 06:36:36 AM
Well, you've already got Liszt.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 06:37:24 AM
Well, you've already got Liszt.

Yeah, I like his piano stuff for the most part.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 20, 2010, 06:48:16 AM
Dave, do you like Hummel? :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 06:53:06 AM
Dave, do you like Hummel? :)

Is he in that span? I should try him. Does he hold a candle?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on October 20, 2010, 06:56:43 AM
Great figurines . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 20, 2010, 07:10:35 AM
I love that sweet spot between pure classical and pure romantic. Something in the Beethoven to Brahms range. Classical loosened up a bit, I guess, but not overblown.

Spohr, "Faust" !

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51rcTwQRJTL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000001WW1?ie=UTF8&tag=goodmusicguide-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B000001WW1)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 07:13:22 AM
Spohr, "Faust" ! (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000001WW1?ie=UTF8&tag=goodmusicguide-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B000001WW1)

Thanks, man.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 20, 2010, 07:31:21 AM
Thanks, man.

Hummel is a little closer to the classical chaps, but here are my two Hummel-introduction dics, purposely chosen ahead of the piano trios, piano concertos, et al.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pWtEMtfeL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Hummel
Mass in D Major, Op. 111; Mass in B-Flat Major, Op. 77 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00007B8PS?ie=UTF8&tag=goodmusicguide-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00007B8PS)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51WYY39LGuL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Hummel
Missa Solemnis in C Major / Te Deum (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000273AOY?ie=UTF8&tag=goodmusicguide-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B000273AOY)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 07:33:50 AM
Hummel is a little closer to the classical chaps, but here are my two Hummel-introduction dics, purposely chosen ahead of the piano trios, piano concertos, et al.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pWtEMtfeL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Hummel
Mass in D Major, Op. 111; Mass in B-Flat Major, Op. 77 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00007B8PS?ie=UTF8&tag=goodmusicguide-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00007B8PS)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51WYY39LGuL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Hummel
Missa Solemnis in C Major / Te Deum (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000273AOY?ie=UTF8&tag=goodmusicguide-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B000273AOY)

Thanks again. I have ordered the Spohr and will wishlist these two.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 20, 2010, 10:27:39 AM
Hummel masses are great, those were the first works that made me connect with him.  I agree with Jens that he is a bit more classical.  I'm glad that you ordered Spohr, he is a fine composer. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 20, 2010, 11:43:09 AM

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/themes/fmblog/images/masthead/masthead_main.png)
A Select Discography of Christoph Eschenbach (Orchestral / Concertos) (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2383)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mc ukrneal on October 20, 2010, 11:45:24 AM
Beethoven - Schubert - Schumann - Chopin - Brahms. That sort of thing. :D Anyone missing from that bunch?
You might enjoy Burgmuller.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on October 20, 2010, 12:10:48 PM
You might enjoy Burgmuller.

You made that name up.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on October 20, 2010, 12:16:10 PM
For some reason I read Burgmuller like Frau Blucher and expect horses to neigh or lightning to strike. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 20, 2010, 12:35:06 PM
For some reason I read Burgmuller like Frau Blucher and expect horses to neigh or lightning to strike. ;D

Somebody just listened to something by Falkenstein in the 'listening thread' and I thought of that creepy guy at the start of the movie who says "Doctor Frankenstein? I am Bruno von Falkstein. I have come from Transylvania to show you your grandfather's will."
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 01, 2010, 01:22:44 PM



Da-dee-dee—da-da-da-dumm—dee-dee: Interview with Rudolf Buchbinder (and Daniel Harding)

http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2428 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2428)



Rudolf Buchbinder, the Rant: Why Henle are Morons and H&M Ruins Individualism

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/rudolf-buchbinder-rant-why-henle-are.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/rudolf-buchbinder-rant-why-henle-are.html)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on November 03, 2010, 05:00:32 AM


Rudolf Buchbinder, the Rant: Why Henle are Morons and H&M Ruins Individualism

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/rudolf-buchbinder-rant-why-henle-are.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/rudolf-buchbinder-rant-why-henle-are.html)

Quote
“Take a look at men, walking on the street. They all look the same. With the blue jeans and the jackets.” Now I really I feel like protesting, ready to cite myself as an example as someone who dresses decidedly unique. But just before I open my mouth I look down on myself and find myself wearing jeans and a suit jacket. I decide to postpone my counter-critique...“

;D :D ;D


Sarge

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 03, 2010, 05:13:14 AM
Jen why are those interviews rendered in the smallest font possible?  It hurts my eyes! :'(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 03, 2010, 05:26:07 AM
Jens why are those interviews rendered in the smallest font possible?  It hurts my eyes! :'(

I'm not sure I can follow you... the rendering of the font (perfectly legible on my computer, tending toward big on ionarts and towards medium-smallish on WETA)  is more dependent on your browser settings than anything I do, methinks.

p.s. ooops. looks like rudolf got in trouble with the henle publishing house following the interview.  ::)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 03, 2010, 05:33:02 AM
Oh sorry Jens ;D

No sorry it has nothing to do with browser settings because I have mine set to allow the site to set the font.  And when I was trying to figure out why you are so mean ;D I looked at the source and saw that you chose 10 pt.  10 pt!!

I hate it when people never stop to think about how their site looks on an hd monitor, especially since hd monitors are the norm now. :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on November 03, 2010, 05:40:20 AM
10pt, woof!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 03, 2010, 05:42:56 AM
Woof indeed!  I've started becoming passionate about readable fonts ever since the kindle greatly reduced eye strain for me. :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 03, 2010, 06:02:57 AM
Oh sorry Jens ;D

No sorry it has nothing to do with browser settings because I have mine set to allow the site to set the font.  And when I was trying to figure out why you are so mean ;D I looked at the source and saw that you chose 10 pt.  10 pt!!

I hate it when people never stop to think about how their site looks on an hd monitor, especially since hd monitors are the norm now. :P

You're talking about WETA, then?

Well, for starters, I have no control over the font-size there... though I'll inquire about it.
HD monitors? Whatever might you mean with that, since that term really only makes sense for SOURCE material and TVs, not computer monitors"
I, for one, have no problems reading anything on my monitor at a resolution of 1680 x 1050 at 32b. Is that already no longer the norm or are my eyes just too young to appreciate the difficulties? In any case, you're the first ever to have mentioned it.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 03, 2010, 06:18:00 AM
HD only refers to resolution, not necessarily source.  I'm using a 1920x1080 monitor and what I see is that the fonts are small on both weta and your blog and on both there are large amounts of unusued white space.  In fact the margins on your weta entry occupy more than 2/3 the space.  Decrease those margins and increase the font, and it would be so much more readable.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 03, 2010, 06:30:32 AM
But I wanted to say that there is nothing particular with those two sites, it's pretty common for sites to be designed poorly these days.  I think that mostly they set them up a few years back when 4:3 low res crts were still the most common and they just don't update.  Even major sites that should know better like cnn and nytimes look bad.  I swear to god I prefer their apps on the touch just because they were designed to be more readable.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 03, 2010, 08:17:28 AM

If every font you read is too small, the resolution of your screen might be too high!

Ionarts-at-Large: Bavarian State Orchestra in Gubaidulina and Strauss
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/ionarts-at-large-bavarian-state.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/ionarts-at-large-bavarian-state.html)


(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TNFyfIbHq4I/AAAAAAAABTs/jUr5a7kfdow/s400/bavarian_state_orchestra_konzert.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 04, 2010, 08:37:44 AM


If every font you read is too small, the resolution of your screen might be too high!


The "Morons" at Henle Reply

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/morons-at-henle-reply.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/morons-at-henle-reply.html)


(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TNLVlKBogXI/AAAAAAAABT0/F_X2pb7kIfU/s400/Henle_Urtext_Beethoven_Tempest_Sonata_op31-2.gif)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 08, 2010, 10:41:06 AM

A Braunfels Quartet
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2418 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2418)

In light of a plentifully stuffed repertoire in classical music,
 from Bach via Bruckner to Boulez (or Vivaldi-Verdi-Varese,
if you wish), there are plenty well known, popular-enough
composers to chose from when performing music. For all
the thrill of discovery, audiences do like what they know
and think they know what they like.

Fine. Just every so often, do get off your arse and try a
Braunfels Quintet...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 08, 2010, 01:40:14 PM
Well, I am ELATED at the moment.  Just got a phone call from one of the local TV stations.  I won tickets to the Moscow Ballet's production of the Great Russian Swan Lake!   :)  The Moscow Ballet is touring Canada, and stopping in Winnipeg on November 29th.

I just went to Swan Lake and The Nutcracker last season (but it was the Royal Winnipeg Ballet).

It will be great to see the Moscow Ballet in action!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mc ukrneal on November 08, 2010, 01:53:47 PM
Well, I am ELATED at the moment.  Just got a phone call from one of the local TV stations.  I won tickets to the Moscow Ballet's production of the Great Russian Swan Lake!   :)  The Moscow Ballet is touring Canada, and stopping in Winnipeg on November 29th.

I just went to Swan Lake and The Nutcracker last season (but it was the Royal Winnipeg Ballet).

It will be great to see the Moscow Ballet in action!
Awesome! Very happy for you. Swan Lake really is a great ballet - wonderful music and great dancing.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 08, 2010, 02:15:01 PM
Fantastic Ray!  I'm jealous! :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 08, 2010, 02:24:45 PM
Fantastic Ray!  I'm jealous! :)

I never (or very rarely) enter draws for tickets.  Let's face it, I was probably the only one to put my name down for the tickets.   :D  All kidding aside, it's great to be a classical music fan (it does have its privileges).  Had I put my name down for Justin Bieber tickets, I probably would have had a 1/50,000 chance of winning.  ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 08, 2010, 02:27:17 PM
I bet you're not as alone as you think.  I've been too some performances in a smallish city that have drawn more people than who post on this entire forum.  There are alot of classical listeners out there, they just don't like obsessively talking about it like we do. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 08, 2010, 02:27:21 PM
correction

Had I put my name down for Justin Bieber tickets, I probably would have had a 1/50,000 chance of winning losing.  ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 08, 2010, 02:28:41 PM
I bet you're not as alone as you think.  I've been too some performances in a smallish city that have drawn more people than who post on this entire forum.  There are alot of classical listeners out there, they just don't like obsessively talking about it like we do. ;D

That is true, David.  :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 08, 2010, 02:29:14 PM
correction

Yes, that is another way of looking at it!  ;D 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on November 08, 2010, 03:19:25 PM
Splendid, Ray!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: George on November 08, 2010, 03:57:17 PM
I never (or very rarely) enter draws for tickets.  Let's face it, I was probably the only one to put my name down for the tickets.   :D  All kidding aside, it's great to be a classical music fan (it does have its privileges).  Had I put my name down for Justin Bieber tickets, I probably would have had a 1/50,000 chance of winning.  ;D ;D

And I'd hope the same odds of caring if you won.  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 09, 2010, 07:07:03 AM
Jens, I installed the no squint add-on so no more complaints from me! :)  Except for about the content of the reviews themselves. >:D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 09, 2010, 07:10:17 AM
A mother laments over the death of her son. Can you put a name to the opera?

For the Aussies reading, this scene was shown on screen before Joan Sutherland's son delivered the eulogy at the concert held in tribute to the soprano at the Sydney Opera House.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 09, 2010, 04:39:27 PM
At last, I got to that: http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/side-notes-rudolf-barshai-has-died.html

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TNnksXYNNOI/AAAAAAAABUs/WoLNCwLbvZ8/s400/Barshai.png) (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/11/side-notes-rudolf-barshai-has-died.html)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 09, 2010, 04:44:18 PM
Man I can't believe that I love the Borodin Q's DSCH cycle (either one) and love Barshai's symphony cycle... and yet didn't know that he was one of the founding members of the quartet!!

Great write up Jens.  I feel inspired to listen to Barshai conducting DSCH's 5th. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 15, 2010, 12:01:42 AM
Apart from being an impossibility, what would you be if you were Brahms and Liszt? (Something I learnt today while going through the dictionary.)

It's a Cockney rhyming slang that means drunk. Brahms and Liszt rhymes with Pissed (does it?), which is Brit slang for drunk. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on November 15, 2010, 04:30:46 AM
Perhaps ten years ago (could it have been that long?) I fetched in (via BRO) a Wuorinen disc with Five and Archeaopteryx.  I am not quite certain, now, of the circumstances, but I let that disc go.  May not have grabbed my ear at first; and where normally I should have let the disc sit, and try it again later . . . .

Anyway, I found a new cut-out copy on amazon. Sold, it seems, by Wuorinen's agent, Howard Stokar.  Just waiting for it to land, now.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 15, 2010, 04:43:07 AM
A mother laments over the death of her son. Can you put a name to the opera?

For the Aussies reading, this scene was shown on screen before Joan Sutherland's son delivered the eulogy at the concert held in tribute to the soprano at the Sydney Opera House.

^^

*Bump*
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 16, 2010, 10:37:24 AM
I've listened to Lindberg's Clarinet Concerto literally a dozen times now! :o  And I wanted to post my impressions after having spent alot of time with it, instead of just initial impressions.

It's not boldly modernist, nor is it indulgantly romantic either, nor new agey Rautavaara-esque, nor minimalist.  It really is a unique piece that is warmly pastorale but punctuated by a few brief intense crescendos and passages that are clinical and not warm.  It's really all over the place.

I think that I would rate it 3/5, I liked but not loved it.  Those stuck in the 18th-19th century because it is too modernist for such ears, and modern/postmodern aficionados need not apply either because it will be too soft for them.  It takes strange ears like mine to be pleased by the music but I am. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on November 16, 2010, 10:45:36 AM
Nice report!
 
I think that I would rate it 3/5, I liked but not loved it.

Pretty much my feeling.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: greg on November 16, 2010, 04:14:40 PM
Nice report!
 
Pretty much my feeling.
Me 3. David's post very well could have been mine.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 18, 2010, 09:11:38 AM
Thanks guys! :)

I have another one but brief: Penderecki's 2nd some consider it hysterical.  Um okay. I consider it conservative. Very Shostakovichian or Mahlerian, neoromantic symphony, ponderous but lyrical.  I like it... but... in the 4th symphony I hear the more mature style of neo-tonal Penderecki.  He pushes tonality to the breaking point but not all like post-Wagner harmony.  This more cerebral work is emotionally intense for me because of it's unique style, which is what I also like about the 3rd, and in fact I swear I hear the 3rd in the fourth movement! :D  And just like the 3rd symphony it seems like Penderecki takes a motif or an idea and transforms it as the symphony progresses.  Similar to Beethoven's 5th conceptually but not at all neoromantic or even postmodern.  These symphonies (3 and 4) are simply different, unique.  Wonderful. :)

Symphony No. 2: 3/5
Symphony No. 4: 4/5

 ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 26, 2010, 08:28:15 AM
Do we take music for granted?  And are we so rushed that we can't stop and appreciate the finer things even when they're right in front of us?

This has probably been talked about before, but I read this article where Joshua Bell performed at a busy metro station in DC, and he went ignored by all but what 6 people out of a 1,000? :o

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 26, 2010, 08:31:25 AM
Do we take music for granted?  And are we so rushed that we can't stop and appreciate the finer things even when they're right in front of us?

Absolutely David.  I think we do take music for granted.......actually we take a lot of things for granted.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 26, 2010, 08:33:36 AM
Absolutely David.  I think we do take music for granted.......actually we take a lot of things for granted.

When we can use ipods to create a constant sound track to our lives, music loses a bit of magic.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 26, 2010, 12:34:21 PM
Do we take music for granted?  And are we so rushed that we can't stop and appreciate the finer things even when they're right in front of us?

This has probably been talked about before, but I read this article where Joshua Bell performed at a busy metro station in DC, and he went ignored by all but what 6 people out of a 1,000? :o

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html)

Yes, I believe it has been talked about. And while we do take things for granted, the article and the "experiment" was complete Bull Shit... and deliberately set up to be pointless... manipulated to prove a point that was decided upon long before writing the article.

I've read few articles more dishonest and more insulting to the intelligence of their readers. Enough to still be angry about it, five years after it was written. :-)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on November 26, 2010, 12:39:27 PM
That's probably why they chose a busy train station instead of say a cafe.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 26, 2010, 12:57:01 PM
That's probably why they chose a busy train station instead of say a cafe.

In the morning, in DC?! With bureaucrats on their way to work, prone to be fired for being late? They could have revived Pierre Fournier and have him play the Suites and I would have pushed him out of the way.  And that's just one issue.  ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Gurn Blanston on November 26, 2010, 01:13:29 PM
Yes, I believe it has been talked about. And while we do take things for granted, the article and the "experiment" was complete Bull Shit... and deliberately set up to be pointless... manipulated to prove a point that was decided upon long before writing the article.

I've read few articles more dishonest and more insulting to the intelligence of their readers. Enough to still be angry about it, five years after it was written. :-)

Yeah, I agree, it's hard to see how it could have turned out any other way. IIRC, even the people who recognized him and/or wanted to hang for a while simply didn't have time to do it. It's almost as thought the writer had just finished Lebrecht's book and wanted to help him out a little... ::)

8)

----------------
Now playing:
Concerto Armonico \ Szüts  Miklos Spanyi (Fortepiano) - Wq 016 Concerto in G for Keyboard 3rd mvmt - Allegretto
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: greg on November 26, 2010, 04:36:27 PM
Do we take music for granted?  And are we so rushed that we can't stop and appreciate the finer things even when they're right in front of us?

This has probably been talked about before, but I read this article where Joshua Bell performed at a busy metro station in DC, and he went ignored by all but what 6 people out of a 1,000? :o

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html)
That was interesting.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 27, 2010, 08:25:05 AM
In the morning, in DC?! With bureaucrats on their way to work, prone to be fired for being late? They could have revived Pierre Fournier and have him play the Suites and I would have pushed him out of the way.  And that's just one issue.  ;)

Well, you know what Jens, that is exactly part of the problem in today's world.  We are so focused on work, and place way to much importance, emphasis and our energies on our work and careers.

The problem is we don't take the time to stop and smell the roses (listen to the beautiful music).  We are so busy rushing to work, worried our jobs won't be there for us if we don't go the extra mile at work once again for the 1,000th day in a row.

When we have families and put so much emphasis on careers and work, we don't have save adequate or enough energy for our families. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 27, 2010, 08:42:37 AM
Well, you know what Jens, that is exactly part of the problem in today's world.  We are so focused on work, and place way to much importance, emphasis and our energies on our work and careers.
The problem is we don't take the time to stop and smell the roses (listen to the beautiful music).  We are so busy rushing to work, worried our jobs won't be there for us if we don't go the extra mile at work once again for the 1,000th day in a row.
When we have families and put so much emphasis on careers and work, we don't have save adequate or enough energy for our families.

Naïveté aside, that's a point about Washington and modern life that a.) didn't need any proof and b.) has nothing to do with music, classical or otherwise, much less Joshua Bell. Which is in turn my point: Why conduct a dishonest experiment of which you know the outcome and which is unrelated to the ingredients? Probably someone worried that his or her job wouldn't be there for him or her if he or she didn't go the extra mile at work...  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on November 27, 2010, 10:33:58 AM
Well, you know what Jens, that is exactly part of the problem in today's world.  We are so focused on work, and place way to much importance, emphasis and our energies on our work and careers.

The problem is we don't take the time to stop and smell the roses (listen to the beautiful music).  We are so busy rushing to work, worried our jobs won't be there for us if we don't go the extra mile at work once again for the 1,000th day in a row.

When we have families and put so much emphasis on careers and work, we don't have save adequate or enough energy for our families.

Utter nonsense, in my view, at least with regard to the Bell "experiment."  There is a place for everything.  A subway platform is not the place to listen to Bach.  It would be an annoyance, even if I was on my way to a concert hall or to my stereo at home to hear the same music.

And I think to say that the problem with "today's world" is equally nonsensical.  Do you think an 18th century peasant with a starving family at home going to the fields at dawn to try to harvest the potatoes before started to rot would stop to listen, even if Bach himself was playing one of his partitas for violin solo?  Life now is easier than it has ever been, unless you happened to be a prince with an efficient tax collector.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 27, 2010, 10:37:45 AM
...even if Bach himself was playing one of his partitas for violin solo?  Life now is easier than it has ever been, unless you happened to be a prince with an efficient tax collector.
;D :) 8)

Bravo! Spoken from my heart. Although for some people politicians, life is too easy. http://www.forbes.com/2010/11/23/greece-economy-european-union-opinions-contributor-george-pieler-jens-laurson.html (http://www.forbes.com/2010/11/23/greece-economy-european-union-opinions-contributor-george-pieler-jens-laurson.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on December 02, 2010, 12:51:30 PM
You know what somebody really needs to record? Rafael Kubelik's three symphonies.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 09, 2010, 10:50:05 AM
Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 10
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-10.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: greg on December 09, 2010, 11:33:38 AM
Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 10
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-10.html)
I'm assuming you're going to add 1-9 later?
(because it's a countdown)?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 09, 2010, 12:02:00 PM
I'm assuming you're going to add 1-9 later?
(because it's a countdown)?
That being the nature of countdowns... yes. 10-2 on ionarts, then the whole list incl. no.1 on WETA. Workin' on no.9 as I type.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 09, 2010, 12:37:15 PM

Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 9
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-9.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-9.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 09, 2010, 06:59:04 PM
I love Gatti Jens, thought those Tchaikovsky recordings were lost to the sands of time.  Thank you, and ordered. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mc ukrneal on December 10, 2010, 12:18:50 AM
I love Gatti Jens, thought those Tchaikovsky recordings were lost to the sands of time.  Thank you, and ordered. :)
You will enjoy them I think. Nice to see them get recognition too - I agree that they are among the best modern 4-6 cycle available. These (4-6) have done well in recording though, so it quite arguable. Still, one can be quite satisfied (thank you very much) with these if they are your lone recording. And the new price point just reinforces that.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 10, 2010, 05:46:37 AM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TQFHv3MB9kI/AAAAAAAABXE/rjBLhCfYgOA/s400/deccaLogo.png)
Side Notes: Decca's Artistic Summer?
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/side-notes-deccas-artistic-summer.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/side-notes-deccas-artistic-summer.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 10, 2010, 08:02:03 AM

Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 8
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-8.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 10, 2010, 08:18:25 AM
You will enjoy them I think. Nice to see them get recognition too - I agree that they are among the best modern 4-6 cycle available. These (4-6) have done well in recording though, so it quite arguable. Still, one can be quite satisfied (thank you very much) with these if they are your lone recording. And the new price point just reinforces that.

I have Karajan in them as well, but kind of tired of him now.  I used to like Mravinsky but even if he's great, I could do better soundwise.  Who do you like in #3?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 11, 2010, 10:26:38 AM

Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 7
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-7.html)

Bach, Duparc et al.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 11, 2010, 12:19:16 PM
Jens is your list meant to be all are equally fine kind of thing, or are you counting down to the top recording of the year?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on December 11, 2010, 12:24:00 PM
Jens, I really love both of your choices for #9.
Question: the comment about Antoni Wit and Naxos recording Weinberg's symphonies - is that a joke or a real report?

Side note: you really need to hear Weinberg's Cello Concerto. Definitely the most instantly "appealing" piece of his I've heard so far, and boy is it a great one.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 11, 2010, 01:23:05 PM
Jens, I really love both of your choices for #9.
Question: the comment about Antoni Wit and Naxos recording Weinberg's symphonies - is that a joke or a real report?

Side note: you really need to hear Weinberg's Cello Concerto. Definitely the most instantly "appealing" piece of his I've heard so far, and boy is it a great one.

Re: Naxos / Wit: that's straight from the horse's mouth; the horse's name being Klaus Heymann, in that case. Haven't published the interview yet, but that's an excerpt.

Jens is your list meant to be all are equally fine kind of thing, or are you counting down to the top recording of the year?

Everything included had been whittled down considerably... but there's still a ranking involved here; counting toward those I presumably love the best. Differences aren't great enough to endow this with more than emotional meaning, I suppose, but still...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on December 11, 2010, 02:28:24 PM
Re: Naxos / Wit: that's straight from the horse's mouth; the horse's name being Klaus Heymann, in that case. Haven't published the interview yet, but that's an excerpt.

Awesome! Get them to do the Cello Concerto. Actually, they'd probably use Dmitry Yablonsky as soloist, wouldn't they? He's got too jumpy and nasal a style to bring it off. Wendy Warner could do it on Cedille Records...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 13, 2010, 05:47:18 AM

Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 6
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-6.html)

Carter, Zimmermann, Wilms...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 15, 2010, 10:22:44 AM


Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 5
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-5.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-5.html)

Hartmann, Mahler
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 15, 2010, 04:57:42 PM
Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 4
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-4.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-4.html)

Maffei, Beethoven...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 15, 2010, 05:50:27 PM
If it's anything like their Mozart VCs set that Zehetmair/Bruggen Beethoven cd has to be gold! :)

btw that Gatti Tchaikovsky set is amazing!!! :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 16, 2010, 08:59:19 AM

Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 3
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-3.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-3.html)

Haydn, Taraut...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 16, 2010, 09:44:17 AM
Ah shucks!  I thought the Minkowski set would be #1, well it got close.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 16, 2010, 09:50:19 AM
Let's start a guessing game: what is Jens' #1 recording of 2010 -- new and re-release?

I'll start: I have absolutely no idea... so far.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 16, 2010, 10:31:51 AM
If it hasn't been mentioned yet... I'm going to go with that Petrenko recording for my guess.  It's pretty hot shit. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 16, 2010, 02:51:13 PM

Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown

# 2
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-2.html)

Strauss / Raff
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 16, 2010, 10:50:43 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if the re-release category included either of the DG Mahler boxes. For the new release, the Szymanowski/Boulez?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 17, 2010, 03:32:10 AM
I wouldn't be surprised if the re-release category included either of the DG Mahler boxes. For the new release, the Szymanowski/Boulez?

...neither.  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 17, 2010, 06:58:16 AM
...neither.  8)

I'm not surprised you weren't 100% with the choices for the people's edition.  Actually I don't know what the other dg set is that Navneeth is talking about.

I didn't know that you were really serious about the Raff, I thought that you were just championing a minor composer! :D  I'll have to check it out some time.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 17, 2010, 07:05:20 AM
Actually I don't know what the other dg set is that Navneeth is talking about.

Dude! :o (Some Mahler fan you are ::) ;) )

The Complete Mahler Edition (http://www.mahler150.com/en_GB/albums/mahler-complete-edition)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 17, 2010, 07:09:59 AM
Ah... refreshing two-hour conversation with young(ish) Norwegian conductor Eivind Gullberg Svenson... some of it even about music.

I'm not surprised you weren't 100% with the choices for the people's edition.  Actually I don't know what the other dg set is that Navneeth is talking about.

I didn't know that you were really serious about the Raff, I thought that you were just championing a minor composer! :D  I'll have to check it out some time.

 yes, perhaps. But a MAJOR minor composer.

The Mahler Edition (not the people's edition, which I lobbied completely very unsuccessfully to turn into something VERY different) is very good of course; not that I asked to have it sent to me, since I already have every recording included on it... but somehow... I try not to include too many huge box sets in the re-issue column; there are enough in it as it is. Anyway, didn't quite tickle me the right way...

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 17, 2010, 07:16:39 AM
Dude! :o (Some Mahler fan you are ::) ;) )

The Complete Mahler Edition (http://www.mahler150.com/en_GB/albums/mahler-complete-edition)

Oh son of a.... that's better than the people's edition!! >:(

Well I'm not much of a Mahler fan anymore, those days have passed years ago.  My favorite composers are Haydn and Bach. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on December 17, 2010, 07:17:53 AM
Oh son of a.... that's better than the people's edition!! >:(

Well I'm not much of a Mahler fan anymore, those days have passed years ago.  My favorite composers are Haydn and Bach. :)

Love the new avatar David!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 17, 2010, 07:18:26 AM
Well I'm not much of a Mahler fan anymore, those days have passed years ago.

Oh. Didn't know that.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on December 17, 2010, 07:22:50 AM
Not sure I want to start a thread just to post another Best of 2010, but I do have another category for 2010:  'Best Pieces in 2010 to finally make an impression'

For me, two works clearly are the front runners:

1) Mahler's 7th Symphony
2) Brahms' 2nd Symphony
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 17, 2010, 07:23:56 AM
The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries produced few native English composers of any real note, so the practical music-loving aristocracy of London came up with a delightful way to ensure continued involvement in European music: they would, from time to time, invite a continental composer over for an extended stay or perhaps many shorter ones, treat him like royalty, play his music, and, eventually, send him along on his way. [Source (http://allmusic.com/work/requiem-for-vocal-soloists-chorus--orchestra-b-165-op-89-c27121/description)]

Didn't know about that, either.

;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on December 17, 2010, 07:24:40 AM
Oh. Didn't know that.

Yeah I've listened to Mahler's symphonies no more than twice over in the past three years, while I've listened to most of Haydn and Bach's works several times!  Actually I don't listen to Romantic era music that much, I currently listen to baroque and modern the most frequently, and then classical but only half as much (guess I overdosed on Haydn a bit), and then romantic is more like sometimes.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 17, 2010, 07:28:32 AM
Yeah I've listened to Mahler's symphonies no more than twice over in the past three years, while I've listened to most of Haydn and Bach's works several times!  Actually I don't listen to Romantic era music that much, I currently listen to baroque and modern the most frequently, and then classical but only half as much (guess I overdosed on Haydn a bit), and then romantic is more like sometimes.

I have noticed that ever since I began visiting GMG, the amount of post-Beethoven and mid-19th C music I listen to has considerably gone down. Increased has the early-to-mid 20th C music.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 18, 2010, 08:21:40 AM

Best Recordings of 2010 Countdown
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/presents.png)
Nos. 1 - 10
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-1.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/12/best-recordings-of-2010-1.html)
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2532 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2532)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 18, 2010, 08:26:22 AM
Ha! I almost guessed the Schumann disc, but for some reason I thought it would be something more "high profile."
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on December 18, 2010, 09:33:37 AM
I think that with this, PortugalSom has just taken CPO's crown for dreadful translation of booklet notes:

(http://img530.imageshack.us/img530/2825/clipboard01pj.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on December 21, 2010, 02:05:31 PM
Naxos.com's homepage is featuring a singer named Michael Bundy, and when I saw his name, I realized that the name Bundy has been ruined for me forever.

BTW Sara, that is really funny.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 22, 2010, 06:00:16 AM
Whenever I get adventurous and try some modern music, it scares me away again and I run back to my comfort zone.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 22, 2010, 06:02:09 AM
Whenever I get adventurous and try some modern music, it scares me away again and I run back to my comfort zone.  ;D

It happens to me, too, sometimes, but I also notice my comfort zone expanding with time.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 22, 2010, 06:02:34 AM
It happens to me, too, sometimes, but I also notice my comfort zone expanding with time.

Me 2
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 22, 2010, 06:16:44 AM
Whenever I get adventurous and try some modern music, it scares me away again and I run back to my comfort zone.  ;D

Does Henningmusick scare you?  (I ask in earnest.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 22, 2010, 06:18:03 AM
Does Henningmusick scare you?  (I ask in earnest.)

Surprisingly, no.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on December 22, 2010, 06:43:11 AM
What really surprises me is that once "atonal honking" gets really, really scary and chaotic and mortifying, then we come full circle and I start to like it again. My favorite "modernist" (in the pejorative sense, and in quotation marks) symphony is Hartmann's Sixth, because it's just so darn crazy and maniacal that I can get scared by it and totally enjoy the feeling.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 22, 2010, 06:46:50 AM
I don't know. There's no Beethoven in this crowd that I've heard.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 22, 2010, 06:50:55 AM
Well, none of us lives in Beethoven's world, and Beethoven has long been part of ours. The world changes.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 22, 2010, 06:51:27 AM
Surprisingly, no.

Glad to know this, of course : )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 22, 2010, 06:52:35 AM
Well, none of us lives in Beethoven's world, and Beethoven has long been part of ours. The world changes.

I know. There's only one. Same with pop: The Beatles. And then there's everyone else.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 22, 2010, 06:56:35 AM
I know. There's only one. Same with pop: The Beatles. And then there's everyone else.  ;D

Don't push it buster! ; )

Though it's true: I did actually load some of Los Cuatro Fab onto the Sansa Fuze player last night.

(None of it's come up via shuffle yet, though.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 22, 2010, 06:58:22 AM
Now you just need some Beethoven...and Judas Priest.

*runs away*
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 22, 2010, 07:07:12 AM
But . . . I've already got the LvB symphonies loaded. Can you imagine? Beethoven even before The Beatles ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 22, 2010, 07:13:04 AM
But . . . I've already got the LvB symphonies loaded. Can you imagine? Beethoven even before The Beatles ; )

Yes, there is a hierarchy even among gods.  0:)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on December 24, 2010, 01:47:58 PM
I just noticed something - with all the composers credited with writing nine symphonies (Bruckner, Schubert, Mahler) who sort of didn't, technically - why not Tchaikovsky too? The Manfred Symphony makes seven, the unfinished "7th" makes eight, and the Orchestral Suite No.3, which he was originally going to designate a symphony* (Das Lied von der Erde anyone?) caps the nine... :-*

*"I meant to write a symphony, but the title is no importance"
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MN Dave on December 25, 2010, 12:53:58 PM
You know that high, piercing sound violins can reach that sounds sort of like a tea kettle? Yeah, that's pretty cool.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 28, 2010, 11:39:00 AM

Latest on WETA:

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/bach_logo_halfsize.png)

Bach is for Dancing (If it Suites You)

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2565)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51gnDEukDLL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
J.S.Bach,
Orchestral Suites, Concerto Köln
Berlin Classics
(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0007MAQGO/weta909-20)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 29, 2010, 12:35:17 AM

ArkivMusic has put all the WETA 2010 Choices on Sale: http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/listPage.jsp?list_id=2114&source=WETA (http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/listPage.jsp?list_id=2114&source=WETA)

Titles will be on sale through January 11th.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on December 29, 2010, 01:24:35 PM
A followup to the recent "which Raff cycle do I choose" talk: I just ran into an intriguing "might be" here. (http://www.classical-mp3.co.uk/index.php?topic=65.0)

(A Chandos employee saying "We are talking to Neeme Jarvi about Raff symphonies right now!".)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on December 29, 2010, 01:28:02 PM
Ugh... I do wish it weren't Neeme Jarvi. He'll just direct all of them really quickly and emotionlessly.

Although that may not be totally fair. I saw him this year, the first time I've seen him live since I lived in Detroit from 2001-2005 and suffered through his directorship (he was ill and sluggish and conducted listlessly from a chair), and he seemed reasonably energized and communicated with the musicians fairly well. The performance (Dvorak Te Deum and Stabat Mater) was typically fast and not particularly Bohemian, but the orchestra and chorus were on top form and the results exciting...

Still kind of wish it weren't Neeme Jarvi. Hmm. Thomas Dausgaard, maybe.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on December 29, 2010, 01:32:39 PM
I do wonder what the heck Chandos will do once Neeme dies - his son at least seems to have greater ambitions than holding up an independent. They will have enough trouble replacing Hickox, but finding somebody they can reliably trust to produce high quality standard rep recordings on a low budget might be hard. He may not have been the most scintillating conductor, but on the whole he was very good (although I can't speak so much about his recent performance).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 29, 2010, 01:32:55 PM
Ugh... I do wish it weren't Neeme Jarvi. He'll just direct all of them really quickly and emotionlessly.

