GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Name That Tune? => Topic started by: Irons on January 19, 2019, 12:54:09 PM

Title: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 19, 2019, 12:54:09 PM
After thumbs up from aligreto and vandermolen I thought it may be fun to have a quiz. The only rules are that the "prize" for correctly answering a teaser is that the winner in turn sets one, and every incorrect guess earns a clue. Fair game to use guesswork, google, books or whatever.

To set the ball rolling: Which British composer is this?

(https://i.imgur.com/XEOv9w8.png)

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 19, 2019, 01:01:44 PM
George Lloyd.

My question.
What not very famous composer worked at the Pieta before, and then with, Vivaldi?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 19, 2019, 03:26:59 PM
George Lloyd.

My question.
What not very famous composer worked at the Pieta before, and then with, Vivaldi?

Well done recognizing that composer JBS; I certainly wouldn't have known it was him!  And good photo Irons!  And thank you so much for starting up this thread.  :-)

And regarding your poser...hmmm...not very famous?  No idea alas!

PD
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 19, 2019, 04:15:17 PM
I took Irons's statement that using Google meant it was okay to use Google Image Search.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 19, 2019, 04:27:35 PM
I took Irons's statement that using Google meant it was okay to use Google Image Search.

Ah, I haven't ever tried using it before now...no idea how that works!

PD
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 19, 2019, 05:04:31 PM
This particular one composed the first opera based on the story of Hamlet (the original story, not the play by Shakespeare)  in 1705.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 19, 2019, 05:18:32 PM
ah, then it must be Gasparini.

Correct.  Your turn...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 20, 2019, 12:46:19 AM
Alexander von Zemlinsky (with Alma Schindler-Mahler-Gropius-Kokoschka... being the femme fatale, of course)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 20, 2019, 01:16:31 AM
Right, I forgot the poor Franz Werfel (probably the one of her husbands and lovers who was the most clearly "overwhelmed" by her personality) and while she was not married to all the ones I mentioned, she certainly was involved with them.

Everybody knows the Music for the Royal Fireworks and Handel composed several other pieces to celebrate successful campaigns or peace treaties of his host nation (like the Utrecht and Dettingen Te Deum).

There is another composer with several works associated with the wars and victories of a nation not his own (and it is not a borderline case like Handel's who by the time of Royal Fireworks had become naturalized) but joined in a struggle against a common enemy.
I am not looking for the famous one (but the famous one would help one along to the solution) but a fairly obscure one that has a direct connection to both a decisive event and a war hero.

Name the composer, the piece and explain the personal connection.

(hint: there is a somewhat cheesy poem from a later time also referring to that event)

I'd also hope that people who immediately know the answer keep back for a while not to spoil the fun.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: aligreto on January 20, 2019, 02:25:26 AM
Great start to the thread!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on January 20, 2019, 02:29:55 AM
Just seen this - Great!

Anyway I got the young George Lloyd without looking at any other responses!  0:)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 20, 2019, 04:25:33 AM
I took Irons's statement that using Google meant it was okay to use Google Image Search.

Yes, no problem with that at all.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 20, 2019, 10:16:24 AM


Everybody knows the Music for the Royal Fireworks and Handel composed several other pieces to celebrate successful campaigns or peace treaties of his host nation (like the Utrecht and Dettingen Te Deum).

There is another composer with several works associated with the wars and victories of a nation not his own (and it is not a borderline case like Handel's who by the time of Royal Fireworks had become naturalized) but joined in a struggle against a common enemy.
I am not looking for the famous one (but the famous one would help one along to the solution) but a fairly obscure one that has a direct connection to both a decisive event and a war hero.

Name the composer, the piece and explain the personal connection.

(hint: there is a somewhat cheesy poem from a later time also referring to that event)

I'd also hope that people who immediately know the answer keep back for a while not to spoil the fun.

I can't even think of a famous one never mind an obscure! For the sake of a clue, Jan Urban?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 20, 2019, 10:19:14 AM
I can't even think of a famous one never mind an obscure! For the sake of a clue, Jan Urban?

The famous one is probably LvB (Wellington's Victory).  But I can't think of any obscure ones at the moment....
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 20, 2019, 10:23:48 AM
first clue: The extremely famous war hero and thus one of the main parties in that conflict was from the nation Handel was naturalized into.
second clue: The composer in question has more than one connection to that nation as well, not only the one asked for or the related one not asked for.
third clue: There is exactly one person on this forum where I would guess that s/he would know the solution very quickly because of a special interest.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 20, 2019, 10:26:04 AM
The famous one is probably LvB (Wellington's Victory).  But I can't think of any obscure ones at the moment....

Neither work nor composer is correct but the very general direction is good.
The famous piece I was referring to is probably as well known as Wellington's Victory but the one I am asking for (from the same composer) is really obscure (but has been recorded, not sure if more than once, though).
Edit: According to wikipedia that piece was recorded twice. And it does have a wikipedia entry, but not in English.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 20, 2019, 10:57:23 AM
Is the famous war hero Lord Nelson?

PD
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 20, 2019, 11:46:27 AM
Is the famous war hero Lord Nelson?

PD

That is what I thought. In that case the famous composer could be Haydn and the obscure one Jan Vanhal.

Edit: Battle of the Nile
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 20, 2019, 11:57:25 AM
Joseph Haydn

Sailor's Song Hob. XXVIa: 31

The famous work being, of course, the Nelson Mass.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: aligreto on January 20, 2019, 12:22:04 PM
Teamwork  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 20, 2019, 12:58:47 PM
You are very close, Lord Nelson is the hero, Haydn the composer, the Battle of the Nile the event. (The poem is "The boy stood on the burning deck", namely of the French "L'Orient" before it exploded.) But the actual piece has not been named yet.
(I was not aware of the piece by Vanhal, Haydn is the only composer involved, I only meant that there is both a famous and an obscure piece by him connected with Nelson.)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Gurn Blanston on January 20, 2019, 01:31:15 PM
You are very close, Lord Nelson is the hero, Haydn the composer, the Battle of the Nile the event. (The poem is "The boy stood on the burning deck", namely of the French "L'Orient" before it exploded.) But the actual piece has not been named yet.
(I was not aware of the piece by Vanhal, Haydn is the only composer involved, I only meant that there is both a famous and an obscure piece by him connected with Nelson.)

Can it be that no one knows 'The Battle of the Nile', that splendiferous bit of doggerel (Hob 26b:4)? I didn't realize there were just 2 recordings of it. Fortunately, I have both of them. It is entertaining, if nothing more.  :)

8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 20, 2019, 02:10:33 PM
Sure, that is the piece and the famous one of course the "Nelson Mass" or "Missa in angustiis"
You were obviously the person I hinted at above who would know immediately. Now everything is solved!
The text stems from Cornelia Knight, a lady of Lady Hamilton's entourage and Hamilton and Nelson did actually meet Haydn in Eszterhazy in september 1800 (en route from Sicily to Britain, I guess) and to their honor the eponymous Mass as well as a Te Deum and that little cantata were given. I don't know if Lady Hamilton sang herself (as the wikipedia article claims). Maybe Gurn can fill in some more details.

Interestingly, the only wikipedia entry is in French! Recordings by Monoyios and Ryden are mentioned there.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_from_the_battle_of_the_Nile

Here is another performance on youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_UXVyZSK6Q&t=1s

It's the kind of question that seems impossibly hard if you don't know anything but becomes fairly easy with a few hints; that's why I was a little hesitant.

So I guess Pohjohla's Daughter and Irons were the main contributors to the eventual solution and one of them should continue.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 20, 2019, 02:44:48 PM
PD, I suggest we arm wrestle to see who goes next. :D Jokes aside, have a run with the baton.


Really impressive contributions. Thanks to all concerned.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Gurn Blanston on January 20, 2019, 03:33:31 PM
Sure, that is the piece and the famous one of course the "Nelson Mass" or "Missa in angustiis"
You were obviously the person I hinted at above who would know immediately. Now everything is solved!
The text stems from Cornelia Knight, a lady of Lady Hamilton's entourage and Hamilton and Nelson did actually meet Haydn in Eszterhazy in september 1800 (en route from Sicily to Britain, I guess) and to their honor the eponymous Mass as well as a Te Deum and that little cantata were given. I don't know if Lady Hamilton sang herself (as the wikipedia article claims). Maybe Gurn can fill in some more details.

Interestingly, the only wikipedia entry is in French! Recordings by Monoyios and Ryden are mentioned there.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_from_the_battle_of_the_Nile

Here is another performance on youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_UXVyZSK6Q&t=1s

It's the kind of question that seems impossibly hard if you don't know anything but becomes fairly easy with a few hints; that's why I was a little hesitant.

So I guess Pohjohla's Daughter and Irons were the main contributors to the eventual solution and one of them should continue.

That was a great question, Jo. I can never ask a Haydn question because everyone would know the answer right away even if they didn't know! :D 

8)

(PS - Emma sang it with Haydn playing the piano. Can you imagine that scene?  :o )
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 20, 2019, 03:37:14 PM
PD, I suggest we arm wrestle to see who goes next. :D Jokes aside, have a run with the baton.


Really impressive contributions. Thanks to all concerned.

Oh, boy!  Well, you are too kind Irons!  *Will take me a bit to come up with one though.  And Jo,  yes, great poser!   :)

* Still recovering from Roger losing today...  ;)
Best,

PD
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on January 21, 2019, 02:59:07 AM
Sure, that is the piece and the famous one of course the "Nelson Mass" or "Missa in angustiis"
You were obviously the person I hinted at above who would know immediately. Now everything is solved!
The text stems from Cornelia Knight, a lady of Lady Hamilton's entourage and Hamilton and Nelson did actually meet Haydn in Eszterhazy in september 1800 (en route from Sicily to Britain, I guess) and to their honor the eponymous Mass as well as a Te Deum and that little cantata were given. I don't know if Lady Hamilton sang herself (as the wikipedia article claims). Maybe Gurn can fill in some more details.

Interestingly, the only wikipedia entry is in French! Recordings by Monoyios and Ryden are mentioned there.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lines_from_the_battle_of_the_Nile

Here is another performance on youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_UXVyZSK6Q&t=1s

It's the kind of question that seems impossibly hard if you don't know anything but becomes fairly easy with a few hints; that's why I was a little hesitant.

So I guess Pohjohla's Daughter and Irons were the main contributors to the eventual solution and one of them should continue.

I thought of Haydn and Nelson immediately but also got lost trying to think of an obscure composer - should have read the posting more carefully. My first thought was Haydn's erstwhile pupil Beethoven, hardly obscure, but this left me with too many military heros - Nelson and Wellington. In any case I had never heard of the cantata though I vaguely recall Haydn accompanying Lady Hamilton.

I am sure there are plenty of cheesy poems about battles, Lepanto by G.K. Chesterton came to mind immediately but that is completely the wrong era.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 21, 2019, 04:04:49 AM
Ye, apparently I had not made it sufficiently clear that only one composer was meant who had written several works connected with that war/hero/battle. As far as I know the personal connection Haydn - Nelson existed only in the episode described above and the mass probably also got its nickname afterwards although it had been composed before. And like the "Missa in tempore belli" the title refers to the dire circumstances of the Napoleonic Wars. The reduced orchestra for the d minor mass was probably also due to the war because the prince had to be more frugal.

And to be complete the poem I had only remembered by the first verse is called "Casabianca".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casabianca_(poem)
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/hemans/works/hf-burning.html
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Gurn Blanston on January 21, 2019, 06:50:00 AM
Ye, apparently I had not made it sufficiently clear that only one composer was meant who had written several works connected with that war/hero/battle. As far as I know the personal connection Haydn - Nelson existed only in the episode described above and the mass probably also got its nickname afterwards although it had been composed before. And like the "Missa in tempore belli" the title refers to the dire circumstances of the Napoleonic Wars. The reduced orchestra for the d minor mass was probably also due to the war because the prince had to be more frugal.

And to be complete the poem I had only remembered by the first verse is called "Casabianca".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casabianca_(poem)
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/hemans/works/hf-burning.html

Also to be remembered in this context: one of Haydn's most famous works, the Military Symphony, was also based on this very same war, which was not actually a 'Napoleonic War' as such, it was the War of the First Coalition between France and pretty much all of Europe. Napoleon was merely a junior officer in 1794, however, it was the very same war. The story of this work became one of my favorite essays, judging by the number of views it has had. Certainly one of MY favorites! :)

No Napoleon yet, but still plenty of war! (https://www.fjhaydn.com/my-blog/2016/11/1794-the-year-part-3-.html)

8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 21, 2019, 07:02:35 AM
Try and not to Google this one:  This composer and musician came from a great family of musicians.  He succeeded Arthur Cock as organist to James I and subsequently John Parsons at Westminster.  Who is he?