And why should he treat Raff any better than he did Prokofiev? ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on December 29, 2010, 01:36:37 PM
I do wonder what the heck Chandos will do once Neeme dies - his son at least seems to have greater ambitions than holding up an independent. They will have enough trouble replacing Hickox, but finding somebody they can reliably trust to produce high quality standard rep recordings on a low budget might be hard. He may not have been the most scintillating conductor, but on the whole he was very good (although I can't speak so much about his recent performance).

Yep, Paavo is already used to serving up Beethoven on RCA - although Neeme, too, once released standard fare on DG. Chandos does have a lot of gifted soloists in the stable (Bavouzet, for starters), and maybe they turn to conductors like Martyn Brabbins? A collaboration on Brabbins' live Gothic Symphony next year might be a great start  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on December 29, 2010, 01:40:29 PM
The proms Gothic's appearance on disc I feel is somewhat inevitable - much as Chandos released Foulds' World Requiem on disc after a live performance - some works are too notable not to release, even if "only" in live performance.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 31, 2010, 11:20:15 AM
Classical Music Survey - 250 Compositions (http://www.ody.ca/~wbailey/Core250Classical(3).pdf)
 
A very interesting list, Bill! What prompted you to compile it?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Fëanor on December 31, 2010, 12:54:27 PM
Classical Music Survey - 250 Compositions (http://www.ody.ca/~wbailey/Core250Classical(3).pdf)
 
A very interesting list, Bill! What prompted you to compile it?
I'm not a musician or musically trained in any way; when my interest in (classical) music revived a few years ago, I need a way to learn about the repertoire and not waste too much time either (1) listening to the same stuff over & over again, or (2) listening to a lot minor works while overlooking the biggies.  This is to say, I compiled the above list for my own education. I had recourse to a number of popular books on classical music, as well as few websites, were I noted and compare the recommendations. I listed these findings in a spreadsheet.  My behind-the-scene inclusive list is comprised of over a thousand items.  At first I had no notion of sharing my results with other people.
 
However I decide to condense the full list to 250 to refine my own listening priorities and, also, in order to share with other not very well-informed people like myself.  This I did by recording the authors' relative ratings, and then selecting those works that had the most and strongest recommendations.  All the data was on a spreadsheet which I then analysed in MS Access.  I fiddle raw results to a very minor extent to suit my own tastes, e.g. to force inclusion of a few more contemporary works than arose stricly from the source recommendations.
 
So basically the list isn't really my own but owes most of its substance to the work of other writers;  I can get around to listing my principal sources is anyone is interested.
 
 
 
 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on December 31, 2010, 01:33:19 PM
Well done!

As I was perusing it, the following questions arose naturally, or what for me will pass for naturally . . . don't  feel obliged, though I am curious in any case where you feel inspired to answer.

I don't think I've ever heard Albéniz's Iberia orchestrated (some of it transcribed for guitar trio, yes). Have you had a chance to check out the piano original?

If you're game to bump the Chaconne from the BWV 1004 (as included in the following item, BWV 1001-1006, you've room for another piece
: )

Similar duplication-by-inclusion with the Carter Second Quartet.

I'm a great fan of Berlioz, so I must ask if you've had any chance/desire to check out his work beyond the Fantastique and the Requiem?

You've just one Hindemith work listed (and it's the obligatory Mathis der Maler Symphony) . . . tell me that's not the only Hindemith you've listened to!
: )

Oh, but for Nielsen you must at least add the Clarinet Concerto.

I don't think I've ever seen Stalingrad tied to the Prokofiev Sonata № 7 . . . that's got me curious . . . .

Interesting that the one Satie line is the Gnossiennes, and not you-know-what!

The Sibelius Symphony № 4 . . . it looks almost as if Tapiola is proposed as a nickname for the symphony?

There is the occasional typo, but I don't want to make myself a complete nuisance.

Really impressed that you set about this so methodically! Well done, again!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: petrarch on December 31, 2010, 06:15:12 PM
However I decide to condense the full list to 250 to refine my own listening priorities

But surely you already know some of the entries, no? Also, I think one way to 'optimize' it would be to start with one work of each type (say, chamber, concerto, symphony, vocal, and overlaps could also be optimized away) for each composer and see where that leads you. As Karl pointed out, there seems to be some redundancy in a few of the entries and that way you might get a better cross section of the output of a composer, but that would imply a composer-centric approach, which might not be what you are interested in.

Stimmung, really? Not Gruppen or Kontakte? No Le Marteau sans Maître?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Fëanor on January 01, 2011, 07:01:04 AM
Well done!

As I was perusing it, the following questions arose naturally, or what for me will pass for naturally . . . don't  feel obliged, though I am curious in any case where you feel inspired to answer.

I don't think I've ever heard Albéniz's Iberia orchestrated (some of it transcribed for guitar trio, yes). Have you had a chance to check out the piano original?

If you're game to bump the Chaconne from the BWV 1004 (as included in the following item, BWV 1001-1006, you've room for another piece
: )

Similar duplication-by-inclusion with the Carter Second Quartet.

I'm a great fan of Berlioz, so I must ask if you've had any chance/desire to check out his work beyond the Fantastique and the Requiem?

You've just one Hindemith work listed (and it's the obligatory Mathis der Maler Symphony) . . . tell me that's not the only Hindemith you've listened to!
: )

Oh, but for Nielsen you must at least add the Clarinet Concerto.

I don't think I've ever seen Stalingrad tied to the Prokofiev Sonata № 7 . . . that's got me curious . . . .

Interesting that the one Satie line is the Gnossiennes, and not you-know-what!

The Sibelius Symphony № 4 . . . it looks almost as if Tapiola is proposed as a nickname for the symphony?

There is the occasional typo, but I don't want to make myself a complete nuisance.

Really impressed that you set about this so methodically! Well done, again!

Thank you, Karl.  I appreciate positive from knowledgable people like yourself, (a composer no less!).
 
The duplications you mentioned obviously need correction; I noticed the Carter myself when at my first look in while at the list.  Also, the Symphony No. 7 is (fairly obviously) incorrectly attribued to Prokofiev instead of Shostakovich.  But these things really just typos and easy to correct, (watch for Ed. 3c).
 
I can't argue the merits of Nielsen's Clarinet Concert; I dont' have a copy and might never have heard it.  However here's the point: it just didn't make the recommended lists of the sources I used.
 
Obviously no two people in the entire world would agree on exactly the same list, but I will take your comments into the question.  In particular, I forced a few inclusions & exclusions based on my own taste against the "experts" recommendations:  these are limited my my own listening experience and I'm always ready to reconsider them.
 
Yes, my approach was methodical, and I give myself due credit for that.  Of course I will continue to reconsider and refine the list over time.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Fëanor on January 01, 2011, 07:22:52 AM
But surely you already know some of the entries, no? Also, I think one way to 'optimize' it would be to start with one work of each type (say, chamber, concerto, symphony, vocal, and overlaps could also be optimized away) for each composer and see where that leads you. As Karl pointed out, there seems to be some redundancy in a few of the entries and that way you might get a better cross section of the output of a composer, but that would imply a composer-centric approach, which might not be what you are interested in.

Stimmung, really? Not Gruppen or Kontakte? No Le Marteau sans Maître?
Thank you for your comments, petrach: very much appreciated.
 
My basic approach was to find frequently and/or highly recommended works regardless of composer.  (I can say, though, that more than one of my sources first identified composers, then representative works.)
 
I felt compelled, however, to make a few personal choices.  Mostly my choices were either to (1) reduce just a bit the number of Romantic works, (2) add contemporary works such as those by Carter, Birtwhistle, Xenakis, Crumb, et al., (3) include a few more chambers works, such as the Arensky, and Carther and Crumb (-- dual purpose additions!).  Certainly I have to admit that my personal choices were constrained by my still-limited listening experience.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 07, 2011, 09:25:48 AM


Classical music for $100
How to put together an introduction-kit for classical music not to exceed 100 dollars:
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/classical-music-for-100.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/classical-music-for-100.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 07, 2011, 11:36:54 AM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TSdq6anAbqI/AAAAAAAABYo/E2uMMWi3Nas/s400/100dollarsBach.png)


Classical music for $100
How to put together an introduction-kit for classical music not to exceed 100 dollars:
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/classical-music-for-100.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/classical-music-for-100.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 08, 2011, 08:29:15 AM

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TSh8yjrQ1QI/AAAAAAAABY4/wP07VKrd4TM/s1600/100dollarsHaydn1550.png)


Classical music for $100: "The Second $100"
Now that we've established that such lists are daft but fun, let's continue. If the first list was purely an intuitive collection of lures, without any didactic or representative pretensions, this list makes more assumptions on the potential listener than just that of a most general, vague interest.
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/classical-music-for-100-second-100.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/classical-music-for-100-second-100.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Fëanor on January 08, 2011, 12:05:26 PM

Classical music for $100: "The Second $100"
Now that we've established that such lists are daft but fun, let's continue. If the first list was purely an intuitive collection of lures, without any didactic or representative pretensions, this list makes more assumptions on the potential listener than just that of a most general, vague interest.
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/classical-music-for-100-second-100.html
Interesting lists, but they prove 200 bucks doesn't go far buying music!!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 08, 2011, 12:25:03 PM
Interesting lists, but they prove 200 bucks doesn't go far buying music!!

But that wasn't the point at all. If you want to go far, quantitatively, with music... there's almost no limit with $200 with dirt cheap box sets everywhere. The point was to invest those $100 most efficiently for lasting attraction to classical music. I firmly believe, in any case, that one CD is more likely to make a great impression than one hundred.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Fëanor on January 09, 2011, 05:33:15 AM
But that wasn't the point at all. If you want to go far, quantitatively, with music... there's almost no limit with $200 with dirt cheap box sets everywhere. The point was to invest those $100 most efficiently for lasting attraction to classical music. I firmly believe, in any case, that one CD is more likely to make a great impression than one hundred.

I concede that your recommendations are a very nice introduction to classical, (though I haven't heard most of your recommendations).  I agree that huge, cheap boxed sets aren't the way to go.
 
On the other hand, next week after you've ONE has heard these initial suggestions, you're ONE is going to want MORE. (This is my point.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 09, 2011, 05:47:23 AM
On the other hand, next week after you've heard these initial suggestions, you're going to want MORE. (This is my point.)

You are using "you" in that general way, aimed at the abstract classical music neophyte whom I am addressing, right?
Because that's exactly what the items on the list are supposed to do: leave the newcomer wanting MORE! (Not within a week; I think that a reasonable rate would be 3 to 12 months, depending on musical voracity of subject at hand... but still.) And the second list is already up (see above); which goes further into classical music. (Again: not quantitatively but qualitatively.)

Meanwhile fresh up on ionarts:
Listen What the Cat Dragged In: Nott's Mahler in Bamberg (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/listen-what-cat-dragged-in-notts-mahler.html)


and on WETA:
From Gabrieli to Now! Interview With Yannick Nézet-Séguin (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2612)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 14, 2011, 05:49:52 PM




Late, but here it is anyway: the Best Recordings of 2010 "Almost List". Stupendous rejects, if you will.

Ionarts:
Best Recordings of 2010 - "Almost List"

http://bit.ly/h4PQyh (http://bit.ly/h4PQyh)

From Bach to Titz, from Norrington to Rousset.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 16, 2011, 06:59:43 AM
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/A_Basket_of_Wild_Strawberri.png)

The Musical Adventures of Young Johnny Barto
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2664 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2664)
"She gave me my first real book of music;
I’ll never forget it… she gave me a book of Henle Mozart
Sonatas, the first book where the notes weren’t as big as
my fist and I had to look really carefully at them. And I
thought: I really made it now. I’m playing from real grown-
up music.
"
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 23, 2011, 05:56:20 AM


A New Label for Christophe Rousset
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2640



(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Neuchatel_Harpsichord_2_550.png)
 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2640)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Drasko on January 23, 2011, 07:18:18 AM

A New Label for Christophe Rousset
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2640
 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2640)

That is excellent news about Bellérophon! It's the only of Lully's tragedies that hasn't been recorded this far. One thing though; it's not his last, that would be Armide, Bellérophon falls somewhere in the middle of the impressive streak of 13 Tragédies en musique in as many years.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 23, 2011, 07:51:37 AM
That is excellent news about Bellérophon! It's the only of Lully's tragedies that hasn't been recorded this far. One thing though; it's not his last, that would be Armide, Bellérophon falls somewhere in the middle of the impressive streak of 13 Tragédies en musique in as many years.

oops. "last unrecorded" that was supposed to be, me thinks.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 23, 2011, 01:21:19 PM


Ionarts-at-Large: Maria João Pires and Markus Stenz in Beethoven



(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_fvqDJniJWuw/TTyQ7Zgqm0I/AAAAAAAABag/TxDzQaJisHI/s400/BRSO_STENZ_PIRES.png)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/ionarts-at-large-maria-joao-pires-and.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/01/ionarts-at-large-maria-joao-pires-and.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 27, 2011, 03:11:51 PM
Concerning the reissue industry, "legendary" has to be the most increasingly annoying of all words :'( A lot so-called ones have hardly ever been out of print.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Chaszz on January 27, 2011, 04:12:51 PM
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/A_Basket_of_Wild_Strawberri.png)

The Musical Adventures of Young Johnny Barto
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2664 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2664)
"She gave me my first real book of music;
I’ll never forget it… she gave me a book of Henle Mozart
Sonatas, the first book where the notes weren’t as big as
my fist and I had to look really carefully at them. And I
thought: I really made it now. I’m playing from real grown-
up music.
"

Wow, thanks for that great Chardin I've never seen before. Where on the web did you find it, please? 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 27, 2011, 04:21:19 PM
Wow, thanks for that great Chardin I've never seen before. Where on the web did you find it, please?
http://bit.ly/fuahMg (http://bit.ly/fuahMg)

I think I helped myself to the image from the National Gallery.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on January 28, 2011, 01:52:10 AM
Vintage Hurwitz ;D :

Quote
When I was in grad school I met a coed who had the best pickup line I have ever heard. I had borrowed a book from the library that she wanted, and in order to induce me to give it up early, she said, "Why don't you come over to my place and check out my clavichord?" Disappointingly, she actually had one; her sister built them as a hobby. As it turned out, playing it was quite fun. The clavichord...[explanation]

http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=13182
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 28, 2011, 06:04:40 AM
Vintage Hurwitz ;D :

http://www.classicstoday.com/review.asp?ReviewNum=13182

Even if he was only half as ugly as a grad student than he is now, he shouldn't have been surprised that she actually had a clavichord. And a cataract.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on January 28, 2011, 06:25:52 AM
Even if he was only half as ugly as a grad student than he is now, he shouldn't have been surprised that she actually had a clavichord. And a cataract.

Left: Dave Hurwitz
Right: Dave Hurwitz, age 25 (artist's representation)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 28, 2011, 06:44:50 AM
Left: Dave Hurwitz
Right: Dave Hurwitz, age 25 (artist's representation)

That's not the picture I have one file.

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/hurwitzerhair.png)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MishaK on January 28, 2011, 12:56:40 PM
Even if he was only half as ugly as a grad student than he is now, he shouldn't have been surprised that she actually had a clavichord. And a cataract.

Ha!

BTW, Jens, you're still one of the most idiosyncratic reviewers I know. Your two $100 selections are quite interesting. I'm amazed at the total lack of symphonic or operatic works.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 28, 2011, 04:49:23 PM
Ha!

BTW, Jens, you're still one of the most idiosyncratic reviewers I know. Your two $100 selections are quite interesting. I'm amazed at the total lack of symphonic or operatic works.

Is that good or bad?

In any case, I think I've explained that somewhere in the footnotes: Something about my impression of total neophytes being that they can deal with the free flowing form of concertos more readily than appreciate the structured forms of sonata and symphony... (and also: concertos in some way making symphonies less necessary... the Eroica will come on its own, eventually)... and re: Opera: the recordings I *would* want to recommend (in any case never in the first batch, because most neophytes will run and take cover at the very idea of opera) were all too expensive to fit the format. A good case could be made for including some symphony earlier in the game... (a late Mozart Symphony; or maybe a catchy one by Haydn... waitasecond: I DID recommend Haydn symphonies!)...but opera is a specialist's specialist territory. Doesn't make the 'lowest common denominator cut. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 02, 2011, 03:06:31 PM

Notions of Bach, Berio, and Galuppi. An Interview with Andrea Bacchetti
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2721 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2721)
(with audio samples)
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Andrea-Bacchetti_1-Kopie.png)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on February 10, 2011, 11:37:51 AM
My new essay is Classical Music on Twitter (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Feb11/Music_and_Twitter.htm), the first half of which is a casual look at how musicians can and currently do use Twitter for outreach and for fun; the second half is a non-exhaustive directory of prominent musicians, composers, and organizations on Twitter (including, of course, our own @karlhenning). I am somewhat totally flattered and awed to have a praise quote: "A really fascinating read." - Joyce DiDonato (http://twitter.com/#!/JoyceDiDonato/status/35782045418536960)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 10, 2011, 05:14:06 PM

March in Music
What to listen for in DC.
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2750

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/15-Crimson-winged-Parrakeet_480.png) (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2750)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on February 12, 2011, 11:09:03 AM
Why are Bach's English suites so-named? They use no English and many French dances.

I should know better than to ask things before reading the Wikipedia article :-*
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 14, 2011, 11:37:12 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-K-SbgzS5SIw/TVmAmkcaxBI/AAAAAAAABbQ/iGYsSBQaA_0/s1600/welcometosaopaulo.JPG)
Side Notes: Marin Alsop A Nova Regente em São Paulo
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/side-notes-marin-alsop-nova-regente-em.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/side-notes-marin-alsop-nova-regente-em.html)


(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hsKlxgVWuxg/TVl2claTwUI/AAAAAAAABbA/Wu8wxg5Icl4/s400/LSO_HARDING_GRIMAUD.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: Hélène Grimaud's Ravel and London Strauss
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/ionarts-at-large-helene-grimauds-ravel.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/ionarts-at-large-helene-grimauds-ravel.html)


(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Wigmore-Hall.png)

Classical WETA CD Pick of the Week: Alina Ibragimova and Cédric Tiberghien in Beethoven

http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2763 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2763)



Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on February 14, 2011, 12:01:05 PM

Ionarts-at-Large: Hélène Grimaud's Ravel and London Strauss
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/ionarts-at-large-helene-grimauds-ravel.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/side-notes-marin-alsop-nova-regente-em.html)


1. I'm not sure why I didn't go to that. Maybe because I've seen Grimaud live in Houston twice and skipped over the programme with her name in the header, when going through the brochure, because even though she makes an amusing interview (in a chat for students after one, a girl asked for advice for a young musician and she said "If you can do anything else, do that instead!"), she's never really inspired me.
2. Any friend of Walter Kaufmann's is a friend of mine. A man who rendered sublime Nietzsche and who wrote highly poetic (and, needless to say, intelligent) philosophy himself.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Marc on February 14, 2011, 12:16:40 PM
Whilst I was searching the Internet for some moving pictures of the immortal Helmut Walcha playing the organ and/or harpsichord, I ran into this link:

http://www.ina.fr/art-et-culture/musique/video/SXF99002234/un-doyen-de-40-ans-le-festival-international-de-musique.fr.html

I think this is 1972 (40th jubilee of the Strasbourg International Music Festival), and I really enjoyed this fine documentary of 23 minutes!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: RJR on February 15, 2011, 04:51:13 PM
1. I'm not sure why I didn't go to that. Maybe because I've seen Grimaud live in Houston twice and skipped over the programme with her name in the header, when going through the brochure, because even though she makes an amusing interview (in a chat for students after one, a girl asked for advice for a young musician and she said "If you can do anything else, do that instead!"), she's never really inspired me.
2. Any friend of Walter Kaufmann's is a friend of mine. A man who rendered sublime Nietzsche and who wrote highly poetic (and, needless to say, intelligent) philosophy himself.
The Faith of a Heretic and Shakespeare to Existentialism. Great books as well by Walter Kaufmann.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: RJR on February 15, 2011, 05:19:23 PM

Lol...yeah I would like to hear a "Welsh Symphony."
With a plate of Welsh Rarebit and a pint of stout.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: RJR on February 15, 2011, 05:36:09 PM
I've often wondered that myself. Yeah, as Op 106 points out, all countries produced conductors, but something about Hungary ... Fricsay, too, and Arthur Nikisch, who made the first (?) Beethoven's Fifth recording, and Christoph von Dohnanyi barely missed the cut by being "of Hungarian descent." Crazy amount of talent in the conducting department. Especially, as you point out, with American orchestras (Nikisch, by the way, took the LSO on its first tour of America...or indeed, the first American tour of any big European orchestra)
There was a book published not too long ago on the history of the London Symphony Orchestra. Perhaps you've already read it.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 17, 2011, 08:01:52 AM
Is the "Gewandhaus-Quartett" the same as the Leipzig Gewandhaus Quartet (the group that records for MDG)? There is a new release from BC containing the quartets of Mendelssohn, played by the former. I gather from the listing at JPC, that this may have been licensed from NCA (hadn't heard of the name before).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on February 17, 2011, 08:07:25 AM
The Faith of a Heretic and Shakespeare to Existentialism. Great books as well by Walter Kaufmann.

Faith of a Heretic is a masterpiece and should have made Dawkins et al completely unnecessary. This week I was marveling at just what an astonishing selection he assembled for his anthology Religion from Tolstoy to Camus. A lot of surprising/revelatory essays by unlikely people.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 17, 2011, 03:53:12 PM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-_UquqBnDF28/TV20yeNnCnI/AAAAAAAABco/Ea1fOFQU29k/s400/OsloPhiharmonic%2BKopie.png)

Side Notes: The Conductor Trading Game (Vasily Petrenko Succeeds Jukka-Pekka Saraste in Oslo)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/side-notes-conductor-trading-game.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/02/side-notes-conductor-trading-game.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 21, 2011, 06:21:24 PM
Mendelssohn Quartets Galore
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/fmb_1822_by_w_hensel-200x300.jpg) (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 21, 2011, 11:30:12 PM
Mendelssohn Quartets Galore
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814
 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814)

Ah, so the one that records for MDG is simply the Leipzig String Quartet. Thanks.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 22, 2011, 04:06:03 AM
Ah, so the one that records for MDG is simply the Leipzig String Quartet. Thanks.

Searches are made more difficult, since in German they go by "Leipziger Streichquartett"...

...and for some strange reason the box of the complete Mendelssohn seems out everywhere, just not in the US.

Edit: I was just told that the box set is a "special edition" for Europe--and no plans to offer it in the US with the five discs that make up the set being available individually.

Complete String Quartets Vol. 1
Opus 12 E flat major/Es-Dur
Opus 13 A minor/a-Moll

MDG 307 1055-2

 

Complete String Quartets Vol. 2
Opus 44,1 D major/D-Dur
Opus 44,2 E minor/e-Moll
Fuga Opus 81,4
Capriccio Opus 81,3

MDG 307 1168-2

 

Complete String Quartets Vol. 3
Opus 44,3 E flat major/Es-Dur
Scherzo. Allegro leggiero Opus 81,2
Tema con variazioni. Andante Opus 81,1
Opus 80 F minor / f-Moll

MDG 307 1056-2

 

Complete String Quartets Vol. 4
Quartett Es-Dur
Oktett op. 20

MDG 307 1057-2

 

The Hebrides op. 26
Symphony No. 5 op. 107 "Reformation"
Ruy Blas op. 95
Symphony No. 1 op. 11

MDG 307 1469-2
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 22, 2011, 05:08:11 AM
[F]or some strange reason the box of the complete Mendelssohn seems out everywhere, just not in the US.

I see it at the European Amazons (!) and JPC.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 04, 2011, 01:46:55 AM
(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B004FUZLYG.01.L.jpg)
D. Scarlatti (1685 – 1757),
Keyboard Sonatas
Alexandre Tharaud
Virgin
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B004FUZLYG/goodmusicguide-20)

Aahhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! genius. and tharaud is marvelous, too.




(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/themes/fmblog/images/masthead/masthead_main.png)
Original and Happy Freaks: Alexandre Tharaud’s Latest
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2833 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2833)




Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: MishaK on March 04, 2011, 02:36:52 PM
Ah, so the one that records for MDG is simply the Leipzig String Quartet. Thanks.

The also recorded a killer disc of the Bruckner quartet and quintet.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on March 04, 2011, 04:47:50 PM
Mendelssohn Quartets Galore
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/fmb_1822_by_w_hensel-200x300.jpg) (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814)

Your article says the Leipzig plays at the National Gallery on March 5th.   The correct date is the 6th (according to the link to the National Gallery web site).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 04, 2011, 05:48:21 PM
Your article says the Leipzig plays at the National Gallery on March 5th.   The correct date is the 6th (according to the link to the National Gallery web site).

Thanks! I've had the sub-editor fired.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 06, 2011, 07:18:02 AM

Concerts to hear in the Washington area:


April in Music
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2857

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/16-Tabuan-Parrakeet-Kopie.png) (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2857)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 12, 2011, 06:18:44 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VTvAd3mGrTw/TXpcLzs4A-I/AAAAAAAABdI/OYd3dYcNCWw/s400/OSLO%2BPHIL%2BBdeB.png)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-oslo-philharmonic-no2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-oslo-philharmonic-no2.html)



(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-t3AXLOaRSSM/TXq5dmawDfI/AAAAAAAABdg/RSndBCgQLg8/s400/BRSO_DENEVE_ZIMMERMANN.png)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-zimmermann-brso-do.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-zimmermann-brso-do.html)



(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7VNWTeysURk/TXpcg0xCbZI/AAAAAAAABdQ/Yw6HnJ_IW0E/s400/OSLO%2BPHIL%2BALBRECHT.png)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-olso-philharmonic-no-1.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-olso-philharmonic-no-1.html)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 13, 2011, 11:05:21 AM

Ionarts-at-Large: Beethoven Between Agony and Delight

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-pWM6WiDiu3k/TX0R9M3i7RI/AAAAAAAABdo/vlCGATguce0/s400/MPhil_Thielemann_Grimaud_Beethoven_Brahms.png)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-beethoven-between.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-beethoven-between.html)

In Mme. Grimaud there is something—although I can’t quite put my finger on what it is—that stands between her monochromatic renditions and the tediousness that a lesser, if similar straight-forward, bland pianist would evoke.

Or so I thought...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 14, 2011, 02:07:39 AM
How incredibly awesome is this!?!?!

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0044ZQ8TE.01.L.jpg)
W.G. Mozart (1756 – 1791),
Keyboard Music v.2
Sonata K.330, Rondo K.511, Adagio K.540 et al.
Kristian Bezuidenhout
McNulty copy of an Anton Walter & Sohn (~1802)
Harmonia Mundi
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0044ZQ8TE/goodmusicguide-20)



Dip Your Ears, No. 107

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/dip-your-ears-no-107.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/dip-your-ears-no-107.html)

For the longest time (well, a couple years, at least) my favorite Mozart
Sonata CD on the fortepiano had been Kristian Bezuidenhout’s disc on
Fleur de Son. Well, move over Bezuidenhout and make room for…
Bezuidenhout.

...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 15, 2011, 12:17:48 AM
Not really sure where this post would best fit. but it seems there is a new mass from the mid-1500s which is higher than Eminem, Bon Jovi and others on the British charts! Alas, on the classical charts, it is #2, behind Andre Rieu.

Here is the article: http://new.music.yahoo.com/various-artists/news/quot-lost-quot-450-year-old-mass-soars-on-british-charts--62010114 (http://new.music.yahoo.com/various-artists/news/quot-lost-quot-450-year-old-mass-soars-on-british-charts--62010114)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 20, 2011, 05:48:14 AM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_f6gacWJkcA/TYXVSEhB84I/AAAAAAAABd4/5RhzyED4fhU/s400/BRSO_5Lines.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: Uchida's Beethoven Touch

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-uchidas-beethoven.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-uchidas-beethoven.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Antoine Marchand on March 23, 2011, 01:56:03 AM
Is the "Gewandhaus-Quartett" the same as the Leipzig Gewandhaus Quartet (the group that records for MDG)? There is a new release from BC containing the quartets of Mendelssohn, played by the former. I gather from the listing at JPC, that this may have been licensed from NCA (hadn't heard of the name before).

Interesting... Do you know if all the string quartets are performed by the Gewandhaus Quartett?

If that, apparently BC would have licensed this 4-CD set from NCA (New Classical Adventure):

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4019272602054.jpg)(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/5028421942056.jpg)

I have their set with the complete Beethoven string quartets and they are just superb. This ensemble is formed by the concertmasters and principal viola and cello of the Gewandhaus Orchestra. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 23, 2011, 07:00:15 AM
Interesting... Do you know if all the string quartets are performed by the Gewandhaus Quartett?

Indeed, they are (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Brilliant%2BClassics/94205).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 23, 2011, 07:55:52 AM
Interesting... Do you know if all the string quartets are performed by the Gewandhaus Quartett?

If that, apparently BC would have licensed this 4-CD set from NCA (New Classical Adventure):

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/4019272602054.jpg)(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/5028421942056.jpg)

I have their set with the complete Beethoven string quartets and they are just superb. This ensemble is formed by the concertmasters and principal viola and cello of the Gewandhaus Orchestra.

The Leipzig Gewandhaus Quartet is not the same as the Leipzig String Quartet... the latter record for MDG (and have recorded the complete Mendelssohn, also). The former record(ed) for NCA and that's the set Brilliant has currently licensed.  See also: http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2814)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 23, 2011, 10:18:32 AM


Fischer, Kreizberg, and Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart (CD Pick of the Week)


(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/yakovKreizberg_marcoBorggreve480.png)
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2914 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2914)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 24, 2011, 04:00:06 AM



Ionarts-at-Large: A Midget, Frogs, and Broken Tea Cups


(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yPo3CLIp3bg/TYiLChhoKYI/AAAAAAAABeo/1t6LHysXTKk/s400/BSTOPRavelZemlinsky.png)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-midget-frogs-and.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/03/ionarts-at-large-midget-frogs-and.html)

I love the music of Zemlinsky. How superb to hear his “The Dwarf”. Too bad it’s not a particularly good opera...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 03, 2011, 11:41:51 AM

“Music – It Has To Become Part of Me” — Interview with Piotr Anderszewski

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/P_Anderszewski_Photo-K_Miur.png)
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2970
 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2970)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 12, 2011, 04:44:10 AM
Just when I was thinking I had a grip on late Romantic French composers, I run into this guy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcel_Labey

I then Google him, only to find that perhaps none of his music has been recorded.

There's still so much for record labels to discover :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 12, 2011, 10:57:19 AM

May in Music
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2987
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/17-Bauers-Parrakeet_480.png)
 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=2987)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 17, 2011, 06:42:10 AM
I bought this a while ago, but have only just noticed a key feature of it:



The disc contains a piano sonata and solo sonatas for violin and viola, and each piece appears to be performed by the same person :o

I've heard of violinists trying out the viola for shits and giggles, and Julia Fischer, for example, is a fine violinisit and pianist, but three?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 21, 2011, 02:21:42 AM
(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/themes/fmblog/images/masthead/masthead_main.png) (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/)


       Musical Excursions: São Paulo

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/SaoPaulo_jfl_JulioPrestesStation_WETA.jpg)

http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3025 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3025)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 23, 2011, 02:54:09 AM



Ionarts-at-Large: Bergen's String Magnificence


(http://www.bachtrack.com/images/concertfinder/GRIEGHALLEN.gif)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/04/ionarts-at-large-bergens-string.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/04/ionarts-at-large-bergens-string.html)
[/quote]
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on April 24, 2011, 03:24:45 AM
for those based in the UK, on TV tonight :


Holst - In the Bleak Midwinter
Sunday 24 April
9:00pm - 11:20pm
BBC4

Quote
This two-hour musical biography of Gustav Holst sits impressively in Tony Palmer's array of marvellous films about musicians. Born in Cheltenham in 1874 to a family with a German background, Holst became one of the foremost English composers. Yet his work owed little to Englishness; he opposed imperialism and the use of his music in the hymn to patriotism I Vow to Thee, My Country. His Planets suite, is, we learn, one of the most original works in English music. A generous set of performances interleaves here with the story of a remarkable man.


An article by the maker of the documentary here (http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/apr/21/gustav-holst-tony-palmer).



edit : oops, it was mentioned already by Pierre (Boris G) in the Holst thread.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on April 24, 2011, 03:30:38 AM
for those based in the UK, on TV tonight :


Holst - In the Bleak Midwinter
Sunday 24 April
9:00pm - 11:20pm
BBC4


An article by the maker of the documentary here (http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/apr/21/gustav-holst-tony-palmer).



edit : oops, it was mentioned already by Pierre (Boris G) in the Holst thread.

Nothing to "oop" about. Some of us don't visit the Holst thread ;), but are grateful to you for posting it here, despite the fact that one of the aforementioned some doesn't have access to BBC4.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 26, 2011, 09:38:35 AM


Vocal CD Pick of the Week: Diana Damrau’s Strauss Sublime

http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3057 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3057)
Quote
There are different kinds of “gorgeous”, “pretty”, “exciting”, and “ravishing” in
music. Really obvious ones—like the Larghetto from Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet—where
it is hard to imagine someone from an even remotely similar cultural background not
to share some of the delight on first hearing. Then there are really difficult ones, pieces
of music that usually demand repeat exposure, willingness, and a little background to
come to experience sensual bliss. No matter how much you love Bartók string quartets,
it would take a considerable arrogance or small-mindedness to suggest that it is easy
music to love, much less lovable upon first exposure....
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 27, 2011, 03:46:07 PM
Stumbled across this *cough* biopick of Nigel Kennedy. ;D

http://www.youtube.com/v/3itpHGkSs4A

Edit: finally remembered how to post a youtube clip!!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on April 27, 2011, 03:47:51 PM
I watched some Verdi (La Traviata), and I'm can feel myself beginning to despise Puccini.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 27, 2011, 04:13:19 PM
I've got another one, it's Andrew Lloyd Weber, but still appropriate because it's about him ripping off composers of the past...

http://www.youtube.com/v/JoVccXgAy6U
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 29, 2011, 04:33:26 AM



Ionarts-at-Large: Berlioz and Strategically Lowered Expectations


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Dl_Sz4GK3IM/Tbq1IT-mhNI/AAAAAAAABfQ/pRdfHx5ncWs/s400/MPhil_Znaider_Anderszewski.png)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/04/ionarts-at-large-berlioz-and.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/04/ionarts-at-large-berlioz-and.html)

Quote
...This premonition of mediocrity isn’t just a hunch. Nikolaj Znaider has been conducting the
Munich Philharmonic before; most recently in a program of Mozart and Tchaikovsky Symphonies.
The Mozart was so atrocious that, in ill health anyway, I was compelled to leave at intermission.
A local colleague who stayed (and, not knowing I had been there, referred to said Mozart
symphony as “making you want to run away”) assured me that the Tchaikovsky was consid-
erably better than the Mozart… but then, it would have been almost impossible not to be. So
what did that mean for the Mozart Concerto KV466 tonight? Ever the seasoned pessimist, I
decided to anticipate disaster; which is the concert-going analogue to the George W. Bush
approach to successful speaching: Lower expectations as much as possible, then hit it out of
the park just by not completely gaffing....

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 29, 2011, 04:36:29 AM
Hey Jens have you done a Bruckner survey similar to your Mahler survey?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 29, 2011, 04:52:43 AM
Hey Jens have you done a Bruckner survey similar to your Mahler survey?

Not quite... no. But since I love Bruckner (and am 'merely' addicted to Mahler), I think there will be one, before long. (WETA or some other publication would have to play along; can't do those things on a shoestring budget...)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on May 01, 2011, 01:09:22 PM
I've only listened to a Beethoven symphony once in the last 24 days.  :o  The First, on April 19 (Paavo Jarvi). How long will this drought continue? Maybe if it lasts a few weeks more unassisted, I'll try to hold back until midsummer and then return to them for some intensive listens.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on May 01, 2011, 01:10:51 PM
I've only listened to a Beethoven symphony once in the last 24 days.  :o  The First, on April 19 (Paavo Jarvi). How long will this drought continue? Maybe if it lasts a few weeks more unassisted, I'll try to hold back until midsummer and then return to them for some intensive listens.

I haven't listened to a Beethoven symphony in six months at least, maybe a year.  Why do you think anyone would care in the least whether you have listened to a Beethoven symphony in the last 24 days.   ::)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on May 01, 2011, 01:31:36 PM
I haven't listened to a Beethoven symphony in six months at least, maybe a year.  Why do you think anyone would care in the least whether you have listened to a Beethoven symphony in the last 24 days.   ::)

Well, I just said it 'cause I was surprised. I live on a pretty steady diet of them, usually about two a week, and I tell friends "there's a Beethoven symphony for every musical mood." I checked the listening log, was really surprised, and had to write it down somewhere or tell somebody. So sorry that it was you whose time was so criminally wasted.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on May 01, 2011, 01:34:14 PM
Well, I just said it 'cause I was surprised. I live on a pretty steady diet of them, usually about two a week, and I tell friends "there's a Beethoven symphony for every musical mood." I checked the listening log, was really surprised, and had to write it down somewhere or tell somebody. So sorry that it was you whose time was so criminally wasted.

If I listened to two Beethoven symphonies a week, after a year I would never want to hear the name Beethoven ever again.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 01, 2011, 01:36:16 PM
His symphonies are great, but I have to say congrats for breaking out of a rut!  There is too much great music out there to spend that much time even with Beethoven's symphonies.  Just think of it this way, for every time you listen again to one of Beethoven's symphonies you missed out on an opportunity for a Bach cantata, or a Brahms piano trio... and you have less heartbeats left before your heart stops ticking. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on May 01, 2011, 01:47:08 PM
Scarpia: What if you listened to the same symphony once per week, every single week, a la Gurn??  :P

His symphonies are great, but I have to say congrats for breaking out of a rut!  There is too much great music out there to spend that much time even with Beethoven's symphonies.  Just think of it this way, for every time you listen again to one of Beethoven's symphonies you missed out on an opportunity for a Bach cantata, or a Brahms piano trio... and you have less heartbeats left before your heart stops ticking. :)

Well, you didn't have to get so damn depressing about it.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 01, 2011, 01:48:12 PM
Scarpia: What if you listened to the same symphony once per week, every single week, a la Gurn??  :P

Well, you didn't have to get so damn depressing about it.  ;D

hehehe ;D guess it's about time for some Pettersson. :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on May 05, 2011, 02:53:44 PM
http://www.birgitnilssonprize.org/

Just what music needed, an award designed specifically to make the rich even richer. The two winners so far have been Plácido Domingo and Riccardo Muti, each receiving a much-needed $1m.

With talented everyday musicians making such paltry amounts it's sad that she would put her name to something so ignoble.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 05, 2011, 03:01:20 PM
http://www.birgitnilssonprize.org/

Just what music needed, an award designed specifically to make the rich even richer. The two winners so far have been Plácido Domingo and Riccardo Muti, each receiving a much-needed $1m.

With talented everyday musicians making such paltry amounts it's sad that she would put her name to something so ignoble.

Ignoble might be overshooting... but I share your sentiment exactly. What a B.S. adventure of self-promotion on the part of the jury members et al. No wonder classical music isn't in the healthiest state...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on May 05, 2011, 04:30:12 PM
Where the hell do they get all that money from? Was she a multi millionaire?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 06, 2011, 01:16:35 AM
Where the hell do they get all that money from? Was she a multi millionaire?

Enough appearances at the MET will do that to you. A few well selling recordings (in times they still sold well), royalties from a few well-selling books... if all of that is well invested. I suppose you could about five to ten million quid together. That's "all" you need to dole out 1m every three to four years.

5m @ 5% = 250k a/annum x 4 = 1m

In Mahler-'news':
 
I Like This Guy a Lot: Thomas Hampson on Gustav Mahler (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3077)
May is Mahler Month on WETA, remembering the composer who
died on May 18th, one hundred years ago. Mahler is a reoccurring
topic in this column and you can find all the Mahler-themed posts
at this link  (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?cat=24)and an overview of the WETA Mahler Survey here (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/12/mahler-survey.html).

 http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3077 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3077)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on May 06, 2011, 05:50:20 AM
Hey....I want to know what happened to the wonderful Bi-weekly Listening Thread we had going?  Any reason why it stopped?   ???
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on May 06, 2011, 12:37:12 PM
Faux Elliot Carter has this to say on Twitter:

[5 May]
Cinco de Mayo party starts at 5. Sent out 50 invites. Sorry you didn't make the cut this year either, Ned. Better luck next year.
Sofia G. wants us to do shots off her stomach. She just wants to show off her abs & rub in the fact that she's had P90x longer than me.
@briansrobinson Charlie Wuorinen never wants to blend. Says he's only going to make tequila sunrises.

[6 May]
still recovering from Cinco de Mayo. It was CRAZEEE. Ferneyhough playing beer pong & Boulez telling dirty jokes.
but Cinco de Mayo hasn't been the same since Alberto Ginastera passed away. #tips40 #spillalittleonetheground #formyhomey
http://twitter.com/_Elliott_Carter
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 14, 2011, 11:26:30 AM
Boy Kremer's cadenzas in the Beethoven Violin Concerto (in the Harnoncourt set) are out of control!  Really wild, out there let's have fun. :D

What are your favorite candenzas that you've heard in recordings or performances?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on May 16, 2011, 01:44:37 AM
Boy Kremer's cadenzas in the Beethoven Violin Concerto (in the Harnoncourt set) are out of control!  Really wild, out there let's have fun. :D

What are your favorite candenzas that you've heard in recordings or performances?

The Schnittke cadenze? Kremer in the Opus 61 could be the clincher for me …
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 16, 2011, 04:37:42 AM
The Schnittke cadenze? Kremer in the Opus 61 could be the clincher for me …

Another vote for Kremer! ;D  What is the Schnittke cadenza... as in he wrote a candenza for the lvb vc or there is a great cadenza in one of his concertos?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 16, 2011, 05:28:43 AM
Another vote for Kremer! ;D  What is the Schnittke cadenza... as in he wrote a candenza for the lvb vc or there is a great cadenza in one of his concertos?

Schnittke wrote a cadenza for Beethoven's op.61; Gidon Kremer recorded it with Neville Marriner & AStMitF (Philips).

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51bCr2hZeWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
L.v.Beethoven
Violin Concerto (w/Schnittke Cadenza)
Kremer - Marriner (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00000E2NO/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=goodmusicguide-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399349&creativeASIN=B00000E2NO)

Myself, I am partial to the Beethoven-Schneiderhan cadenza ("op.61b")
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on May 16, 2011, 05:31:23 AM
Thanks for the clarification, Jens.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 16, 2011, 07:44:37 AM
Yes thanks, cool Jens! :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 19, 2011, 07:51:01 AM
Great operas in 10 minutes, this was funny ;D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vNReqUGtsc (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vNReqUGtsc)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 22, 2011, 03:48:38 AM
Ripping my meager classical CD collection to my hard drive.  :) I think I have more download albums than CD's.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 22, 2011, 03:57:07 AM
Mahler in Leipzig

Here from Night No.2:

Mahler Festival Leipzig: Salonen - Dresden - Third Symphony

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-kqilU6eehto/TdhR_oUEDGI/AAAAAAAABgE/mJ19JRoZh1k/s400/Leipzig_Mahler_3_Dresden_Salonen.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-salonen-dresden.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-salonen-dresden.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 22, 2011, 06:03:57 AM
Ripping my meager classical CD collection to my hard drive.  :) I think I have more download albums than CD's.

I have about 4 gigs of downloaded albums vs ~215 gigs of flac or ~80 gigs of mp3s ripped.  I think I'm going to need a bigger hd soon.  Is your meager my meager?  I bet your collection is bigger! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 22, 2011, 06:54:20 AM
I have about 4 gigs of downloaded albums vs ~215 gigs of flac or ~80 gigs of mp3s ripped.  I think I'm going to need a bigger hd soon.  Is your meager my meager?  I bet your collection is bigger! :D

Are you talking just classical or everything?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 22, 2011, 11:14:04 AM
Are you talking just classical or everything?

For me it doesn't matter I don't have that much pop music. But to answer your question-- everything.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 22, 2011, 11:17:31 AM
For me it doesn't matter I don't have that much pop music. But to answer your question-- everything.

It might be around the same gig size as yours but I don't rip anything to FLAC either. So maybe more recordings.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 22, 2011, 11:40:02 AM
I've been taking classical music seriously for about 26 years now.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 22, 2011, 02:09:13 PM
It might be around the same gig size as yours but I don't rip anything to FLAC either. So maybe more recordings.

Uh yeah that is 3x more! ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 22, 2011, 02:09:48 PM
I've been taking classical music seriously for about 26 years now.

You've been taking classical music seriously since I was 5! :o
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 22, 2011, 02:16:51 PM
You've been taking classical music seriously since I was 5! :o

Really? Ha! You're a youngin'. ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 23, 2011, 03:49:30 AM

Mahler in Leipzig

Here from Night No.4:

Mahler Festival Leipzig: Nezét-Séguin - BRSO - Seventh Symphony

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1ScFUxxakWU/TdpRmqBW0CI/AAAAAAAABgs/fLV5J6rg_q4/s400/Leipzig_Mahler_7_BRSO_Nezet_Seguin.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-nezet-seguin.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-nezet-seguin.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 23, 2011, 03:50:43 AM

Mahler in Leipzig

Here from Night No.3:

Mahler Festival Leipzig: Märkl - MDR SO - Tenth Symphony

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hf3aJegbYkw/TdkSWMQN01I/AAAAAAAABgM/ulpLF4-msVE/s400/Leipzig_Mahler_10_MDRSO_Markl.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-markl-mdr-so.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-markl-mdr-so.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on May 25, 2011, 06:33:39 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51i4DS0IHHL._SS500_.jpg)

I know it's the podium, but Celi looks so creepy here - like one of the Rheingold giants in Boulez's floppy-arms production.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 25, 2011, 09:00:05 AM
20th Century composers and I.

Love: NA

Like well enough: Barber, Bartók, Bax, Bernstein, Brian, Britten, Busoni, Górecki, Holst, Janáček, Khachaturian, Mahler, Nielsen, Orff, Prokofieff, Satie, Scriabin, Shostakovich, Sibelius, Strauss, Weill, Zwilich

No: Berg, Copland, Gershwin, Ives, Messiaen, Vaughan Williams, Schoenberg, Stravinsky

The jury is out: Bloch, Davies, Duruflé, Enesco, Ginastera, Hanson, Harris, Hindemith, Honegger, Ibert, Kodály, Martin, Martinu, Menotti, Milhaud, Mompou, Piston, Poulenc, Rubbra, Schmidt, Schuller, Schuman, Sessions, Simpson, Szymanowski, Thompson, Thomson, Tippett, Tournemire, Tubin, Turina, Villa-lobos, Walton, Respighi, Rodrigo
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on May 25, 2011, 09:25:42 AM
I think I shall probably count as a 21st-c. composer, anyway ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 25, 2011, 09:26:22 AM
I think I shall probably count as a 21st-c. composer, anyway ; )

 ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 25, 2011, 09:36:44 AM
I think I shall probably count as a 21st-c. composer, anyway ; )

Although Sibelius, Shostakovich and Prokofiev have individual pieces I really love.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on May 25, 2011, 05:05:15 PM
Like well enough: Barber, Bartók, Bax, Bernstein, Brian, Britten, Busoni, Górecki, Holst, Janáček, Khachaturian, Mahler, Nielsen, Orff, Prokofieff, Satie, Scriabin, Shostakovich, Sibelius, Strauss, Weill, Zwilich

No: Berg, Copland, Gershwin, Ives, Messiaen, Vaughan Williams, Schoenberg, Stravinsky

The jury is out: Bloch, Davies, Duruflé, Enesco, Ginastera, Hanson, Harris, Hindemith, Honegger, Ibert, Kodály, Martin, Martinu, Menotti, Milhaud, Mompou, Piston, Poulenc, Rubbra, Schmidt, Schuller, Schuman, Sessions, Simpson, Szymanowski, Thompson, Thomson, Tippett, Tournemire, Tubin, Turina, Villa-lobos, Walton, Respighi, Rodrigo

Surprised you don't like Vaughan Williams or Copland. The Naxos disc of Copland's early symphonies is pretty good.
 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 25, 2011, 05:13:23 PM
Surprised you don't like Vaughan Williams or Copland. The Naxos disc of Copland's early symphonies is pretty good.

I guess my Vaughan Williams rating is more indifference than anything. Maybe I haven't heard enough; maybe I have. :)

Copland does not do it for me at all. I know. Shocker.  :-\
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 26, 2011, 11:27:14 AM

Mahler in Leipzig

Here from Night No.6:

Mahler Festival Leipzig: Gilbert - NY Phil - Fifth Symphony / Kindertotenlieder

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ivtTyw_MfWA/Td6zGOGaq6I/AAAAAAAABhM/UlQydUFM9mA/s400/Leipzig_Mahler_5_NYP_Gilber.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-gilbert-ny-phil.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-gilbert-ny-phil.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on May 26, 2011, 11:28:30 AM
I guess my Vaughan Williams rating is more indifference than anything. Maybe I haven't heard enough; maybe I have. :)

Is your exposure to Vaughan Williams the English Folk Song type stuff, or the more thorny works?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on May 26, 2011, 11:42:38 AM
Is your exposure to Vaughan Williams the English Folk Song type stuff, or the more thorny works?

Oh, a little bit of everything. It's probably that I haven't found the right entry piece for myself. Or I'm not trying hard enough. But should I have to try that hard? :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on May 26, 2011, 11:44:22 AM
Oh, a little bit of everything. It's probably that I haven't found the right entry piece for myself. Or I'm not trying hard enough. But should I have to try that hard? :)

No, just curious.  He is a composer who seems to compose in a broader range of styles than most.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 27, 2011, 08:52:58 AM
Mahler in Leipzig

Here from Night No.7:

Mahler Festival Leipzig: Zinman - Tonhalle Zurich - Sixth Symphony

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-r9dDg2VHfaw/Td_gWwGB4mI/AAAAAAAABhU/n20nxcC05rg/s400/Leipzig_Mahler_6_Tonhalle_Zinman.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-zinman-tonhalle.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-zinman-tonhalle.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 28, 2011, 06:04:32 AM

Mahler in Leipzig

Here from Night No.8:


Mahler Festival Leipzig: Harding - Mahler Chamber Orchestra - Fourth Symphony


(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-gebHpo_apOw/TeELx0d4AeI/AAAAAAAABhc/LoACikVAd4Q/s400/Leipzig_Mahler_4_MCO_Harding.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-harding-mahler.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/mahler-festival-leipzig-harding-mahler.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 28, 2011, 01:10:04 PM


(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/themes/fmblog/images/masthead/masthead_main.png)
Christian Gerhaher, Otmar Schoeck – A Love Story

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/O_Schoeck.png)
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3151 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3151)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 01, 2011, 03:59:53 AM


(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/themes/fmblog/images/masthead/masthead_main.png)
Bernstein via Angers: John Axelrod in Conversation*

(http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/johnAxelrod.png)
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3178 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=3178)


*"Kaddish Symphony: Rubbish or Genius?"
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 12, 2011, 03:14:33 PM
Some of you may remember the "esteemed" Dr. David Wright, who got quietly kicked out of MusicWeb for being a bit of a nutter. He seems to have found some friends who share his perculiar interests with him so closely that I assume he's conversing with his own sockpuppet:

Link to another rant about Britten from his new website (PDF). (http://www.wrightmusic.net/pdfs/britten-more-thoughts.pdf)

Choice quote: "He was a criminal in the days when homosexuality was illegal"
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 12, 2011, 03:33:13 PM
Some of you may remember the "esteemed" Dr. David Wright, who got quietly kicked out of MusicWeb for being a bit of a nutter. He seems to have found some friends who share his perculiar interests with him so closely that I assume he's conversing with his own sockpuppet:

Link to another rant about Britten from his new website (PDF). (http://www.wrightmusic.net/pdfs/britten-more-thoughts.pdf)

Choice quote: "He was a criminal in the days when homosexuality was illegal"

Wow. Just "wow". Cringeworthyhilariousandveryverysad! The copyright notice alone is terrific... and the rest... an imbecilic rant that beggars belief. No wonder he was asked to leave the pastures of GMGCMF behind...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on June 12, 2011, 10:59:18 PM
Two can play this game! (Re-arranged below to reflect my me.)

20th Century composers and I.

Love: Atterberg, Gershwin, Janáček, Ravel, Roussel, Shostakovich, Sibelius

Like quite a bit: Bernstein, Copland, Ibert, Hartmann, Holst, Khachaturian, Kodály, Martinu, Lutoslawski, Poulenc, Rachmaninov, Respighi, Rodrigo, Scriabin, Strauss, Turina, Villa-lobos

Like well enough: Barber, Ginastera, Górecki, Hindemith, Ives, Lloyd, Milhaud, Suk, Stravinsky, Vaughan Williams, Walton

No: Berg, Davies, Orff [O Fortuna drives me batty, that's all], Schoenberg

Indifferent/Unmoved: Bartók, Bax, Busoni, Hanson, Satie

The jury is out: Bloch, Brian, Britten, Duruflé, Enesco, Harris, Honegger, Mahler, Martin, Menotti, Messiaen, Mompou, Nielsen, Piston, Prokofieff, Rubbra, Schmidt, Schuller, Schuman, Sessions, Simpson, Szymanowski, Thompson, Thomson, Tippett, Tournemire, Tubin, Weill, Zwilich

Dave, you do know you left Ravel off, right? And Roussel? And Rachmaninov?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on June 13, 2011, 12:10:07 AM
No, he didn't - check again.
 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on June 13, 2011, 01:04:24 AM
No, he didn't - check again.

Yes, he did - they're in the quoted version in my post because I rearranged all the composers to display my own tastes.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on June 13, 2011, 01:05:16 AM
Some of you may remember the "esteemed" Dr. David Wright, who got quietly kicked out of MusicWeb for being a bit of a nutter. He seems to have found some friends who share his perculiar interests with him so closely that I assume he's conversing with his own sockpuppet:

Link to another rant about Britten from his new website (PDF). (http://www.wrightmusic.net/pdfs/britten-more-thoughts.pdf)

Choice quote: "He was a criminal in the days when homosexuality was illegal"

And there's the part where they spell his name "Britain"...

EDIT: Though my favorite bit is that "sexy" is frequently used as a pejorative.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 13, 2011, 01:41:57 AM
And there's the part where they spell his name "Britain"...

EDIT: Though my favorite bit is that "sexy" is frequently used as a pejorative.

I think no pretense needs to be made calling the author(s) "they". If you compare the "response" of "40 eminent musicians to the brilliant Dr. Watson's lucid essay on Benjamin Britten", you will find that the examples, anecdotes, even the spelling mistakes and the frequent habit of just dropping entire words is the very same.
I wouldn't, however, rule out that in his mind these authors are 'separate'.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on June 16, 2011, 06:19:42 AM
Question
When string players are playing so hard (?) that they make those annoying click/scratch sounds, is there a word for that sound?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 16, 2011, 07:43:16 AM
Question
When string players are playing so hard (?) that they make those annoying click/scratch sounds, is there a word for that sound?

On purpose or as a by-product of enthusiasm gone overboard?
If the former, it's best to look into the score... if it's strepitoso (rare), or sulla tastiera (which can explain the clicking of strings on the fingerboard), sforzato, or the like.
If not... I can't think of a term that would neatly describe it better than the words you suggest. And it wasn't 'col legno', presumably... because you would have noticed...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on June 16, 2011, 08:31:06 AM
On purpose or as a by-product of enthusiasm gone overboard?

Certainly the latter - I mean accidental byproducts of enthusiasm heard in some performances but not others. I'll try to find a clip if uncertainty remains...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 17, 2011, 12:53:33 PM
What is wrong with Amazon's classical reviewers? Many of the major contributors seem extremely angry and combatative, to the extent that I don't click on review comments any more because it's no doubt part of some gigantic cross-post series of skirmishes between various factions unknown to me. It's bizarre :-\
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 24, 2011, 06:21:05 AM
Does anybody know exactly what went on with the piano music attributed to George Gurdjieff? I can't find a helpful source, but it has the appearance that Thomas de Hartmann must have written it all rather than co-wrote, with Gurdjieff acting merely as a "mentor" figure, and as such should I file it under Hartmann rather than Gurdjieff?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 24, 2011, 06:29:18 AM
Does anybody know exactly what went on with the piano music attributed to George Gurdjieff? I can't find a helpful source, but it has the appearance that Thomas de Hartmann must have written it all rather than co-wrote, with Gurdjieff acting merely as a "mentor" figure, and as such should I file it under Hartmann rather than Gurdjieff?

We (Tower DC) always filed under "Hartmann, T.de". He wrote the music... or 'interpreted' the hummings of Gurdjieff, if you wish
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 24, 2011, 06:30:32 AM
Thanks!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: chasmaniac on June 24, 2011, 06:37:42 AM
Some of you may remember the "esteemed" Dr. David Wright, who got quietly kicked out of MusicWeb for being a bit of a nutter. He seems to have found some friends who share his perculiar interests with him so closely that I assume he's conversing with his own sockpuppet:

Link to another rant about Britten from his new website (PDF). (http://www.wrightmusic.net/pdfs/britten-more-thoughts.pdf)

Choice quote: "He was a criminal in the days when homosexuality was illegal"

This stuff is hilarious! Any chance Poe's Law applies and the whole thing's a send-up? If not, let me amend my reaction to: How sad.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on June 24, 2011, 07:30:27 AM
Any chance Poe's Law applies and the whole thing's a send-up? If not, let me amend my reaction to: How sad.

Unfortunately not... Wright is a well known crank.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 06, 2011, 12:08:46 PM
Those of you who don't use/enable AdBlock on this forum may have noticed a "download Bach's WTC here" banner during the past week or two. I wish I could find it now, but yesterday I Googled the pianist, and it turns out he has a rather colourful history (http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy&hl=en&safe=off&source=hp&q=Tzvi+Erez&aq=f&aqi=g5&aql=&oq=&pbx=1&fp=1&biw=1440&bih=776&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&cad=b).

This may be the world's first case of a fraudster working his way out of bankrupcy by recording Bach :) It beats honest work I suppose :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on July 06, 2011, 12:28:41 PM
Those of you who don't use/enable AdBlock on this forum may have noticed a "download Bach's WTC here" banner during the past week or two. I wish I could find it now, but yesterday I Googled the pianist, and it turns out he has a rather colourful history (http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy&hl=en&safe=off&source=hp&q=Tzvi+Erez&aq=f&aqi=g5&aql=&oq=&pbx=1&fp=1&biw=1440&bih=776&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&cad=b).

This may be the world's first case of a fraudster working his way out of bankrupcy by recording Bach :) It beats honest work I suppose :P

Thanks.  I was wondering he was.  I clicked on the ad last week just to see who the pianist was (and I suppose clicking on the ad might generate some revenue to GMG?).

Well, he'll just have to play his way out of trouble without my help, I guess.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 06, 2011, 12:34:23 PM
and I suppose clicking on the ad might generate some revenue to GMG?

Hopefully - I disable my blocker on important sites because of that. A general note to anyone - don't be tempted to overdo the clicks, as G--gle tracks that.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on July 06, 2011, 06:32:38 PM
don't be tempted to overdo the clicks, as G--gle tracks that.

- unless you've blocked Google cookies.
 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 07, 2011, 01:12:39 AM
- unless you've blocked Google cookies.

It's at least in part measured by IP, and also range if it's a dynamic one...

Ah, here we go:

(http://i.imgur.com/wuYJp.jpg) (http://www.nivmusic.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?products_id=90&gclid=CLTzuveD76kCFRRc4QodgRv-XA)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 07, 2011, 04:22:33 AM
Next month Opus Arte releases the Blu-Ray of "Anna Nicole: The Opera."
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 07, 2011, 04:37:46 AM
Oh, you don't mean it?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 07, 2011, 04:39:22 AM
Oh, you don't mean it?

(http://imc-static.simranmt.com/catalog/product/cache/2/image/5e06319eda06f020e43594a9c230972d/a/n/annanicolebr.jpg)

I sincerely regret not seeing it in person and probably will acquire the DVD (though not the Blu-Ray...).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 07, 2011, 04:50:57 AM
Can't be enough tabloid opera out there for me . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on July 07, 2011, 04:38:34 PM
Yes, from the subject and the timing I imagined it to be the "arty" equivalent of Rocky Horror. Should get the queens in though.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 08, 2011, 03:54:18 AM
Just discovered the Timpani label from France. Yikes: looking through their catalog on Classicsonline, I think I want to hear every single release. The programs are all so appetizing - and so many of them have such beautiful cover designs!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 08, 2011, 12:06:21 PM
Definitely check their Ropartz symphonies and Le Flem. The Chandos series makes the D'Indy less of a discovery than it might have been, but they have a good disc of his chamber music. If you are feeling masochistic, Timpani also recorded some Furtwängler.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 11, 2011, 07:18:15 AM
After leaving a bronzed disc ripping (constant error correction with EAC) for 24 hours, lagging up my PC, I think it's time to abort :( I am perhaps destined not to hear George Lloyd's chamber music ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on July 11, 2011, 04:30:21 PM
Listening to Prokofiev's Peter & the Wolf (instrumental version on Infinity Digital) had me wondering if Sergei identified with the duck (or as Michael Flanders called her, "the stupid duck"). He was after all a bit of an "odd duck", and ended up through his own foolishness being swallowed by the Soviet Union, much as the duck, after swimming out to safety, came back to land and was swallowed by the wolf.

"If you listen very carefully, you'd hear the duck quacking inside the wolf's belly, because the wolf in his hurry had swallowed her alive."

 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 19, 2011, 11:14:44 AM
When I tag CDs, I tend to translate foreign ensemble names into English, this is fine with "symphoniker" and so on, but I just encountered "Neue Düsseldorfer Hofmusik".

What is a "Hofmusik" when it's at home?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 19, 2011, 11:23:11 AM
Hmmm... the New Dusseldorf Court Musicians? What an odd name; what are they playing?

How do you translate, say, Hofkapelle Stuttgart (unless you haven't got any of their discs)?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 19, 2011, 11:41:37 AM
Hmmm... the New Dusseldorf Court Musicians? What an odd name; what are they playing?

How do you translate, say, Hofkapelle Stuttgart (unless you haven't got any of their discs)?

Chapel Royal or court orchestra.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 19, 2011, 11:50:14 AM
Hmmm... the New Dusseldorf Court Musicians? What an odd name; what are they playing?

How do you translate, say, Hofkapelle Stuttgart (unless you haven't got any of their discs)?

This 'un:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CZMRJRnLL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Haydn-8-Concerti-Franz-Joseph/dp/B002ED6VL8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1311108324&sr=8-2)

I... don't have a clue how I'd do the one you suggest either :'( Why can't they all be easy like the Freiburger Barockorchester. The translation system is useful though, as many Continental European norms involve putting the most generic word (orchestra) at the beginning of the name, rather than the English manner of prioritising the most distinctive word - i.e., the city that the ensemble is from.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 19, 2011, 11:56:12 AM
This 'un:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CZMRJRnLL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Haydn-8-Concerti-Franz-Joseph/dp/B002ED6VL8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1311108324&sr=8-2)


New Dusseldorf Court Musicke, I'spose.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on July 19, 2011, 12:04:36 PM
Thanks! I know that these things can sometimes be pesky to translate :(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 31, 2011, 12:35:23 PM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 1 )

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/07/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-1.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/07/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-1.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on August 03, 2011, 06:04:15 PM
I wonder if I can encourage more forumites to participate in the "GMG's favorite..." threads? Only, at the moment it's the same half dozen people posting repeatedly, which is hardly presentative.
 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on August 04, 2011, 02:49:20 AM
I don't because I don't consider myself familiar enough to rank so many different pieces.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on August 04, 2011, 03:38:24 AM
I don't because I don't consider myself familiar enough to rank so many different pieces.

But you have like five billion cds! :D  I have not as many as you but have heard nearly everything on the chamber thread.  Give it a shot! :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on August 04, 2011, 03:44:34 AM
But you have like five billion cds! :D  I have not as many as you but have heard nearly everything on the chamber thread.  Give it a shot! :)

I might have heard them but I can't remember them all; I certainly don't know every chamber piece in existence so how could I possibly rank them? And besides, I'm too lazy to figure out how the ranking works.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on August 04, 2011, 03:59:37 AM
...Though I have been watching the threads. For instance, I wondered why Gurn was dissing the Alkan duo, so I pulled it up on Spotify, listened to it and decided he was crazy. ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on August 04, 2011, 04:09:52 AM
...Though I have been watching the threads. For instance, I wondered why Gurn was dissing the Alkan duo, so I pulled it up on Spotify, listened to it and decided he was crazy. ;)

Wanderer would be ecstatic if you showed up just to support Alkan! :D  All you have to do is +2 one work, +1 another, -1 a third and then post the new board. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 05, 2011, 01:02:03 PM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 2 )

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-2.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: chasmaniac on August 06, 2011, 12:38:44 AM
I wonder if I can encourage more forumites to participate in the "GMG's favorite..." threads? Only, at the moment it's the same half dozen people posting repeatedly, which is hardly presentative.

I did it for a while, but then... ooo, shiny!

I'm easily bore- ooo, another shiny!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on August 06, 2011, 02:22:35 AM
I did it for a while, but then... ooo, shiny!

I'm easily bore- ooo, another shiny!

 ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 07, 2011, 02:51:36 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 3 )

Mozart * Le nozze di Figaro * Claus Guth * Robin Ticciati * Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-3.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-3.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 07, 2011, 11:13:27 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 4 )

Sokolov Recital



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-4.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-4.html)


Last night Macbeth * Muti * Peter Stein; earlier this morning Mozart with Ivor Bolton & Julia Fischer. Later tonight: Sasha Waltz-choreographed performance of assorted modern works.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: The new erato on August 08, 2011, 12:52:55 AM
Just discovered the Timpani label from France. Yikes: looking through their catalog on Classicsonline, I think I want to hear every single release. The programs are all so appetizing - and so many of them have such beautiful cover designs!
Yes indeed. Start with the Pierne issues, all are fantastic. And there's a couple of Florent Schmitt discs that are absolutely superb.

Waiting for the next Timpani offer on the usual UKwebshops.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 08, 2011, 11:01:06 AM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 5 )

Perfumed Naphthalene: Riccardo Muti, Peter Stein, Giuseppe Verdi, Mr. & Mrs. Macbeth



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-5.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-5.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 08, 2011, 04:52:36 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/TTXbv.png)

6 & 9 are £10. In general, Amazon's mp3 download costs more than the CDs. The British have always been shit at capitalism, but srsly guys.

One day I will understand.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 09, 2011, 05:30:01 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 6 )

Mozart Matinee * Ivor Bolton * Julia Fischer



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-6.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on August 09, 2011, 10:22:24 AM
Hehe, I am so immature - I take a kind of perverse pleasure in seeing an otherwise intelligent person try to be a wit but slip up. In the latest Gramophone, a reviewer adds [sic] tags to a claim that a pianist's survey of "all 35" of Beethoven's piano sonatas is being undertaken - but clearly this means that the electoral sonatas will be included.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 11, 2011, 04:52:11 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 7 )

The Fifth Continent • Continū, Salzburg Media Productions



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-7.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 14, 2011, 07:21:26 AM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 8 )

Mahler Scenes • Mahler, Strauss, Schnittke



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-8.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 17, 2011, 05:23:12 AM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 9 )

Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia • Haydn, Rossini



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-9.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-9.html)


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 10 )

Chamber Concert 3 • Schubert, Schumann, Schoenberg



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-10.html)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 21, 2011, 12:16:53 PM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 11 )

Recital • Mullova & Bezuidenhout



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-11.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-11.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 24, 2011, 01:36:28 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 12 )

Nestlé Young Conductors Award • Round Table • Winner • Concert



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/kit-kat-conductor-notes-from-2011.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/kit-kat-conductor-notes-from-2011.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on August 24, 2011, 11:41:55 AM
WOW!  The Havergal Brian composer thread officially holds top spot for the most replies posted in the active composer discussion threads!!  Quite an accomplishment.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on August 24, 2011, 11:46:01 AM
If I posted a bunch on the Mahler thread I could change that pretty quick! ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 25, 2011, 05:57:06 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 12 )

Guest Orchestra • ORF RSO Vienna • Rott / Berg



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/rottnroll-notes-from-2011-salzburg.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/rottnroll-notes-from-2011-salzburg.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 26, 2011, 06:53:55 AM
Salzburg Highlight
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 14 12 )

Camerata 1 • Mahler Scenes 8
Ives • Hartmann • Mahler • Mozart
Nagano  •  Pires



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-12.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-12.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 30, 2011, 04:43:16 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 15 )

Chamber Concert • Ives & Beethoven
Zehetmair Quartet •  P.L.Aimard



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-15.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-15.html)


Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 16 )

Die Frau ohne Schatten
Thielemann •  Loy



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/phantasmorgastic-but-with-shadows.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/08/phantasmorgastic-but-with-shadows.html)



Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 31, 2011, 07:45:29 AM
An opportunity for Martinu's fans to take issue with Arkiv:

Quote
Supraphon is now on sale, including Martinu: Overture, Rhapsody / Belohlávek, Czech PO, perhaps the single most appealing selection of Martinu's orchestral works.
[emphasis mine]

Despite not being one myself, I feel like quibbling about it.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 01, 2011, 01:45:42 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC8Vaqn59fc/TjWmN03d2vI/AAAAAAAABlE/8A-kKphVQMs/s400/2011notesfromsalzburgfestiv.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 17 )

Janáček • Věc Makropulous
Salonen •  Denoke



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-17.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-17.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 01, 2011, 04:35:25 AM
(http://www.seenandheard-international.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/notesfromthesalzburgfestiva.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 18 )

Shostakovich SQ4t Cycle • Mandelring Quartett



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-18.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-18.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on September 06, 2011, 05:17:22 AM
As of now - the Top 10 Most Posted Composer Threads (unlocked) are:

1 - Havergal Brian
2 - Mahler Mania, Rebooted
3 - Vaughan Williams's Veranda
4 - Bruckner's Abbey
5 - The Carter Corner
6 - Haydn's Haus
7 - Elgar's Hillside
8 - Ludwig Van Beethoven
9 - The Snowshoed Sibelius
10 - Stockhausen's Spaceship

As of now, the Top 10 Most Viewed Composer Threads (unlocked) are:


1 - Bruckner's Abbey
2 - Mahler Mania, Rebooted
3 - Vaughan Williams's Veranda
4 - The Carter Corner
5 - Ludwig Van Beethoven
6 - Havergal Brian
7 - Haydn's Haus
8 - Prokofiev's Paddy Wagon
9 - The Snowshoed Sibelius
10 - Scandinavian and Finnish Composers
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on September 06, 2011, 06:13:26 AM
What about the Luchesi thread? :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on September 06, 2011, 06:27:13 AM
What about the Luchesi thread? :D

Not sure?   :D

Hey, did you order or check into Tchaik's Orchestral Suites yet?  I'm dying to know your thoughts!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on September 06, 2011, 06:41:41 AM
Not sure?   :D

Hey, did you order or check into Tchaik's Orchestral Suites yet?  I'm dying to know your thoughts!