Best,

PD
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on January 21, 2019, 07:17:08 AM
Try and not to Google this one:  This composer and musician came from a great family of musicians.  He succeeded Arthur Cock as organist to James I and subsequently John Parsons at Westminster.  Who is he?

Best,

PD

Without checking Google or any sleeve notes, Orlando Gibbons is the first name that comes to mind.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 21, 2019, 07:42:37 AM
Without checking Google or any sleeve notes, Orlando Gibbons is the first name that comes to mind.

That didn't last long!   ;D  Yes, you're correct.  I was listening to an album of viols and they included a fantasy by him there (with the Jayne Consort).  I do have at least one other album which (if I'm recalling correctly) features his music.  I don't know his music very well, so it's a bit of a hit-or-miss/trial by error for me at the moment!

Your turn,

PD
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on January 21, 2019, 08:40:57 AM
Berlioz wrote (in a letter) 'I am grateful to you for having let me make the acquaintance of this diffident, audacious young man who has taken it into his head to make a new music. He will suffer greatly...'

Who is the young man?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 21, 2019, 09:11:13 AM
Hmm...a guess here:  Saint-Saens?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on January 21, 2019, 09:29:55 AM
Hmm...a guess here:  Saint-Saens?

No, but not unreasonable.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 21, 2019, 09:42:06 AM
Wagner?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on January 21, 2019, 09:48:22 AM
Wagner?

Not Wagner. Berlioz and Wagner met in Paris and after that enjoyed (?) a tortuous relationship, mainly due to Wagner's duplicity and egomania. Berlioz wrote quite a lot about Wagner but not the quote above.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 21, 2019, 11:02:04 AM
Berlioz wrote (in a letter) 'I am grateful to you for having let me make the acquaintance of this diffident, audacious young man who has taken it into his head to make a new music. He will suffer greatly...'

Who is the young man?

The one who wrote a scherzo for a teamwork sonata dedicated to the man to whom Berlioz wrote the letter.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 21, 2019, 03:24:35 PM
To whom was Berlioz writing?

PD
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on January 22, 2019, 01:30:27 AM
Berlioz met the young Brahms on one of his tours of Germany. The older Brahms had a different musical outlook to Berlioz but always remembered his kindness and encouragement. Occasionally Brahms conducted 'Harold in Italy' but wasn't sympathetic to the rest of Berlioz' output.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 01:34:11 AM
In other words, Brahms.  But since I've already posed a question you should have a go at it since you obviously knew the answer.

Thanks. Here's mine.

This composer, soloist and teacher played a prominent role in the musical life of his country and was a highly acclaimed and well-connected member of her artistic and intellectual circles. He had a gentle and likeable personality (although later in life he became rather melancholy). Yet, none of his colleagues, friends, pupils and relatives attended his funeral.

Who was he?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 01:35:51 AM
Thanks. Here's mine.

This composer, soloist and teacher played a prominent role in the musical life of his country and was a highly acclaimed and well-connected member of her artistic and intellectual circles. He had a gentle and likeable personality (although later in life he became rather melancholy). Yet, none of his colleagues, friends, pupils and relatives attended his funeral.

Who was he?
Enescu?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 01:38:15 AM
Enescu?

Don't know the details of his funeral but no. Anyway, funny you should have been the first to reply.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 01:39:37 AM
...Anyway, funny you should have been the first to reply.  ;)
? ? ?

Un abrazo,
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 01:41:19 AM
? ? ?

That was a hint, actually.

Quote
Un abrazo,

Likewise.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 02:03:04 AM
That was a hint, actually.
....
NPI  ;D..


Granados?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 02:07:43 AM
NPI  ;D..


Granados?

Bingo! He had no funeral at all, he drowned in the English Channel in 1916.

[He] took a ship to England, where he boarded the passenger ferry SS Sussex for Dieppe, France. On the way across the English Channel, the Sussex was torpedoed by a German U-boat, as part of the German World War I policy of unrestricted submarine warfare. In a failed attempt to save his wife Amparo, whom he saw flailing about in the water some distance away, Granados jumped out of his lifeboat and drowned. However, the ship broke in two parts and only one sank (along with 80 passengers). Ironically, the part of the ship that contained his cabin did not sink and was towed to port, with most of the passengers, except for Granados and his wife, on board.

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on January 22, 2019, 03:09:59 AM
Thanks. Here's mine.

This composer, soloist and teacher played a prominent role in the musical life of his country and was a highly acclaimed and well-connected member of her artistic and intellectual circles. He had a gentle and likeable personality (although later in life he became rather melancholy). Yet, none of his colleagues, friends, pupils and relatives attended his funeral.

Who was he?
That was a good choice of question.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 03:39:22 AM
Bingo! He had no funeral at all, he drowned in the English Channel in 1916.

[He] took a ship to England, where he boarded the passenger ferry SS Sussex for Dieppe, France. On the way across the English Channel, the Sussex was torpedoed by a German U-boat, as part of the German World War I policy of unrestricted submarine warfare. In a failed attempt to save his wife Amparo, whom he saw flailing about in the water some distance away, Granados jumped out of his lifeboat and drowned. However, the ship broke in two parts and only one sank (along with 80 passengers). Ironically, the part of the ship that contained his cabin did not sink and was towed to port, with most of the passengers, except for Granados and his wife, on board.

Your turn.
Thanks. It was a bit by elimination that I got to him. He had  to be Spanish, but couldn’t be Falla or Albéniz .... Let me think of an appropriate question. Stay tuned!  :)
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 04:35:58 AM
OK, here goes.

This living composer’s parents were instrumental in putting a famous American art patron’s collection into safekeeping in a château in the Limousin just before the outbreak of WW2. The parents and the composer-to-be fled to America shortly afterwards.. Back in France, the  composer studied with a leading French composer who had himself been an émigré in the US (as well as with another composer who was briefly a POW).

The parents were famous in their own right in literary circles in France in the interwar period. The secured art collection is now exhibited in another European country. The composer’s name only fleetingly appears when you make a search here in GMG (mainly in a short thread, the title of which could—in the current environment—be seen as pollitically incorrect).

So, who is this composer? (Bonus points: who are the two teachers I mentioned? Who was the art patron, and where is the collection exhibited nowadays?).
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 06:51:37 AM
This living composer’s parents were instrumental in putting a famous American art patron’s collection into safekeeping in a château in the Limousin just before the outbreak of WW2. The parents and the composer-to-be fled to America shortly afterwards.. Back in France, the  composer studied with a leading French composer who had himself been an émigré in the US (as well as with another composer who was briefly a POW).

The parents were famous in their own right in literary circles in France in the interwar period. The secured art collection is now exhibited in another European country. The composer’s name only fleetingly appears when you make a search here in GMG (mainly in a short thread, the title of which could—in the current environment—be seen as pollitically incorrect).

So, who is this composer? (Bonus points: who are the two teachers I mentioned? Who was the art patron, and where is the collection exhibited nowadays?).

Off the top of my head, the collection must be Peggy Guggenheim's, currently located in Venice, Italy. The leading French composer former emigre to US, must be Milhaud. The French POW composer must be Messiaen. Am I on the right track?
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 07:07:16 AM
Off the top of my head, the collection must be Peggy Guggenheim's, currently located in Bilbao, Spain. The leading French composer former emigre to US, must be Milhaud. The French POW composer must be Messiaen. Am I on the right track?
Very much so  ;)....except for the fact that Mrs. Guggenheim’s collection is not in Bilbao, but in Venice.

(https://i0.wp.com/www.guggenheim.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/architecture-pgc-exterior-16-9-ratio-web.jpg?w=870&zoom=2)
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 07:10:11 AM
Very much so  ;)....except for the fact that Mrs. Guggenheim’s collection is not in Bilbao, but in Venice.

(https://i0.wp.com/www.guggenheim.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/architecture-pgc-exterior-16-9-ratio-web.jpg?w=870&zoom=2)

Actually I had updated my post but you were already posting your reply.

So, a living former student of both Milhaud and Messiaen whose parents were literary folks.... Ladies and gentlemen, meet Betsy Jolas.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 07:11:35 AM
Actually I had updated my post but you were already posting your reply.

So, a living former student of both Milhaud and Messiaen whose parents were literary folks.... Ladies and gentlemen, meet Betsy Jolas.  8)
Bravo, Monsieur! A very interesting composer, whom I’ve just recently discovered.  :)

Back to you... ;)
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 07:14:09 AM
Bravo, Monsieur! A very interesting composer, whom I’ve just recently discovered.  :)

A serial babe, right?  :laugh:

Quote
Back to you... ;)

I must think about it. Give me some time.
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 07:50:11 AM
A serial babe, right?  :laugh:
...
Yep. Hence my talk of possible political incorrectness (in this age if “MeToo” and all that)...
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 08:20:55 AM
Yep. Hence my talk of possible political incorrectness (in this age if “MeToo” and all that)...

I like political incorrectness.  :D

So... He was born into a very musical and cultured family (his uncle and cousin were composers, his brother a philosopher, he was himself highly knowledgeable in, and heavily influenced by, poetry and philosophy). He was possibly the most opinionated and uncompromising composer and performer ever, which greatly damaged his reputation and career. He lived in relative poverty and dispiritedness. Near the end of his life he received moral and financial support from a most unlikely source (ie, coming from a country which most of us would probably utter one and the same name if hardpressed to name a native classical musician).

That should be piece of cake, I basically gave him away.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 09:13:24 AM
I like political incorrectness.  :D

So... He was born into a very musical and cultured family (his uncle and cousin were composers, his brother a philosopher, he was himself highly knowledgeable in, and heavily influenced by, poetry and philosophy). He was possibly the most opinionated and uncompromising composer and performer ever, which greatly damaged his reputation and career. He lived in relative poverty and dispiritedness. Near the end of his life he received moral and financial support from a most unlikely source (ie, coming from a country which most of us would probably utter one and the same name if hardpressed to name a native classical musician).

That should be piece of cake, I basically gave him away.  :)
Could that be Medtner?
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 11:50:41 AM
Could that be Medtner?

The one and only. :)

The hint pointed to the Maharajah of Myssore and Zubin Mehta.

Zure txanda, jauna.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 11:58:17 AM
The one and only. :)
And the native classical musician from the same land as the Maharaja of Mysore would be Zubin Mehta? Although I first thought of Ravi Shankar (who did compose some “classical”—in the Western sense—concertos). [N.B.: I made this question before Florestan edited his message]

Quote
....
Zure txanda, jauna.  ;D
Eskerrik asko.  ;)

To avoid this turning into a ping pong match between Florestan and me, I invite any willing Fellow GMGer to submit the next question... :)
Title: Re: Quiz
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 12:12:35 PM
To avoid this turning into a ping pong match between Florestan and me, I invite any willing Fellow GMGer to submit the next question... :)

By all means! The more, the merrier.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 22, 2019, 12:44:39 PM
Ok. Since we can give additional clues, I thought this style of question might be fun:

Who am I? Before the age of 10, I had already composed my first work and perfromed on at least one instrument. I later became a court conductor. I also taught, and some of my students went on to be the best and brightest composers both in America and Europe. Incidentally, I married a former student. I wrote numerous works, including masses, operas, and symphonies. Who am I?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 12:52:59 PM
Who am I? Before the age of 10, I had already composed my first work and perfromed on at least one instrument. I later became a court conductor. I also taught, and some of my students went on to be the best and brightest composers both in America and Europe. Incidentally, I married a former student. Who am I?

The bolded part would suggest Robert Fuchs, but the other hints do not match.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 22, 2019, 12:54:17 PM
I thought it might be Liszt, but the last clue (marriage) doesn’t fit, alas,  :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 22, 2019, 12:56:20 PM
The bolded part would suggest Robert Fuchs, but the other hints do not match.  :)
Not him or Liszt (good guesses though!). Another clue is: I was appointed Royal Professor of organ and composition. I was born in Liechtenstein.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 01:06:48 PM
Not him or Liszt (good guesses though!). Another clue is: I was appointed Royal Professor of organ and composition. I was born in Liechtenstein.