I've been into RVW's Sea Symphony so much it slipped my mind!  Soon though!!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on September 06, 2011, 06:45:28 AM
I've been into RVW's Sea Symphony so much it slipped my mind!

Now there's something you don't read every day. Thanks, it made me smile :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: karlhenning on September 06, 2011, 06:49:50 AM
Very cool, Davey!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 07, 2011, 12:18:11 AM

(http://www.seenandheard-international.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/notesfromthesalzburgfestiva.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 19 )

West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • Great Beethoven, Great Bullshit



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-19.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-19.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 07, 2011, 07:05:23 AM

(http://www.seenandheard-international.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/notesfromthesalzburgfestiva.png)

Notes from the 2011 Salzburg Festival ( 20 )

Vienna Philharmonic • Lang Lang, Liszt, and Jansons



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-20.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/notes-from-2011-salzburg-festival-20.html)

+



Heart of a Soldier: Interview with Thomas Hampson
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-YNZn8G4FopI/TmeRMrpfQBI/AAAAAAAABq8/ZvP1YJyuVfU/s400/Thomas%2BHampson_D_Acosta.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/heart-of-soldier-interview-with-thomas.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/09/heart-of-soldier-interview-with-thomas.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mn Dave on September 22, 2011, 05:26:10 PM
http://minnesota.publicradio.org/collections/special/columns/state-of-the-arts/archive/2011/09/minnesota-orchestra-names-erin-keefe-as-concertmaster.shtml
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on October 03, 2011, 08:04:48 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/wMmbX.png) (http://www.miumiu.com/en/campaign/video?cmp=youtube_en_UK_comm_04102011)
(click)

I thought it was nice that they didn't pick the usual suspect, either composer or piece.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 03, 2011, 08:15:00 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/wMmbX.png) (http://www.miumiu.com/en/campaign/video?cmp=youtube_en_UK_comm_04102011)
(click)

I thought it was nice that they didn't pick the usual suspect, either composer or piece.

Video was cool, mostly stuck around to see who the cellist was, though. That image, though. That's my new No 1 All Time Favorite Thing Ever. Also avatar.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on October 14, 2011, 01:38:00 PM
Check track 15 (http://www.amazon.com/Amy-Beach-Still-Waters/dp/B000000T9R/ref=sr_1_3?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1318627827&sr=1-3)

I believe it's supposed to be "birches" ::)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 17, 2011, 01:34:02 PM
Check track 15 (http://www.amazon.com/Amy-Beach-Still-Waters/dp/B000000T9R/ref=sr_1_3?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1318627827&sr=1-3)

I believe it's supposed to be "birches" ::)

Excellent! Sounds like the kind of young bitrches I wouldn't mind. Civilized and calm, well behaved and refined. But naked.



Listen What the Cat Dragged In: Music by Naji Hakim

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/10/listen-what-cat-dragged-in-music-by.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/10/listen-what-cat-dragged-in-music-by.html)
(With audio samples)

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B004S6N8TW.MZZZZZZZ.jpg)
N. Hakim,
Set Me As A Seal Upon Your Heart
Chamber & Organ Music
N.Hakim et al.
Signum Classics
(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B004S6N8TW/goodmusicguide-20)

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B004C1C9FM.MZZZZZZZ.jpg)
N. Hakim,
Hakim plays Hakim
Organ Music
N.Hakim et al.
Signum Classics
(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B004C1C9FM/goodmusicguide-20)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 10, 2011, 08:19:06 AM
Any particular music one would listen to perhaps, on Remembrance Day?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 10, 2011, 10:36:35 AM
Any particular music one would listen to perhaps, on Remembrance Day?

Berlioz, Symphonie funèbre et triomphale
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brahmsian on November 10, 2011, 10:47:15 AM
Berlioz, Symphonie funèbre et triomphale

Good one.  I do have a recording of said work.  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: chasmaniac on November 10, 2011, 10:55:59 AM
Any particular music one would listen to perhaps, on Remembrance Day?

Maybe it's obvious, but how about that symphony #3 by Vaughan Williams? Came after the First Last War and has a "My God, what have we we done?" feel to it.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on November 14, 2011, 08:25:41 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/CCC66.jpg)

:)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Jared on November 14, 2011, 08:32:20 AM
Maybe it's obvious, but how about that symphony #3 by Vaughan Williams? Came after the First Last War and has a "My God, what have we we done?" feel to it.

complete with 'Last Post' trumpet... a superb work.

Last night, I was privileged to watch Derek Jarman's silent film to Benjamin Britten's War Requiem... very powerful images..

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 14, 2011, 10:37:56 AM
I can't bring myself to take part in the Roussel thread . . . too put off by the whiney thread title.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Jared on November 14, 2011, 10:48:23 AM
I can't bring myself to take part in the Roussel thread . . . too put off by the whiney thread title.

so, what you're basically saying is that if I were to start a 'Why Doesn't anyone love RVW as much as I do?' thread, you wouldn't be one of the principle participants... is that it??  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 14, 2011, 11:47:53 AM
Or Koechlin: Why don't the rest of you get on the program?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 02, 2011, 03:35:50 PM
Alexandre Tharaud: A Case of Perpetual Puppy
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/12/tharaud-case-of-perpetual-puppy.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/12/tharaud-case-of-perpetual-puppy.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 09, 2011, 01:27:59 AM
I remember during a discussion (or was it a debate?) about the 'Living Stereo' box someone wished the powers-that-be would release the 'Living Presence' from Mercury. Well, folks, it's here:



I've used the ASIN tag for reference, although it's much cheaper at UK stores.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 09, 2011, 03:23:30 AM
I remember during a discussion (or was it a debate?) about the 'Living Stereo' box someone wished the powers-that-be would release the 'Living Presence' from Mercury. Well, folks, it's here:

I've used the ASIN tag for reference, although it's much cheaper at UK stores.

pictures here: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mercury-Living-Presence-50-1-CD-Collectors-Box-Set-New-/120726192220?pt=Music_CDs&hash=item1c1bd7805c (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mercury-Living-Presence-50-1-CD-Collectors-Box-Set-New-/120726192220?pt=Music_CDs&hash=item1c1bd7805c)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 11, 2011, 05:44:32 PM
ionarts:Best of 2011, Part 10 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/12/best-recordings-of-2011-10.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 13, 2011, 09:43:50 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_profilepage&v=WQCOr8UiS7I#t=220s

Is the kind of singing unique to Monteverdi or even this work, or was it prevalent during his time? (It lasts for about 9 seconds from where the video starts and transformed afterwards.) Somehow, to these modern ears, they seem slightly less reverent for a religious work of that time (not that I hold an encyclopaedic knowledge about it between my ears ::)) and perhaps even playful.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 21, 2011, 06:56:27 AM

True, Sarge, I'm no good. I have a thing about symphonies going over 30 minutes. I can only think of 2 that can justify it, and they weren't written in the 20th century, or even after 1825.

Gosh.

Gotta say it again: Gosh.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on January 12, 2012, 11:28:09 AM
The film/documentary "Pianomania" in full on youtube :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOvGwpq_S_c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOvGwpq_S_c)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 12, 2012, 08:38:49 PM
The film/documentary "Pianomania" in full on youtube :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOvGwpq_S_c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOvGwpq_S_c)

Thanks. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on January 13, 2012, 04:19:34 PM
O fortuna!

(http://catsandcoupons.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/TunaCan.jpg)

 :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Est.1965 on January 13, 2012, 04:33:37 PM
The film/documentary "Pianomania" in full on youtube :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOvGwpq_S_c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOvGwpq_S_c)

Es ist in deutscher Sprache.
Ich bin hoffnungslos an deutschen. Ich kann es nicht verstehen.
Ach!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 14, 2012, 12:02:18 AM
O fortuna!

 :P

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=videos&search_query=o+fortuna+misheard+lyrics
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on January 14, 2012, 12:47:18 AM
Es ist in deutscher Sprache.
Ich bin hoffnungslos an deutschen. Ich kann es nicht verstehen.
Ach!

Hi John,
if you click the CC button on the youtube player, you can select English subtitles in the menu that pops up  ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Est.1965 on January 14, 2012, 12:55:36 AM
Hi John,
if you click the CC button on the youtube player, you can select English subtitles in the menu that pops up  ;)

Thank you papy.  Great.  :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 20, 2012, 03:09:48 PM
What does the French word tableau translate into when applied to music - 'part' or 'scene'?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on January 20, 2012, 06:33:13 PM
I've been busted humming to Mahler's 2nd! :D

Earlier this week my students were working on completing a virtual lab... and they didn't need my help for the time being so I was listening to the glorious final movement of the M 2 when I looked down to see they had all gathered around the door giggling!! :-[ ;D :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Wanderer on January 21, 2012, 01:11:47 AM
What does the French word tableau translate into when applied to music - 'part' or 'scene'?

I'm inclined to say scene.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 21, 2012, 02:19:49 AM
I'm inclined to say scene.

Merci!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 23, 2012, 11:45:12 AM
Today I learned: both Tchaikovsky and Korngold's violin concertos are in D major, and both are assigned opus 35.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 23, 2012, 11:59:00 AM
Sara, you remind me that I need to revisit the Korngold concerto . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 23, 2012, 12:15:38 PM
It's perfect, although I keep hearing the E.T. theme in the first movement. Someone who I mentioned this to didn't hear it the same, though.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: KeithW on January 23, 2012, 02:14:48 PM
Today I learned: both Tchaikovsky and Korngold's violin concertos are in D major, and both are assigned opus 35.

Elgar's violin concerto is in B minor, Op. 61.  The third violin concerto by Saint-Saens is also in B minor, Op. 61.

I'm sure there was another violin concerto (most definitely not in B minor) assigned Op. 61  :)

Ah, but it was in D major, so there's some connection to Tchaikovsky and Korngold






Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 23, 2012, 02:26:08 PM
Elgar's violin concerto is in B minor, Op. 61.  The third violin concerto by Saint-Saens is also in B minor, Op. 61.

I'm sure there was another violin concerto (most definitely not in B minor) assigned Op. 61  :)

Ah, but it was in D major, so there's some connection to Tchaikovsky and Korngold

That is a cool pick n__n I've noticed some composers doing deliberate Beethoven opus number hommages with certain works, but can't recall one for the life of me.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on January 24, 2012, 12:07:02 AM
Hanson's 6th is in six movements, and I think I can hear reference to Prokofiev's 6th in it.

Dvorak's 3rd is his only symphony in three movements.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 24, 2012, 06:16:04 AM
Oh, that reminds me of Lepo Sumera:

Symphony No.1 - 2 movements
Symphony No.2 - 3 movements
Symphony No.3 - 4 movements
Symphony No.4 - 5 movements
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 24, 2012, 06:43:56 AM
Quote
For truly spiritual music, you need to turn to Jonathan Harvey, says Ivan Hewett.

As someone who's composed a setting of a Passion, I half-resent this sort of remark.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 24, 2012, 11:00:28 AM
IMO any use of the s-word is highly suspect anyway.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 24, 2012, 11:01:02 AM
Good point.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on January 30, 2012, 08:51:55 PM
Anyone got any advice on how to get into atonal/modern stuff? At the moment it's just unpleasant to me and I'm curious as to what I'm missing. Is it just a matter of adjusting to it through putting in the hours listening to it or is it something that someone can just find unpleasant and never get past that point?

*awaits the barrage of conflicting opinions* :D

Okay what have you heard so far? :)  It's okay to not like famous atonal music btw, you have to get used to it.  But knowing what you've heard and what you felt about 'em will help everyone come up with good alternatives.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on January 30, 2012, 10:05:01 PM
Depending on your experience, what you call "atonal" may not be what we generally recognise as such. Crazy notes-all-over-the-place stuff can actually be quite tonally centred, once you know what to listen for.

I find actual atonal music (IF any music can truly be atonal) in general pretty boring BTW. Rare is the composer who can make something interesting to the listener while avoiding the game of harmonic relationships.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 31, 2012, 03:12:29 AM
Okay what have you heard so far? :)  It's okay to not like famous atonal music btw, you have to get used to it.  But knowing what you've heard and what you felt about 'em will help everyone come up with good alternatives.

Anyone got any advice on how to get into atonal/modern stuff? At the moment it's just unpleasant to me and I'm curious as to what I'm missing. Is it just a matter of adjusting to it through putting in the hours listening to it or is it something that someone can just find unpleasant and never get past that point?

*awaits the barrage of conflicting opinions* :D

I know we have a thread (or a discussion within a thread) on precisely that topic somewhere.

Echoing DavidW: What have you arrived at so far? In any case:

Gently, is the idea! It took me a considerable time, but the enjoyment that waits at the end of that progression is very considerable.

In between your gentle path might pluck a few real 'difficult' pieces so as to give you contrast that that which you already like... it helps the mind, somehow, when it goes back to Webern and suddenly thinks: Oh, my... he sure was a romantic at heart.

I loved approaching Schoenberg through Strauss and especially Webern through Bach. One foot on solid ground, the other gently pulled on over into the pantonal camp.
These discs, in various ways, were instrumental in that and are still among my most cherished recordings:

(http://www.arkivmusic.com/graphics/covers/full/59/592445.jpg)
Schnittke, Bach, Webern-Bach,
Faust-Cantata,
Chorales, Fuga a 6 voci,
Boreyko / Hamburg SO
Berlin Classics (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B005FUT97U/goodmusicguideUK-21)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51IKj6PgkzL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Bach, Webern, Webern-Bach,
"Ricercar"
Poppen / MKO / Hilliard Ens.
ECM (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00008HCEY/nectarandambrUK-21)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41OvVQ0CB8L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
J.Strauss II (via Schönberg, Webern, Berg),
Waltz Arrangements,
Berliner Streichquartett et al.
Berlin Classics (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00070FZWG/nectarandambrUK-21)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2005/09/dip-your-ears-no-42.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2005/09/dip-your-ears-no-42.html)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2005/09/dip-your-ears-no-43.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2005/09/dip-your-ears-no-43.html)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended_11.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended_11.html)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/03/between-boulez-and-bach-interview-with.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/03/between-boulez-and-bach-interview-with.html)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Oct08/Schonberg_phoenix133.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Oct08/Schonberg_phoenix133.htm)

Get your hands on a copy of "Langsamer Satz" (Webern, see link above), too. Oh, and perhaps the piece teetering on the edge between romanticism and atonality: Berg's Piano Sonata op.1. There's a YouTube clip of Gould, explaining it, and then playing it: His best performance of all the ones I have of him playing op.1. Unfortunately it's not a complete performance, not on disc, and finding it on Youtube always takes me ages. There are other fine performances that I've found recently... after being frustrated with almost every recording for a long time. The one I have on record that satisfies me the most is probably Uchida (see below). But I'm surprised (very much, so) by how absolutely wonderful and feeling Marc Andre Hamelin's performance is in this clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z67mnXTttoE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z67mnXTttoE). Listen to the coffee house sentimentality seeping through the cracks in the harmonies.
Shura Cherkassy ain't half bad, either. http://youtu.be/41m49EdJRGY (http://youtu.be/41m49EdJRGY) But too many miss the wistful, romantic quality. If that work were played by a program like 'Sibelius', it would sound like an awful jumble of notes. It needs to breath like slime-mold. :-) http://youtu.be/HUA6N9DWwa8 (http://youtu.be/HUA6N9DWwa8)


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pV4kfbJ1L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Schoenberg, Berg, Webern
Mitsuko Uchida / Boulez
Philips (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000058BGZ/goodmusicguide-20)
UK-link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000058BGZ/goodmusicguideUK-21)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on January 31, 2012, 04:13:50 AM
Thanks jlaurson, that's very helpful.

What I think of atonal (and I'm very much aware that what I think of atonal might very well be tonal) is some Schoenburg stuff like his second string quartet. I remember when it first listened to it it sounded like quite alien to me. I found it hard to find anything I liked in it, though I could tell it was music if that makes sense. What I think of "modern" is more dissonant music, starting with the likes of Prokofiev as a beginning point here for me, though I recognise that dissonance has a far, far older pedigree than that.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 31, 2012, 04:48:55 AM
What I think of atonal (and I'm very much aware that what I think of atonal might very well be tonal) is some Schoenburg stuff like his second string quartet. I remember when it first listened to it it sounded like quite alien to me. I found it hard to find anything I liked in it, though I could tell it was music if that makes sense. What I think of "modern" is more dissonant music, starting with the likes of Prokofiev as a beginning point here for me, though I recognise that dissonance has a far, far older pedigree than that.

On one hand, I am unsure how to be of help, because much the of atonal music which I heard early on in my musical journey, I found attractive right away.

On the other . . . one wants to try to be of help
: )
 
In tonal/atonal terms, what is your impression of this (http://soundcloud.com/karlhenning-1/12-how-to-tell-op-103)? (Fair disclosure: it's a piece of my own)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on January 31, 2012, 04:53:57 AM
In tonal/atonal terms, what is your impression of this (http://soundcloud.com/karlhenning-1/12-how-to-tell-op-103)? (Fair disclosure: it's a piece of my own)

I get an error when I follow that link.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 31, 2012, 04:55:56 AM
Hm, I don't know why. I just tried it myself, and it worked.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on January 31, 2012, 05:09:31 AM
It worked after a few minutes.

I don't know. I think it's chromatic (could be very wrong) and I can't tell if it is has a key or not. Thus proving your point to me that I can't tell atonal from tonal yet. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 31, 2012, 05:26:57 AM
It worked after a few minutes.

I don't know. I think it's chromatic (could be very wrong) and I can't tell if it is has a key or not. Thus proving your point to me that I can't tell atonal from tonal yet. :)

Glad you're being a good sport! : )

Actually, you've done just fine here.  Fact is that in my own music, sometimes I write at no great distance from Common Practice, sometimes at quite a great distance indeed.  And I will often range about within the same piece.

Probably someone has pointed this out already . . . but Schoenberg famously didn't care for the term atonality (What can it mean? Music without tones?) In brief, rather than thinking of them as two compartmentalized opposites (tonality VS. atonality), I think more something of a sliding scale, where it is a matter of how many/few centers of tonal gravity, and of how strong the gravitational pull may be at one time or another.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on January 31, 2012, 05:30:33 AM
Glad you're being a good sport! : )

Actually, you've done just fine here.  Fact is that in my own music, sometimes I write at no great distance from Common Practice, sometimes at quite a great distance indeed.  And I will often range about within the same piece.

Probably someone has pointed this out already . . . but Schoenberg famously didn't care for the term atonality (What can it mean? Music without tones?) In brief, rather than thinking of them as two compartmentalized opposites (tonality VS. atonality), I think more something of a sliding scale, where it is a matter of how many/few centers of tonal gravity, and of how strong the gravitational pull may be at one time or another.


You mean like writing in mostly in a diatonic scale but then using chromatic elements in places? It's still pretty much "in the key of C" but not quite?

Edit: Or introducing some dissonance but having the piece mostly consonant?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 31, 2012, 05:48:21 AM
Edit: Or introducing some dissonance but having the piece mostly consonant?

True dissonance presupposes tonality. That's why pan-tonal music has such a difficult time. (Well, one of the reasons, at any rate.) There needs to be a consonance from which to deviate to create that delicious (or jarring) tension... and then to release it (to induce that smile or the relief). That's why many works toy with so-called a-tonality but the way the notes work together, we are drawn toward making sense of their relationship and -- like magnets, or the 'magnetic lines' in Photoshop -- are ready to snap to the nearest 'tonally logical explanation'. The music can then take us into other directions, suggesting to our ears that they were misguided... only for them to snap onto the next chord-like structure that comes along.

Schoenberg used (or rather: theorized about) his tone-row system to un-train the ears from doing that and to make sure that no accidental tonality allowed them their bad habits. That was new... not the sounds themselves. There's plenty of tonally ambiguous work that preceded him... not the least in Debussy where there's often no more than a diffuse tonality-cloud that shape-shifts as it goes along. Berg, of course, 'ruined it' right away when he used Schoenberg's strict system and showed how it could still be utilized to do something rather romantic with it. (Violin Concerto being the most popular example of that. A violinist friend of mine, with stubbornly conservative taste but at least the grace to acknowledge "theoretical greatness" to Berg's VC, eventually, finally came around to the work after being exposed to it for hours and hours because it's the background music for the '20th Century' developmental stage in Sid Meier's "Civilization IV".  ;D)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on January 31, 2012, 05:56:35 AM
I'm glad to see the Civ obsession stretches to even the most cultured amongst us. ;)

Thanks, this is proving most educational. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on January 31, 2012, 05:58:40 AM
I'm going to throw in a rec for Ligeti, I don't know if he is described as atonal but he is pretty out there when compared to pre-20th century music, but rarely does he sound abrasive.  Many of his works have an eerie atmosphere that is hard to find elsewhere.  Sounding beautiful in a very unique way. :)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 31, 2012, 06:14:29 AM
True dissonance presupposes tonality. That's why pan-tonal music has such a difficult time. (Well, one of the reasons, at any rate.) There needs to be a consonance from which to deviate to create that delicious (or jarring) tension... and then to release it (to induce that smile or the relief). That's why many works toy with so-called a-tonality but the way the notes work together, we are drawn toward making sense of their relationship and -- like magnets, or the 'magnetic lines' in Photoshop -- are ready to snap to the nearest 'tonally logical explanation'. The music can then take us into other directions, suggesting to our ears that they were misguided... only for them to snap onto the next chord-like structure that comes along.

Schoenberg used (or rather: theorized about) his tone-row system to un-train the ears from doing that and to make sure that no accidental tonality allowed them their bad habits. That was new... not the sounds themselves. There's plenty of tonally ambiguous work that preceded him... not the least in Debussy where there's often no more than a diffuse tonality-cloud that shape-shifts as it goes along. Berg, of course, 'ruined it' right away when he used Schoenberg's strict system and showed how it could still be utilized to do something rather romantic with it.

Or indeed, rather that Romantic was Schoenberg's idiom, whether he worked in a 'more straightforward' late-tonal idiom, or in his method of using twelve tones equally.
 
Nice thumbnail, Jens.  From here we pivot to the manner/method of those points of repose, whether a matter of within (or orbiting) Common Practice, or of (for instance) Hindemith's interesting ideas of a hierarchy of intervals, arranged by their power to assert a tonal center. There's more ways to the woods than one.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 31, 2012, 07:51:17 AM
Thanks, this is proving most educational. :)

Same here. It's at about this stage of the development of 20th C. music that I stopped reading Ross' book -- one that I would recommend to you (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rest-Noise-Listening-Twentieth-Century/dp/1841154768/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1328024739&sr=8-4), nesf, if you haven't already read it -- because he fooled me into thinking that I would end up liking all this 'honking' and I wouldn't be able to follow the 'line' of the book if I stopped to listen every piece listed in it. ;) (Actually, it was through this work that I eventually started listening to Berg.) And staying on the topic of atonality, I remember reading that the earliest signs of <music-technical mumbo-jumbo> can be traced back to a piece by Liszt.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on January 31, 2012, 08:10:48 AM
Same here. It's at about this stage of the development of 20th C. music that I stopped reading Ross' book -- one that I would recommend to you (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rest-Noise-Listening-Twentieth-Century/dp/1841154768/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1328024739&sr=8-4), nesf, if you haven't already read it -- because he fooled me into thinking that I would end up liking all this 'honking' and I wouldn't be able to follow the 'line' of the book if I stopped to listen every piece listed in it. ;) (Actually, it was through this work that I eventually started listening to Berg.) And staying on the topic of atonality, I remember reading that the earliest signs of <music-technical mumbo-jumbo> can be traced back to a piece by Liszt.

I have that book on my shelves waiting for my concentration to be good enough to read it!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on January 31, 2012, 08:43:08 AM
Same here. It's at about this stage of the development of 20th C. music that I stopped reading Ross' book -- one that I would recommend to you (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rest-Noise-Listening-Twentieth-Century/dp/1841154768/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1328024739&sr=8-4), nesf, if you haven't already read it -- because he fooled me into thinking that I would end up liking all this 'honking' and I wouldn't be able to follow the 'line' of the book if I stopped to listen every piece listed in it. ;) (Actually, it was through this work that I eventually started listening to Berg.) And staying on the topic of atonality, I remember reading that the earliest signs of <music-technical mumbo-jumbo> can be traced back to a piece by Liszt.

The Bagatelle sans tonalité
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b29qCN3rFIE

I haven't been listening to more modernistic music too long either, but lately I've been listening to the Second Viennese school, and occasionally tipped my ears in Dutilleux, Ligeti, Penderecki, Xenakis.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on January 31, 2012, 09:05:00 AM
I have that book on my shelves waiting for my concentration to be good enough to read it!

It reads more like a series of articles than a book.  Instead of gearing up for a big read you can treat each chapter like an article that you read every once and awhile when you have the hankering. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 31, 2012, 09:05:34 AM
The Bagatelle sans tonalité
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b29qCN3rFIE

Yep, that's the one.

Quote
I haven't been listening to more modernistic music too long either, but lately I've been listening to the Second Viennese school, and occasionally tipped my ears in Dutilleux, Ligeti, Penderecki, Xenakis.

I find the likes of Dutilleaux, what little I've heard of him anyway, much preferable to hard-core VS II. Of course, to me the Strauss-Mahler-influenced works of Webern and Berg are more engaging.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on January 31, 2012, 09:50:45 AM
An alternate route which worked for me is Mahler - Shostakovich - Schnittke. By the time you are able to tolerate the latter, you're ready for all kinds of weirdness.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on January 31, 2012, 10:03:09 AM
By the time you are able to tolerate the latter, you're ready for all kinds of weirdness.
;D
The cello sonata is nice.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on February 16, 2012, 05:44:13 PM
In an effort of outreach toward my father, I copied some music to CD-R for him. Our tastes are very different - he only likes Nice vocal music. But I thought he'd like Mozart's Coronation Mass and Requiem. Giving him Mahler's 8th was a risk. I'm not sure if he was joking when he said "I tried and failed to feel some inspiration from Prokofiev's 'Hail to Stalin'."

He liked Allegri's Miserere. Apparently he really likes the sound of boy singers, news which fills me with horror. He recommended this to me:



Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 17, 2012, 05:40:51 AM
 Quote from: eyeresist on February 16, 2012, 09:44:13 PM (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?topic=13493.msg602222#msg602222)
. . . Giving him Mahler's 8th was a risk.
 
Unless he likes things like the Harvard Fight Song arranged for 400 singers and massive orchestra ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 17, 2012, 05:42:41 AM
 Quote from: eyeresist on February 16, 2012, 09:44:13 PM (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?topic=13493.msg602222#msg602222)
He liked Allegri's Miserere. Apparently he really likes the sound of boy singers, news which fills me with horror.
 
Dude, there's nothing wrong with liking that sound.

You should try Jas O'Donnell's recording of Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms; there are boy trebles in the choir (which Stravinsky's score denotes as a preference).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on February 18, 2012, 03:14:35 PM
A question, with a new piece of complicated music what are good ways to approach it? I'm starting on Beethoven's Late Quartets and finding them a bit overwhelming and I feel a bit out of my depth musically, should I perhaps try and break them down into movements and get to know each movement before trying to listen to them straight through at the start? Or is it just a case of listen until it starts making some sense to you?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 18, 2012, 03:16:56 PM
Or is it just a case of listen until it starts making some sense to you?

That's the key with me, just repeat several times.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on February 18, 2012, 03:57:02 PM
That's the key with me, just repeat several times.

I do that too, but if one mvmt then clicks for me, I either repeat it a bit, or I play the two movements around it to get a feel for the transition - to map it out.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 18, 2012, 11:08:46 PM
A question, with a new piece of complicated music what are good ways to approach it? I'm starting on Beethoven's Late Quartets and finding them a bit overwhelming and I feel a bit out of my depth musically, should I perhaps try and break them down into movements and get to know each movement before trying to listen to them straight through at the start? Or is it just a case of listen until it starts making some sense to you?

However one looks at it, for me it essentially boils down to liking parts and then figuring out the whole later (even in a simplistic way), for works which don't click immediately. There have been many times where I liked only one movement but not the others initially (the 3rd movement from Brahms' D minor cto., for example), but I would let the whole piece play while anticipating what I liked. That way, the chances of picking up something in the other movements increased and at the same time I didn't get an overdose of the last movement alone. Repeated listening to single movements may work in the case of Mahler or Bruckner, say, where some movements last as long, if not longer, than a late quartet by Beethoven. ;D

That said, I don't make a routine out of it. It's best when I'm in the mood to explore. YMMV, of course. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on February 19, 2012, 04:39:59 AM
That said, I don't make a routine out of it. It's best when I'm in the mood to explore. YMMV, of course. :)

Yeah, that's my current approach to new music and it seems to work. :)


Thanks guys, it's interesting to hear opinions on this.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on February 19, 2012, 06:35:27 AM
I don't think that I've ever tried it by individual movements, I think I'll give that a shot myself. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 05, 2012, 04:38:22 AM
An organist buddy introduced me to this yesterday. Can you even believe it?

http://www.youtube.com/v/QApu6Xk5w28
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 05, 2012, 01:36:28 PM
An organist buddy introduced me to this yesterday. Can you even believe it?

http://www.youtube.com/v/QApu6Xk5w28

In which direction do you mean our disbelieve to go??

There's little of his that I like, but nothing that doesn't amaze me.
And as long as he looks (looked) like Pee-wee Herman came in out of a glue-storm and was rolled around in the Svarovsky factory reject bin, there will  be (were) a lot of people that won't even allow themselves to be amazed by him. And he talks, for all the unbridled enthusiasm, like someone typing in All-CAPS. At least he's thrown away the white rhinestone costume... so he seems to be on the right track!  ;D

 - - - - -


For Winter’s Rains and Ruins Are Over
Music in celebration of springtime
http://www.listenmusicmag.com/feature/for-winters-rains-and-ruins-are-over.php (http://www.listenmusicmag.com/feature/for-winters-rains-and-ruins-are-over.php)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 05, 2012, 02:44:23 PM
 Quote from: jlaurson on Today at 05:36:28 PM (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?topic=13493.msg607637#msg607637)
In which direction do you mean out disbelieve to go??
 
You are at perfect liberty.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 09, 2012, 10:06:55 AM
Approaching two years late, I find out that the blog, Dial ‘M’ for Musicology (http://musicology.typepad.com/) has shuttered up.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Leo K. on March 09, 2012, 02:25:25 PM
as long as he looks (looked) like Pee-wee Herman came in out of a glue-storm and was rolled around in the Svarovsky factory reject bin, there will  be (were) a lot of people that won't even allow themselves to be amazed by him.

I am one of those people  8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 11, 2012, 05:05:30 AM
Er...didn't Classics Today used to get updated...I dunno..like daily?  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on March 11, 2012, 06:18:58 AM
Er...didn't Classics Today used to get updated...I dunno..like daily?  ;D

Yup that's why they have today's new reviews... boy I can't remember how long it's been since I used that site.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 11, 2012, 06:31:54 AM
Those reviews have been out there for at least three days.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on March 11, 2012, 06:45:03 AM
You should write them a letter! :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 11, 2012, 08:01:44 AM
 :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 14, 2012, 09:24:35 AM
You should write them a letter! :D

It appears they've changed the look of the site.

http://www.classicstoday.com/
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on March 16, 2012, 01:06:06 AM
Wow, ClassicsToday's new search function is a load of shit. Instead of simply selecting categories from a drop-down list, you have to type, and get those annoying autocomplete prompts. I ignored them, searched for "shostakovich" and "quartet", and got f-all. Genius. Oh, I did get a warning about a script threatening to cause a memory leak, so I guess that's something....?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on March 18, 2012, 05:40:51 PM
On Sunday afternoon, ABC TV showed the second half of 2011 last of the proms. (They showed the first half a few weeks ago.) A horrible experience. The audience was blowing those cheap plastic horns and also employing other noisemakers, even during the music; Britten's Young Person's Guide was ruined by mediocre poetry recited by a mediocre, crowd-baiting actress, there was a singalong of "You'll never walk alone", and all the prommers bobbing in time to P&C1 looked like twats. I sat there watching all the Champagne Charlies and Hooray Harrys, thinking "If a bomb went off now would it really be so terrible? True, it would take out the orchestra, but London has so many who would notice?"
 >:D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on March 21, 2012, 06:40:06 PM
Digging through MDT's clearance sale, I found something really surprising. The 23-year-old Emmanuel Pahud recorded a Marco Polo CD just as he was joining the Berlin Philharmonic.

(http://cdn.naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedfiles/images/cds/hires/8.223527.jpg)

Looks pretty tempting at US $3.60.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on March 22, 2012, 12:35:15 PM
oh dear... one was not impressed (http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/mar/21/philharmonia-salonen-lang-lang-review)  >:D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on March 24, 2012, 05:25:24 PM
Things I want to see #28: an orchestra playing an opera where each instrumentalist whose mouth is not occuped by an instrument also fills the role of the of the singers and choir members.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on March 25, 2012, 04:49:59 AM
Things I want to see #28: an orchestra playing an opera where each instrumentalist whose mouth is not occuped by an instrument also fills the role of the of the singers and choir members.

I've witnessed something like that in a small and much less straining work: Berio's Opus Number Zoo.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 25, 2012, 05:48:39 AM
Things I want to see #28: an orchestra playing an opera where each instrumentalist whose mouth is not occuped by an instrument also fills the role of the of the singers and choir members.