Josef Rheinberger then.

I have a box with his complete chamber music, which is sheer delight.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 22, 2019, 01:07:01 PM
Rheinberger?


Edit: ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 22, 2019, 01:09:41 PM
Yup. His students included R Strauss, Humperdinck, and Furtwangler. Students from the US included Berwald and Chadwick. 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 22, 2019, 01:11:48 PM
I'll gladly let Irons have the next turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 22, 2019, 02:02:34 PM
I'll gladly let Irons have the next turn.

That is most gentlemanly of you, Florestan. I must say ritter and yourself are red hot at this quiz lark!

Which work by a famous composer consists of seven named individual pieces in which two have identical titles and subtitles?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 01:09:04 AM
That's a tough one. Could we have some hints, please?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on January 23, 2019, 01:40:36 AM
That's a tough one. Could we have some hints, please?

Yes, ungoogleable.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 02:03:01 AM
Yes, ungoogleable.

Off the top of my head I thought of some partitas by Bach, for instance the first keyboard one which has seven movements two of which are Menuets, but there's no tempo indication (subtitles) for them.

I suspect, given Irons' preferences, that it must be something more modern.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 23, 2019, 04:32:27 AM
There is Dowland's Lachrymae or seven Tears, but they are all different "lachrimae" (that's basically the point). There is Haydn's 7 last words, but here are actually 9 movements, all with different titles.

It could be a song cycle? although most are longer than 7 and recurring titles would be rare (although Schumanns op.39 does have two songs titled "In der Fremde").

Probably something British I am not aware of...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 04:49:42 AM
Probably something British I am not aware of...

That's my hunch too.

EDIT: There is Koechlin's The Seven Stars Symphony in which two subtitles are the same but not the titles.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 23, 2019, 05:01:48 AM
A clue would be most welcome....nationality of composer, or instrumentation of the piece, or century of composition. Anything!  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 23, 2019, 07:09:02 AM
Not British. Trees of southern climes.

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_oH7YVmRWh-s/STRZ1KL8N1I/AAAAAAAAC98/fkNkLAhxQJc/s400/Columnar+Cypress+tree.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 23, 2019, 10:18:29 AM
Greece? Checking for work’s by Skalkottas that would match the requirements, but no luck so far....
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on January 23, 2019, 10:38:59 AM
Greece? Checking for work’s by Skalkottas that would match the requirements, but no luck so far....

That looks like a what I would call a Roman Cypress, I associate it with Italy. Probably found all over the mediterranean, though.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 23, 2019, 10:53:12 AM
That looks like a what I would call a Roman Cypress, I associate it with Italy. Probably found all over the mediterranean, though.

You are very close to cracking it. Cypress and Italy is the key.

If you all recall I did say a "famous" composer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Papy Oli on January 23, 2019, 10:59:05 AM
I did check Respighi's works (pines ? of Rome ? and others..) but could not find anything matching...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 11:02:37 AM
Dvorak's Cypresses doesn't fit in the bill...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 23, 2019, 11:03:26 AM
Yeah, I had thought of Respighi as well. But he never seems to have seven movements, usually four. Dvorak "Cypresses" doesn't fit either.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 11:10:24 AM
A winner of the Prix de Rome, maybe?  ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 23, 2019, 11:15:11 AM
I’ve looked at the catalogues of Respighi, Malipiero, Casella...niente!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 23, 2019, 11:22:34 AM
Verdi's Requiem?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 23, 2019, 11:26:48 AM
I found a piece by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco called "Cipressi" op.17 (piano solo) but it does not seem to have 7 marked subdivisions. (And admittedly I googled "cipressi musica" which could be counted as cheating...)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 11:29:06 AM
Another thought: the most famous cypresses in Italy are those at the Villa d'Este. The most famous composer associated with it is Liszt. Now, good luck perusing his entire catalogue of solo piano works...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 23, 2019, 11:30:20 AM
...And admittedly I googled "cipressi musica" which could be counted as cheating...
At this point, anything goes... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 11:31:00 AM
I found a piece by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco called "Cipressi" op.17 (piano solo) but it does not seem to have 7 marked subdivisions. (And admittedly I googled "cipressi musica" which could be counted as cheating...)

Not according to the rules. See the OP.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 11:45:41 AM
Liszt's Annees de pelerinage, II (Italy) I think fits the bill:

Deuxième année: Italie
"Deuxième année: Italie" ("Second Year: Italy"), S.161,

Sposalizio (Marriage of the Virgin, a painting by Raphael) in E major
Il penseroso (The Thinker, a statue by Michelangelo) in C♯ minor
Canzonetta del Salvator Rosa (Canzonetta of Salvator Rosa; this song "Vado ben spesso cangiando loco" was in fact written by Giovanni Bononcini[9]) in A major
Sonetto 47 del Petrarca (Petrarch's Sonnet 47) in D♭ major
Sonetto 104 del Petrarca (Petrarch's Sonnet 104) in E major
Sonetto 123 del Petrarca (Petrarch's Sonnet 123) in A♭ major
Après une lecture de Dante: Fantasia Quasi Sonata (After Reading Dante: Fantasia Quasi Sonata) in D minor

How does it fits the bill, I wonder? There are no two identical titles and there are no subtitles.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 23, 2019, 11:48:24 AM
Quote
Which work by a famous composer consists of seven named individual pieces in which two have identical titles and subtitles?

Verdi's Requiem has seven sections of which two have identical titles and sub-titles. The Dies irae section has a dies irae subsection and the libra me section has a libra me subsection as well. Have I understood the question correctly? Verdi's Italian, but then I have no idea what the Cyprus thing refers to.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 11:55:58 AM
Well, there are seven sections, and there are subtitles, three Petrach's Sonnets.  But he did say only two with the same sub-title,so maybe it does not fit the bill after all.


He said titles and subtitles. What is the subtitle of the title Il pensieroso?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on January 23, 2019, 11:57:03 AM
Verdi's Requiem has seven sections of which two have identical titles and sub-titles. The Dies irae section has a dies irae subsection and the libra me section has a libra me subsection as well. Have I understood the question correctly? Verdi's Italian, but then I have no idea what the Cyprus thing refers to.

I was also looking at the Verdi Requiem just now. I was interpreting the question as asking for two sections that have the same title, with subtitles that match also. (For instance, Bach's mass in b minor has two sections titled Kyrie, but there are no subtitles.) But you are right, it is worded in such a way that it could be interpreted as requiring a subsection to have the same title as the section containing it for two sections. It that case, the Requiem fits.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 12:02:20 PM
Verdi's Requiem has seven sections of which two have identical titles and sub-titles. The Dies irae section has a dies irae subsection and the libra me section has a libra me subsection as well. Have I understood the question correctly?

You might be on to something, although I don't see the cypresses connection either. Anyway, I understood it as something quite different, like, for instance:

Florestan: Suite Grotesque FWV I:12bis

Mvt. 1 Prelude
Mvt 2. Moonlight on the lake (nocturne-barcarolle)
Mvt. 3. Siberian Polka
Mvt. 4. Serenade of the Hangman
Mvt 5. Moonlight on the lake (nocturne-barcarolle)
Mvt 6. Fireworks on the Moon
Mvt 7. Good Night, My Love

Mvt 2 and Mvt 3 have identical titles and subtitles.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on January 23, 2019, 12:14:27 PM
You might be on to something, although I don't see the cypresses connection either. Anyway, I understood it as something quite different, like, for instance:

Florestan: Suite Grotesque FWV I:12bis

Mvt. 1 Prelude
Mvt 2. Moonlight on the lake (nocturne-barcarolle)
Mvt. 3. Siberian Polka
Mvt. 4. Serenade of the Hangman
Mvt 5. Moonlight on the lake (nocturne-barcarolle)
Mvt 6. Fireworks on the Moon
Mvt 7. Good Night, My Love

Mvt 2 and Mvt 3 have identical titles and subtitles.

That's how I interpreted it, and Mozart's posthorn serenade almost foots the bill, it has seven movements, and two have title Menuetto and contain a subsection "Trio." (Not quite, since the second Menuetto has two trios, so strictly the subsections are Trio I and Trio II.)

I guess we wait to see what Irons says he meant.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 23, 2019, 12:17:36 PM
Another thought: the most famous cypresses in Italy are those at the Villa d'Este. The most famous composer associated with it is Liszt. Now, good luck perusing his entire catalogue of solo piano works...

You are there. Liszt: Years of Pilgrimage, Third Year (Italy). Movements 2&3 are both titled Aux cyprés de la Villa d'Este - thrénodie.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 12:22:03 PM
You are there. Liszt: Years of Pilgrimage, Third Year (Italy). Movements 2&3 are both titled Aux cyprés de la Villa d'Este - thrénodie.

Gosh, am I dumb, no, really, the dumbest of dumbs. How on earth could I have thoguht of some obscure work and completely forget about the obvious?

Anyway, San Antone nominated it, albeit tentatively, so the next turn should be his.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on January 23, 2019, 12:23:18 PM
You are there. Liszt: Years of Pilgrimage, Third Year (Italy). Movements 2&3 are both titled Aux cyprés de la Villa d'Este - thrénodie.

Yes, except one could argue that the titles are Aux cyprés de la Villa d'Este I and Aux cyprés de la Villa d'Este II, not strictly identical. Obviously a supercilious objection. But Mozart's Posthorn also fits the original spec, but not the hint.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 23, 2019, 12:26:27 PM
But can one really call Liszt famous?  ::) Just joking: well played, Irons! And well “approximated”, San Antone and Florestan.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 23, 2019, 12:39:12 PM
Until San Antone comes back with his quiz, here is mine.

As a child, I was praised by a famous composer. Due to a circumstance related to my birth, I had no official musical education but I studied privately with, among others, a composer who is now almost forgotten but back then was quite popular. I composed in many genres, including opera, symphonic and chamber music; my most enduring legacy is in a genre for which the famous composer above is not famous, although he produced some fine works. My music is not frequently recorded or performed but I know for a fact that several people on this forum seem to have derived much pleasure from it and praised it accordingly. I had a musical name (in more than one sense). The problem is, I can't remember it, so please help me.

 :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: zamyrabyrd on January 25, 2019, 09:26:57 AM
As a child, I was praised by a famous composer. Due to a circumstance related to my birth, I had no official musical education but I studied privately with, among others, a composer who is now almost forgotten but back then was quite popular. I composed in many genres, including opera, symphonic and chamber music; my most enduring legacy is in a genre for which the famous composer above is not famous, although he produced some fine works. My music is not frequently recorded or performed but I know for a fact that several people on this forum seem to have derived much pleasure from it and praised it accordingly. I had a musical name (in more than one sense). The problem is, I can't remember it, so please help me.   :)

Would the composer/teacher be Salieri?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 25, 2019, 09:35:33 AM
Would the composer/teacher be Salieri?

No, but he composed operas too.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 25, 2019, 09:53:21 AM
Was Raff the teacher maybe?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 25, 2019, 09:57:55 AM
Was Raff the teacher maybe?

No, not Raff. Someone younger than him.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 25, 2019, 10:12:46 AM
Is the composer Karl Amadeus Hartmann?

No.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on January 25, 2019, 11:36:01 PM
Camargo 'Mozart' Guarnieri?

Just a guess.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 26, 2019, 04:40:33 AM
Camargo 'Mozart' Guarnieri?

Just a guess.

Not him either.

The title of one of the most famous works of this composer is in a language which is very relevant to the most famous work of the famous composer who praised the mystery composer as a child --- not their native language, though.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 26, 2019, 07:58:23 AM
Quiz à la Florestan: “I had a mother, I had a teacher (almost completely forgotten  today), I composed some music (rarely performed today). Who am I?”  ::) ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 26, 2019, 08:07:11 AM
Quiz à la Florestan: “I had a mother, I had a teacher (almost completely forgotten  today), I composed some music (rarely performed today). Who am I?”  ::) ;D

Hey, at least it's not Montemezzi.  ;D

Here's the hint that should give the composer away.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/80/Bologna_Pinacoteca_Nazionale_-_Rafa%C3%ABl_Santi_%281483-1520%29_-_Heilige_Cecilia_in_extase_met_Paulus%2C_Johannes_%28evangelist%29%2C_Augustinus_en_Maria_Magdalena_-_26-04-2012_9-13-18.jpg/320px-thumbnail.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 26, 2019, 08:10:28 AM
Cecile Chaminade?

She's the only composer I know of who is named after the patron saint of music.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 26, 2019, 08:10:49 AM
Handel?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 26, 2019, 08:22:20 AM
Cecile Chaminade?

She's the only composer I know of who is named after the patron saint of music.

A-ha!

Praised by Georges Bizet when she was 8; due to her being born a girl she couldn't study at the Conservatory, but took private lessons with Benjamin Godard; althouhg she composed operas, symphonic and chamber music, she is best remembered for her piano music, a genre in which Bizet wrote some fine works, like Jeux d'enfants and Chants du Rhin; one of her best known pieces is La lisonjera, a title which the main character in Carmen would have had no problem understanding. Last but not least, ukrneal, kyjo and yours truly have praised her music here at GMG.

Bravo! Back to you, sir!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 26, 2019, 08:23:12 AM
Handel?

Maybe next time...  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 26, 2019, 08:29:35 AM
A-ha!

Praised by Georges Bizet when she was 8; due to her being born a girl she couldn't study at the Conservatory, but took private lessons with Benjamin Godard; althouhg she composed operas, symphonic and chamber music, she is best remembered for her piano music, a genre in which Bizet wrote some fine works, like Jeux d'enfants and Chants du Rhin; one of her best known pieces is La lisonjera, a title which the main character in Carmen would have had no problem understanding. Last but not least, ukrneal, kyjo and yours truly have praised her music here at GMG.

Bravo! Back to you, sir!

That was a pure random guess!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 26, 2019, 08:31:03 AM
That was a pure random guess!

Not random; were it not for that Raphael, woudl you have guessed her? I was sure it'd give the composer away. ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 26, 2019, 08:36:02 AM
Okay. This composer fronted a dance band as a teenager, and attended New York University for two years studying for a business degree before attending a concert of the New York Philharmonic made him decide to become a composer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 26, 2019, 09:49:01 AM
Okay. This composer fronted a dance band as a teenager, and attended New York University for two years studying for a business degree before attending a concert of the New York Philharmonic made him decide to become a composer.

William Schuman ?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 26, 2019, 07:24:54 PM
William Schuman ?

We have a winner!
The name of the band was "Billy Schuman and his Alamo Society Orchestra", btw.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 27, 2019, 03:44:04 AM
Which eponymous hero murdered his first son and watched under disguise his second son's execution?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 10:38:04 AM
Which eponymous hero murdered his first son and watched under disguise his second son's execution?

Titus Andronicus? 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 27, 2019, 11:53:48 AM
Titus Andronicus?
In a version in which Titus’s daughter Lavinia is actually a transgender son, perhaps.  ;D

And one would be hard-pressed to find a work based on this gory play which isn’t really obscure.  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 12:30:35 PM
In a version in which Titus’s daughter Lavinia is actually a transgender son, perhaps.  ;D

I wouldn't be surprised if it has been done.

Quote
And one would be hard-pressed to find a work based on this gory play which isn’t really obscure.  ::)

The goriness made me think about it (I confess to not having read it, but I do know it's all bloodshed). And who said these quizes are about really obscure composers? I mean, Chaminade vs Montemezzi is a no brainer, really.  >:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 01:57:08 PM
Taras Bulba

Yes indeed! Very good, bravo!

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 02:01:27 PM
If he wanted a musical work based on the story: Janacek's Rhapsody or the opera by Lysenko.

My guess is Janacek. Be it as it may, afaIc it's your turn. Don't wait, hit us!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 27, 2019, 02:07:01 PM
Taras Bulba

Yes, well done. I could have also added the "hero" met his maker burnt to death strapped to a wheel. Great piece from Janacek.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 02:08:56 PM
I could have also added the "hero" met his maker burnt to death strapped to a wheel.

Is this how Gogol died? My sources beg to differ.  :laugh:

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 02:20:10 PM
Here's an easy one:

This composer (whose music is thought to embody the national spirit of his native land) was actually very much influenced by an American writer and two painters, one American and another British. 

Name the composer, the author and the painters.

Joseph Holbrooke and Edgar Allan Poe? (painters be damned)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on January 27, 2019, 02:23:20 PM
Only a guess, but I thought Delius?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 02:24:33 PM
Only a guess, but I thought Delius?

You might be spot on. Let's see.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 27, 2019, 02:27:11 PM
Debussy, Poe, Turner & Whistler.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 02:30:26 PM
Debussy, Poe, Turner & Whistler.

Possibly, but then again "very much influenced"? An overstatement, methinks. Mallarme and the French Impressionist painters were much more influent, methinks as well.

If you really want Poe, then get Holbrooke. Even Rachmaninoff would do.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 27, 2019, 02:38:42 PM
I just finished this book which makes the case very convincingly about their particular influence.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51kI8Z5itML._SY346_.jpg)

Debussy almost completed two operas based on the works of Poe, and found a kinship in the paintings with his stylistic goals.

Haven't read that book so I can't comment, but from what I read Debussy was quite conscious and deliberate about his Frenchness. Honestly, I doubt he would have justified his musical aesthetics by citing Poe and pointing at Whistler and Turner.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 27, 2019, 02:53:04 PM
This composer was hired to write music for a film adaptation of a novel. He then wrote a full-length score based on the novel, apparently thinking the film would be made to fit the score, rather than the other way round. In the end, another person was hired to write the final film score, that, while adapting material from the first score, only left one song from the original untouched. Unhappy about this, the composer then recast his music as a cantata. He also made a recording of the work, though it was cut to fit on an LP. It has been subsequently recorded in full. Name the composer, the film, and the cantata.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 27, 2019, 05:57:13 PM
This composer was hired to write music for a film adaptation of a novel. He then wrote a full-length score based on the novel, apparently thinking the film would be made to fit the score, rather than the other way round. In the end, another person was hired to write the final film score, that, while adapting material from the first score, only left one song from the original untouched. Unhappy about this, the composer then recast his music as a cantata. He also made a recording of the work, though it was cut to fit on an LP. It has been subsequently recorded in full. Name the composer, the film, and the cantata.


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51jq8SJbCTL.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 27, 2019, 06:07:53 PM
New question.

The only surviving autograph of this well known composer is a graffito on the wall of the Sistine Chapel (if the autograph is actually his).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 27, 2019, 10:48:30 PM
.
Correct, of course.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 27, 2019, 11:41:55 PM
New question.

The only surviving autograph of this well known composer is a graffito on the wall of the Sistine Chapel (if the autograph is actually his).
I got this very question at a game night once. It's exactly who you'd expect it to be I think (once you know). Alas, I didn't know for the game night!! SO I feel I need to disqualify myself from this one. Great question!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 27, 2019, 11:42:59 PM
New question.

The only surviving autograph of this well known composer is a graffito on the wall of the Sistine Chapel (if the autograph is actually his).
That would be Josquin des Prés

I got this very question at a game night once. It's exactly who you'd expect it to be I think (once you know). Alas, I didn't know for the game night!! SO I feel I need to disqualify myself from this one. Great question!
Am I right, mc ukrneal? Very gracious of you to abstain... :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 12:16:47 AM
Think what you want.  :P   And then read the book.

I'll keep an eye on it, thanks for the rec.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 28, 2019, 12:20:52 AM
That would be Josquin des Prés
Am I right, mc ukrneal? Very gracious of you to abstain... :)
Yes. And I await your question (which I probably won't know) with great anticipation! :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 12:52:51 AM
Thank you, mc ukrneal.

With JBS’s permission (I suppose he’ll be in bed at this time), here goes a easy one:

This composer (who is mainly remembered for one still frequently performed work) inserted a couple of bars into an interlude of an opera by another very famous composer (as in rehearsals for the world premiere of that opera they could not get a scenery change to adapt to the music as it had been composed). In the subsequent run of performances of the opera, those inserted bars were dropped (as they were no longer necessary).

So who was the composer of those inserted bars, and what opera are we talking about?

EDIT: That Villa-Lobos was a good one, Karlo! Have you seen the film? It’s really bizarre!  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 09:59:39 AM
This composer (who is mainly remembered for one still frequently performed work) inserted a couple of bars into an interlude of an opera by another very famous composer (as in rehearsals for the world premiere of that opera they could not get a scenery change to adapt to the music as it had been composed). In the subsequent run of performances of the opera, those inserted bars were dropped (as they were no longer necessary).

So who was the composer of those inserted bars, and what opera are we talking about?

Ernesto Halffter, de Falla, Atlantida?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 10:02:53 AM
Ernesto Halffter, de Falla, Atlantida?
Ernesto Halffter did not compose “a couple of bars” of Atlántida, but about 50% of the total.  ;)

Frío, frío....

EDIT:

Perhaps not that frío after all: one of Falla’s least known works (there’s only one recording of it AFAIK) includes a theme that features prominently in the opera we’re looking for (but is not originally by its composer).  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 28, 2019, 10:50:38 AM
The opera was Parsifal, and the interloping composer was Humperdinck.

Although I have no idea what theme you are referring to (I suppose it might help if I had ever heard Atlantida, of course).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 10:50:49 AM
Ernesto Halffter did not compose “a couple of bars” of Atlántida, but about 50% of the total.  ;)

Frío, frío....

EDIT:

Perhaps not that frío after all: one of Falla’s least known works (there’s only one recording of it AFAIK) includes a theme that features prominently in the opera we’re looking for (but is not originally by its composer).  ;)

NPI. MHN.

Oh, I see JBS scores high again.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 10:54:47 AM
The opera was Parsifal, and the interloping composer was Humperdinck.
Correct!

And the theme used by Falla (in his incidental music for Calderón’s El gran teatro del mundo) and in Parsifal (and by Mendelssohn before that)  is the Dresden Amen.

Your turn, JBS.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 28, 2019, 11:08:48 AM
This one should be fairly easy.
A collateral relative of this composer was one of the lovers of Catherine the Great. His parents were members of the gentry/nobility, but both were actually illegitimate  at birch, although his father was adopted by his biological father (that is, the grandfather of the composer).  At one point his father was vice governor of  Novograd.    As a composer, he is almost as well known for his adaptations and orchestrations of the works of other composers as for his own works.  And, as a final clue, he is referenced in Solzhenitsyn's The First Circle.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 28, 2019, 11:12:33 AM
This one should be fairly easy.
A collateral relative of this composer was one of the lovers of Catherine the Great. His parents were members of the gentry/nobility, but both were actually illegitimate  at birch, although his father was adopted by his biological father (that is, the grandfather of the composer).  At one point his father was vice governor of  Novograd.    As a composer, he is almost as well known for his adaptations and orchestrations of the works of other composers as for his own works.  And, as a final clue, he is referenced in Solzhenitsyn's The First Circle.
I don't know the personal life stuff ,but the other stuff kinda sounds like Rimsky-Korsakov.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 11:13:56 AM
This one should be fairly easy.
A collateral relative of this composer was one of the lovers of Catherine the Great. His parents were members of the gentry/nobility, but both were actually illegitimate  at birch, although his father was adopted by his biological father (that is, the grandfather of the composer).  At one point his father was vice governor of  Novograd.    As a composer, he is almost as well known for his adaptations and orchestrations of the works of other composers as for his own works.  And, as a final clue, he is referenced in Solzhenitsyn's The First Circle.

Glinka?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 28, 2019, 11:34:02 AM
Glinka?

Right country, at least.
Extra clue is....the insect genus Bombus. 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 11:40:04 AM
Right country, at least.
Extra clue is....the insect genus Bombus.
Hasn’t mc ukrneal got it right?

I don't know the personal life stuff ,but the other stuff kinda sounds like Rimsky-Korsakov.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on January 28, 2019, 11:47:47 AM
Hasn’t mc ukrneal got it right?

Sorry,  I missed Neal's reply....so he has the ball now, so to speak...

Bombus is the bumblebee, btw.  Looking it up, I stumbled on the fact that the word itself did not appear until late medieval/Tudor time, and before that one term used to refer to these insects was "dumbledor".  So you can use that for your next Harry Potter trivia game.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 28, 2019, 11:51:36 AM
There is something that inks all these composers together: Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Liszt, Joachim, MacDowell, and Gade. What is it that links them?
(If guesses are wrong, I will add more composers to that list).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 11:52:07 AM
...I stumbled on the fact that the word itself did not appear until late medieval/Tudor time, and before that one term used to refer to these insects was "dumbledor".  So you can use that for your next Harry Potter trivia game.
Yep, in the Good Magic Guide Forum.... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 11:57:05 AM
There is something that inks all these composers together: Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Liszt, Joachim, MacDowell, and Gade. What is it that links them?
(If guesses are wrong, I will add more composers to that list).
The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 12:00:31 PM
The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.