What a concept!
Here's your chance to write an original opera about an orchestra, the staging is a full orchestra tuxedos and all, it takes place during a performance and while certain musicians aren't playing their instruments they are singing...of course the difficulty is creating a plot that would be interesting...some love triangles, political disagreements...a slightly similar concept was done by the great Fellini...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchestra_Rehearsal

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on March 25, 2012, 05:52:54 PM
An amusing review teaser at MusicWeb today:

Pyotr Il'yich TCHAIKOVSKY (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/Mar12/Tchaikovsky_Nutcracker_107086.htm) (1840-1893) The Nutcracker Marie Lindquist, Anders Nordström, Jens Rosén, Alexandra Kastrinos, Royal Swedish Opera O/Renat Salavatov rec. 1999 ARTHAUS MUSIK [RMay]  Not a first choice but certainly an interesting supplement for anyone seeking a new slant on a popular old favourite or intending to cast a vote for the Social Democratic Party.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 26, 2012, 12:39:47 PM
I have a $25 iTunes gift card burning a hole in my wallet.

HELP!!!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 26, 2012, 12:43:56 PM
I have a $25 iTunes gift card burning a hole in my wallet.

HELP!!!


Just PM me the gift card code, thanks.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 26, 2012, 01:11:30 PM

Just PM me the gift card code, thanks.

 >:(

 :-*
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on March 27, 2012, 03:03:08 PM
I have a $25 iTunes gift card burning a hole in my wallet.

HELP!!!

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Y-z-Jl9PL._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 27, 2012, 03:09:11 PM
You are a day late, my friend.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on March 27, 2012, 03:11:56 PM
http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/nightfall/id452171014

*hides*
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Antoine Marchand on March 27, 2012, 03:23:16 PM
You are a day late, my friend.  ;D

http://www.amazon.com/Couperin-L-uvre-pour-clavecin/dp/B002UYG940

It's a shame because who knows if this is not the best complete set of Couperin's keyboard music in existence and you even get some change.  :)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on March 27, 2012, 04:07:30 PM
http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/nightfall/id452171014

*hides*

Nice!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 28, 2012, 03:35:34 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Couperin-L-uvre-pour-clavecin/dp/B002UYG940

Antoine, many thanks for that!  I am very happy with the Olivier Baumont box of Couperin, but for 20 clams, a second account (and so highly recommended) is, in the parlance of our times, a no-brainer.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Antoine Marchand on March 28, 2012, 07:10:51 PM
Antoine, many thanks for that!  I am very happy with the Olivier Baumont box of Couperin, but for 20 clams, a second account (and so highly recommended) is, in the parlance of our times, a no-brainer.

You're welcome, Karl. I hope you will enjoy those discs.

BTW, maybe it's time to add that Baumont to my collection after years in my wishlist. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on March 31, 2012, 02:33:22 AM
Apparently the cousin of my great grandfather (on my mother's side) was Clytie Hine, a soprano (born in Australia) who was in the first performance of Elgar's Starlight Express, sang opera in Beecham's company, and ended up as a singing teacher and trainer in NY (by this time married and known as Hine Mundy - her husband was a cellist who went on to some sort of work with the Met Opera). Oh, she taught Peters Pears, and apparently Britten's song "Down by the Salley Gardens" was dedicated to her.

My question to the panel is: does any collector of older vocal recordings know if Clytie is on CD anywhere? Like many people nowadays, my parents are uncovering the family history, and would love to have an artifact of our "famous" ancestor. Her performinging songs would be ideal, but an opera in which she was of the ensemble would be great too.

Grateful for any help :)

http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/traveling-culture/chau1/pdf/hine/1/brochure.pdf
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mc ukrneal on April 01, 2012, 08:00:46 AM
Apparently the cousin of my great grandfather (on my mother's side) was Clytie Hine, a soprano (born in Australia) who was in the first performance of Elgar's Starlight Express, sang opera in Beecham's company, and ended up as a singing teacher and trainer in NY (by this time married and known as Hine Mundy - her husband was a cellist who went on to some sort of work with the Met Opera). Oh, she taught Peters Pears, and apparently Britten's song "Down by the Salley Gardens" was dedicated to her.

My question to the panel is: does any collector of older vocal recordings know if Clytie is on CD anywhere? Like many people nowadays, my parents are uncovering the family history, and would love to have an artifact of our "famous" ancestor. Her performinging songs would be ideal, but an opera in which she was of the ensemble would be great too.

Grateful for any help :)

http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/traveling-culture/chau1/pdf/hine/1/brochure.pdf
IS this the same person? http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/hine-clytie-may-12640 (http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/hine-clytie-may-12640) If so, there is unlikely to be much on record, though you might try contacting one of the organizations listed. Here is a picture: http://www.historicopera.com/beecham_page3.htm (http://www.historicopera.com/beecham_page3.htm). If there is a Peter Pears or Britten organization, they may be able to help as well. If you are able to contact any of the opera companies or opera houses where she performed, they may be able to help too.

EDIT: This has some performance listings: http://www.musicweb-international.com/hooey/licette_chrono.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/hooey/licette_chrono.htm)
It also appears the daughter is still alive. Maybe she can help if someone can track her down, though she is nearly 100 now. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meg_Mundy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meg_Mundy)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on April 01, 2012, 08:49:35 AM
If there is a Peter Pears or Britten organization, they may be able to help as well.

There's a Britten and Pears archive here (http://www.brittenpears.org/page.php?pageid=380).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on April 01, 2012, 04:57:31 PM
Thanks MK, and also Papy. I don't seem to be any closer - perhaps I am chasing a grail. :(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on April 04, 2012, 10:28:59 PM
This is probably not serious enough for the Mahler Mania thread...

I think probably the first time I heard Mahler's name was as spoken by Tom Lehrer in his introduction to his song "Alma". This transcription (http://www.casualhacker.net/tom.lehrer/the_year.html) doesn't really give an idea of his wry comic delivery (though I've tried to improve the punctuation):
Quote
Last December 13th, there appeared in the newspapers the juiciest, spiciest, raciest obituary it has ever been my pleasure to read. It was that of a lady name Alma Mahler Gropius Werfel, who had in her lifetime managed to acquire as lovers practically all of the top creative men in central Europe. And among these lovers (who were listed in the obituary, by the way, which was what made it so interesting) there were three whom she went so far as to marry: one of the leading composers of the day, Gustav Mahler, composer of Das Lied von der Erde, and other light classics; one of the leading architects, Walter Gropius, of the Bauhaus school of design; and one of the leading writers, Franz Werfel, author of the Song of Bernadette and other masterpieces.
It's people like that who make you realize how little you've accomplished. It is a sobering thought, for example, that, when Mozart was my age, he had been dead for two years. It seemed to me, reading this obituary, that the story of Alma was the stuff of which ballads should be made, so here is one.

One of the big laughs of the monologue came after the line "Das Lied von der Erde, and other light classics". Now that I've grown into that work (after finding a version with non-strangulated tenor and non-hooting alto), this joke doesn't really work, particularly as the people who laughed at this joke in concert were probably the type of cultural dabblers who'd sit down fairly happily to a couple of hours of Puccini, who by comparison with DLvdE is basically the same thing but less good. :P



  The first one she married was Mahler,
  Whose buddies all knew him as Gustav.
  And each time he saw her he'd holler:
  "Ach, that is the fraulein I moost have!"

  Their marriage, however, was murder.
  He'd scream to the heavens above,
  "I'm writing Das Lied von der Erde,
  And she only wants to make love!"

  ...

  While married to Gus, she met Gropius,
  And soon she was swinging with Walter.
  Gus died, and her tear drops were copious.
  She cried all the way to the altar...

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread - yoddeling
Post by: Scion7 on April 05, 2012, 12:43:20 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Y-z-Jl9PL._SS400_.jpg)

Good ... Lord ...

 :o
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mc ukrneal on April 05, 2012, 01:45:47 AM
Good ... Lord ...

 :o
But there is so much more. There are your 'yodeling for dummies':
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41CZYV07KZL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41X30KKWR8L._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (love the chicken)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61HsPFdwR7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Then there is national yodeling:
AMerica
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Zn3rRphvL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)
Germany
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51bz08spxNL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Bulgaria
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515fIHEG3FL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Bavaria
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41dQOl%2Br5QL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Switzerland
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61YfFFfTMrL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)
Austria
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61i0BXTog3L._SL500_AA280_.jpg)
Somewhere in Asia
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61i1cvXhwcL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)
Arabia (That is what Amazon says):
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31vxfufLZIL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Swissconsin (Swiss + Wisonsin - gotta love it)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61VIq9TsCHL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Then there's yodeling for different professions:
Cowboys(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51KgfXPXoHL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Rangers(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51vfupPk4qL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Astrologers(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61B9YTliw0L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Customer Service(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61672u7143L._SL500_AA280_.jpg)
Drifter(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31DMUJS3PML._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

There's national professions (apparently):
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4120C9VY1ZL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Yodeling oldies:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/610EKbV78UL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51g12KZrr1L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

And even here, hot chick covers:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41iz6ZQYyDL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/511F34FMPyL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Yodeling and jumping:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51qRLF2LagL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

And "I bet they regret that when they get older ' cover posing yodeling:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61lacmcpdCL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Religious:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51iULx2yCHL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Secular:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21F90502XSL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

And 'that's really out there, perhaps I should cut down on the mind altering substances' yodeling:
(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/a1/8d/5bb8225b9da0a2fc0405f010.L._AA300_.jpg)

What I can't figure out is why they spell it both yodelling and yodeling... :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on April 05, 2012, 02:08:38 AM
Who here (other than myself and Ray, perhaps) has heard the yodelled version of the Overture to Guillame Tell? ;D

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 05, 2012, 03:06:17 AM
On that note: My 2011 Yodeling Favorites "Almost List"



Best Recordings of 2011 - "Almost List"

http://ionarts.blogspot.de/2012/04/best-recordings-of-2011-almost-list.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.de/2012/04/best-recordings-of-2011-almost-list.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 05, 2012, 03:11:25 AM
Whatever did happen to the yodeling cowgirls? . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mc ukrneal on April 06, 2012, 02:34:50 AM
Whatever did happen to the yodeling cowgirls? . . .
Probably more information that you wanted to know, but then you did ask! :) http://www.cockmanfamily.com/butterpats/ (http://www.cockmanfamily.com/butterpats/)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Szykneij on April 06, 2012, 05:14:38 PM
I had the opportunity today to go for a drive through northeastern Massachusetts and visit some old haunts from several years ago when I was working on my Masters degree. It was a beautiful sunlit morning, and just as I was passing through a scenic area along the Ipswich River, George  Butterworth's "Banks of Green Willow" came on the radio. What a terrific piece of music! I had never heard it before, and to experience it for the first time under those conditions was amazing.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 06, 2012, 05:35:04 PM
If this were Facebook, I would thumb-up that post ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mirror Image on April 06, 2012, 05:36:29 PM
If this were Facebook, I would thumb-up that post ;D

Me too! That's a gorgeous work by Butterworth. I think I'll listen to it now. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 07, 2012, 03:54:27 AM


Ionarts-at-Large: David Fray on a Day in D-Minor
(http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/04/ionarts-at-large-david-fray-on-day-in-d.html)
Quote
complauding [kuhm-plawd-ing]
Gerund
1. The contemporaneous grumbling and praise of the presence of Haydn on a concert program, but performed as the first piece, thereby subliminally or overtly suggesting that Haydn is ‘nice’, but ‘not really that important’. When of course he is that important. And more.
+ some Bach & Dvořák
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-I8DS1Vk_SPQ/T3-rtaobp1I/AAAAAAAAB6c/0j9rw6iMFh8/s1600/bach_solopart_BWV1052_PNG.png) (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/04/ionarts-at-large-david-fray-on-day-in-d.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on April 07, 2012, 03:21:13 PM
I am feeling increasingly guilty for not knowing a note of Denisov's music. Seemingly half of the multi-composer CDs Gubaidulina is featured on includes at least one of his compositions, and yet I never get around to playing them -_-
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 09, 2012, 10:18:29 AM
Mercy, but those were the days, eh?

Just *how* do you come up with all that silly stuff? I have to admit there is some kind of negative genius shining through your nonsensical contributions sometimes. Are you currently on medication?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on April 09, 2012, 10:31:25 AM
Mercy, but those were the days, eh?

Who was at the receiving end of that one?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 09, 2012, 10:56:41 AM
That curious character Sydney Grew . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 10, 2012, 05:17:04 AM
It may not be for everyone . . . but I really dig this alternation in this morning's listening between Haydn and Wuorinen . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on May 07, 2012, 06:29:35 PM
Has anyone been trying to follow the Gramophone forum lately? It is a pitiful place. The same half dozen always insulting each other in an endless circular pattern....
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on May 14, 2012, 08:03:21 PM
David Robertson will take over from Ashkenazy at the Sydney Symphony from 2014 (http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/sydney-symphony-appoints-us-conductor-as-new-chief-20120515-1ynwt.html)

So more John Adams. Oh great.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 15, 2012, 02:47:16 AM
Ah! Another Jn Adams enthusiast! Isn't he just the greatest?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on May 15, 2012, 10:49:51 AM
François Hollande, the new French president got sworn in today in the lounges of the Palais de l'Elysée... to his chosen tune of Air des Sauvages off Les Indes Galantes by Rameau.

http://www.ouest-france.fr/ofdernmin_-Quand-Francois-Hollande-choisit-l-air-des-Sauvages-_6346-2077219-fils-tous_filDMA.Htm (http://www.ouest-france.fr/ofdernmin_-Quand-Francois-Hollande-choisit-l-air-des-Sauvages-_6346-2077219-fils-tous_filDMA.Htm)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on May 16, 2012, 01:09:50 AM
Ah! Another Jn Adams enthusiast! Isn't he just the greatest?

You test me, boy, you test me! :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on May 20, 2012, 01:56:57 PM
Just realized the reason ClassicsToday is such a wasteland is that 90% of the new content is behind a $50/yr paywall. Guess it's time to finally deprogram my brain from wanting to visit that site.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on May 20, 2012, 03:27:27 PM
Just realized the reason ClassicsToday is such a wasteland is that 90% of the new content is behind a $50/yr paywall. Guess it's time to finally deprogram my brain from wanting to visit that site.

I haven't used that site in years excluding that time I looked up Hurwitz' idiotic HIP wine.  The reviews there are useless to me.

So I had no idea that those fools put up a paywall!  Ha they really think their reviews have that much value!? :D :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on May 20, 2012, 05:35:05 PM

If you have to pay, surely Fanfare beats ClassicsToday?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 22, 2012, 01:06:36 PM


Notes from the 2012 Dresden Music Festival ( 1 )
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-G3kIvbiVq_E/T7wIRK9Cu0I/AAAAAAAACAU/GdkIKqbRONE/s1600/notes-from-the-dresden-music_festival.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qLKjHZOHkWw/T7vMWDQDFOI/AAAAAAAACAE/w-XobW9Jqrg/s1600/Palais_im_Garten2.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/05/notes-from-2012-dresden-music-festival.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/05/notes-from-2012-dresden-music-festival.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 03, 2012, 11:44:27 PM
Is there a practical difference in English language musical terminology between "fantasy" and "fantasia"?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on June 03, 2012, 11:54:05 PM
'Fantasia' is Italian and 'fantasy' English, I don't think there's any other difference.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 04, 2012, 12:50:38 AM
Thanks. I had noticed that often the French and German spellings of the word are sometimes translated into English, but that Italian form seems to come through unchecked.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 04, 2012, 01:03:25 AM
And then . . . what did Vaughan Williams mean by invoking the spelling phantasy . . . ?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on June 04, 2012, 01:32:22 AM
And then . . . what did Vaughan Williams mean by invoking the spelling phantasy . . . ?

A phenomenal-fantasy?  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 04, 2012, 01:47:38 AM
That Phaughan Williams was a fenom!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 07, 2012, 04:34:07 AM
apropos to this thread's title and increasingly more so in the future.


Classical:NEXT, Classical Music's new MIDEM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-cVv8T0tKRLA/T89_4UZ4x4I/AAAAAAAACSU/EZVe16cchog/s1600/ClassicalNext_Logo.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/06/classicalnext-classical-musics-new.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/06/classicalnext-classical-musics-new.html)
Quote
The Event

What’s “Classical:NEXT”? In short: it’s the independent classical music label’s MIDEM.
It’s the outgrowth of collective disgruntlement with the music industry’s dominant trade
fair where classical music had become a tolerated afterthought. CLASS, the association
for classical independent labels in Germany (read: Musikproduktion Dabringhaus &
Grimm), banked on the dissatisfaction of Cannes in February, crowded expensive hotels,
and increasingly high participation fees and opted instead for Munich in May (May 30 –
June 2), a winning proposition right there...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 08, 2012, 05:41:06 AM
Is there a practical difference in English language musical terminology between "fantasy" and "fantasia"?

And then . . . what did Vaughan Williams mean by invoking the spelling phantasy . . . ?

And what did Frank Bridge mean by spelling it phantasie for a trio but phantasy for a quartet?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: stingo on June 08, 2012, 08:22:39 AM
And then . . . what did Vaughan Williams mean by invoking the spelling phantasy . . . ?

Phillies phan?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on June 22, 2012, 01:22:17 AM
I just received an email about another petition to save La Petite Band. Of course I went to the site straight away and commented "La Petite Band are a treasure, not only of Belgium but of the world." Not sure if the site registered my "signature", though...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on June 22, 2012, 01:38:15 AM
Not sure if the site registered my "signature", though...

It's registered, Neil.

(Let's just hope that Cato doesn't notice your 'indirect' pluralisation of the band. ;D ;))
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 22, 2012, 03:14:32 AM
I don't think Cato will consider that a Grumble.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 22, 2012, 10:05:34 AM
It must be exciting: listen — the orchestra cannot stay together!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on June 22, 2012, 10:18:46 AM
It must be exciting: listen — the orchestra cannot stay together!

I can already see a list or sorts taking shape, along with Jens' The recording is OOP, therefore it must be excellent!. :D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on June 24, 2012, 07:21:00 PM
It must be exciting: listen — the orchestra cannot stay together!

True! Barbirolli's live recording of Walton's Partita for orchestra - the third and final movement gets quite hectic towards the finish, and the sense that the orchestra are barely keeping it together adds to the excitement (there's a big cheer at the end).

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on July 08, 2012, 01:37:33 PM
I'm considering buying a book on Beethoven and one on String Quartets. Any thoughts? :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: KeithW on July 12, 2012, 12:42:17 PM
I'm considering buying a book on Beethoven and one on String Quartets. Any thoughts? :)

So many to choose from.  A scholarly but immensely enjoyable one is :
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51hLvTKnSxL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg)


On SQs - a Beethoven specific 'must-have' for me is
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Vz2OMwqTL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg)

This volume - which is in the same series as Steingberg's three volumes (symphony, concerto and choral) is a useful desk reference

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51hFYNiT9WL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: nesf on July 12, 2012, 01:41:16 PM
Thank you. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 17, 2012, 08:11:33 AM


Evelyn Lear’s (Recorded) Legacy

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-pGmzk01gylM/T_GgtYzetTI/AAAAAAAACzo/zdciDMF3T54/s1600/Evelyn_Lear_laurson.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/07/evelyn-lears-recorded-legacy.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/07/evelyn-lears-recorded-legacy.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 20, 2012, 08:36:56 AM




The Cocooned Cadaver: Kriegenburg’s Walküre

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fb2tknYe57Q/UAl2qh9xDQI/AAAAAAAADNI/kih8cR0zDkI/s400/Wagner_Ring_BStOp_Walkure.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/07/the-cocooned-cadaver-kriegenburgs.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/07/the-cocooned-cadaver-kriegenburgs.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 23, 2012, 06:33:43 AM


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)

Dip Your Ears, No. 122 (Kuijken's Third Brandenburgs)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/07/dip-your-ears-no-122-kuijkens-third.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/07/dip-your-ears-no-122-kuijkens-third.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on July 25, 2012, 11:41:40 AM
A couple of videos on the background behind the Aldeburgh World Orchestra, bringing together young musicians from more than 30 nationalities, orchestra I saw last week at Snape. The first video has several views of Snape maltings and locations around, that will give you a feel for the place  0:)

http://thespace.org/items/e00000l8 (http://thespace.org/items/e00000l8)

http://thespace.org/items/e0000h06 (http://thespace.org/items/e0000h06)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 06, 2012, 01:17:42 AM
Yesterday I finally loaded my Braga Santos onto my player. Oh, and Barber.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 08, 2012, 01:13:33 AM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 1 )
Schleswig-Holstein Festival Orchestra


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-1.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-1.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 10, 2012, 06:31:46 AM


(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Jdz0MduXBaw/UCUTK1NQAyI/AAAAAAAADdA/8Ug6Wdlv6K0/s1600/Oleg_Kagan_Musikfest_Breslik_laurson.jpg)

Breslik's Sweltering, Paradisical Müllerin


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/bresliks-sweltering-paradisical-mullerin.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/bresliks-sweltering-paradisical-mullerin.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 11, 2012, 05:14:50 AM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 2 )
Handel Tamerlano


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-2.html)


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 3 )
Christian Gerhaher Liederabend


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-3.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-3.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 13, 2012, 03:27:38 AM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Wmk803_NfUc/UCjldnshSKI/AAAAAAAADic/FNlitgzAv0A/s1600/Rachmaninoff_Southpaw_laurson.jpg)
No Composer Left Behind
International Left Handers Day Contribution
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/10/no-composer-left-behind.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/10/no-composer-left-behind.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 13, 2012, 11:31:47 PM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 4 )
Beethoven Cycle • Hagen Quartet


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-4.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-4.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 17, 2012, 07:37:41 AM
I'm thinking of creating a playlist of crazy/unusual/gargantuan piano waltzes. Some combination of:

Godowsky (J. Strauss): Kunstlerleben metamorphosis 14'
Ferrata: Second study on Chopin's Minute Waltz 2'
Moszkowski: Valse Op 34 No 1 8'
Liszt: Mephisto Waltz No 1 11'
Rodgers: Carousel Waltz 6'
Rihm: Brahmsliebewalzer 4'
Barber: Waltz Op 28 4'
Rudolf Hindemith: Des Kaisers Neue Kleider 5'
Saint-Saens: Etude Op 52 No 6, En forme de valse 6'
Szpilman: Paraphrase on a Waltz by Robert Stoltz 3'
Sudbin (Chopin): A la minute 5'
Ravel: La valse 11'

That's 79 minutes. What am I missing? I need one or two things in minor keys.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 17, 2012, 12:52:13 PM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-X60z_D957rw/UC6WUBzC7-I/AAAAAAAADpw/C0D7vnoJH6E/s1600/Contemp8_Zimmermann_Stein_Lelli_600.jpg)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 6 )
Salzburg contemporary 8
B.A.Zimmermann | Ecclesiastic Action


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-6.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on August 17, 2012, 01:44:42 PM
I'm thinking of creating a playlist of crazy/unusual/gargantuan piano waltzes. Some combination of:

Godowsky (J. Strauss): Kunstlerleben metamorphosis 14'
Moszkowski: Valse Op 34 No 1 8'
Liszt: Mephisto Waltz No 1 11'
Rihm: Brahmsliebewalzer 4'
Rudolf Hindemith: Des Kaisers Neue Kleider 5'
Sudbin (Chopin): A la minute 5'
Ravel: La valse 11'

That's 58 minutes. What am I missing? I need one or two things in minor keys.
Well, these are just collections of smaller waltzes, but nonetheless:
Ravel's Valses nobiles et sentimentales and Brahms's Sixteen Waltzes, Op. 39
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 17, 2012, 02:28:58 PM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-II88aKARETE/UC6kbq_0rtI/AAAAAAAADro/oVhw_LlHR2o/s1600/Mozarteum_GS_Laurson_blueprint_600.jpg)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 7 )
Salzburg contemporary 9
H.Holliger | E.Carter et al.


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-7.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on August 29, 2012, 03:17:56 PM
I own two Mahler recordings. I'm all about the Mahler.
Title: Re: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 29, 2012, 05:44:51 PM
I own two Mahler recordings.

Both of them! Good on ya, mate!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on August 29, 2012, 07:36:01 PM
I own two Mahler recordings. I'm all about the Mahler.

Hey, Mahler didn't make any recordings!  $:)


Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 29, 2012, 10:05:36 PM
I own two Mahler recordings. I'm all about the Mahler.

One. Beat that! :P

Hey, Mahler didn't make any recordings!  $:)

There's a video clip in YouTube that's supposedly of G. playing a piano reduction of the first movement of the Fifth.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on August 30, 2012, 02:48:55 AM
One. Beat that! :P

You're halfway there!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 30, 2012, 05:31:37 AM
You're halfway there!

Oddly enough I have twice as many recordings of Bruckner's music as of Mahler's.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Ataraxia on August 30, 2012, 05:40:38 AM
Oddly enough I have twice as many recordings of Bruckner's music as of Mahler's.

Oh, yes. I have many more Bruckners.
Title: Re: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 30, 2012, 09:35:34 AM
Oh, yes. I have many more Bruckners.

Quite right!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 30, 2012, 11:12:49 AM
Hey, Mahler didn't make any recordings!  $:)
Actually one of the CDs MusicWeb had on its latest reviewer distribution list (I didn't request it) was Mahler piano rolls? Are those a thing? It definitely said "Gustav Mahler, piano".

But piano rolls aren't quite the same kind of "recording".
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on August 30, 2012, 12:16:28 PM
Actually one of the CDs MusicWeb had on its latest reviewer distribution list (I didn't request it) was Mahler piano rolls? Are those a thing? It definitely said "Gustav Mahler, piano".

But piano rolls aren't quite the same kind of "recording".
There are piano roll recordings of at least the first movement of 5th symphony, something from the 4th symphony, and the accompaniment to a song from fahrenden Gesellen.

I haven't got a note of Bruckner. however, if anyone believes they can convert me, feel free to do so.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 30, 2012, 01:31:51 PM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-slwEMUFsup0/UDeqx3sjCiI/AAAAAAAADzg/VZBoexQFYMU/s1600/Notes%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2BBayreuth%2BFestival.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LQH_5TePBoc/UD6bvJY-ReI/AAAAAAAAD7A/kN8dJ6JXNEE/s1600/bayreuth_tannhaeuser2012_betty_hubby.jpg)
Bayreuth 2012: Tannhäuser is a Gasser
Tannhäuser • Thielemann • Baumgarten


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/bayreuth-2012-tannhauser-is-gasser.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/bayreuth-2012-tannhauser-is-gasser.html)


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-slwEMUFsup0/UDeqx3sjCiI/AAAAAAAADzg/VZBoexQFYMU/s1600/Notes%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2BBayreuth%2BFestival.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OIFSrsUZTmI/UD6nbsTkEZI/AAAAAAAAD_Y/FU2qF6ULk0Q/s1600/bayreuth_parsifal2012_ii.jpg)
Bayreuth 2012: Parsifal, a Gift of Greatness
Parsifal • P.Jordan • Herheim


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/bayreuth-2012-parsifal-gift-of-greatness.html (http://hhttp://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/08/bayreuth-2012-parsifal-gift-of-greatness.html)
Title: Re: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on August 30, 2012, 05:22:20 PM
Quite right!

Oh, you'll rue that in a few years ;)
Title: Re: Re: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 31, 2012, 01:46:06 AM
Oh, you'll rue that in a few years ;)

Well, time was when the music of neither Mahler nor Bruckner did much for me. FWIW, it was (eventually) the former whose symphonies I took to first; nor have I reached any point of tiring of them. But in the past six months, of the two, I've been listening to Bruckner more.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 04, 2012, 07:11:46 AM

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vX4OVdt1_3s/UEYhwwo_XGI/AAAAAAAAEDc/z3sh4t3_Z0g/s1600/LISTEN_600_1.2.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/listen-up-remembering-fischer-dieskau.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/listen-up-remembering-fischer-dieskau.html)

Quote

A Voice from Ruins
An appraisal of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
(http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/listen-up-remembering-fischer-dieskau.html)

When Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau passed away this year, there were few superlatives raining down on him in obituaries that hadn’t already been used during his lifetime. He was one of three or four giants in classical music who were able to shape the cultural landscape — and he was the last one. Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau need not have been your favorite singer in order to acknowledge his greatness and importance.

Like Herbert von Karajan and Leonard Bernstein, Fischer-Dieskau arrived right at the time when recording technology allowed for the easier-than-ever dissemination of music, when competition was limited, and when classical music still defined mainstream culture, even for those who didn’t much care for it. With some four hundred records to his name, Fischer-Dieskau became one of the most recorded singers of all time. In Germany he is called Der Jahrhundertsänger — literally that’s “singer of the century,” or “hundred-year singer,” although neither translation does justice to the air of veneration the term connotes. His complete recordings of Schubert, Schumann, Liszt, Wolf, Beethoven and Brahms and copious doses of other, less well-known Lieder composers were the record collector’s natural (and often sole) choice. There are few classical-music listeners above the age of thirty-five for whom Fischer-Dieskau’s interpretations of this repertoire didn’t leave the emotional footprint of first exposure.

The quantity and, at its best, quality, intelligence and matter-of-course-ness of his Lieder singing made German art songs known, even popular, in non-German-speaking countries. American critics, marveling at the quality of his Lied interpretations, were more reserved in their Fischer- Dieskaumania than their German and English colleagues, but not by much. Harold C. Schonberg called him “the most protean singer alive today,” saying he was “acknowledged to be the greatest of contemporary lieder singers [who] has triumphed in opera . . . from Handel to Henze [and] a stalwart in oratorio work.” Donal Henahan referred to Fischer-Diesk...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 04, 2012, 08:58:34 AM
God bless Brilliant Classics, but Lawd knows I don't need a 37-CD box of Boccherini.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 04, 2012, 01:09:20 PM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-aI3aXIpMnDY/UEZ7_CxEnNI/AAAAAAAAEIc/gQS7_jfMxxk/s1600/SOLDATEN_4_Ruth-Walz_collage.jpg)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 12 )
Bernd Alois Zimmermann • Die Soldaten


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-12.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-12.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 05, 2012, 06:09:34 AM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-r2Vy3_Fo-LM/UEdhePb2TCI/AAAAAAAAEP0/hH2NircLGx4/s1600/Staatskapelle_Dresden_600.png)
Christian Thielemann's Inauguration Concert
Hugo Wolf • Anton Bruckner


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/christian-thielemanns-inauguration.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/christian-thielemanns-inauguration.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: eyeresist on September 05, 2012, 04:47:27 PM
God bless Brilliant Classics, but Lawd knows I don't need a 37-CD box of Boccherini.

:D

How about a hole in the head, instead?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 06, 2012, 06:30:02 AM


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Chamber Music You Didn't Know You Love
Joseph Marx • String Quartets


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/chamber-music-you-didnt-know-you-love.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/chamber-music-you-didnt-know-you-love.html)



(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XwIFAjsXUW0/UCEyRdJv4rI/AAAAAAAADbM/hiDaGbuNi3M/s1600/Salzburg-Festival-NEU_2012_laurson.jpg)
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/A2Hkb1tCQAAGeih.jpg:large)
Notes from the 2012 Salzburg Festival ( 13 )
George Frideric Handel • Giulio Cesare in Egitto


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-13.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/notes-from-2012-salzburg-festival-13.html)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 07, 2012, 08:19:31 AM

(http://www.seenandheard-international.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Munich_Phil_520_inversion.png)
Maazel's Inauguration Concert in Munich v.1
Mahler 9


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/ionarts-at-large-maazels-inauguration.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/09/ionarts-at-large-maazels-inauguration.html)

In an hour the same thing, but with Wagner & Bruckner 3
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Todd on September 10, 2012, 06:18:05 AM
Don't know if this has been mentioned anywhere, but the ClassicsToday "Insider" content, at least the text, appears to be freely available by simply performing a basic search of the word "reference" (or whatever other key word you may fancy) in the main site search box. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 20, 2012, 08:27:12 AM


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UaX7izz5nfY/UILEoV2mK8I/AAAAAAAAEoY/aEwbrW3cLOE/s400/BRSO_Jansons_Beethoven_Schedrin_Bronfman.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: BRSO in Shchedrin, Shostakovich, Beethoven


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/10/ionarts-at-large-brso-in-shchedrin.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/10/ionarts-at-large-brso-in-shchedrin.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 26, 2012, 02:23:39 PM


(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-cN_3ahtSs4E/UIsNCYkOOJI/AAAAAAAAEqU/73yPZt3XABA/s1600/Concert_Program_Synesthesia_laurson_600.png)

Concert Program Synesthesia


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/10/concert-program-synesthesia.html
 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/10/concert-program-synesthesia.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 27, 2012, 03:24:20 AM



(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-FG4Oto20D5w/UIu4HM1dE5I/AAAAAAAAEsA/WOozYMLGrEA/s400/MPHIL_Dausgaard_Andsnes_Kurtag.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: MPhil and Dausgaard in White, Blue, and Orange


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/10/ionarts-at-large-mphil-and-dausgaard-in.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/10/ionarts-at-large-mphil-and-dausgaard-in.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 06, 2012, 07:58:47 AM
A 'budget' re-release that discusses parts of the score in the notes -- and in more than one language!!!

https://outhere-music.com/store-REW_504/Joseph_Haydn-Trios_for_Nicolaus_Esterhazy-Rincontro.html (scroll down a little to find the fancy online booklet viewer)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 12, 2012, 07:36:48 AM
Together with the BBC and New York Philharmonic, the [Royal Philharmonic Society] has also co-commissioned a major work in response to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony to be premiered at the BBC Proms. (http://www.gramophone.co.uk/classical-music-news/royal-philharmonic-society-celebrates-200th-anniversary-in-2013)

Ambitious? Quixotic? Meaningless?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 12, 2012, 11:12:22 AM
Ambitious? Quixotic? Meaningless?

Well . . . what could “a major work in response to Beethoven's Ninth” mean?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on November 12, 2012, 11:16:36 AM
Well . . . what could “a major work in response to Beethoven's Ninth” mean?

Precisely. Hence my last question. Does it even have a meaning?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 12, 2012, 11:17:35 AM
For this composer, no. For the people funding the commission . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on November 12, 2012, 04:40:56 PM
For this composer, no. For the people funding the commission . . . .
It could be like the 1928 Columbia competition to complete Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, which resulted in pretty much every composer violating the rules.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: PaulR on November 12, 2012, 04:48:16 PM
Well . . . what could “a major work in response to Beethoven's Ninth” mean?
A symphony that extols the ideas of universal hatred and separation?  (as opposed to universal brotherhood)
Title: Re: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 12, 2012, 04:52:23 PM
It could be like the 1928 Columbia competition to complete Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, which resulted in pretty much every composer violating the rules.

And to so little artistic consequence.
Title: Re: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on November 12, 2012, 04:57:50 PM
And to so little artistic consequence.

Franz Schmidt's Third Symphony, Havergal Brian's Gothic Part I, Atterberg's Sixth, Irgens-Jensen's Passacaglia (not well-known, but considered his finest achievement)... don't sneeze at that competition so readily, sir. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 13, 2012, 04:02:17 AM
Well, I admit, I was thinking on the lines of "completions of the Unfinished" : )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Scarpia on November 13, 2012, 06:00:40 PM
This LP, released in 1951,

(http://www.mediafire.com/conv/0b2030b7ec33271b82c8d27df11751897741b1aa721cb637e2d48b30039d56496g.jpg)

still has the original price sticker on the back.  List price, $4.99.  Taking account inflation between 1951 and 2012, that is $44 in 2012 dollars.

As you can see from the sticker on the front, it's market value has depreciated to $0.75.  On the other hand, I just got this 14 CD set for $23.



I'm not going to complain that CDs are too expensive.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 14, 2012, 02:57:28 AM
A bit torn, now. I want to keep on with the Shostakovich SQ Gala. But I feel the urge to listen to lots of Schoenberg, too.
 
Of course, I can really do both . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 14, 2012, 06:09:23 AM
And lo! Brahms' SQs have suddenly begun to make sense.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on December 14, 2012, 10:58:33 AM
And lo! Brahms' SQs have suddenly begun to make sense.
Excellent!
They're definitely some of the best Brahms, but took more time to appreciate properly for me, too, compared to most of his other chamber music.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 14, 2012, 11:08:27 AM
Go, Nav!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 17, 2012, 06:33:49 AM



(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-TvLvxzDkfrQ/UM4QFOcZBNI/AAAAAAAAE9c/U4h-THVB_oY/s1600/Ferruccio_Busoni_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts at Large: Marc-André Hamelin at the Herkulessaal
Busoni - Bach - Debussy - Hamelin - Rachmaninoff

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-marc-andre-hamelin-at.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-marc-andre-hamelin-at.html)



(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nwyfD-aGbBY/UM5ERZML41I/AAAAAAAAE-c/SqmAmdNoGjk/s1600/Jansons_Beethoven_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts at Large: Mariss Jansons' Beethoven Cycle
Beethoven & World Premiere of Mochizuki's Nirai (Like a friendly giant, happily disoriented, lumbering through the forest.)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-mariss-jansons.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-mariss-jansons.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 17, 2012, 12:39:45 PM
Cor, but it's a dog's age since I listened to the Hammerklavier. What a beaut'!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mirror Image on December 17, 2012, 12:43:44 PM


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-TvLvxzDkfrQ/UM4QFOcZBNI/AAAAAAAAE9c/U4h-THVB_oY/s1600/Ferruccio_Busoni_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts at Large: Marc-André Hamelin at the Herkulessaal
Busoni - Bach - Debussy - Hamelin - Rachmaninoff

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-marc-andre-hamelin-at.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-marc-andre-hamelin-at.html)



(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nwyfD-aGbBY/UM5ERZML41I/AAAAAAAAE-c/SqmAmdNoGjk/s1600/Jansons_Beethoven_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts at Large: Mariss Jansons' Beethoven Cycle
Beethoven & World Premiere of Mochizuki's Nirai (Like a friendly giant, happily disoriented, lumbering through the forest.)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-mariss-jansons.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-mariss-jansons.html)

Busoni! Ha! An interesting composer no doubt.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 19, 2012, 01:15:07 PM



(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OxjV2BLeMAY/UNIlc6kbZWI/AAAAAAAAE_w/wRJB9wqwic8/s1600/la_mer_Hokusai_laurson_600.png)

Ionarts at Large: Maazel's Warhorses

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-maazels-warhorses.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-maazels-warhorses.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on December 28, 2012, 04:45:14 AM
Da-da-da-daaa gets a cultural biography: http://www.bookforum.com/inprint/019_04/10581
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 28, 2012, 12:53:53 PM
Quote
Quote
Quote
Let the "Best Recordings of 2012" begin, spread over the 12 Days of Christmas. Here's #10:



Best Recordings of 2012 (#10)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#9)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#8)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#7)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html)




Best Recordings of 2012 (#6)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 30, 2012, 03:51:45 AM
Quote
Quote
Quote
Quote


Best Recordings of 2012 (#10)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#9)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#8)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#7)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#6)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#5)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html)




29.12.12

Ionarts-at-Large: The Domestication of Pelléas and Mélisande
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-AWHphykCnd8/UN36OTPF8nI/AAAAAAAAFGc/xXm850jqEaw/s1600/Pelleas_Melisande_Frankfurt_laurson_600.jpg) (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-domestication-of.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on December 31, 2012, 08:47:50 AM
Quote


Best Recordings of 2012 (#9)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#8)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#7)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#6)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#5)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#4)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-4.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-4.html)


(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-3UVLHm8WBbs/UOCV_oTeUHI/AAAAAAAAFL4/CSgxwjKO-gM/s1600/HJ-LIM_laurson_600.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: HJ Lim, Ken Masur, and Hints of Scriabin

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-hj-lim-ken-masur-and.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ionarts-at-large-hj-lim-ken-masur-and.html)

HJ Lim is best known for a marketing blast by EMI, eager to promote the young Korean pianist’s recording of the (almost*) complete Beethoven sonatas...

...In his attempts to casually shimmy along, Ken Masur looked like the only straight guy at a gay dance party...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 01, 2013, 11:00:13 AM

Quote


Best Recordings of 2012 (#10)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#9)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#8)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#7)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#6)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#5)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#4)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-4.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-4.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#3)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-3.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-3.html)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 02, 2013, 11:11:55 PM
Quote


Best Recordings of 2012 (#10)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-10.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#9)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-9.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#8)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-8.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#7)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-7.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#6)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-6.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#5)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-5.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#4)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-4.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2012/12/best-recordings-of-2012-4.html)


Best Recordings of 2012 (#3)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/best-recordings-of-2012-3.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/best-recordings-of-2012-3.html)



Best Recordings of 2012 (#2)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/best-recordings-of-2012-2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/best-recordings-of-2012-2.html)

Quote
Imagine a Violin Concerto that has everything it takes to become an
overplayed favorite—yet is virtually unknown? Imagine no more, listen: To...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on January 03, 2013, 01:49:24 PM
Oh my!!!  Another Elgar thread locked!  Good heavens.  :o :o
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 03, 2013, 03:40:08 PM
The entire list, topped by Purcell & Friends:


(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-z9n-UMfOjC8/UOX8cvodHvI/AAAAAAAAFaY/eCDDUfEGuvE/s1600/Best_Recordings_of_2012_laurson_600.jpg)

Best Recordings of 2012 (# 1 - 10)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/best-recordings-of-2012-1-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/best-recordings-of-2012-1-10.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 05, 2013, 10:42:37 AM
Page 14 here (http://issuu.com/londonphilharmonic/docs/14dec12_lpoprognotes?viewMode=presentation&mode=embed) makes for a rather sad reading. LPO is a very famous name, I know, but is it a league below the likes of NY, Berlin and Vienna in terms of finances or is this the case even at those places?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 06, 2013, 01:35:38 PM
Page 14 here (http://issuu.com/londonphilharmonic/docs/14dec12_lpoprognotes?viewMode=presentation&mode=embed) makes for a rather sad reading. LPO is a very famous name, I know, but is it a league below the likes of NY, Berlin and Vienna in terms of finances or is this the case even at those places?

You can't really compare European (Continental), American, and UK Orchestras in terms of finance. European orchestras work on the cheap, compared to American ones (where Unions have wreaked greater havoc)... and UK Orchestras somewhere in-between... plus very different financing systems with endowments, pension funds, state subsidies et al. Ultimately every orchestra needs money... and there are many ways of trying to get it. This is just one way... and not the dumbest.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 06, 2013, 10:07:27 PM
Ultimately every orchestra needs money... and there are many ways of trying to get it. This is just one way... and not the dumbest.

It was just a teeny-weeny bit shocking that they couldn't afford a couple of stools for the players!

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 07, 2013, 06:43:37 AM
It was just a teeny-weeny bit shocking that they couldn't afford a couple of stools for the players!

They can... but you want to catch small contributions, as well as large ones. And not just tell the donors of 'piddling' sums that it'll be swallowed up in the big sea of anonymous money down the administrative road... but make them feel that even a small gift makes a tangible difference. In other words: It' more reflecting good marketing than it is actual poverty.  They can't well write: We need L.250,- towards the year-end bonus of our HR Director, can they? :-)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 07, 2013, 06:57:36 AM
They can... but you want to catch small contributions, as well as large ones. And not just tell the donors of 'piddling' sums that it'll be swallowed up in the big sea of anonymous money down the administrative road... but make them feel that even a small gift makes a tangible difference. In other words: It' more reflecting good marketing than it is actual poverty.  They can't well write: We need L.250,- towards the year-end bonus of our HR Director, can they? :-)

Ah. I appreciate the elucidation. ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 07, 2013, 07:07:21 AM
Ah. I appreciate the elucidation. ;)

I didn't intend to patronize you... hope that's not how it came across.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on January 07, 2013, 07:20:08 AM
I didn't intend to patronize you... hope that's not how it came across.

Oh, not at all. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 08, 2013, 03:59:23 AM
All the while I am enjoying the concentration on Dmitri Dmitriyevich, I do feel an ascendant urge for Liszt.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 08, 2013, 12:24:59 PM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-z4sQBbj5UV0/UOxkuOnRIbI/AAAAAAAAFhA/1KRCBjoiBEU/s1600/Brahms_Strauss_Quixote_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts-at-Large: Ageing Maestros and a Youthful Knight-Errant

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/ionarts-at-large-ageing-maestros-and.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/ionarts-at-large-ageing-maestros-and.html)

Haitink-reviewing by way of Masur-bashing:

...but there’s also a point in saying that it is not fair to music; the composers being mistreated. Who would let a decorated but shaky doctor operate on patients, based on past merit?

On the bill: Brahms' First & Strauss' Don Quixote
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on January 08, 2013, 04:13:13 PM
Weird, a full year after the fact I somehow finally found out that Naxos' house Bach/Haydn conductor Helmut Muller-Bruhl passed away.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 09, 2013, 03:33:45 PM

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-I1KxAKWSnUU/UEc-h4nmLAI/AAAAAAAAEL8/dXXBSc35eFg/s1600/Munich_Phil_600.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: Youthful Bruckner With James Gaffigan

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/ionarts-at-large-youthful-bruckner-with.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/ionarts-at-large-youthful-bruckner-with.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on January 12, 2013, 04:32:17 AM
How Alan Rusbridger learned to play Chopin's first Ballade

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2013/jan/11/alan-rusbridger-chopin-video (http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2013/jan/11/alan-rusbridger-chopin-video)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/12/play-it-again-chopin-ballade-no-1-alan-rusbridger (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/12/play-it-again-chopin-ballade-no-1-alan-rusbridger)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on January 12, 2013, 04:42:29 AM
How Alan Rusbridger learned to play Chopin's first Ballade

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2013/jan/11/alan-rusbridger-chopin-video (http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2013/jan/11/alan-rusbridger-chopin-video)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/12/play-it-again-chopin-ballade-no-1-alan-rusbridger (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/12/play-it-again-chopin-ballade-no-1-alan-rusbridger)

That was interesting. I've often thought of doing that: learning at least one piece. In fact, a few decades ago I taught myself about half the "easy" Chopin prelude before circumstances prevented finishing it. We'll eventually, probably, inherit a piano. Maybe it's still in my future.

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on January 12, 2013, 05:48:07 AM
How Alan Rusbridger learned to play Chopin's first Ballade

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2013/jan/11/alan-rusbridger-chopin-video (http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2013/jan/11/alan-rusbridger-chopin-video)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/12/play-it-again-chopin-ballade-no-1-alan-rusbridger (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/12/play-it-again-chopin-ballade-no-1-alan-rusbridger)
Very interesting indeed!
This may be of interst, too (about 0:30 before the end): 'Ax said that he didn't think that he had ever heard a perfect performance of this piece, apart from Pollini'
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 14, 2013, 01:45:28 AM
(http://i.forbesimg.com/assets/img/forbes_logo/forbes_logo_white.svg)


Got a regular column on Forbes.com now... perhaps I'll be able to smuggle classical music into it on a more regular basis.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/)

http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2013/01/13/the-tower-that-fell/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2013/01/13/the-tower-that-fell/)
http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2013/01/13/artistic-propaganda-in-ossetia/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2013/01/13/artistic-propaganda-in-ossetia/)
http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2013/01/13/when-a-concert-isnt-just-a-concert/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2013/01/13/when-a-concert-isnt-just-a-concert/)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 14, 2013, 02:16:02 PM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-c-uzjg_5p4I/UPR84Lv9dxI/AAAAAAAAFuY/V0qwjz577SA/s1600/Olivier_Messiaen_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts-at-Large: Mariss Jansons' Birthday Turangalîla

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/ionarts-at-large-mariss-jansons.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/ionarts-at-large-mariss-jansons.html)


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aRBqVEFm6bU/UPm2FsFICBI/AAAAAAAAF8M/EMaiDsgkkPE/s1600/Anton_Bruckner_II_laurson_600.jpg)
A Survey of Bruckner Cycles
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/a-survey-of-bruckner-cycles.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/a-survey-of-bruckner-cycles.html)

(Help with broken links or wrong information or mix-ups always much appreciated.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 29, 2013, 06:54:37 AM
I could scarcely credit my eyes when I read this, this morning:

Quote
Few composers evoke elevated sentiments such as “wow!” and “we get the picture” as powerfully as Locatelli.

I suppose some listeners in our day "wow" easily. (And, is "we get the picture" an elevated sentiment?)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on January 29, 2013, 06:56:40 AM
I could scarcely credit my eyes when I read this, this morning:

I suppose some listeners in our day "wow" easily. (And, is "we get the picture" an elevated sentiment?)

YIKES. Was that hacksterdom spilled in actual print?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 29, 2013, 06:59:57 AM
Pixels, but . . . prestige-ly pixels.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on January 30, 2013, 02:23:59 PM
A camera on a trombone (http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xwip90_gopro-sur-un-trombone_fun?start=20#.UQmdt1Tvh8H)  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 31, 2013, 03:04:48 AM
How old is the youngest composer you regularly listen to?

He's getting older all the time.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 03, 2013, 09:24:20 AM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xjsVNJNpvV4/UQ6PNxllW3I/AAAAAAAAGCM/_lfJwlrYbTg/s1600/Gergiev_laurson_600.jpg)

Valery Gergiev Signs Contract With Munich Philharmonic
Valery Gergiev Signs Contract With Munich Philharmonic. Here's why, and what to expect:

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/valery-gergiev-signs-contract-with.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/valery-gergiev-signs-contract-with.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 05, 2013, 01:43:49 PM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-I1KxAKWSnUU/UEc-h4nmLAI/AAAAAAAAEL8/dXXBSc35eFg/s1600/Munich_Phil_600.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: Gergiev's First Time
Gergiev’s first concert after officially being announced and presented as the incoming Principal Conductor of the MPhil couldn’t have been more symbolic...

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/ionarts-at-large-gergievs-first-time.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/ionarts-at-large-gergievs-first-time.html)

see also:
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xjsVNJNpvV4/UQ6PNxllW3I/AAAAAAAAGCM/_lfJwlrYbTg/s1600/Gergiev_laurson_600.jpg)

Valery Gergiev Signs Contract With Munich Philharmonic
Valery Gergiev Signs Contract With Munich Philharmonic. Here's why, and what to expect:

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/valery-gergiev-signs-contract-with.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/valery-gergiev-signs-contract-with.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on February 08, 2013, 07:20:51 AM
Conductor James DePreist has died, age 76.

(http://chevalierdesaintgeorges.homestead.com/images/DePreistTribute6_500_Z.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on February 09, 2013, 08:31:19 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/video/2013/feb/08/tortoise-sex-piano-richard-clayderman-video (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/video/2013/feb/08/tortoise-sex-piano-richard-clayderman-video)

 >:D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 09, 2013, 08:46:23 AM
Well, I've only now learnt that Richard Clayderman was French.

And I certainly understand why the French would try to keep that secret.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 11, 2013, 03:45:56 PM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NvhjsOtwz2E/URUneREDYYI/AAAAAAAAGFc/QTVVyLIq9-Y/s1600/NSO_European_Tour_laurson_600.jpg)
NSO-at-Large: Nuremberg Pranks

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/nso-at-large-nuremberg-pranks.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/nso-at-large-nuremberg-pranks.html)

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NvhjsOtwz2E/URUneREDYYI/AAAAAAAAGFc/QTVVyLIq9-Y/s1600/NSO_European_Tour_laurson_600.jpg)
NSO-at-Large: Frankfurt Hijinks

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/nso-at-large-frankfurt-hijinks.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/nso-at-large-frankfurt-hijinks.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 20, 2013, 06:13:09 AM
Anyone can think of a case of "character assassination" in the fields of science or music?

There must be something... but I'm not having any ideas. I was thinking of Gesualdo, for a while, but that wasn't character assassination, that was just assassination. And not of him, but by him.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 20, 2013, 06:23:48 AM
I'd almost say Golijov, except that that's not character assassination, it's justice ; )
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 20, 2013, 06:32:07 AM
Robert Oppenheimer (?)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 20, 2013, 06:47:21 AM
Robert Oppenheimer (?)

John Adams as the perpetrator, presumably?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 20, 2013, 06:50:30 AM
Johann Georg Faust?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 20, 2013, 06:57:17 AM
John Adams as the perpetrator, presumably?

No, silly. It was much later, under Eisenhower, I think. :P
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 20, 2013, 07:00:35 AM
John Cage has suffered some character assassination on this forum.  But I am sure his reputation will survive.

He'd be the first to laugh it off.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 20, 2013, 07:02:33 AM
He'd be the first to laugh it off.

Or may have even called it appreciation. >:D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 20, 2013, 07:12:56 AM
No, silly. It was much later, under Eisenhower, I think. :P


haha. Seriously... I'm not aware if Oppenheimer was defamed in any successful way: Any hinters? 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on February 20, 2013, 07:31:59 AM
haha. Seriously... I'm not aware if Oppenheimer was defamed in any successful way: Any hinters? 

I'm obviously referring to all the hearings post the Manhattan Project. If you attribute the cause to a collective paranoia on the part of some government officials and treat the events as nothing more than a sequence of government-led investigations, then I suppose he won't fit your bill. But it's no secret that at least some of that was fuelled by a feud with Edward Teller.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on February 22, 2013, 01:21:24 PM
A condition comment on a used copy of the Chailly Bruckner cycle :

Quote
Used - Like New - Unfortunately disc 5 is missing. all other discs perfect though

oh that's ok then...  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 22, 2013, 01:53:09 PM
A condition comment on a used copy of the Chailly Bruckner cycle :

oh that's ok then...  ;D

Don't start being picky. That's like... barely 10%. And the 5th Symphony, really... it's not like you don't have it already. :-)
Anyone who already has the 5th, though, and not the others, might get a bargain...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 22, 2013, 01:54:59 PM

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4ls9SAVgK_I/USenSifFpZI/AAAAAAAAGL4/U65BayABBQo/s1600/MAHLER_02_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts-at-Large: Mahler With Mehta and Angel Blue
Seriously, "Angel Blue" is not a stripper?

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/ionarts-at-large-mahler-with-mehta-and.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/ionarts-at-large-mahler-with-mehta-and.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on February 24, 2013, 06:21:09 AM
For those who can access the BBC I-player, there's a running documentary series on 20th Century Classical Music on BBC4, called "The Sound and the Fury: A Century of Music".

Part 1 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01qnp5f/The_Sound_and_the_Fury_A_Century_of_Music_Wrecking_Ball/)

The first episode looks at the shift in the language and sound of music from the beautiful melodies and harmonies of the giants of classical music such as Mozart, Haydn and Brahms into the fragmented, abstract, discordant sound of the most radical composers of the new century - Schoenberg, Webern, Stravinsky and beyond.

It examines how this new music, which can perplex and upset even the most contemporary of audiences, was a response to the huge upheaval in the world at the start of the 20th century - with its developments in technology, science, modern art and the tumult of the First World War.

Featuring specially-shot performances of some of the key works of the period, performed by the London Sinfonietta, members of the Aurora Orchestra and the American composer and pianist Timothy Andres, the story of this radical episode in music history is brought to life through the contributions of some of the biggest names in modern classical music, among them Steve Reich, John Adams, Michael Tilson Thomas, Pierre Boulez, George Benjamin and Alex Ross, music critic of the New Yorker.

From the atonal experiments of Vienna to the jazz-infused sounds coming from New York in the 1920s, the film travels the world to place this music in context and to uncover the incredible personalities and lives of the composers whose single-minded visions changed the course of classical music for ever.



Part 2 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01qsqzc/The_Sound_and_the_Fury_A_Century_of_Music_Free_for_All/)

The second episode looks at how the freewheeling modernism that had shocked, scandalised and titillated audiences in the first two decades of the 20th century comes under state control. Initially, many practitioners thought the totalitarian regimes would be good for music and the arts. What followed in Germany was a ban on music written by Jews, African-Americans and communists, while in the Soviet Union there was a prohibition on music the workers were unable to hum. In the USA, many composers voluntarily embraced music for the masses.

After the cataclysm of the 1940s, a new generation of 20-something composers - Boulez, Stockhausen, Xenakis, Nono, Ligeti - turned their back on what they saw as the discredited music of the past and decided to try and reinvent it from scratch. Or, at least, from serialism, which became, as the 1950s wore on, as much of a straitjacket as the strictures of totalitarianism had been before. But from this period of avant-garde experimentation, which many listeners found baffling and even terrifying, came some of the most influential and radical musical innovations of the century.

The story is told by a musical cast list including Pierre Boulez, Michael Tilson-Thomas, Peter Maxwell-Davies, Harrison Birtwistle and John Adams.



The 3rd part will focus on the USA with Steve Reich, etc...

Interesting and educational, although excepting Shostakovitch/Stravinsky/Gershwin/Copeland and a bit of Schönberg, the rest of the contents isn't doing much for me (Webern, Berg, Boulez, Ives, Maxwell Davies,  Birtwistle, Stockhausen, Nono, Ligeti, Xenakis...).

there's a concert  (http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p015319h/The_Sound_and_the_Fury_in_Concert_Messiaen_Ligeti_Xenakis_and_Birtwistle/)as well if that's your thing.

Performances by the London Sinfonietta and cellist Oliver Coates of works by Oliver Messiaen, Gyorg Ligeti, Iannis Xenakis and Harrison Birtwistle recorded in 2012 for BBC Four’s The Sound and the Fury: A Century of Music. Performances include the 1st and 5th Movements of Oliver Messiaen’s ‘Quartet for the End of Time’, the 1st Movement of Gyorg Ligeti’s ‘Chamber Concerto’, Oliver Coates performing Iannis Xenakis’s ‘Kottos’ plus ‘Antistrophe’ and ‘Strasimon’ from Harrison Birtwistle’s ‘Trageodea’.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 16, 2013, 01:48:41 PM


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)

Dip Your Ears, No. 129 (Viols and Organ)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/dip-your-ears-no-129-viols-and-organ.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/dip-your-ears-no-129-viols-and-organ.html)
“Consorts to the Organ” confusingly means exactly what it says: a consort – of viols – to accompany a – chamber – organ. The consort makes the majority of the merry noise of the musicke of Billy Lawes (1602 – 1645)...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 21, 2013, 02:13:35 PM

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-wZutZvyUzcw/UUo03FwQnuI/AAAAAAAAGTc/5_o6IIlUv6s/s1600/Dallas_Symphony_Munich_laurson_600.jpg)

Ionarts-at-Large: Dallas SO and @violincase in Munich

...with their second of two programs: Wagner’s Prelude & Liebestod, Steven Stucky’s Elegy from August 4, 1964,
and Richard Strauss’ Suite from Der Rosenkavalier pivoting around the constant of the two programs, Erich Korn-
gold’s Violin Concerto...

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/ionarts-at-large-dallas-so-and.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/ionarts-at-large-dallas-so-and.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 21, 2013, 03:44:28 PM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-oxDH-7i4kg4/UUuZn1ZxLOI/AAAAAAAAGTs/ppUd6_lUj4w/s1600/Jakobsplatz_Orchestra_Munich_laurson_600.jpg)

The Shtick, Shpil, and Spheres of Daniel Hope

...Then Philip Glass’ Echorus, which is the good man at his Glassian best and better yet: a piece originally written for Menuhin which allows Daniel Hope one of his “did you know I studied with Menuhin?!” plugs. No... really? Tell us more. ...

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-shtick-shpil-and-spheres-of-daniel.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-shtick-shpil-and-spheres-of-daniel.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 21, 2013, 06:14:12 PM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-oxDH-7i4kg4/UUuZn1ZxLOI/AAAAAAAAGTs/ppUd6_lUj4w/s1600/Jakobsplatz_Orchestra_Munich_laurson_600.jpg)

The Shtick, Shpil, and Spheres of Daniel Hope

...Then Philip Glass’ Echorus, which is the good man at his Glassian best and better yet: a piece originally written for Menuhin which allows Daniel Hope one of his “did you know I studied with Menuhin?!” plugs. No... really? Tell us more. ...

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-shtick-shpil-and-spheres-of-daniel.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-shtick-shpil-and-spheres-of-daniel.html)


Never thought Louis CK would be mentioned in the same article as Arvo Part.  :D

Thanks for the link, Jens.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 23, 2013, 09:26:33 AM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)

Dip Your Ears, No. 130 (Bach, Fresh Squeezed)

The accordion has a reputation problem in the US, where its esteem ranks somewhere between recorder and kazoo...

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/dip-your-ears-no-130-bach-fresh-squeezed.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/dip-your-ears-no-130-bach-fresh-squeezed.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 25, 2013, 06:54:38 AM
t'is up now:

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-GEp8pryRAMU/UU-BUrZ64WI/AAAAAAAAGV0/SbfbpphxIjc/s1600/Antonin_Dvorak_laurson_600.jpg)
A Survey of Dvorák Symphony Cycles (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/a-survey-of-dvorak-symphony-cycles.html)


OK... inspired myself, of sorts, and put together a "Dvorak Survey", much like the

Bruckner Survey http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/a-survey-of-bruckner-cycles.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/01/a-survey-of-bruckner-cycles.html) and the
Sibelius Survey http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/05/survey-of-sibelius-cycles.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/05/survey-of-sibelius-cycles.html). (Will go live tomorrow (9AM, EST) here: http://ionarts.blogspot.com/search/label/Discography (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/search/label/Discography)) With about 15 3/4 + 1/2 cycles that I found (one of them mix&match), it's only half the size than either Bruckner or Sibelius... not surprising, really... given the popularity-discrepancy between 7-9 and cumbersome (though in their own way very appealing) 1-4. And thanks to awesome Qobuz (http://www.qobuz.com/), I can listen in on several sets I don't have. (Qobuz is a bit like Spotify and iTunes combined (streaming and downloading), but for specifically classical music audiophiles and, for the the time being, only in French. (Not that that keeps me.) Between that, the NML, and Spotify, I can sample pretty much anything that's out there, now.

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/a-survey-of-dvorak-symphony-cycles.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/a-survey-of-dvorak-symphony-cycles.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 27, 2013, 09:19:29 AM
Can you believe this?
 
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51zE--RV1qL.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on March 27, 2013, 11:11:32 AM
Can you believe this?
 
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51zE--RV1qL.jpg)
Featuring the Shower Scene...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 31, 2013, 04:15:53 AM
Am I seeing double, or do we really have two Norman Norman dello dello Joio Joio threads threads now?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 31, 2013, 04:19:20 AM
Lawd, there's three of him, now!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on March 31, 2013, 04:35:59 AM
Lawd, there's three of him, now!

A thread for each one of his names?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 31, 2013, 05:49:34 AM


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Dip Your Ears, No. 131 (Pfitzner Supreme) (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/dip-your-ears-no-131-pfitzner-supreme.html)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/dip-your-ears-no-131-pfitzner-supreme.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/03/dip-your-ears-no-131-pfitzner-supreme.html)
Palestrina, Pfitzner's supposed masterpiece, can be dull. Not this one!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 01, 2013, 02:44:12 AM
April is What the heck, listen to anything month....
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on April 01, 2013, 10:10:47 AM
April is What the heck, listen to anything month....
Not going to listen to that hoity-toity French stuff, or 2nd Viennese school, then?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 01, 2013, 10:30:44 AM
Why not? It's all good.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on April 01, 2013, 10:39:27 AM
Yes, I guess 'anything' covers those, too. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 06, 2013, 09:06:14 AM


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Dip Your Ears, No. 132 (Gál’s Marionettes) (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/dip-your-ears-no-132-gals-marionettes.html)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/dip-your-ears-no-132-gals-marionettes.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/dip-your-ears-no-132-gals-marionettes.html)
Don’t let the amateurish graphic design of this release (strictly speaking re-release from an earlier Olympia recording), or the performer’s shiny turquoise waistcoat fool you: These are quality piano duos...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 08, 2013, 06:46:22 AM
...Christoph Biller, the 16th Thomanercantor since Bach, says that God can’t be known (hence faith), but he can be felt—in Bach. Bach—and I agree wholehearted, although “without invisible means of support” myself—is next to Godliness. Part of what makes Bach stand apart is that deep, quasi-spiritual sense one gets from his music… a feeling Romain Rolland might have described as “oceanic”: A sense of rightness, universal like a mathematical proof...

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-uqyYjeXy_8o/UNlfq2leIiI/AAAAAAAAFB8/L6ShBiPlP9U/s1600/Bach_Stamps_Briefmarken_laurson_600.jpg)
Bach is Next to Godliness, the Flute Not

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/bach-is-next-to-godliness-flute-not_8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/bach-is-next-to-godliness-flute-not_8.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 11, 2013, 11:05:17 PM

(http://images-onepick-opensocial.googleusercontent.com/gadgets/proxy?container=onepick&gadget=a&rewriteMime=image%2F*&url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com%2F-YEVpDNmCkus%2FUQ1nRixw-UI%2FAAAAAAAAGBc%2FJmJ2d8PdPk4%2Fs1600%2FRichard_Wagner_laurson_600.jpg)
Parsifal and the Tree of Life

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/parsifal-and-tree-of-life.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/parsifal-and-tree-of-life.html)

 Konwitschny zooms in on the individual as such and pain—and puts Amfortas front and center of his all-white papier-mâché stage to illustrate this point...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 12, 2013, 02:57:19 AM
First thing in the morning I am apt to misread the odd thread title; mentally, I am morally prepared for that.

Still, got a big chuckle when I caught myself thinking I had read Wagner's Vanilla.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 14, 2013, 04:52:48 AM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Dip Your Ears, No. 133 (Bach Motets)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/dip-your-ears-no-133-bach-motets.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/dip-your-ears-no-133-bach-motets.html)

According to Gardiner, the Motets are "the cantor’s 'most perfect… most hypnotic… works'. Certainly perfect for a Sunday. (With audio samples from all six, by different performers.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on April 16, 2013, 02:52:00 AM
If only Souzay were a composer, here at GMG we could have The Souzay Queue.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 20, 2013, 09:14:57 AM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Dip Your Ears, No. 134 (The Lovely Hill)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/dip-your-ears-no-134-lovely-hill.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/dip-your-ears-no-134-lovely-hill.html)

Here’s chamber music you didn’t know you love: From Australian Alfred Hill (1869-1960), whose string quartets...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on April 24, 2013, 07:17:29 AM

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mx-5Lh8IsKQ/UXf1YxECZ2I/AAAAAAAAGbU/PzL8DHmloUc/s1600/Hansel&Gretel_Munich_standard_laurson_600.jpg)
Crunch Time for Missing Children

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/crunch-time-for-missing-children.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/crunch-time-for-missing-children.html)
The Scoping Report on Missing and Abducted Children 2011 states the following: “Children who go missing are at risk of harm. When a child goes missing, there is something wrong, often quite seriously, in that child’s life. The reasons behind missing incidents are varied, where children go missing as a consequence of specific, distinct circumstances. The serious problem of missing and abducted children is a broad, complex and challenging issue. It tends to be poorly defined, lacking in accurate statistics, and is subject to an array of responses at local, national and international levels. At the same time, there is a pressing and urgent concern for improving responses to cases of missing and abducted children. Being missing from home or a place of residence not only entails several inherent risks for children and young people, but is also a cause and consequence of other grave concerns in any child’s life.”

The FBI cites a 2002 federal study on missing children according to which a heartening 99.8 percent of children reported missing “were located or returned home alive. The remaining 0.2 percent either did not return home or were not found. The study estimated that most of missing children cases involved runaways from juvenile facilities and that only an estimated 0.0068 percent were true kidnappings by a stranger. The primary conclusion of the study was that child abductions perpetrated by strangers rarely occur. However, when they do occur, the results can be tragic.”

Tragic, indeed. Which makes the following events all the more dramatic: After a domestic altercation on the evening of April 1st, two underage siblings went missing near Munich...

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Geo Dude on April 24, 2013, 01:38:39 PM
...Christoph Biller, the 16th Thomanercantor since Bach, says that God can’t be known (hence faith), but he can be felt—in Bach. Bach—and I agree wholehearted, although “without invisible means of support” myself—is next to Godliness. Part of what makes Bach stand apart is that deep, quasi-spiritual sense one gets from his music… a feeling Romain Rolland might have described as “oceanic”: A sense of rightness, universal like a mathematical proof...

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-uqyYjeXy_8o/UNlfq2leIiI/AAAAAAAAFB8/L6ShBiPlP9U/s1600/Bach_Stamps_Briefmarken_laurson_600.jpg)
Bach is Next to Godliness, the Flute Not

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/bach-is-next-to-godliness-flute-not_8.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/04/bach-is-next-to-godliness-flute-not_8.html)


Thank you for this. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 10, 2013, 01:54:57 AM
Do titles for a musical work come any more pretentious than "Cosmic Pulses"?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on May 12, 2013, 08:16:40 AM
Can you believe this?
 
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51zE--RV1qL.jpg)
Oh, I believe just about anything from recording companies/marketing executives/the corporate monster that governs us all. :laugh: Next, maybe: "Most Joyous Classical Music", "Most Extreme Classical Music"... :laugh:
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: knight66 on May 13, 2013, 09:38:16 AM
http://www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc/2013/05/valery-gergiev-i-conducted-18-concerts-in-8-days.html

How mad is this, borders on a kind of illness surely?

Mike
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on May 13, 2013, 09:39:56 AM
And you just know he didn't shave in all that period.
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Geo Dude on May 13, 2013, 10:02:21 AM
Having seen pictures of Gergiev with a beard I don't think the lack of shaving is problematic.  I do hope he found time for regular bathing, though.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 13, 2013, 10:02:44 AM
http://www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc/2013/05/valery-gergiev-i-conducted-18-concerts-in-8-days.html

How mad is this, borders on a kind of illness surely?

Mike

That's a lot of toothpicks.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: knight66 on May 13, 2013, 11:30:33 AM
I think we are fortunate he is involved in music and not soldiering. No one's borders would be inviolate.

Mike
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 14, 2013, 12:11:13 AM
I think we are fortunate he is involved in music and not soldering. No one's borders would be inviolate.