You beat me to a second.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 28, 2019, 12:06:21 PM
The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.
That was quick! The others were German, Thomas, Walton, Blacher, Kabelac, Woyrsh, Rihm, and Casablancas. If I missed anyone let me know. 

You're up!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 12:08:56 PM
Another really easy one:

This composer was born on a boat (the crossing is so short, I’m surprised the delivery could be completed before they docked). Who is he?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 12:36:10 PM
Another really easy one:

This composer was born on a boat (the crossing is so short, I’m surprised the delivery could be completed before they docked). Who is he?

Andre Caplet.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 12:37:59 PM
Andre Caplet.
Indeed. Crossing from Le Havre to Honfleur....

À vous, cher ami.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 12:44:19 PM
Guess not one, but two composers. The recordings of their music are only slightly more numerous than the hen's teeth, yet they are very famous, were hugely influential and are the object of countless books and articles.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 12:46:49 PM
Guess not one, but two composers. The recordings of their music are only slightly more numerous than the hen's teeth, yet they are very famous, were hugely influential and are the object of countless books and articles.
Nietzsche and Adorno?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 12:47:40 PM
Nietzsche and Adorno?

One is correct.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 12:50:51 PM
One is correct.
Nietzsche and Rousseau?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 12:52:08 PM
Nietzsche and Rousseau?

Are you aware of any recording of Rousseau's music? Or Adorno's, for that matter?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 12:58:10 PM
Are you aware of any recording of Rousseau's music? Or Adorno's, for that matter?
I have three CDs with music by Adorno in my collection. Here’s one:



And there’s at least two recordings of Rousseau’s Le Devin du Village, e.g this one:



 :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 12:59:13 PM
Okay, then make it four composers and name the fourth.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 28, 2019, 01:00:30 PM
Okay, then make it four composers and name the fourth.  :)
William Herschel?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 01:03:04 PM
William Herschel?

No. Does he fit in "hugely influential" and "object of countless books and articles"? If yes, then he's the fifth.  :D

He wrote some nice music, though.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 01:05:36 PM
I'm off to bed now. Let the one who guesses correctly proceed with the next turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 28, 2019, 01:09:56 PM
No. Does he fit in "hugely influential" and "object of countless books and articles"? If yes, then he's the fifth.  :D

He wrote some nice music, though.
Well, yes. In addition to discovering Uranus, he uncovered the truth about nebulae, infrared radiation, and built life-changing telescopes (and a bunch of other astronomical stuff) . He was like the first Instagram star (haha) of his time.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 28, 2019, 01:12:07 PM
Okay, then make it four composers and name the fourth.  :)
Rabindranath Tagore?  ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on January 28, 2019, 05:02:46 PM
Garcia Lorca, Federico   ?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 28, 2019, 10:26:14 PM
Rabindranath Tagore?  ???

Garcia Lorca, Federico   ?


No, but there is a connection between them and the other.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 29, 2019, 03:23:12 AM
No, but there is a connection between them and the other.
Poet-composer Ezra Pound?

Before you ask  ;):

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 29, 2019, 05:25:18 AM
Poet-composer Ezra Pound?

Before you ask  ;):



No, not him either but that makes six of them.  :D

Here's a hint:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81qIyGCv3vL._UX569_.jpg)

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on January 29, 2019, 05:32:47 AM
 Abaelardus (Abélard)?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 29, 2019, 05:34:15 AM
Abaelardus (Abélard)?

No. And don't you tell me his music was recorded too.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 29, 2019, 05:39:16 AM
It’s E.T.A Hoffmann, of course...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 29, 2019, 05:39:43 AM
It’s E.T.A Hoffmann, of course...

Finally!  :D

Was the hint helpful or you just had an epiphany?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on January 29, 2019, 05:57:50 AM
No. And don't you tell me his music was recorded too.  :D
https://www.youtube.com/v/iDtJZfcHJlQ
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on January 29, 2019, 06:29:12 AM
Why is Metallica a hint for Hoffmann?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 29, 2019, 06:37:57 AM
Finally!  :D

Was the hint helpful or you just had an epiphany?
I had Hoffmann as my next (possibly last  ::)) name in the lineup of poet- (or philosopher-) composers. Then googled “Metallica Hoffmann”, and the rest is history...

Here goes, then:

This composer’s second opera had a successful première in a foreign country. Later, when it was scheduled to be performed in the composer’s home country, the head of state personally intervened to have it prohibited. Composer and opera?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 29, 2019, 06:38:32 AM
Why is Metallica a hint for Hoffmann?
Der Sandmann.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 29, 2019, 07:17:51 AM
Der Sandmann.

Precisely.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 29, 2019, 12:27:15 PM
This composer’s second opera had a successful première in a foreign country. Later, when it was scheduled to be performed in the composer’s home country, the head of state personally intervened to have it prohibited. Composer and opera?

It would be tempting to look for Hitler or Stalin but I have a hunch it's none of them.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 29, 2019, 12:32:18 PM
It would be tempting to look for Hitler or Stalin but I have a hunch it's none of them.
It’s neither of them....
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 29, 2019, 12:37:45 PM
It’s neither of them....

NPI. MHN.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2019, 12:57:02 AM
Another clue, then:

The opera’s libretto is adapted (by its prestigious author) from a bestselling novel. The novel is usually included in lists of the type “100 best 20th century novels in Spanish”. Curiously, the novel was never censored in the home country of both composer and author. 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 01:25:11 AM
Another clue, then:

The opera’s libretto is adapted (by its prestigious author) from a bestselling novel. The novel is usually included in lists of the type “100 best 20th century novels in Spanish”. Curiously, the novel was never censored in the home country of both composer and author.

Thanks. What I infer from the above is that the author of the novel is also the author of the libretto and that he is from a different country than the composer. Is this correct?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 30, 2019, 01:27:41 AM
Ah-ha. I was stuck in 19th century Europe, but I think you've pulled a fast one (haha) and moved to South America. Thus, my guess is Ginastera's Bomarzo.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2019, 01:28:55 AM
Thanks. What I infer from the above is that the author of the novel is also the author of the libretto and that he is from a different country than the composer. Is this correct?
Novelist and librettist are one and the same person, and he and the composer are from the same country. To be exact, though, some sources say the composer’s wife (whom he later divorced) had a substantial if uncredited role in the libretto.

mc ukrneal guess is correct!  :)

 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 01:32:30 AM
Believe it or not, yesterday I thought about Argentina, but under Peron, so obviously couldn't find anything.  :D

Clever!

Can hardly wait for Neal's one.

Oh, and this Mujica Lainez is certainly prestigious if you say so, but I've never heard of him.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2019, 01:37:56 AM
Believe it or not, yesterday I thought about Argentina, but under Peron, so obviously couldn't find anything.  :D

Clever!

Can hardly wait for Neal's one.

Oh, and this Mujica Lainez is certainly prestigious if you say so, but I've never heard of him.  :)
Bomarzo is based on Manuel Mujica Lainez’s novel of the same name. The opera was premiered in Washington to great acclaim, even if it was deemed rather daring (Der Spiegel’s review was titled “Porno im Belcanto”  ;D). Argentina’s de facto president General Onganía told the head of the Teatro Colón “Look, either you strike Bomarzo from the season, or I shut down the theatre”. Only 5 years later could the opera be performed in Buenos Aires.

Mujica is widely considered one of the great Argentine (or Spanish language, for that matter) novelists of the second half of the 20th century. Bomarzo is a long historical novel, but unmistakably Argentine in its psychoanalytic approach to the title character.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 01:48:13 AM
Bomarzo is based on Manuel Mujica Lainez’s novel of the same name. The opera was premiered in Washington to great acclaim, even if it was deemed rather daring (Der Spiegel’s review was titled “Porno im Belcanto”  ;D). Argentina’s de facto president General Onganía told the head of the Teatro Colón “Look, either you strike Bomarzo from the season, or I shut down the theatre”. Only 5 years later could the opera be performed in Buenos Aires.

Mujica is widely considered one of the great Argentine (or Spanish language, for that matter) novelists of the second half of the 20th century. Bomarzo is a long historical novel, but unmistakably Argentine in its psychoanalytic approach to the title character.

Thanks for the info. Tough guy, this Ongania!  :D

The only Argentinian writers I'm familiar with are Borges and Sabato. And a guy who wrote "Don Segundo Sombra" but whose name I can't remember otomh.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2019, 01:53:17 AM
Thanks for the info. Tough guy, this Ongania!  :D

The only Argentinian writers I'm familiar with are Borges and Sabato. And a guy who wrote "Don Segundo Sombra" but whose name I can't remember otomh.
He also prevented Bartók’s The Miraclous Mandarin and Stravinsky’s Sacre to be performed at the Colón, and forbade the screening of Antonioni’s Blow Up in Argentine cinemas.:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 01:57:19 AM
He also prevented Bartók’s The Miraclous Mandarin and Stravinsky’s Sacre to be performed at the Colón, and forbade the screening of Antonioni’s Blow Up in Argentine cinemas.:D

Which means he was an avid reader of ballet and opera librettos and a cinephile, otherwise how could he have known about the subject matters?  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 30, 2019, 02:19:43 AM
Let's try something a little different. I am going to list 6 composers. You will need to figure out how to get from composer 1 to 6 using works that they have written. SO to get from #1 to #2, you need to name the work that links them, Once you have the work that links #1 to #2, you will need to figure out the new work that links #2 to #3 and so on. For example, if composer #1 and #2 were Prokofiev and Berlioz, the linking work could be Romeo and Juliet. But keep in mind, there is no restriction in what the work might be. SO here we go:

#1: Strauss II
#2: Rossini
#3: Verdi
#4: Elgar
#5: Tchaikovsky
#6: Herbert

PS: In an interesting twist, #5 and #6 are interchangeable.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 02:31:42 AM
Let's try something a little different. I am going to list 6 composers. You will need to figure out how to get from composer 1 to 6 using works that they have written. SO to get from #1 to #2, you need to name the work that links them, Once you have the work that links #1 to #2, you will need to figure out the new work that links #2 to #3 and so on. For example, if composer #1 and #2 were Prokofiev and Berlioz, the linking work could be Romeo and Juliet. But keep in mind, there is no restriction in what the work might be. SO here we go:

#1: Strauss II
#2: Rossini
#3: Verdi
#4: Elgar
#5: Tchaikovsky
#6: Herbert

PS: In an interesting twist, #5 and #6 are interchangeable.

Strauss II rto Rossini: Figaro-Polka op. 320
Rossini to Verdi: Otello
Verdi to Elgar: Falstaff
Elgar to Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings
Tchaikovskly to Herbert: Serenade for Strings
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 30, 2019, 02:33:54 AM
Strauss II rto Rossini: Figaro-Polka op. 320
Rossini to Verdi: Otello
Verdi to Elgar: Falstaff
Elgar to Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings
Tchaikovskly to Herbert: Serenade for Strings
Really close, but the last one is something else (works don't repeat) and I used something else for the first one (something more well known).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 02:44:53 AM
Really close, but the last one is something else (works don't repeat) and I used something else for the first one (something more well known).

You didn't specifiy either that works don't repeat or that works have to be famous. On the contrary, you said there's no restriction in what the works might be. ;D

Anyway, the first one is Cinderella. The last one I can't figure out.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2019, 02:50:56 AM
You didn't specifiy either that works don't repeat or that works have to be famous. On the contrary, you said there's no restriction in what the works might be. ;D
Pot...kettle. ..black. .. : ;). Your question about two "poet / philosopher - composers "  had, what was it, 6 valid answers ?  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 30, 2019, 02:57:23 AM
You didn't specifiy either that works don't repeat or that works have to be famous. On the contrary, you said there's no restriction in what the works might be. ;D

Anyway, the first one is Cinderella. The last one I can't figure out.
Well, I'll give it to you, since I did say that. The last one was the Enchantress. I'll be sure to take your 'advice' on board next time! :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 30, 2019, 02:57:59 AM
Pot...kettle. ..black. .. : ;). Your question about two "poet / philosopher - composers "  had, what was it, 6 valid answers ?  :D
Yeah! Let him have it! :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 02:58:12 AM
Pot...kettle. ..black. .. : ;). Your question about two "poet / philosopher - composers "  had, what was it, 6 valid answers ?  :D

First, my questioin was not about "poet / philosopher / composer" but simply about "composer", the rest was up to you; second, I acknowledged them all as valid.  :)

But there's no problem, really. Come up with the connection between Tchaikosvksy and Herbert and you win.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 03:10:09 AM
Well, I'll give it to you, since I did say that. The last one was the Enchantress.

How does it connect to Tchaikovsky? I ask because I really don't know.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 03:36:05 AM
This composer manifested a very early musical talent. Beside music, he had a keen interest in another art form. His musical work is mostly written for piano, with some symphonic and chamber works thrown in for good measure. he died in a psychiatric asylum. He was a synaesthete with a strong penchant for cosmic mysticism. Who is he?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 03:42:01 AM
This composer manifested a very early musical talent. Beside music, he had a keen interest in another art form. His musical work is mostly written for piano, with some symphonic and chamber works thrown in for good measure. he died in a psychiatric asylum. He was a synaesthete with a strong penchant for cosmic mysticism. Who is he?
Ciurlionis.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 03:42:24 AM
Ciurlionis.

Piece of cake, ain't it?

Hit us!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 04:08:54 AM
This composer was taught an instrument by a pupil of another composer. Both composers were born in (essentially) the same country, and died in the same city, in another country. Who are the two composers?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 30, 2019, 04:11:07 AM
How does it connect to Tchaikovsky? I ask because I really don't know.


The Enchantress was a work by both Herbert (operetta) and Tchaikovsky (opera).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2019, 04:16:18 AM
The Enchantress was a work by both Herbert (operetta) and Tchaikovsky (opera).
And that was me looking for an obscure connection between Naughty Marietta and Francesca da Rimini... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 04:19:08 AM
The Enchantress was a work by both Herbert (operetta) and Tchaikovsky (opera).

Thanks.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 04:24:18 AM
(essentially) the same country

Either the Austrian or the Russian Empire, right?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 05:02:56 AM
Either the Austrian or the Russian Empire, right?
No. The form of government was restored after an armed conflict had ended, for some time after the younger composer's birth, but abolished a few years later.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on January 30, 2019, 05:36:41 AM
No. The form of government was restored after an armed conflict had ended, for some time after the younger composer's birth, but abolished a few years later.

This suggests to me the Third French Republic, established after the Franco-Prussian War caused the collapse of the Second Empire (ca 1871); the Third Republic perished with the Fall of France (1940).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 05:48:05 AM
This suggests to me the Third French Republic, established after the Franco-Prussian War caused the collapse of the Second Empire (ca 1871); the Third Republic perished with the Fall of France (1940).
No, but that is where the two died, though not during the Third Republic.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 06:00:43 AM
I can think of some combos that at various points in history could have been considered "essentially" the same country, such as Portugal/Brazil, Denmark/Norway or Spain/Cuba but none of them fits the historical hint.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 06:05:47 AM
This suggests to me the Third French Republic, established after the Franco-Prussian War caused the collapse of the Second Empire (ca 1871); the Third Republic perished with the Fall of France (1940).

From 1871 to 1940 there were not "a few years", though, but seven full decades.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 06:13:43 AM
I can think of some combos that at various point in history could have been considered "essentially" the same country, such as Portugal/Brazil, Denmark/Norway or Spain/Cuba but none of them fits the historical hint.
It's just one country, but the war changed temporarily who was in charge, until a coup before the end of the war.  0:)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 06:15:59 AM
It's just one country, but the war changed temporarily who was in charge, until a coup before the end of the war.  0:)

If you mean Italy, then it's incorrect that the form of government was restored because under Mussolini Italy did not formally cease to be a monarchy.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 06:25:17 AM
If you mean Italy, then it's incorrect that the form of government was restored because under Mussolini Italy did not formally cease to be a monarchy.
No, I don't mean Italy, but another monarchy was briefly turned into a national legionary state.  >:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 06:29:27 AM
No, I don't mean Italy, but another monarchy was briefly turned into a national legionary state.  >:D

You are still incorrect. From 1866 to 1947 Romania has never formally ceased to be a monarchy. During the so called "national legionary state" (1940-41) the formal and never disputed head of state was king Michael.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 06:33:46 AM
You are still incorrect. From 1866 to 1947 Romania has never formally ceased to be a monarchy. During the so called "national legionary state" the formal and never disputed head of state was king Michael.
I stand corrected.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 06:45:20 AM
I stand corrected.

No problem.

Now, one of the two composers is obviously Enescu, but who is the other?  ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 06:46:03 AM
No problem.

Now, one of the two composers is obviously Enescu, but who is the other? Ligeti, Xennakis and Kurtag fit in "essentially the same country" but where they taught by one of Enescu's pupils? I couldn't find anything in this respect. Conversely, which one of Enescu's teachers was the pupil of a composer born in present-day Romania? I couldn't find anything in this respect, either.

Beats me, honestly.  :)
Enescu's pupil was the other composer's teacher.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 06:49:44 AM
Enescu's pupil was the other composer's teacher.

Still no idea. Xenakis?  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 06:55:27 AM
Still no idea. Xennakis?  :D
I don't think he played the violin. ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 06:57:21 AM
I don't think he played the violin. ;)

I don't think either, it was just a random guess.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 07:21:29 AM
Horațiu Rădulescu.

Why "(essentially) the same country"? It's u]the[/u] same country all the way. You put me on the wrong track from the beginning.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on January 30, 2019, 07:21:54 AM
Ok, I thought I knew who it was and then stumbled across someone else quite by accident - a name I've never even heard before: Horațiu Rădulescu. Is that it?

Shoot you beat me by just a bit!!!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on January 30, 2019, 07:27:17 AM
Horațiu Rădulescu.

Why "(essentially) the same country"? It's u]the[/u] same country all the way. You put me on the wrong track from the beginning.  ;D
Yes, and you're right. I made mistake when making the question, thinking Rădulescu was born during the communist era.. But still, the same country ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 07:29:18 AM
Shoot you beat me by just a bit!!!

By writing "(essentially) the same country" Karlo made me think about non-Romanian composers born on the territory of present-day Romania, particuarly in Transylvania. It took me a long time until I looked for a list of purely Romanian composers.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 07:30:05 AM
Yes, and you're right. I made mistake when making the question, thinking Rădulescu was born during the communist era.. But still, the same country ;D

Yes, same country. See my reply above.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on January 30, 2019, 08:03:18 AM
Yes, same country. See my reply above.
Except that much irreparable harm was done to the city he was born in.  ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on January 30, 2019, 08:49:27 AM
Except that much irreparable harm was done to the city he was born in.  ???

Sad but true.  :(

This composer was born in one country (say, A) and died in another one (say, B). While in A he studied with someone who would become B's most famous composer. He was deeply passionate about, and heavily influenced by, B's culture and folklore. He died as a result of an incident in which he took part inadvertently. Oddly enough, one of his teacher's compositions inadvertently celebrate a feature of the person who caused his death.

Name the two composers, the two countries and the composition.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2019, 12:55:57 PM
Sad but true.  :(

This composer was born in one country (say, A) and died in another one (say, B). While in A he studied with someone who would become B's most famous composer. He was deeply passionate about, and heavily influenced by, B's culture and folklore. He died as a result of an incident in which he took part inadvertently. Oddly enough, one of his teacher's compositions inadvertently celebrate a feature of the person who caused his death.

Name the two composers, the two countries and the composition.
NPI.... :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 09, 2019, 05:54:46 AM
Kolahtaa!  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 12, 2019, 03:57:29 AM
I am not sure where we are in this thread - but I thought I'd post a question for your consideration (probably very easy):

He was the most literary of composers. In his early years he was torn between literature and music and tried his hand at both. Fortunately for us, his early sketches for novels in the style of his favorite Romantic writers came to nothing. Instead we have the enduring magic of solo piano works, the great song cycles, a wealth of chamber music, and many other orchestral and choral works.  His extraordinary artistic achievements must be set against recurrent illness, self-inflicted obstacles, and misjudgments.

Who is he?
I imagine that would be Robert Schumann (and yes, I did use your subsequent post in the WAYLTN thread as a clue... :)).

Florestan ‘s last (and, true to his style, rather cryptic) question remains unanswered, and he seems reticent to provide any clues... :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 12, 2019, 04:39:41 AM
Florestan ‘s last (and, true to his style, rather cryptic) question remains unanswered, and he seems reticent to provide any clues... :(

Yiou must have misssed this:

Kolahtaa!  :D

Here's another one: the famous composer was a heavy drinker and in one respect ressembles Rossini.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 12, 2019, 04:53:03 AM
Yiou must have misssed this:

Here's another one: the famous composer was a heavy drinker and in one respect ressembles Rossini.

Sibelius springs to mind. Like Rossini he lived for many years after retiring from composing though Rossini continued to compose for his own amusement.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 12, 2019, 04:53:41 AM
Sibelius springs to mind. Like Rossini he lived for many years after retiring from composing though Rossini continued to compose for his own amusement.

Hot! Very hot!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on February 12, 2019, 07:24:11 AM
Sad but true.  :(

This composer was born in one country (say, A) and died in another one (say, B). While in A he studied with someone who would become B's most famous composer. He was deeply passionate about, and heavily influenced by, B's culture and folklore. He died as a result of an incident in which he took part inadvertently. Oddly enough, one of his teacher's compositions inadvertently celebrate a feature of the person who caused his death.

Name the two composers, the two countries and the composition.
Sibelius, born in the Russian Empire, Grand Duchy of Finland, and died in Finland, as did Toivo Kuula, who, in a drunken fight with jägers about whether the jägers, trained in Germany, or the peasant army had a bigger role in getting Finland independent, and if Toivo Kuula's March of the White Guard was better than Sibelius' Jäger March, and also the Swedish/Finnish language question, got in a fist fight with the jägers, pulled a knife, cut (not very seriously) an officer of the White Guard, and escaped to the yard, where after falling down in the stairs, he was shot in the head by the jägers.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 12, 2019, 10:51:33 AM
Sibelius, born in the Russian Empire, Grand Duchy of Finland, and died in Finland, as did Toivo Kuula, who, in a drunken fight with jägers about whether the jägers, trained in Germany, or the peasant army had a bigger role in getting Finland independent, and if Toivo Kuula's March of the White Guard was better than Sibelius' Jäger March, and also the Swedish/Finnish language question, got in a fist fight with the jägers, pulled a knife, cut (not very seriously) an officer of the White Guard, and escaped to the yard, where after falling down in the stairs, he was shot in the head by the jägers.

If you wouldn't know the correct answers, who would?  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on February 12, 2019, 12:02:18 PM
If you wouldn't know the correct answers, who would?  :D
Quite.  :laugh: I had an inkling it might be Sibelius and someone else right away but didn't remember anything about his possible students, but that hint made me check if Kuula studied with him...

Rafael can take the next turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 12, 2019, 12:13:44 PM
Quite.  :laugh: I had an inkling it might be Sibelius and someone else right away but didn't remember anything about his possible students, but that hint made me check if Kuula studied with him...

Rafael can take the next turn.
Thanks, Karlo, but I won’t be able to follow this for the coming days. The honour is yours, in any case.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 14, 2019, 05:19:06 AM
While we wait for North Star to test us, I offer this simple question:

What do a fin de siecle French composer and the Father of Bluegrass have in common?  Name the men and the work.
Both - Maurice Ravel and Bill Monroe - had a car accident. (Knew it about Ravel, didn't know Monroe).  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 14, 2019, 06:00:22 AM
Not what I was thinking of, and it involves a specific musical composition of each. Wrong Frenchman, right grasser.
Des pas sur la neige (Préludes, first book, 1909/10) & Footprints in the snow (1945), by one Claude Debussy and Bill Monroe, respectively.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on February 14, 2019, 12:02:46 PM
Correct!  Your turn if North Star remains AWOL.