Mike

For a second I thought: Yes... a lot of loose connections, in that case... (then I saw the "i".)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 24, 2013, 11:20:44 PM

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nP06lu7gRbA/UZ-tRxYzx3I/AAAAAAAAGcs/pNM3dHXul5g/s1600/Les_noces_Stravinsky_laurson_600.png)
Whitsun Salzburg: Stravinsky for Dummies

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/05/whitsun-salzburg-stravinsky-for-dummies.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/05/whitsun-salzburg-stravinsky-for-dummies.html)

The topic this year was “OPFER/SACRIFICE”, with thematic and linguistic links which had to
include the two most famous ‘sacrifices’ in music: Bach’s
Musical Offering and of course
Le sacre du printemps. It was the latter I went to see—a Stravinsky triple bill of Les
noces (“The Wedding”), Sacre, and L'oiseau de feu (“The Firebird”), with Gergiev
at the helm of the Mariinsky troupe… both orchestra and ballet.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 25, 2013, 12:57:21 AM

Latest issue of LISTEN MAGAZINE is out, including more CD mini-reviews than usual, and a short appreciation of Colin Davis on record...

(http://listenmusicmag.com/_resources/img/covers/05-13-full.jpg) (http://listenmusicmag.com/)

Sublime Lark (BIS) ► Quicksilver Brahms (Ondine) ► Bohemian Ducks (Harmonia Mundi) ► Heavenly Interspersed (LSO Live) ► Auspicious Debut (Mariinsky) ►
Plucky Historicism (Naïve) ► Gold Standard Scarlatti (Piano Classics) ► With Re-Mixed Feelings (DG) ► Incidental Requiem (King's College Choir) ► Spellbinding Goerne (Harmonia Mundi) ► Undiscovered (Supraphon) ► Lutoslawski Touchstone
(BR Klassik) ► A Very Classical Mix (Gramola)

Available digitally here... but really one should hold it in one's hand, with the beautiful paper stock and art design... http://www.listenmagazine-digital.com/listenmagazine/ (http://www.listenmagazine-digital.com/listenmagazine/)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on May 25, 2013, 06:48:04 AM

Latest issue of LISTEN MAGAZINE is out, including more CD mini-reviews than usual, and a short appreciation of Colin Davis on record...

(http://listenmusicmag.com/_resources/img/covers/05-13-full.jpg) (http://listenmusicmag.com/)

Sublime Lark (BIS) ► Quicksilver Brahms (Ondine) ► Bohemian Ducks (Harmonia Mundi) ► Heavenly Interspersed (LSO Live) ► Auspicious Debut (Mariinsky) ►
Plucky Historicism (Naïve) ► Gold Standard Scarlatti (Piano Classics) ► With Re-Mixed Feelings (DG) ► Incidental Requiem (King's College Choir) ► Spellbinding Goerne (Harmonia Mundi) ► Undiscovered (Supraphon) ► Lutoslawski Touchstone
(BR Klassik) ► A Very Classical Mix (Gramola)

Available digitally here... but really one should hold it in one's hand, with the beautiful paper stock and art design... http://www.listenmagazine-digital.com/listenmagazine/ (http://www.listenmagazine-digital.com/listenmagazine/)

One of those reviews, in XL format:
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Dip Your Ears, No. 139 (Mozart's Many Requiems)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/05/dip-your-ears-no-139-mozarts-many.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/05/dip-your-ears-no-139-mozarts-many.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 07, 2013, 04:15:16 AM
Quote from: Arnold Bax
. . . I have no interest whatever in sound for its own sake.

That's fine, as a statement of Bax's personal and musical interests. It isn't as if it were binding upon all artists, of course;  nor does his lack of interest in a line of musical pursuit, signify that the pursuit is anything unworthy. I mean, I have no interest in Bax's music, e.g.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 07, 2013, 04:35:13 AM
Aye, in A Certain Someone's sig  ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on June 14, 2013, 01:02:52 PM
Aldeburgh: £4.7m Benjamin Britten archive building is officially opened by Dame Janet Baker (http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/aldeburgh_4_7m_benjamin_britten_archive_building_is_officially_opened_by_dame_janet_baker_1_2237595)

(http://www.eadt.co.uk/polopoly_fs/013_pnp_red_house_5_1_2237594!image/944432940.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_630/944432940.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 15, 2013, 12:25:54 AM

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MipcPvlcaOM/UbsD2R9vxsI/AAAAAAAAGdw/t6sVDqO9Q8E/s1600/BRSO_Nelsons_Denoke_Wagner_Dvorak.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: Grazioso Indeed! Nelsons with the BRSO


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/ionarts-at-large-grazioso-indeed.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/ionarts-at-large-grazioso-indeed.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 17, 2013, 05:38:03 AM

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7-_P4hVe1To/Ub8B6od-MZI/AAAAAAAAGfU/Yfbj4RIGNow/s1600/Academy-for-Ancient-Music_Berlin_jens-f-laurson.jpg)

Ionarts-at-Large: AkAMus Rocks Corelli


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/ionarts-at-large-akamus-rocks-corelli.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/ionarts-at-large-akamus-rocks-corelli.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 20, 2013, 09:59:51 AM



Flying Dutchman Sketches & Doodles


(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LBOA-F9R8gs/UcNG_p0giHI/AAAAAAAAGgM/nbaQDnSL3ws/s1600/Dutchman_graphic_Laurson_mope+Kopie.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/flying-dutchman-sketches-doodles.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/flying-dutchman-sketches-doodles.html)



(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YEVpDNmCkus/UQ1nRixw-UI/AAAAAAAAGBc/JmJ2d8PdPk4/s1600/Richard_Wagner_laurson_600.jpg)

Minkowski's Sons of Meyerbeer: Wagner & Dietsch

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/minkowskis-sons-of-meyerbeer-wagner.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/minkowskis-sons-of-meyerbeer-wagner.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on June 22, 2013, 11:52:53 AM


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-WVkZ4AMutAM/UcR3Hrslc6I/AAAAAAAAGg0/B0_asXrjhjE/s320/MPhil_Currentzis_Melnikov_Prokofiev_Laurson.png)

The Currentzis Dances II & Ravel’s Wonderful Rubbish

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-currentzis-dances-ii-ravels.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-currentzis-dances-ii-ravels.html)

Quote
...But don’t ever, ever tut-tut or pshaw! Pop songs or techno or down-tempo songs (not that the type to do so would be able to distinguish),
while professing a love for Ravel’s confessedly music-devoid Bolero. Like it, by all means. We all do. But then don’t thumb your nose at the
popularity of Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” (featuring Pharrell Williams & Nile Rodgers, for good measure), which is exactly the same piece of music,
except that Daft Punk have the decency to stop the joke after 4 minutes...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on June 22, 2013, 01:59:06 PM
Aldeburgh: £4.7m Benjamin Britten archive building is officially opened by Dame Janet Baker (http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/aldeburgh_4_7m_benjamin_britten_archive_building_is_officially_opened_by_dame_janet_baker_1_2237595)

(http://www.eadt.co.uk/polopoly_fs/013_pnp_red_house_5_1_2237594!image/944432940.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_630/944432940.jpg)
Great to see a pic of Dame Janet again!  I wonder, does she sing at all now?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on June 24, 2013, 08:56:09 AM
An oasis in Iceland: The best record store in the world? (http://www.gramophone.co.uk/blog/the-gramophone-blog/the-best-record-store-in-the-world)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Pat B on June 24, 2013, 09:35:05 AM
An oasis in Iceland: The best record store in the world? (http://www.gramophone.co.uk/blog/the-gramophone-blog/the-best-record-store-in-the-world)

Hey, I've been there! I didn't buy any classical though. The exchange rate to ISK was still tough.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Cato on June 24, 2013, 02:41:23 PM
I just came across this:

Quote
An empty papal throne is pictured as Archbishop Rino Fisichella (R) reads a message from Pope Francis before a RAI National Symphony Orchestra concert, directed by conductor Juraj Valcuha of Slovakia, in Paul VI hall at the Vatican June 22, 2013....

Minutes before the concert was due to start, an archbishop told the crowd of cardinals and Italian dignitaries that an "urgent commitment that cannot be postponed" would prevent Francis from attending.

The prelates, assured that health was not the reason for the no-show, looked disoriented, realizing that the message he wanted to send was that, with the Church in crisis, he - and perhaps they - had too much pastoral work to do to attend social events....

See:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/24/us-pope-concert-idUSBRE95N0S920130624 (http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/24/us-pope-concert-idUSBRE95N0S920130624)

Was there nothing by Ginastera or Piazzola on the program?   0:)

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 28, 2013, 03:04:14 AM
I have an embarrassment of riches to choose from, for First-Listen Friday . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Geo Dude on June 28, 2013, 08:28:09 AM
I have an embarrassment of riches to choose from, for First-Listen Friday . . . .

Why don't you list the recordings and let us help you pick? ;D

(Yeah, I just want to know what new stuff you have in. :))
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Todd on July 10, 2013, 06:01:35 PM
(http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/hanbook_2266_227944432)

Any really big Myung-Whun Chung fans here?  A 33 CD Korean market set is available for under $300.  I do like some of his work, but I think I shall pass.  (Too bad DG didn't finish the Dvorak symphony cycle.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 11, 2013, 05:43:33 AM


The Cello Suites, Bach I (Mischa Maisky - DVD)

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-thtV3npwdYY/UdP62-OpysI/AAAAAAAAGk4/s4r7zdpJuxs/s600/BACH_Portrait_original_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-cello-suites-bach-i-mischa-maisky.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-cello-suites-bach-i-mischa-maisky.html)


Dip Your Ears, No. 97

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/02/dip-your-ears-no-97.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/02/dip-your-ears-no-97.html)



Beethoven Sonatas - A Survey of Complete Cycles
Part 8, 2010 Onward


(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-VYQWtbpDv9Q/UPQjw3NPXEI/AAAAAAAAFro/1OCHnnTJ3H8/s1600/Beethoven_basic_laurson_600.jpg)

INCL: R.BUCHBINDER II • H J LIM • S.GOODYEAR • F.F.GUY • L.LORTIE • P.RÖSEL


http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/beethoven-sonatas-survey-of-complete.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/beethoven-sonatas-survey-of-complete.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on July 12, 2013, 12:11:53 PM
Supraphon physical CDs are now being distributed stateside by Naxos. Not sure if an NML appearance will follow (but one can dream).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 14, 2013, 06:50:26 AM


Dip Your Ears, No. 146 (Christine Schäfer Sings SchoenBerg)

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/dip-your-ears-no-146-christine-schafer_13.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/dip-your-ears-no-146-christine-schafer_13.html)



(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-l3cZP3kRCEQ/UeLX-8TIfDI/AAAAAAAAGqM/8xGyrpzzS70/s320/MPhil_Mariinsky_Gergiev_M5.png)

Ionarts-at-Large: Bavaro-Russian Peace Orchestra with Gergiev

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-at-large-bavaro-russian-peace.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-at-large-bavaro-russian-peace.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on July 15, 2013, 06:31:51 AM
Quote
Today we announce that we will launch our own record label, AAM Records, this autumn. Over the past forty years we have released over 300 CDs, predominantly on the Decca and Harmonia Mundi labels. The establishment of AAM Records will allow us to build on this distinguished legacy, taking full control of our future recording catalogue and producing a range of recordings which match the artistic plans and development of the orchestra...

Source (http://www.aam.co.uk/#/news/2013/aam-records-launch.aspx)

A bit too late for Hogwood to complete the Haydn symphonies set, perhaps? :(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: knight66 on July 15, 2013, 10:42:47 AM
Great to see a pic of Dame Janet again!  I wonder, does she sing at all now?

She teaches. It is many years since she performed.

Mike
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 21, 2013, 05:20:18 AM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)


Dip Your Ears, No. 147 (Rick LaSalle's Sonatas)

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00A2NFDDY.01.L.jpg)
Rick LaSalle, Piano Sonatas, Ragtime
Ingrid Marsoner
Gramola

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/dip-your-ears-no-147-rick-lasalles.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/dip-your-ears-no-147-rick-lasalles.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 23, 2013, 08:25:58 AM
Happy Birthday to self!


Ionarts Turns 10


(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-TfgITMrvnk4/Ue3Wnbcn3DI/AAAAAAAAEzI/PXwbtK0Msa4/s1600/I+O+N+A+R+T+S++10th+birthday_laurson_600.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-turns-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-turns-10.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 23, 2013, 08:26:32 AM
Congrats, Jens!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on July 24, 2013, 07:17:56 AM
She teaches. It is many years since she performed.

Mike
It would be great to witness one of her master classes!  I can only imagine she's as great a teacher as she was a singer. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 25, 2013, 03:05:10 AM


The Cello Suites, Bach III (Gastinel, Queyras, Lipkind)



(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2VqOm52_jIA/UdQxf89lK6I/AAAAAAAAGl4/5Kar6d1lYnw/s600/BACH_Portrait_abstract_laurson_600.jpg)

ttp://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-cello-suites-bach-iii-gastinel.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-cello-suites-bach-iii-gastinel.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on July 25, 2013, 04:39:31 AM
Erratum from here (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/May09/Britten_2175262.htm):

Quote
CD20
Noye’s Fludde Op. 59 rec. 1898

Well, I feel certain it was recorded sometime later than 1898 . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 26, 2013, 03:10:00 AM
Happy Birthday to self!

Ionarts Turns 10

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-TfgITMrvnk4/Ue3Wnbcn3DI/AAAAAAAAEzI/PXwbtK0Msa4/s1600/I+O+N+A+R+T+S++10th+birthday_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-turns-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-turns-10.html)




Mieczysław Weinberg’s Idiot
Awe-inspiring Masterpiece Unearthed in Mannheim

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-S_jm2ylAgk4/UfE5YvFQCbI/AAAAAAAAGsU/PsL9KAb29uY/s1600/IDIOT_Mannheim_Mysh_Rogo_train_HansJorg-Michel_Laurson_600.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/mieczysaw-weinbergs-idiot-awe-inspiring.html

 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/mieczysaw-weinbergs-idiot-awe-inspiring.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on July 26, 2013, 09:59:28 AM
A couple of debating articles on Benjamin Britten in today's East Anglian Daily times :

Great debate: Benjamin Britten - a genius or coward? (http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/great_debate_benjamin_britten_a_genius_or_coward_1_2301627)

Benjamin Britten failed to share the perils of war with his fellow countrymen, says Michael Cole (http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/great_debate_benjamin_britten_failed_to_share_the_perils_of_war_with_his_fellow_countrymen_says_michael_cole_1_2301625)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 26, 2013, 10:04:37 AM
A couple of debating articles on Benjamin Britten in today's East Anglian Daily times :

Great debate: Benjamin Britten - a genius or coward? (http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/great_debate_benjamin_britten_a_genius_or_coward_1_2301627)

Benjamin Britten failed to share the perils of war with his fellow countrymen, says Michael Cole (http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/great_debate_benjamin_britten_failed_to_share_the_perils_of_war_with_his_fellow_countrymen_says_michael_cole_1_2301625)

Wow... what a false dichotomy... as if being a genius had anything to do with being a coward or not.
Thousands of others were cowards, too, but not geniuses. At least Britten gave back his nations in ways he was obviously more suited to do, than running bayonet-first into mustard gas.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Papy Oli on July 26, 2013, 11:32:03 AM
Wow... what a false dichotomy... as if being a genius had anything to do with being a coward or not.
Thousands of others were cowards, too, but not geniuses. At least Britten gave back his nations in ways he was obviously more suited to do, than running bayonet-first into mustard gas.

The article against Britten did seem like a cheap shot indeed. I didn't know about his "escaping" from the UK nor do I know enough of his works to make a judgement on the comments about the operas (i only have a couple of his shorter works)... That said, nor did I know about George Formby that the writer seems to prefer at a push. I had to ask older colleagues at work about that Formby guy and for parity, have checked him out on youtube earlier on... well ok... entertaining maybe but not for long :laugh:... He might not like Britten's music, fair point, but regardless, his legacy for the Snape / Aldeburgh area is a massive argument to ignore like he seems to do.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 27, 2013, 08:13:40 AM



Mieczysław Weinberg’s Idiot
Awe-inspiring Masterpiece Unearthed in Mannheim

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-S_jm2ylAgk4/UfE5YvFQCbI/AAAAAAAAGsU/PsL9KAb29uY/s1600/IDIOT_Mannheim_Mysh_Rogo_train_HansJorg-Michel_Laurson_600.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/mieczysaw-weinbergs-idiot-awe-inspiring.html
 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/mieczysaw-weinbergs-idiot-awe-inspiring.html)


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Dip Your Ears, No. 148 (Double the Chorales, Double the Joy)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/dip-your-ears-no-148-double-chorales.html

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00BI8SEWE.01.L.jpg) (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/dip-your-ears-no-148-double-chorales.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 29, 2013, 02:50:26 PM
Few things on the itinerary:

Diana Damrau Recital (w/Xavier de Maistre)
El Sistema • Youth Orchestra of Caracas, Felsenreitschule, Shostakovich I think...
Birtwistle: Gawain, Felsenreitschule
Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra Mahler III, Grosses Festspielhaus
Salzburg contemporary • Klangforum Wien 1,   Kollegienkirche (Birtwistle and stuff)
W. Braunfels, Jeanne d’Arc, Felsenreitschule
Mozart, Lucio Silla, Haus für Mozart, Fischer Adam
Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra Mahler VII, Grosses Festspielhaus
Vienna  Phil • Mahler V • Zubin Mehta, Grosses Festspielhaus




Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 1 )
El Sistema • Youth Orchestra of Caracas

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/el-sistema-youth-orchestra-of-caracas.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/el-sistema-youth-orchestra-of-caracas.html)




Ionarts-at-Large: A Damrau Liederabend to Harp On

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-meFOZ9UKT0Q/UfP92sFhZ0I/AAAAAAAAGvs/4EyjHf2h56k/s1600/Damrau_Maistre_laurson_600.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-at-large-damrau-liederabend-to.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/ionarts-at-large-damrau-liederabend-to.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on July 30, 2013, 07:17:18 AM

Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 2 )
Harrison Birtwistle • Gawain

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/07/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-2.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 03, 2013, 06:11:51 AM


Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 4 )
Salzburg Contemporary • Klangforum Wien 1 (Birtwistle)
"Trading Places" and Other Deadly Compositions

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-4.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-4.html)



(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5qNdvoe4EdM/T385kcE3K6I/AAAAAAAAB6E/nR1C_9bD0sI/s1600/DIP-YOUR-EARS.png)
Dip Your Ears, No. 149 (Hans Rott Returns)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/dip-your-ears-no-149-hans-rott-returns.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/dip-your-ears-no-149-hans-rott-returns.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 04, 2013, 05:38:30 AM



Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 5 )
Walter Braunfels • Jeanne D'Arc
The Would-Be Future of Opera at Stake

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-5.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-5.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 04, 2013, 11:05:03 AM
The Landfill Harmonic Orchestra


http://www.youtube.com/v/UJrSUHK9Luw#at=170
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 05, 2013, 05:00:31 AM



Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 6 )
Lucio Silla • W.A.Mozart
Pretty to Die for and Deadly Boring

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-6.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-6.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 05, 2013, 06:46:19 PM
Well, humbug. Antoni Wit's career as head of the Warsaw Philharmonic is over, and - like everything else about Antoni Wit's career - it took place with no fanfare whatsoever. He didn't even get a farewell concert - the last concert of the season was presented by Stanislaw Skrowaczewski. His farewell was, improbably, Roussel's Bacchus et Ariane.

I now feel even luckier than ever to have seen Mahler's Third with Wit/Warsaw when I did. I've never seen any other orchestra/conductor combo that came close in terms of communication, rapport, oneness of voice and spirit, or luxuriousness of sound. It's not hard for me to imagine that that's what my father remembers about seeing Karajan live in Berlin when he was there in the '70s.

I was thinking of going back to Warsaw this June for a Wit/WPO, as a leg on a planned European jaunt. Guess I'll have to settle for... some other wonderful amazing things!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Todd on August 05, 2013, 07:09:45 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41yYLgWaxlL.jpg)


Now this is what I call subtle.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 06, 2013, 06:19:36 AM
Not particularly considering any recordings at the moment, but it wouldn't feel right to say that on the Recordings you're considering thread.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on August 06, 2013, 06:38:47 AM
Well, humbug. Antoni Wit's career as head of the Warsaw Philharmonic is over

Where did you hear that, Brian? I can't find anything online. What's he going to do now? I hear Boston is looking for a conductor  8)

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 06, 2013, 06:44:42 AM
I hear Boston is looking for a conductor  8)

Sarge

No, they got Nelsons. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on August 06, 2013, 06:51:42 AM
No, they got Nelsons. :)

Well, I'm late to the party  ;D  I hadn't heard the news. Congratulations, Boston!

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 06, 2013, 07:01:20 AM
He's slow out the gate, though, as he seems to have injured himself in Bayreuth.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 06, 2013, 12:00:48 PM
Where did you hear that, Brian? I can't find anything online. What's he going to do now? I hear Boston is looking for a conductor  8)

Sarge
The news is buried here. (http://www.filharmonia.pl/dyrektor_naczelny_i_artystyczny.en.html) Wit has no website, and the WPO didn't do a farewell concert with him, and they also don't have any fanfare about their new director. It's almost like they wanted nobody to know. But:

"Managing and Artistic Director of Warsaw Philharmonic from January 2002 till August 2013.... From the concert season of 2010-11, he held the post of guest conductor with Orquesta Sinfónica de Navarra in Pamplona. As of 2013-14, he will take over as that orchestra's artistic director, simultaneously accepting the position of honorary conductor to Cracow Philharmonic."

Makes me wonder if arrangements with Naxos will continue in Warsaw, or in Pamplona. Also makes me wonder if he's semi-retiring to Spanish wine country.

EDIT: Looked at the OS de Navarra's 2013-14 schedule. He's only appearing with them three times, in February-April, and only in the most normal of repertoire (Mozart [inc. Requiem], Haydn, Beethoven, Scheherazade).

EDIT II: Oh I was wrong! Wit/Warsaw's farewell is 23 August... at the BBC Proms. A delicious program of Lutoslawski, Panufnik and Shostakovich with Alexander Melnikov. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/whats-on/2013/august-23/14666)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 07, 2013, 03:00:30 AM
Resurrecting the WETA Mahler Survey
to go along with coverage of part of the Salzburg Mahler Cycle


(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-P6H22KDd6dw/UgFGyyJ0t9I/AAAAAAAAG5U/R-igMN9QkJc/s1600/Gustav_Mahler_7_1.png)
Gustav Mahler – Symphony No.7 (Part 1)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/gustav-mahler-symphony-no7-part-1.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/gustav-mahler-symphony-no7-part-1.html)


(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BZS1d24Ctts/UgH63jkBZQI/AAAAAAAAG6U/Qu8O4SPCQcE/s1600/Gustav_Mahler_7_2.png)
Gustav Mahler – Symphony No.7 (Part 2)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/gustav-mahler-symphony-no7-part-2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/gustav-mahler-symphony-no7-part-2.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on August 07, 2013, 05:59:55 AM
The news is buried here. (http://www.filharmonia.pl/dyrektor_naczelny_i_artystyczny.en.html) Wit has no website, and the WPO didn't do a farewell concert with him, and they also don't have any fanfare about their new director. It's almost like they wanted nobody to know. But:

"Managing and Artistic Director of Warsaw Philharmonic from January 2002 till August 2013.... From the concert season of 2010-11, he held the post of guest conductor with Orquesta Sinfónica de Navarra in Pamplona. As of 2013-14, he will take over as that orchestra's artistic director, simultaneously accepting the position of honorary conductor to Cracow Philharmonic."

Makes me wonder if arrangements with Naxos will continue in Warsaw, or in Pamplona. Also makes me wonder if he's semi-retiring to Spanish wine country.

EDIT: Looked at the OS de Navarra's 2013-14 schedule. He's only appearing with them three times, in February-April, and only in the most normal of repertoire (Mozart [inc. Requiem], Haydn, Beethoven, Scheherazade).

EDIT II: Oh I was wrong! Wit/Warsaw's farewell is 23 August... at the BBC Proms. A delicious program of Lutoslawski, Panufnik and Shostakovich with Alexander Melnikov. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/whats-on/2013/august-23/14666)

Thanks for digging up all that information. And let's hope his work with Naxos continues. It's been a great run so far.

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 09, 2013, 07:35:22 AM
E-mail came in from Naxos today, touting Alsop conducting Brahms's Ein deutsches Requiem.

Does anyone who has heard it, speak for it?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 09, 2013, 10:36:52 AM
E-mail came in from Naxos today, touting Alsop conducting Brahms's Ein deutsches Requiem.

Does anyone who has heard it, speak for it?
Directly relevant to the previous discussion, Wit said he wanted to record that with Warsaw but Naxos refused and said they wanted to hand it to someone else. They offered him the complete Dvorak chorchestral works as a consolation; that Requiem is coming soon.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 09, 2013, 10:39:36 AM
Sure, that has the look of a purely artistic decision . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on August 09, 2013, 11:00:50 AM
I suppose Alsop noticed that Gardiner finished off his Brahms cycle with the Requiem, and wanted to do the same with hers.

That said,  there are a lot more recordings of the Brahms Requiem, and a lot of them good ones;  Dvorak choral/orchestral not so much, and I'll be much more interested in(meaning, much more likely to buy) these Dvorak recordings than I would be interested in a hypothetical Wit Brahms Requiem.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 09, 2013, 11:55:04 PM


(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-a9tH6rOMBdQ/UgU2_2BCi_I/AAAAAAAAG-o/ls6oxZFNdRo/s1600/Russian_Sixes_laurson_600.png)

Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 10 )

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 1 • Mariss Jansons
A Russian Pair of Sixes

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-10.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 10, 2013, 05:21:30 AM
That said,  there are a lot more recordings of the Brahms Requiem, and a lot of them good ones;  Dvorak choral/orchestral not so much, and I'll be much more interested in(meaning, much more likely to buy) these Dvorak recordings than I would be interested in a hypothetical Wit Brahms Requiem.

Yup. The absence of an acceptable recording of Dv's Te Deum is one of the recorded catalogue's worst omissions; one of the composer's greatest and most individual (that is, most Dvoraky) masterpieces, with somehow no satisfactory performance available.

(Neumann, Rilling = fairly sluggish and needing extra jubilance; Chandos = choir is not good, and blatantly Russian; Macal = New Jersey orchestra not up to snuff. Haven't heard Shaw or the Belohlavek performance, which is on DVD only.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on August 13, 2013, 06:11:27 PM
E-mail came in from Naxos today, touting Alsop conducting Brahms's Ein deutsches Requiem.

Does anyone who has heard it, speak for it?
I've not heard of that recording, but I can certainly speak for Marin Alsop.  She's one of my favorite conductors.  But I'm prejudiced: I've heard her live with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra here in Denver.  I can still remember Maestra Alsop and the CSO doing a flawless Mahler 7 and a very exciting performance of a Roy Harris symphony (#3?).
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 14, 2013, 04:06:59 AM
I know she is capable of fine work, indeed;  which is why the rumor of meh Brahms (the symphonies on Naxos) is so disconcerting.  Am hoping the Op.45 may be notably better.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 14, 2013, 10:45:03 AM
I know she is capable of fine work, indeed;  which is why the rumor of meh Brahms (the symphonies on Naxos) is so disconcerting.  Am hoping the Op.45 may be notably better.
My personal version of that rumor is very good Brahms 1 and 3, overall-good but problematic 4, and pretty dull 2.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 16, 2013, 03:21:16 AM
I appreciate the sharper granularity, Brian.  What were the problems in the e minor?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 16, 2013, 04:32:44 PM
My collection only contains Alsop in a disc of Barber, Glass Sym. 2/3 and Weill Symphonies.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on August 16, 2013, 04:46:53 PM
Having listened to that Alsop Mahler 1 I bought and B&N this afternoon--there's certainly nothing wrong with it.  But there's also nothing that shouts out "you must hear this performance".    I might suggest it as a budget-minded choice for someone just getting into Mahler, but you can actually throw a dart at the Amazon listings for this symphony and come up with a choice just as good.

Same general reaction to her Brahms 1, btw.  It's her Barber and John Adams recordings I like best of what I've heard from her.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 17, 2013, 05:49:24 AM
Alsop is scheduled to conduct the OAE in Brahms' German Requiem at the Proms tonight.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/whats-on/2013/august-17/14630
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 17, 2013, 06:16:47 AM
Having listened to that Alsop Mahler 1 I bought and B&N this afternoon--there's certainly nothing wrong with it.  But there's also nothing that shouts out "you must hear this performance".    I might suggest it as a budget-minded choice for someone just getting into Mahler, but you can actually throw a dart at the Amazon listings for this symphony and come up with a choice just as good.

Same general reaction to her Brahms 1, btw.  It's her Barber and John Adams recordings I like best of what I've heard from her.

I like the finale best on that Mahler 1 - really thrilling, to these ears. The rest is just good. I've seen her Mahler 1, Barber, AND John Adams live; the Barber's exciting and really coheres, but when I think of Marin Alsop concerts I've been to, the first thing I'll always think of is the Doctor Atomic Symphony, which she's yet to record.

EDIT: Karl, just did a GMG search and I wrote a long review of Alsop's Brahms here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,3348.msg79956/topicseen.html#msg79956). My superlatives for #1 are something I'd now like to tone down a little/lot. Actually I was a whole lot wordier/rambly back in '07, looks like. But hey, that comment at the end about how her Dvorak Seventh would probably suck was spot-on. Can't think of a worse recording of that symphony.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 17, 2013, 09:07:35 AM



Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 10 )
Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 1 • Mariss Jansons

A Russian Pair of Sixes

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-a9tH6rOMBdQ/UgU2_2BCi_I/AAAAAAAAG-o/ls6oxZFNdRo/s1600/Russian_Sixes_laurson_600.png)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-10.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-10.html)




Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 11 )
Soloist Recital • Till Fellner

Baroque Brawn and Classical Timidity

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wO2d-EL4UI8/Ug-62BDyPdI/AAAAAAAAHAY/eI8isYLE9hk/s1600/Salzburg_Till-Fellner_c_SilviaLelli_600_jens-f-laurson.JPG)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-11.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-11.html)




Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 12 )
El Sistema • White Hands Choir

The Calligraphy of Song

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ZxPkgMWYXdk/Ug-uQqVVhJI/AAAAAAAAHAA/pauzlDWfBuY/s1600/White_Hands_Choir_Salzburg_ionarts_600.JPG)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-12.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-12.html)




Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 13 )
Liederabend • Christian Gerhaher & Gerold Huber

The Art of Darkness

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WK27Kqn-ifA/Ug-nuBPqolI/AAAAAAAAG_w/9F40QA1DNT8/s1600/Gerhaher_Salzburg_ionarts_600.JPG)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-13.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-13.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 18, 2013, 03:39:59 AM
Man, I just had a dream where I kept reading reviews of all these amazing masterpiece symphonies that nobody's ever heard of, that were just coming out on CD, and how the reviewer hoped they would be played in concert halls alongside Beethoven. One was a Mackerras recording just being issued on Supraphon. But of course the moment I woke up I realized none of them were real.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on August 18, 2013, 04:01:02 AM
Man, I just had a dream where I kept reading reviews of all these amazing masterpiece symphonies that nobody's ever heard of, that were just coming out on CD, and how the reviewer hoped they would be played in concert halls alongside Beethoven. One was a Mackerras recording just being issued on Supraphon. But of course the moment I woke up I realized none of them were real.
Well, the Asrael is relatively recent...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 18, 2013, 05:37:43 AM

A Helping Hand for Hans Gál!

 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/a-helping-hand-for-hans-gal.html)
Quote
Conductor Kenneth Woods and his Orchestra of the Swan are busily raising money (via indigogo) for the last installment of their splendid, admirable, gorgeous-sounding Hans Gál Symphony project. Hans Gál is a composer dear to ionarts, he's been mentioned in the past and bound to get more attention still, in the future. His is music “you didn't know you love”—and you won’t, unless more recordings...
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/a-helping-hand-for-hans-gal.html[/url]
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 18, 2013, 06:54:39 AM
Well, the Asrael is relatively recent...
The Mackerras one was a Symphony No. 1 by "Rakostava" played by the "Rakostava Ensemble" and the review explained how it was formed ad-hoc by Mackerras from a bunch of Rakostava enthusiasts.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 19, 2013, 03:31:05 AM
. . . But hey, that comment at the end about how her Dvorak Seventh would probably suck was spot-on. Can't think of a worse recording of that symphony.

You are a man foresighted, Brian!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on August 20, 2013, 08:25:25 AM
Great to see a pic of Dame Janet again!  I wonder, does she sing at all now?

Not much, really.

http://www.youtube.com/v/fGskxHlFEbg
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 20, 2013, 11:46:22 AM
Karl just tweeted this, found it fascinating and sorrowful...

Recording cancelled in Minnesota because ‘orchestra is unfit’
http://www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc/2013/08/recording-cancelled-in-minnesota-because-orchestra-is-unfit.html
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on August 20, 2013, 12:59:02 PM
I don't understand, what is a lockout? ???
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 20, 2013, 01:46:58 PM
I don't understand, what is a lockout? ???

Contract disputes between the musicians and the organization. Something that many US orchestras have faced because of finacial cutbacks. The one in Minnesota seems to be the worst of the lot, with the exception of the orchestras that have completely folded.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on August 20, 2013, 05:27:47 PM
Thanks, sounds depressing.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 20, 2013, 11:55:35 PM
Thanks, sounds depressing.

One of the most depressing, and also disgusting, developments in recent American orchestra history... slamming one of the nation's best orchestras, and one with a would-be bright future into the ground. It will not recover from this for decades to come, if ever.

http://www.adaptistration.com/blog/tag/minnesota-orchestra/ (http://www.adaptistration.com/blog/tag/minnesota-orchestra/)

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/08/20/daily-circuit-orchestra-lockout (http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/08/20/daily-circuit-orchestra-lockout)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on August 21, 2013, 02:29:07 AM
I had a dream that I met this nasty, disgusting guy who was being horrible to women and acting like a giant sleazebag. When he left the room I asked someone, "Who was that?"

"Oh that was Robert von Bahr."

"Darn it...I love BIS."

Can't remember anything else.

I'm told that in real life Robert von Bahr is one of the nicest, most enthusiastic music lovers you'll meet.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 21, 2013, 02:35:26 AM
It was your dream slandered him, not you, Brian . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on August 21, 2013, 02:46:39 AM


I'm told that in real life Robert von Bahr is one of the nicest, most enthusiastic music lovers you'll meet.

He can have a bit of a bite, when he means to, but yes... like many of those who really do it 'for the love of the game', he's full of heart-warming enthusiasm.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on August 21, 2013, 03:20:48 AM

A Helping Hand for Hans Gál!
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/a-helping-hand-for-hans-gal.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/a-helping-hand-for-hans-gal.html)

Quote
Happy news: Goal achieved!!!


Excellent  8)

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 22, 2013, 06:51:04 AM
I'll post here, though what were quite the right thread is questionable.

Béla Fleck has a new recording out which probably I shall investigate, a concerto for banjo and orchestra, and a banjo quintet (i.e., quintet for banjo and quatuor à cordes).

Pretty much learnt of this piece via Twitter . . . seems he recently performed the piece with the Phila Orchestra. (There's worse cross-over slumming a major orchestra can resort to, I reckon.)

Anyone know who actually did the orchestration/scoring?  Much as I admire Fleck as a musician, I don't have any indicators that he is a composer for orchestra . . . and the samples sound passable.  (For the first and second movements;  the third movement sample seems to promise something on the dumbed-down orchestra model of Keith Emerson's "Piano Concerto No 1.")
 