 8)
I'll gladly hand the baton over to Christo.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 14, 2019, 11:30:05 PM
I'll gladly hand the baton over to Christo.  :laugh:
It's my honour!  :D

This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia, but adopted different nationalities and different versions of their last name (the same family name), though later the brother moved to North America. Together they wrote ten symphonies and about twice as many concertos.  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 15, 2019, 07:39:45 AM
This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia, but adopted different nationalities and different versions of their last name (the same family name), though later the brother moved to North America. Together they wrote ten symphonies and about twice as many concertos.  ::)

Hint: both studied in Paris.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 15, 2019, 08:29:01 AM
I can only come up with the Rubinstein brothers, but they don’t see to meet any of the other criteria set out by Christo.  :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 15, 2019, 08:45:23 AM
I can only come up with the Rubinstein brothers, but they don’t see to meet any of the other criteria set out by Christo.  :(

I'm the other way round! Tcherepnin fits the criteria but I can't find a brother!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 15, 2019, 08:53:21 AM
I can only come up with the Rubinstein brothers, but they don’t see to meet any of the other criteria set out by Christo.  :(
I'm the other way round! Tcherepnin fits the criteria but I can't find a brother!

Nope, neither can I.  :-X Another hint: who told you they're brothers?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on February 15, 2019, 05:07:52 PM
Did Vladimir Dukelsky aka Vernon Duke have a brother?
(He does fit most of the other clues.)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 07:56:12 AM
Did Vladimir Dukelsky aka Vernon Duke have a brother?
(He does fit most of the other clues.)
Good try; but no.  :-\  Some more hints then. Between the wars, both composers studied in Paris, the first with Nadia Boulanger, the second with Tcherepnin - but unlike the latter both were free to return to their respective home countries and continue to build a career there. Like Dukelsky and for similar reasons, the second later moved to New York City.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 08:28:39 AM
Between the wars, both composers studied in Paris, the first with Nadia Boulanger, the second with Tcherepnin - but unlike the latter both were free to return to their respective home countries and continue to build a career there.

I really don't get this. You said they were brothers born in Russia. What do you mean by "their respective home countries"?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 08:31:58 AM
I really don't get this. You said they were brothers born in Russia. What do you mean by "their respective home countries"?
I wrote:

This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia, but adopted different nationalities and different versions of their last name (the same family name), though later the brother moved to North America. Together they wrote ten symphonies and about twice as many concertos.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 16, 2019, 08:45:30 AM
I wrote:

This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia, but adopted different nationalities and different versions of their last name (the same family name), though later the brother moved to North America. Together they wrote ten symphonies and about twice as many concertos.
But are the brothers or not?  ???

Quote
Another hint: who told you they're brothers?  ::)

I’m rather confused... :-[
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 08:45:45 AM
I wrote:

This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia,

Which makes Russia their home country alright.

Quote
but adopted different nationalities and different versions of their last name (the same family name), though later the brother moved to North America.

Then you surely meant "their respective adoption countries".

And now that I think of it, what purpose has "though" above? It's an adverastive conjunction but I fail to see why you employed it.

It's all quite confusing, honestly.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 08:59:01 AM
Which makes Russia their home country alright.
Something happened with the Russian empire, remember? With 'home country' I'm referring to their ancestral lands, nations & also home countries.
Then you surely meant "their respective adoption countries".
No, I didn't, I meant what I wrote.
But are the brothers or not?  ???
Another hint: who told you they're brothers?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 09:00:11 AM
Something happened with the Russian empire, remember? With 'home country' I'm referring to their ancestral lands, nations & also home countries.

Okay, so this is what I infer from the above:

1. they were born in Russia but were not ethnic Russians
2. they were brothers yet they had different ancestral lands/nations

I have no problem with (1), but (2) is even more confusing than before.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:03:20 AM
Okay, so this is what I infer from the above:

1. they were born in Russia but were not ethnic Russians
2. they were brothers yet they had different ancestral lands/nations

I have no problem with (1), but (2) is even more confusing than before.  ;D
Ad 1: correct
Ad 2: no, they weren't & no, they hadn't.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 09:06:36 AM
Ad 2: no, they weren't

They were not brothers? Then you either are drunk now or were back then when you wrote this:

It's my honour!  :D

This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia

No, really: now you say that this composer's brother was actually not his brother. Boggles the mind!



Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:08:52 AM
No, really: now you say that this composer's brother was actually not his brother. Boggles the mind!
Think again.   >:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 09:12:46 AM
Think again.   >:D

Were they brothers? Yes or No. If Yes, then your original hint stands as true. If No, it is false --- and how are we supposed to find the right answer based on a false hint?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:17:15 AM
Were they brothers? Yes or No. If Yes, then your original hint stands as true. If No, it is false --- and how are we supposed to find the right answer based on a false hint?
who told you they're brothers?  ::)
no, they weren't
Think again.   >:D
Yes, please do so.  >:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 09:24:11 AM
who told you they're brothers?  ::)

You did. If you can't remember your own posts, let me refresh your memory.

This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia

I dare anyone to interpret this statement of yours in any other way than they were indeed brothers.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:26:24 AM
You did. If you can't remember your own posts, let me refresh your memory.

I dare anyone to interpret this statement of yours in any other way than they were indeed brothers.
Me. You better read & think again.  >:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Papy Oli on February 16, 2019, 09:27:33 AM
step brothers ?  ;D
brothers from another mother ?   :blank:

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:29:00 AM
step brothers ?  ;D
brothers from another mother ?   :blank:
Nope, bis.  ;) The composer's brother was just a brother & also a composer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 16, 2019, 09:33:22 AM
Ah, of course...the famous Schroedingers, who are simultaneously brothers snd not brothers... >:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Papy Oli on February 16, 2019, 09:33:40 AM
Nope, bis.  ;) The composer's brother was just a brother & also a composer.

We're in a spot of b(r)other...  :P
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 09:37:07 AM
Ah, of course...the famous Schroedingers, who are simultaneously brothers snd not brothers... >:D

I give up. This seems to be some kind of wordplay which no sane person with even a basic knowledge of English seems to be able to decipher.

And you dared call me cryptic... 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:38:40 AM
I give up. This seems to be some kind of wordplay which no sane person with even a basic knowledge of English seems to be able to decipher.

Deep, deep sigh. And another hint: her daughter is a - rather famous, they say - painter.  :P
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 09:43:08 AM
Deep, deep sigh. And another hint: her daughter is a - rather famous, they say - painter.  :P

Her, that is, whose?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:45:06 AM
Her, that is, whose?
The composer's (only) daughter is a painter, the composer's brother was also a composer.  :blank:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Papy Oli on February 16, 2019, 09:45:58 AM
well, the composer is female....

the brother can't be...

can he ?

 ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 09:53:52 AM
well, the composer is female....

the brother can't be...

can he ?

 ;D
No, he can't. He's his sister's brother and she is more famous.  :laugh: (Yet I own recordings of both of them).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 09:57:58 AM
well, the composer is female....

the brother can't be...

can he ?

 ;D

Now I see what Christo did. Well, blame it on the damn English language which distinguishes not between genres when it comes to articles or nouns. "This composer" means either she or he. There's no such ambiguity in Romanian (a Romance language), where the article and the noun tells one rioght away if it's a he or a she. Therefore my confusion, and probably also ritter's.

I must admit, Johan, you tricked us alright! Clever, clever --- or should I say, naughty, naughty?  :D

Yet I still have no effing idea about them!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 10:07:40 AM
It's not the English language, it's your naughty lack of imagination - that forbids you to think that a composer can be a woman.  >:D The question remains: who's she, and who's her brother?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 10:24:42 AM
It's not the English language, it's your naughty lack of imagination - that forbids you to think that a composer can be a woman.  >:D

Oh yeah, sure, I was such an unimaginative guy as to offer Cecile Chaminade as riddle some pages ago.

Quote
The question remains: who's she, and who's her brother?  ::)

She is her brother's sister and her brother is his sister's brother.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 10:34:15 AM
She is her brother's sister and her brother is his sister's brother.
They were a musical family: another brother was a well-known pianist and also composer, who shared her nationaltiy (unlike the more famous brother we're looking for).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 10:53:09 AM
They were a musical family: another brother was a well-known pianist and also composer, who shared her nationaltiy (unlike the more famous brother we're looking for).

More confusing than ever! I give up.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on February 16, 2019, 11:08:20 AM
In other words we are looking for a family of three composers, one of them a female who emigrated to the US while the two other siblings stayed in Europe.

IHN*I....

Was her name change related to marriage or something else?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 11:09:39 AM
More confusing than ever! I give up.
OK. She's Polish composer, Grażyna Bacewicz (1909-1969) and her brother is the Lithuanian avant-garde composer Vytautas Bacevičius (1905-1970): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gra%C5%BCyna_Bacewicz & http://www.mic.lt/en/database/classical/composers/bacevicius & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vytautas_Bacevi%C4%8Dius
Both she and her brother Kiejstut (the pianist) identified as Polish, but her father and older brother identified as Lithuanian; adaptiing the Polish and Lithuanian variants of their family name respectively (a fact that always intrigued me, hence my riddle). All were born in born in Łódź, in the Russian empire, and all were forced to chose their nationality as a consequence of the First World War (as were many, in Central Europe). Vytautas became an exile after the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and settled in New York.

Your turn again.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 11:28:32 AM
OK. She's Polish composer, Grażyna Bacewicz (1909-1969) and her brother is the Lithuanian avant-garde composer Vytautas Bacevičius (1905-1970): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gra%C5%BCyna_Bacewicz & http://www.mic.lt/en/database/classical/composers/bacevicius & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vytautas_Bacevi%C4%8Dius
Both she and her brother Kiejstut (the pianist) identified as Polish, but her father and older brother identified as Lithuanian; adaptiing the Polish and Lithuanian variants of their family name respectively (a fact that always intrigued me, hence my riddle). All were born in born in Łódź, in the Russian empire, and all were forced to chose their nationality as a consequence of the First World War (as were many, in Central Europe). Vytautas became an exile after the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and settled in New York.

Well played, sir! Really well played! My hat off to you! I withdraw my previous comments about your drunkenness and apologize.  0:)

Quote
Your turn again.  ;D

Do I deserve it?  ???

Amyway...

This composer (NB, a he not a she...  >:D ) was born in an illustrious family. In his circle of acquaintances there were three illustrious men of letter. Three illustrious composers' works are closely related to him. His complete works are available on Spotify (where it is available, that is).

Hint: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 12:01:38 PM
This composer (NB, a he not a she...  >:D ) was born in an illustrious family. In his circle of acquaintances there were three illustrious men of letter. Three illustrious composers' works are closely related to him. His complete works are available on Spotify (where it is available, that is).

Hint: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.

Hmm, François Couperin?  :blank:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 12:03:54 PM
Hmm, François Couperin?  :blank:

Nee.  :D

How does he fit in the hint?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 12:34:23 PM
Nee.  :D

How does he fit in the hint?
I remember we learned to translated these lines in our first class; why couldn't it refer to Couperin's death ('Tombeau de Couperin', after all)?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 12:39:24 PM
I remember we learned to translated these lines in our first class; why couldn't it refer to Couperin's death ('Tombeau de Couperin', after all)?  ::)

Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 12:57:10 PM
Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.  ;D
Composers never die for their fatherland, they only write music for the occasion.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 01:00:41 PM
Composers never die for their fatherland, they only write music for the occasion.

You're wrong --- and not only in this case.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 16, 2019, 01:03:36 PM
You're wrong --- and not only in this case.
Hah! #diedinwar #scribblesdown  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 01:06:40 PM
#diedinwar

#diedinaction

#themanwhokilledhimisknownbynamesurnameandrank
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on February 16, 2019, 01:28:35 PM
#diedinaction

#themanwhokilledhimisknownbynamesurnameandrank

PFC Raymond Norwood Bell?

Although PPMDE and KIA don't seem to really apply to Webern.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 16, 2019, 01:32:20 PM
PFC Raymond Norwood Bell?

Although PPMDE and KIA don't seem to really apply to Webern.

Nope and nope.