The Quintet I have undimmed hopes for, recalling his wonderful Sparrow Quartet/Abigail Washburn project.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 26, 2013, 09:08:59 AM
Do you have an interest in symphony music, Gentle Reader?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on August 26, 2013, 09:38:46 AM
Do you have an interest in symphony music, Gentle Reader?
Not when it's "most relaxing" like this.  But then, I've been known to fall asleep to Mahler. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 26, 2013, 09:49:34 AM
Surely not in the Veni Creator Spiritus, mon cher!  ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on August 26, 2013, 09:52:52 AM
Surely not in the Veni Creator Spiritus, mon cher!  ;)
Yes, even there. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 26, 2013, 10:23:49 AM
Tee-hee!
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on August 31, 2013, 06:04:14 AM
Stop trying to pressure me, Spotify...

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/08/31/yhaharad.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on August 31, 2013, 12:02:05 PM
Stop trying to pressure me, Spotify...

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/08/31/yhaharad.jpg)

I totally agree with Spotify on this occasion.  8)
This, on the other hand... :
Quote
Check out this song by Günter Wand: Bruckner 5th Symphony

And I would think that people who listen to Rzewski have heard of Prokofiev, so there's no need to recommend his music to that demographic.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on August 31, 2013, 06:12:39 PM
Check out this song by Günter Wand: Bruckner 5th Symphony
Reminds me of the time, many years ago now, when a trombonist coming into an orchestral rehearsal asked humorously, "What song are we doing today?"  The conductor answered, "Prock-a-feef." ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 01, 2013, 05:31:39 AM
Call me anything, just don't call me late to the chess match.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on September 01, 2013, 07:00:33 AM
Quote
Beethoven assigned the publishing rights to Johann Traeg of Vienna. Although the main fair copies are lost, it is recorded that Traeg issued the parts, not publishing a full score, however, until around 1846/7, by which time he had sold his rights to Steiner & Company, also of Vienna. This music therefore could not be examined except through performance for almost forty years.
[Emphasis mine.]

[Source (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDD22069&vw=dc)]

Why couldn't someone with enough knowledge simply have bought the parts separately and then re-created the complete score? Leaving questions of whether it's time-consuming aside, is it not possible to create a full score in such a way?
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 02, 2013, 02:56:24 AM
Cool, got retweeted by the Berlin Philharmonic...

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/09/02/ujyzazur.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Parsifal on September 02, 2013, 03:45:26 AM
[Emphasis mine.]

[Source (http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDD22069&vw=dc)]

Why couldn't someone with enough knowledge simply have bought the parts separately and then re-created the complete score? Leaving questions of whether it's time-consuming aside, is it not possible to create a full score in such a way?

It would take rather little knowledge to recreate the score.  But I think there is a point, not that it was impossible to "study" the piece (by doing what you suggest) but that the publisher took for granted that the piece was not worth "studying," and that only performance materials (for domestic entertainment) and not a score would be in demand by the public.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on September 02, 2013, 04:59:42 AM
It would take rather little knowledge to recreate the score.  But I think there is a point, not that it was impossible to "study" the piece (by doing what you suggest) but that the publisher took for granted that the piece was not worth "studying," and that only performance materials (for domestic entertainment) and not a score would be in demand by the public.

Thanks, Scarps. The way it's worded in the notes, I thought that one must have a "secret key" of some sort to complete the score. ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Parsifal on September 02, 2013, 05:07:18 AM
Thanks, Scarps. The way it's worded in the notes, I thought that one must have a "secret key" of some sort to complete the score. ;D

Just a lot of attention to detail.  Individual parts often have short-hand such as "seven bars of rest" which would have to be made explicit in the score.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Todd on September 02, 2013, 07:35:38 AM
(http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/imgs/s300x300/4791304.jpg)


I'm not a fashionista, but that shirt strikes me as just awful, but it may very much be in style. 
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 02, 2013, 09:13:14 AM
(http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/imgs/s300x300/4791304.jpg)


I'm not a fashionista, but that shirt strikes me as just awful, but it may very much be in style.

On the upside, she's wearing something.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Parsifal on September 02, 2013, 09:15:20 AM
On the upside, she's wearing something.

Upside?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 04, 2013, 08:00:18 AM



Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 14 )
El Sistema • Ntl. Children’s Symphony Orchestra & Simon Rattle

Pint-sized Mahler

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nflh0d7ZUak/UhJDKSApnsI/AAAAAAAAHBU/vZysbO3RQK4/s1600/Salzburg_NCOoV_Rattle_600_Laurson.JPG)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-14.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-14-el.html)




Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 15 )
Shakespeare/Mendelssohn • Ein Sommernachtstraum

Inspiration for Wagner

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-DryV6f04PUI/UhNrGmids4I/AAAAAAAAHCU/oOqUDxqaaps/s1600/Salzburg_Sommernachts_Vocalensemble_Titiana_600_Laurson.JPG)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-15.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-15.html)




Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 16 )
Salzburg contemporary • Klangforum Wien 2, Heinz Holliger

Japanese Rain, Confused Owls, Nocturnal Guitar Lessons

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-zZplIxJ8POY/UhPHADuVQAI/AAAAAAAAHDY/PyjnuSNdLhI/s1600/Salzburg_Klangforum_Holliger_600_Laurson.JPG)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-16.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-16.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on September 04, 2013, 08:46:30 AM
(http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/imgs/s300x300/4791304.jpg)


I'm not a fashionista, but that shirt strikes me as just awful, but it may very much be in style.
I asked a female friend my age. She said: "If it didn't have the flowers all over it I'd like the dress. But as it is... no."

Are they continuing to record with SBYOV because it's cheap? Dudamel has the LAPO, but I imagine they have to get paid like adults...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on September 04, 2013, 10:12:33 AM
Are they continuing to record with SBYOV because it's cheap? Dudamel has the LAPO, but I imagine they have to get paid like adults...

It's been a while since they last referred to themselves as a Youth Orchestra. Still, they aren't yet "top tier" however popular they might be.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on September 04, 2013, 10:26:15 AM
I asked a female friend my age. She said: "If it didn't have the flowers all over it I'd like the dress. But as it is... no."

Are they continuing to record with SBYOV because it's cheap? Dudamel has the LAPO, but I imagine they have to get paid like adults...

Tiffany lamps do not make good dresses.   I think we can all agree on that.

As to the SBOV vs. LAPO--I'm not sure I'd call the LAPhil a top tier orchestra, in contrast to the SFO upstate.   I'd put it in the top tier of American orchestras, but no further.   And in terms of international name recognition,  SBOV undoubtedly has more at the present moment.  And there are probably some people who look at the acronym LAPO and think it's a spin off of LAPD.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Parsifal on September 04, 2013, 10:44:33 AM
I asked a female friend my age. She said: "If it didn't have the flowers all over it I'd like the dress. But as it is... no."

I don't think it is fair to judge the dress without seeing the entire thing.  Those appliqué flowers have recently been in fashion, I believe (although I don't find them attractive), but I do like the stained-glass pattern.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 04, 2013, 10:52:30 AM
I asked a female friend my age. She said: "If it didn't have the flowers all over it I'd like the dress. But as it is... no."

Are they continuing to record with SBYOV because it's cheap? Dudamel has the LAPO, but I imagine they have to get paid like adults...

Not that cheap, unless they're recording them in Venezuela or on tour where someone else picks up the tab.
And definitely not the SB"Y"OV anymore... Technically the SBO II, anyway (the original toured until about the 90s; the one that Dudamel became famous with (or made famous) is a different orchestra but confusingly by same name... which toured under varying names in the early years, to make it still more confusing.) The Youth Orchestras of El Sistema are now the Teresa Carreño YO and the Youth Orchestra of Caracas and their kids' orchestra is the National Children’s SO of Venezuela. The SBO II may not yet be a super sophisticated Orchestra, but their Mahler (not as difficult as, say, Haydn granted) can measure itself with the best in the world. M3 in Salzburg was fantastic w/best last movement I've heard live... and M7 was very good, with a hugely impressive Scherzo.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 05, 2013, 11:22:51 PM



Notes from the 2013 Salzburg Festival ( 17 )
Die Meistersinger • Richard Wagner

Innocence Regained

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IPkrK-57VLU/UfFuIMEi-QI/AAAAAAAAGt8/hWkrJhEEoRs/s1600/notesfromthesalzburgfestival2013.jpg)
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/--i3oDAHBiyQ/UiisfmT1yUI/AAAAAAAAHE8/smZoclgun9Q/s1600/Salzburg_Meistersinger_Krokodil_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/08/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-17.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-salzburg-festival-17.html)
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on September 06, 2013, 06:35:04 PM
Spotify is trying so hard  :D

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/09/07/ty7usuba.jpg)(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/09/07/2uquhu7a.jpg)(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/09/07/ure2u6yg.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 08, 2013, 05:17:11 AM



Notes from the 2013 Schubertiade ( 1 )

Schubert and Rarely Beyond

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-n1TL3iL_g20/Uix0e86lteI/AAAAAAAAHG8/e3u7LrTrvE0/s1600/Schubertiade_Schwarzenberg_Vista_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-1.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-1.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 09, 2013, 04:27:43 AM



Notes from the 2013 Schubertiade ( 2 ) • Prégardien Père et Fils

A Father & Son Duo of Tenors

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Im5NvBxpoQo/Ui3MMwcao1I/AAAAAAAAHHc/mCkxLgUg_S0/s1600/Schubertiade_Pregardien_father-son_laurson_600.jp)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-2.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-2.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 11, 2013, 11:27:55 AM



>NOTES FROM THE 2013 SCHUBERTIADE ( 3 ) • BELCEA QUARTET & THOMAS QUASTHOFF

A Father & Son Duo of Tenors

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KLbLv20VYG8/Ui3RGZRkr4I/AAAAAAAAHHw/UMUIYLwD9VI/s1600/Schubertiade_Belcea_Quasthoff_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-3-belcea.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-3-belcea.html)

Reciting poems like a High School valedictorian at his commencement speech...



>NOTES FROM THE 2013 SCHUBERTIADE ( 4 ) • BELCEA QUARTET & TILL FELLNER

A Father & Son Duo of Tenors

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-S298oYXN7Jc/Ui3l3bV0OWI/AAAAAAAAHII/jObPIhhPCV0/s1600/Schubertiade_Belcea_Fellner_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-4-belcea.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-4-belcea.html)

The Belcea Quartet makes a wonderful Trio...




>NOTES FROM THE 2013 SCHUBERTIADE ( 5 ) • DIANA DAMRAU & XAVIER DE MAISTRE

And tears are heard within the harp I touch.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ryYduf70hAg/Ui7ZiSWLVxI/AAAAAAAAHIo/KgDNpbRFcQ8/s1600/Schubertiade_Damrau_Maistre_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-5-diana.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-5-diana.html)

The harp remains the singularly most tedious instrument, all the same...




>NOTES FROM THE 2013 SCHUBERTIADE ( 6 ) • LEMONY BOSTRIDGE & LASCIVIOUS RÖSCHMANN

St. Anthony and his Funny Fishes

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-M735Pcfmwkc/UjDHpRwcI_I/AAAAAAAAHJA/t7RGXZR7r7U/s1600/Schubertiade_Bostridge_Roeschmann_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-5-diana.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-5-diana.html)

With a face that looks like a lemon, squeezed against its will...


Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 12, 2013, 10:54:43 PM



>NOTES FROM THE 2013 SCHUBERTIADE ( 6 ) • LEMONY BOSTRIDGE & LASCIVIOUS RÖSCHMANN

St. Anthony and his Funny Fishes

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-M735Pcfmwkc/UjDHpRwcI_I/AAAAAAAAHJA/t7RGXZR7r7U/s1600/Schubertiade_Bostridge_Roeschmann_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-6-lemony.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-6-lemony.html)

With a face that looks like a lemon, squeezed against its will... [link corrected]



>NOTES FROM THE 2013 SCHUBERTIADE ( 7 ) • HAGEN QUARTETT I

Of Serious and Harp-playing Beethoven Cows

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IJly2fsISvM/UjIsVHRO3aI/AAAAAAAAHKk/TQs8-0dYQSA/s1600/Schubertiade_Hagen_Quartett_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-7-hagen.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-7-hagen.html)

As hard as it is to trade the countryside, the sun, and the smell of grass and herbs  (essential experiences for anyone attending the Schubertiade) in for a concert hall, it has to be done: Duty calls...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 20, 2013, 04:31:31 AM
I like my Bach Cantatas red in tooth and claw.
 
(That's a joke, son.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Sergeant Rock on September 20, 2013, 04:37:35 AM



>NOTES FROM THE 2013 SCHUBERTIADE ( 7 ) • HAGEN QUARTETT I
(http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-7-hagen.htmll)

Link doesn't work, Jens.

Sarge
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on September 20, 2013, 04:38:45 AM
Link doesn't work, Jens.
Sarge

One too many "l". Fixed now.



>Notes from the 2013 Schubertiade ( 8 ) • Andreas Scholl & Tamar Halperin

A Silver Voice in a Golden Age of Countertenors

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-XtOXfcCYk2I/UjcW3TQwxhI/AAAAAAAAHLM/9yUXuh_wunY/s1600/Schubertiade_Scholl_Halperin_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-8-andreas.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-8-andreas.html)

It can’t be easy...to know he’s now... been passed and surpassed by a new purpose-built crop of countertenors that have raised the bar again, leaving Scholl behind, a bygone great.



>Notes from the 2013 Schubertiade ( 9 ) • Angelika Kirchschlager & Philharmonia Schrammeln

Darling Salzburg-Earnestness

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SJHmn1ZpT4s/Uix2vLW20sI/AAAAAAAAHHI/V_37dxqH76I/s1600/Schubertiade_Notes_singlelayer.jpg)
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vZ97xUYRyyk/UjomeH66IRI/AAAAAAAAHNg/T1CK08FYNZo/s1600/Schubertiade_Kirchschlager_Schrammeln_laurson_600.jpg)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-9-angelika.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/09/notes-from-2013-schubertiade-9-angelika.html)

 Those dances set the mood for when Angelika Kirchschlager waltzed on stage, strutting a Dirndl as befits her Salzburg-native self and the occasion...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 20, 2013, 08:39:53 AM
In case you didn't realize that Orff was a 20th-c. composer. (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,22240.0/topicseen.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on October 01, 2013, 03:22:37 AM
BBC Music Magazine just tweeted...

@MusicMagazine: Osmo Vänskä resigns from Minnesota Symph Orch: 'It is a very sad day for me', he says in his statement
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on October 01, 2013, 03:33:21 AM
Will be very interesting to see what Vänskä will do. Perhaps more Aho with the Lahti...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on October 01, 2013, 04:53:46 AM
Will be very interesting to see what Vänskä will do. Perhaps more Aho with the Lahti...

Think LONDON!  ;) http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/10/osmo-vanska-quits-minnesota.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/10/osmo-vanska-quits-minnesota.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on October 01, 2013, 05:24:15 AM
Think LONDON!  ;) http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/10/osmo-vanska-quits-minnesota.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2013/10/osmo-vanska-quits-minnesota.html)
Would be cool, with Oramo & Salonen already there. 8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Opus106 on October 01, 2013, 05:44:11 AM
Would be cool, with Oramo & Salonen already there. 8)

Little Finland, London.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Est.1965 on October 01, 2013, 09:35:28 AM
Will be very interesting to see what Vänskä will do. Perhaps more Aho with the Lahti...

What do you think of his Aho cycle with the Lahti?  It is bloody brilliant!   :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on October 01, 2013, 12:29:11 PM
What do you think of his Aho cycle with the Lahti?  It is bloody brilliant!   :)
I think I should save a good deal of money and get the recordings! I have heard some from Spotify and Youtube, and 'bloody brilliant' is a good way to put it.
(Disclaimer: I do not mean that absolutely everyone should listen to Aho's music, nor do I suggest that it belongs to the pantheon of the absolutely greatest and Beethoven should move aside)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 07, 2013, 08:48:27 AM
My eye tends to simplify the subject header as Yearlong Noise Festival.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on October 15, 2013, 04:12:32 AM
Halloween theme: Top 11 Scared Works
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: ChamberNut on October 15, 2013, 04:22:17 AM
Halloween theme: Top 11 Scared Works

Good one!  We should do that starting now, since we are in October!  :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 17, 2013, 08:25:54 AM
Good one!  We should do that starting now, since we are in October!  :)
Luciano Berio: Sequenza for Oboe. -- At least it's scary to play! :o :laugh:
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on October 23, 2013, 08:08:40 AM
GUESSING GAME: what is this a Google Street View of and why is it in the Classical Chat Thread?
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on October 24, 2013, 06:50:02 AM
I love Amazon.com's honesty...

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/24/papuqy9u.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: amw on October 27, 2013, 02:13:08 PM
I've just discovered that The Sixteen Harry Christophers are not, in fact, a vocal group consisting entirely of people named Harry Christopher, but a vocal group called The Sixteen conducted by a person named Harry Christophers.

In retrospect, that seems the only logical conclusion, yet nonetheless I feel my world is slightly poorer for having learned this fact.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on October 27, 2013, 07:48:46 PM
I've just discovered that The Sixteen Harry Christophers are not, in fact, a vocal group consisting entirely of people named Harry Christopher, but a vocal group called The Sixteen conducted by a person named Harry Christophers.

In retrospect, that seems the only logical conclusion, yet nonetheless I feel my world is slightly poorer for having learned this fact.

And to add to confusion,  the number of vocalists is not always sixteen.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 28, 2013, 04:07:35 AM
And to add to confusion,  the number of vocalists is not always sixteen.

Well, probably shouldn't be.

(Of course, one might add that if you have sixteen singers, they probably shouldn't all be named Harry Christopher, either . . . .)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 29, 2013, 10:32:07 AM
And to add to confusion,  the number of vocalists is not always sixteen.
Sounds like The BareNaked Ladies, who neither are ladies nor perform in the nude... ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on October 29, 2013, 10:40:04 AM
False advertising, dadgummit!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on October 29, 2013, 10:46:46 AM
False advertising, dadgummit!
I know.  Someone should sue... :laugh:
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on October 30, 2013, 04:40:58 PM
Damn you, Satie...

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/10/31/aru3y5um.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on November 06, 2013, 06:23:32 PM
Interesting to me that Maurizio Pollini, according to ArkivMusic, has only recorded music by 18 composers in a nearly 50-year career. He's been unusually adventurous in 20th century repertoire, but 18 seems scant, and before 1900 there are some amazing omissions. Never a single solo work by Mozart, Haydn, Brahms; just one by J.S. Bach. Nothing from Ravel, Scriabin, Rachmaninov.

For context: Yevgeny Sudbin, who I think is around age 30, has already recorded music by 17 different composers. Herbert Schuch has done 14.

I wonder if this reflects more on Pollini, or on the variety and learn-everything-ness that we expect of virtuosos in the 21st century, which wasn't necessarily the case when Pollini was young?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on November 06, 2013, 07:35:31 PM
Interesting to me that Maurizio Pollini, according to ArkivMusic, has only recorded music by 18 composers in a nearly 50-year career. He's been unusually adventurous in 20th century repertoire, but 18 seems scant, and before 1900 there are some amazing omissions. Never a single solo work by Mozart, Haydn, Brahms; just one by J.S. Bach. Nothing from Ravel, Scriabin, Rachmaninov.

For context: Yevgeny Sudbin, who I think is around age 30, has already recorded music by 17 different composers. Herbert Schuch has done 14.

I wonder if this reflects more on Pollini, or on the variety and learn-everything-ness that we expect of virtuosos in the 21st century, which wasn't necessarily the case when Pollini was young?

Possibly he never felt attracted to the late Romantic repetoire?  At any rate,  I'd say his advocacy of modern, living, composers more than balances out the lack of standard warhorses.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Todd on November 06, 2013, 07:47:06 PM
Interesting to me that Maurizio Pollini, according to ArkivMusic, has only recorded music by 18 composers in a nearly 50-year career.



Keep in mind that he has played more music in recital, and he has conducted occasionally, too (see below).  Maybe more live recordings will pop up in coming years.  I'd rather an artist focus on works that interest him or her than try to master everything.  Incidentally, Pollini did state in an interview that he wants to record Gaspard, but who knows if he will.


(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/143/MI0001143897.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 09, 2013, 06:23:30 AM
Possibly he never felt attracted to the late Romantic repetoire?

And I have known more than one, let us say, advanced student of the piano who, on considering the huge herd of pianists ready to play All the Usual Suspects, find Other Music more attractive. (Particularly, but not exclusively, new music.)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 12, 2013, 06:15:48 AM
Well, I do like them, but I couldn't say that I love (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,17785.0/topicseen.html) them . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Gurn Blanston on November 12, 2013, 07:08:58 AM
Sounds like The BareNaked Ladies, who neither are ladies nor perform in the nude... ;)

Hey, that woman is no lady.... >:(

8)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 12, 2013, 11:04:08 AM
Interesting to me that Maurizio Pollini, according to ArkivMusic, has only recorded music by 18 composers in a nearly 50-year career. He's been unusually adventurous in 20th century repertoire, but 18 seems scant, and before 1900 there are some amazing omissions. Never a single solo work by Mozart, Haydn, Brahms; just one by J.S. Bach. Nothing from Ravel, Scriabin, Rachmaninov.

For context: Yevgeny Sudbin, who I think is around age 30, has already recorded music by 17 different composers. Herbert Schuch has done 14.

I wonder if this reflects more on Pollini, or on the variety and learn-everything-ness that we expect of virtuosos in the 21st century, which wasn't necessarily the case when Pollini was young?

I have recordings of music solo music by Brahms and Mozart. His commercial recordings aren't all on DG.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Mandryka on November 12, 2013, 11:13:17 AM
Sounds like The BareNaked Ladies, who neither are ladies nor perform in the nude... ;)

Or a  peanut,which is neither a pea nor a nut.

Not to mention the Holy Roman Empire.
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on November 24, 2013, 07:19:25 AM
A few pics from my visit to the Civic Opera House in Chicago. A view from my seat for Parsifal and a few from inside the pit. The second one featuring a photobomb from an orchestra member  ;D

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/24/eparery9.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/24/ga2eguby.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/24/e6use7y7.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Henk on November 24, 2013, 11:12:55 AM
It appears to that I develop a preference of opera (Rossini, Cimarosa, Handel, Mozart, Bizet) and some postmodern music (Parra, de Raaff, Aperghis, Ferneyhough, Pécou, Birtwistle, Donatoni). And I know why.

Beethoven and Stravinsky are other composers who remain my favorites, because I like their music so much.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 25, 2013, 07:04:30 AM
G Major
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on November 25, 2013, 09:11:36 AM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-_-LAuQYaovA/UpODeyol33I/AAAAAAAAHU4/FvRiutVN9lg/s1600/LISTEN_600_Winter2013.png)
http://www.listenmusicmag.com/composer/wagner-the-revolutionary.php

Wagner the Revolutionary

REBELLION, MA NON TROPPO!
(http://www.listenmusicmag.com/composer/wagner-the-revolutionary.php)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on November 27, 2013, 11:52:22 AM
It's time my fine-feathered friends!


(http://gregscottmoeller.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/shostakovichsanta.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on November 27, 2013, 12:54:06 PM
If you're doing these for others, Greg, and taking requests, I'll have Britten Santa. :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on November 27, 2013, 01:03:05 PM
If you're doing these for others, Greg, and taking requests, I'll have Britten Santa. :)

I did a bunch last year, I'll get you a Britten Santa!
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on November 27, 2013, 01:04:48 PM
I did a bunch last year, I'll get you a Britten Santa!
Thanks!
Yes, I remember, I had Sibelius then. And apparently I didn't save it on my PC.  :-[
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on November 27, 2013, 01:32:38 PM
Yippee!

Quote from: guess who
It is cruel, you know, that music should be so beautiful. It has the beauty of loneliness of pain: of strength and freedom. The beauty of disappointment and never-satisfied love. The cruel beauty of nature and everlasting beauty of monotony.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jochanaan on November 27, 2013, 04:54:08 PM
Dmitri Dmitriyevich Claus?  Love it!  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on November 28, 2013, 01:47:02 AM
100 € / kg (http://www.concertgebouworkest.nl/nl/winkel/The-Radio-Legacy/)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: 71 dB on November 28, 2013, 03:34:40 AM
I think I have lost all my interest to discuss and argue about classical music.   :P I want to listen to classical music (and all other music for that matter) on my own terms.

-----------

Finally I finished the "deluxe" headphone adapter I have been planning to construct for months. Headphone adapters are connected to the speaker output terminals of an audio amplifier to attenuate the signal about 30-40 dB for headphones. Headphone adapters are passive headphone amplifiers Benefits:

- Low output impedance meaning high damping factor (the headphone outputs of audio amplifiers have too high impedance).
- Possibility to shape the signal more suitable for headphone listening (e.g. crossfeeding)
- inexpensive to make if you have the skills.

The effective output impedance of my new headphone adapter is 1 ohm. That's comparable to quality headphone amplifiers.  With Sennheiser HD 598 headphones the damping factor is 60, much higher than the recommendation of 8 or more. Higher damping factor means tighter and cleaner distortion free sound.

Almost all stereophonic recordings are produced for loudspeakers. They have wide "superstereo" sound because of acoustical crossfeeding that happens because both ears hear sound from both loudspeakers. Room acoustics futher blends the audio channel information. When listening with headphones this stereo image narrowing doesn't happen and the resulting sound is tiresome and unnatural. Sounds are located near ears on the left and right side of the head rather that in front of the listener where they usually belong. Stereo image is also tangled because  psycoacoustic cues of the sound are too strong. This is called spatial distortion. How to get rid of it? Well, (electrical) crossfeeding is the obvious answer since lack of it gave us this problem in the first place!

My new headphone adapter has no less than 6 crossfeed levels to accommodate with different kind of recordings from mild -9.9 dB up to pretty strong -1.1 dB. Frequencies below 800 Hz are crossfeeded to the other channel at these levels delayed by about 250 µs to simulate the longer distance to the ear. Most headphone amplifiers on the market do not have crossfeeding and those models that have it give only one or two options for the level. Crossfeeding is extremely important because spatial distortion is nowadays the biggest problem of headphone listening, people just don't realise that and are happy with the unreal and tiresome superstereo sound optimized for loudspeakers.

My new headphone adapter has also mono and "blurred mono" options for problematic soundtracks. Works well with Youtube where stereophonic sound is often f*cked up. When people upload videos of themselves speaking about something, they should acquiesce to mono sound. "Blurred mono" is near-mono. It preserves a small part of channel separation. 

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on November 28, 2013, 04:46:31 AM
I think I have lost all my interest to discuss and argue about classical music.

What use is a forum to you, or you to a forum, then? ;)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: 71 dB on November 28, 2013, 02:02:30 PM
What use is a forum to you, or you to a forum, then? ;)

95 % of my message was about my new headphone adapter. This forum provided a place to post it. I don't know if anyone gets anything out of it.

Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on December 07, 2013, 05:43:53 PM
The Hurwitzer naming a few CDs that he collected while in hell...

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/12/08/uteju8um.jpg). (http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/12/08/apa9uvyz.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on December 07, 2013, 06:03:19 PM
I'm not sure the performance is worthy of eternal perdition,  but I tend to agree with him about that Bruckner recording....agree enough, at least, that I haven't thought it worth listening to for several years now....
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 31, 2013, 06:30:25 AM
A big chuckle to close out the year, I am lovin' this:

Quote
"Give up on Beethoven .. You've got Stockhausen now." -Miles Davis
STOCKHAUSEN PERFORMANCES
(will be updated regularly)
*rolls eyes* - Metal Dave
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mn dave on December 31, 2013, 09:43:00 AM
I bought that honkin' huge Rubinstein box and have barely touched its millions of CDs.  :(
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 31, 2013, 10:16:05 AM
I bought that honkin' huge Rubinstein box and have barely touched its millions of CDs.  :(

I nose a resolution for 2014! :)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mn dave on December 31, 2013, 10:16:39 AM
I nose a resolution for 2014! :)

Yeah, man. There are a couple Haydn boxes I've barely touched as well.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: North Star on January 14, 2014, 04:57:17 AM
I have taken a couple of breaks - one has to eat, too..
Quote from: Amazon customer reviewer
37 hours or so of Britten at one sitting could be a challenge for some.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 17, 2014, 10:30:41 AM
I clicked (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,6860.msg771734.html#msg771734). And I'm glad, I tell you.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on January 27, 2014, 07:47:39 AM
I just got notified that Jose Serebrier is following me on Twitter. I feel really weird now.
Title: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 11, 2014, 05:03:08 AM
Mega Media knows how to bargain...

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/02/11/yquhatyq.jpg)(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/02/11/hyju9uqy.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: Brian on February 11, 2014, 12:09:03 PM
Daniele Gatti has canceled two months of work for health reasons.


@Greg - that's hilarious.  ;D
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 11, 2014, 12:27:52 PM
To thine own name be true . . . .
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 14, 2014, 09:43:59 AM
NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY WINS BERLINER PHILHARMONIKER CONCERTMASTER AUDITION

(http://static1.berliner-philharmoniker.de/uploads/tx_news/Bendix-Balgley.jpg)

http://www.berliner-philharmoniker.de/en/news/detail/noah-bendix-balgley-wins-berliner-philharmoniker-concertmaster-audition/
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 14, 2014, 09:48:45 AM
Noah Balgley, Jr?
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on February 14, 2014, 09:54:10 AM
Noah Balgley, Jr?


(http://splitsider.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/ad-6-640x360.jpg)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 16, 2014, 04:59:29 AM
Daniele Gatti has canceled two months of work for health reasons.



Inflammation of the shoulder tendons in both shoulders. Sounds uncomfortable.

If you speak German (or are in Vienna today or tomorrow), this might be of interest:


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-1Yt6bfhfAB8/UwC1fJ09K_I/AAAAAAAAHcI/iur4c_N7fjo/s1600/WienerKonzerthaus_Magazin_Graphik.png)


Musikalisches Armbrustschießen: Wiener Symphoniker und Schostakowitsch

(http://konzerthaus.at/magazin/Portals/0/blog_data/Shostakovich_old3_laurson_600.jpg)
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Nach seinen Vokal-Symphonien Nr. 13 und 14 kehrte der todkranke (und sich dessen bewusste) Dmitri Schostakowitsch in seiner 15. und letzten Symphonie zu einer relativ klassischen Form mit vier klar strukturierten Sätzen zurück. Schostakowitsch beschrieb den ersten Satz, das Adagietto, als „Spielzeugwarenladen mit vielem Krimskrams und Plunder – durch und durch heiter.“ Der Hörer wird nach diesem ersten Satz nicht umhinkommen, die Worte des Komponisten anzuzweifeln. Wenn dies ein Spielzeugwarenladen ist, dann einer der kleine Panzer, Spielzeuggewehre und Juniors erstes Folterset verkauft...
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on February 16, 2014, 05:51:17 AM


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Ionarts-at-Large: Michael Schade, Trumpeteering Song

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2014/02/ionarts-at-large-michael-schade.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2014/02/ionarts-at-large-michael-schade.html)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on March 03, 2014, 01:01:29 PM
Arkivmusic has a Naxos sale on right now.  Don't know if it interests anyone but I thought it was cool.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 04, 2014, 10:56:34 PM
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In Memoriam Claudio Abbado: A Discography
http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2014/03/02/in-memoriam_claudio_abbado_discography/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/laursonpieler/2014/03/02/in-memoriam_claudio_abbado_discography/)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 05, 2014, 12:05:05 PM
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Some people chase tornados; others go after black holes. Either activity affords more aural pleasure than Stockhausen, jeh-jeh-jeh-jeh.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on March 07, 2014, 10:36:21 AM
Where's that confounded Bridge? (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,22957.msg781839.html#msg781839)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: jlaurson on March 08, 2014, 04:45:07 AM

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Philippe Herreweghe on Haydn and why Making Records Makes Sense 

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http://konzerthaus.at/magazin/Home/tabid/41/entryid/342/Philippe-Herreweghe-on-Haydn-and-why-Making-Records-Makes-Sense.aspx (http://konzerthaus.at/magazin/Home/tabid/41/entryid/337/Default.aspx)
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: mn dave on April 02, 2014, 05:33:59 AM
Whoa, mama! Jan Swafford has a Beethoven book coming out!!!

Much excitement here.

Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: EigenUser on April 05, 2014, 06:32:08 AM
I think I'm reaching the conclusion that my favorite eras of music are modern and early romantic. It seems odd that I wouldn't like late romantic so much, since they (not surprisingly) bridge the temporal and stylistic gaps. However, I've been finding that the music of Mahler, (R) Strauss, and even Brahms to be just too long and too heavy. I saw the NSO play Brahms 2nd Symphony last year and I though that it had great writing, but I was bored out of my mind! I don't mean to offend any lovers of this music. It is great. However, my mind just can't handle it. There are some exceptions as always, but this is a trend I've noticed recently.

I've loved Mendelssohn for a long time. His string symphonies and the octet are my favorites of his. His octet, as I'm sure most people here know, was written when he was 16-17! The string symphonies (12 of them + an odd 13th one) have memorable Haydn-like melodies (with some added chromaticism anticipating the era to follow) and clearly show an understanding of Bachian counterpoint. The opening of the 7th one even sounds like it could be a transcription of a Bach keyboard work. Note that these were written when Felix was age 10-12. Geez, it makes me feel so worthless :( .

Schumann is someone else I've been exploring recently, though at a very slow rate. I am blown away by the "Konzertstuck" for 4 Horns and the "Manfred" overture. Especially the "Konzertstuck" -- really an amazing piece. It should be programmed with Ligeti's "Hamburg" horn concerto; that would be cool. I've enjoyed other stuff of his, but these are my favorites so far.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: kishnevi on April 05, 2014, 09:24:41 AM
Perhaps you should go for shorter duration works?  For Strauss for example you might try the songs and Metamorphoses.  Granted late Romantic can be a bit self indulgent and harmonically rich to the point of indigestion.  But I usually think of Brahms as mid romantic not Late.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: DavidW on April 05, 2014, 05:37:21 PM
Especially the "Konzertstuck" -- really an amazing piece. It should be programmed with Ligeti's "Hamburg" horn concerto; that would be cool. I've enjoyed other stuff of his, but these are my favorites so far.

I think I'll have to give that program a try, sounds cool!  In Mahler try his lieder, those shorter forms pack a punch.  Unless I'm mistake, I think that helped Brian or Karl get into Mahler.  I also prefer the shorter forms.  You can find many short works in the romantic era in the form of chamber works, solo piano and concerti.
Title: Re: The Classical Chat Thread
Post by: EigenUser on April 05, 2014, 07:09:23 PM
Perhaps you should go for shorter duration works?  For Strauss for example you might try the songs and Metamorphoses.  Granted late Romantic can be a bit self indulgent and harmonically rich to the point of indigestion.  But I usually think of Brahms as mid romantic not Late.
Yes, this is definitely the problem -- the music is perfectly good, but it overstays its welcome (for me). The problem that I run into is that I love the big orchestra sound, but also a relatively short duration. I also don't really like songs very much  :-[ .