KIA it is, though.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: SymphonicAddict on February 16, 2019, 07:59:37 PM
If Andrei and Christo ever meet face to face, I feel the strong hunch that they will get along very well  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 17, 2019, 03:47:19 AM
If Andrei and Christo ever meet face to face, I feel the strong hunch that they will get along very well  :D

We're a smooth running tandem, solving riddles together in the closest of all possible cooperations.  8) My entry:
This composer’s brother was also a composer. Both were born in Russia, but adopted different nationalities and different versions of their last name (the same family name), though later the brother moved to North America. Together they wrote ten symphonies and about twice as many concertos.  ::)
met with some constructive scepticism:
Were they brothers? Yes or No. If Yes, then your original hint stands as true. If No, it is false --- and how are we supposed to find the right answer based on a false hint?
especially:
They were not brothers? Then you either are drunk now or were back then when you wrote
and of course some moments of thorough self-reflection:
I give up. This seems to be some kind of wordplay which no sane person with even a basic knowledge of English seems to be able to decipher.  And you dared call me cryptic...
but, as always, it all served to reach a higher form of mutual respect and understanding:
Well played, sir! Really well played! My hat off to you! I withdraw my previous comments about your drunkenness and apologize.  0:)
because the answer really wasn't that difficult at all & and we all happily continued playing our collections of their music:
OK. She's Polish composer, Grażyna Bacewicz (1909-1969) and her brother is the Lithuanian avant-garde composer Vytautas Bacevičius (1905-1970)

You see, a little fun & games bring us all closer together.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 17, 2019, 09:25:19 AM
If Andrei and Christo ever meet face to face, I feel the strong hunch that they will get along very well  :D

As far as I'm concerned there's no reason why we wouldn't.  :)

Supplementary hint for the KIA composer: his uncle was also a composer (and instrumentist) and is far more famous than him.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 18, 2019, 02:36:26 AM
KIA it is, though.
The usual suspects, all KIA, are Toivo Kuula, Jehan Alain, Albéric Magnard, René Vierne, Maurice Jaubert, Rudi Stephan, Edmund von Borck, Clement Harris, George Butterworth, Frederick Kelly, Ernest Farrar, Walter Leigh. But I don't see anyone fitting the other criteria, do you?  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 18, 2019, 04:25:27 AM
The usual suspects, all KIA, are Toivo Kuula,

He was not KIA, see above North Star's post about him.

Quote
Jehan Alain, Albéric Magnard, René Vierne, Maurice Jaubert, Rudi Stephan, Edmund von Borck, Clement Harris, George Butterworth, Frederick Kelly, Ernest Farrar, Walter Leigh. But I don't see anyone fitting the other criteria, do you?  ;)

No, I don't.

Think deep. Think outside the box.   ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 18, 2019, 10:40:37 AM
Think deep. Think outside the box.   ;D
You mean: 'killed in action' like Lully was, who struck his foot with his long conducting staff and died from gangrene?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 18, 2019, 10:58:35 AM
You mean: 'killed in action' like Lully was, who struck his foot with his long conducting staff and died from gangrene?

No. I mean "killed in action" like in killed in action, ie during a battle.

You know, it's not only during WWI that people were KIA. And remember what yuo said about me not being able to imagine that a composer can be a woman? I proved you wrong --- now can you prove me wrong if I think you're not able to imagine that a composer can be a(n)______.? (hint: just recently a GMGer stated in another thread that he had a few things in common with a very famous composer --- which is incidentally quite relevant to our current discussion ---, one of which had something to do with hate).

That's it, I gave him away.  ;D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on February 18, 2019, 02:06:09 PM
Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 18, 2019, 02:18:29 PM
Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia?

Yessss!

Nephew of Frederick the Great of Prussia, king, composer and flutist.

Quote from: Wikipedia
He was killed in combat by Jean-Baptiste Guindey, quartermaster of the French 10th Hussars, after Louis Ferdinand refused an offer to surrender and wounded the French NCO

Dedicatee of Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto and Antonin Reicha's L'art de varier. Liszt wrote an Élégie sur des motifs du Prince Louis Ferdinand de Prusse.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/518xmhCwidL._SX466_.jpg)

Bravo, mein Herr! Your turn!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 18, 2019, 10:50:47 PM
now can you prove me wrong if I think you're not able to imagine that a composer can be a Prussian
  #fixed 8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on February 19, 2019, 12:16:27 AM
I had in fact thought of Prince Louis Ferdinand already a few weeks ago both as a possible solution (but he did not fit the particular question) and as a possible quiz question to put. Tbh I hadn't really followed the current question but #326 really gave it away because it referred to the ridiculous statement someone made that Beethoven "hated" the aristocracy. He might have hated the concept but he was friends with many aristocrats and supposedly said about Louis Ferdinand something like that he was a good pianist (or composer), "not at all princely"
I even owned that Thorofon box for a while but eventually culled it. The music is roughly like a lesser Hummel or Ries, nice enough but certainly not essential.

I am too lazy to think of a good question, so here an easy one with aristocracy: Which famous popular song was composed by a Princess and later Queen who was deposed by a foreign aggressor (or more precisely in a coup staged by the foreign power) although she was allowed to live and died more than 20 years later?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 12:32:52 AM
  #fixed 8)

Nope. I meant aristocrat.   ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 12:41:22 AM
I am too lazy to think of a good question, so here an easy one with aristocracy: Which famous popular song was composed by a Princess and later Queen who was deposed by a foreign aggressor (or more precisely in a coup staged by the foreign power) although she was allowed to live and died more than 20 years later?

Aloha oe, composed by Queen Liliʻuokalani of Hawaii.

I didn't know the answer beforehand but the historical hint made me immediately think of her.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 12:53:00 AM
Nope. I meant aristocrat.   ;D
I live less than a mile from the castle of the count ('Imperial Count') who wrote these six Concerti Armonici (and heard them performed there):
https://www.youtube.com/v/PPHBcqLUEwI
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 12:59:43 AM
I live less than a mile from the castle of the count ('Imperial Count') who wrote these six Concerti Armonici (and heard them performed there):
https://www.youtube.com/v/PPHBcqLUEwI

I never knew you're into Baroque.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 01:05:36 AM
I never knew you're into Baroque.  :)
I sing loads of Bach (did the St. Matthew P twice, last Spring) but prefer less backward instruments in an orchestra.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 01:10:06 AM
Here's an easy one: which composer had a deep interest in the study of cider, vinegar and constipation?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 01:12:14 AM
Here's an easy one: which composer had a deep interest in the study of cider, vinegar and constipation?
Sounds like Cyril Scott?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 01:13:30 AM
Sounds like Cyril Scott?

The one and only.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 01:47:53 AM
OK. This composer wrote mostly vocal music, but also poetry, was personally adored by an emperor, took a monastic vow and was dedicated a special feast day (celebrated September 7).   ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 02:23:43 AM
Saint Kassia the Hymographer?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 02:29:38 AM
Saint Kassia the Hymographer?
The one & only! Kassia or Kassiani (805/10-ca.865), Roman abbess, composer, poet, and hymnographer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kassia
https://www.youtube.com/v/ioWWIiG_sHc
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2019, 02:32:50 AM
To make things even more complicated fun, allow me add some ingredients to this quizical brouhaha:

I’m a composer and a virtuoso. I traveled a lot: Russia, Austria, Hungary, Germany, France, Belgium, Poland, The Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden , Norway, the Baltic states…Everywhere I was received with great consideration and I met at least one emperor and several kings in person. I performed for Berlioz, shared a podium with Franz Liszt, shook hands with Wagner and Meyerbeer, talked to Rossini. I even performed, in Leipzig,in a trio, with Felix Mendelssohn and Ferdinand David. Who am I?

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 02:54:12 AM
The one & only! Kassia or Kassiani (805/10-ca.865), Roman abbess, composer, poet, and hymnographer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kassia
https://www.youtube.com/v/ioWWIiG_sHc
I must confess that the list of orthodox feast days was what helped me; I had never heard of Saint Kassia(ni). I listen to toe YouTube you posted with interest.

Since I cannot post a question right now, let’s go ahead using pjme’s very cosmopolitan and well-connected mystery composer.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 03:01:41 AM
I must confess that the list of orthodox feast days was what helped me; I had never heard of Saint Kassia(ni). I listen to toe YouTube you posted with interest.

Since I cannot post a question right now, let’s go ahead using pjme’s very cosmopolitan and well-connected mystery composer.  :)
I was sure, Andrei would only check the Catholic calendar.  8) ;D Good idea to follow Peter's (pjme) lead and wonder, whether his mystery composer-virtuoso could be Clara Wieck, perhaps?  :-\
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2019, 03:18:15 AM
No, it is a man: moustache & beard well trimmed.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 03:31:24 AM
No, it is a man: moustache & beard well trimmed.
Well , I have this silly anecdote : during the intermission of a concert at the Laieszhalle in Hamburg,  I was looking at the busts on display in the foyer.  There was, among other figures related to the musical history of the Hansestadt, Mahler and Scnittke. I noticed a bust that reminded me of Voltaire,  and I asked myself what on earth he could be doing there. Then I saw the nameplate : it wasn't Voltaire at all, it was Clara Wieck!   ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2019, 03:39:13 AM
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Atelier_de_Nicolas_de_Largilli%C3%A8re%2C_portrait_de_Voltaire%2C_d%C3%A9tail_%28mus%C3%A9e_Carnavalet%29_-002.jpg/399px-Atelier_de_Nicolas_de_Largilli%C3%A8re%2C_portrait_de_Voltaire%2C_d%C3%A9tail_%28mus%C3%A9e_Carnavalet%29_-002.jpg)(https://www.schumann-portal.de/assets/images/e/ClaraSchumann1883-4c2c5ede.jpg)

Hmmmm.....Aha!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 04:12:52 AM
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Atelier_de_Nicolas_de_Largilli%C3%A8re%2C_portrait_de_Voltaire%2C_d%C3%A9tail_%28mus%C3%A9e_Carnavalet%29_-002.jpg/399px-Atelier_de_Nicolas_de_Largilli%C3%A8re%2C_portrait_de_Voltaire%2C_d%C3%A9tail_%28mus%C3%A9e_Carnavalet%29_-002.jpg)(https://www.schumann-portal.de/assets/images/e/ClaraSchumann1883-4c2c5ede.jpg)

Hmmmm.....Aha!
Spitting image!  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 04:25:44 AM
To make things even more complicated fun, allow me add some ingredients to this quizical brouhaha:

I’m a composer and a virtuoso. I traveled a lot: Russia, Austria, Hungary, Germany, France, Belgium, Poland, The Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden , Norway, the Baltic states…Everywhere I was received with great consideration and I met at least one emperor and several kings in person. I performed for Berlioz, shared a podium with Franz Liszt, shook hands with Wagner and Meyerbeer, talked to Rossini. I even performed, in Leipzig,in a trio, with Felix Mendelssohn and Ferdinand David. Who am I?

Ole Bull? Although he had no moustache and beard.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 19, 2019, 05:29:56 AM
Thalberg?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 05:50:59 AM
Thalberg?

No moustache and beard for him, either.  :)

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 06:13:16 AM
Niccolò Paganini? No moustache AFAIK, but perhaps sideburns will do in this context?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 06:15:33 AM
The "moustache and beard" criterion is met by Stephen Heller, but I don't know about the other ones.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 06:16:38 AM
Niccolò Paganini? No moustache AFAIK, but perhaps sideburns will do in this context?

Did he travel as far North as Norway?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 06:17:26 AM
Henri Vieuxtemps, perhaps?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 06:19:36 AM
Henri Vieuxtemps, perhaps?

Given pjme is Belgian, it might be HV alright.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 06:24:49 AM
Paganini, Vieuxtemps, Sarasate...all those violin dudes are the same to me   ::) :D. But yes, Vieuxtemps does seem to fit the bill. Let’s see what pjme has to say.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 06:31:47 AM
Paganini, Vieuxtemps, Sarasate...all those violin dudes are the same to me   ::) :D.

And yet their music is easily distinguishable from each other.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 19, 2019, 07:08:02 AM
No moustache and beard for him, either.  :)


Not at the same time (that I can find), but he did have both at various times.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 19, 2019, 07:08:54 AM
Paganini, Vieuxtemps, Sarasate...all those violin dudes are the same to me   ::) :D. But yes, Vieuxtemps does seem to fit the bill. Let’s see what pjme has to say.  :)
But the photos I see show a fairly shaggy beard.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2019, 07:09:00 AM
Alas no - but with "Paganini" and "Vieuxtemps" you're coming closer. My composer/virtuoso was compared to Paganini and yes, he's Belgian.
Go back to that trio with Mendelssohn and David.....( they performed Beethoven opus 97....in 1844)!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Draško on February 19, 2019, 07:20:30 AM
Adrien-François Servais
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 07:26:26 AM
Draško best me to it!  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 19, 2019, 07:29:36 AM
My guess is Ysaye, but I can't find a photo of him sporting facial hair.
Jnless he played with Mendelssohn-Bartholdy using a ouija board, rather unlikely  ;D.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 07:40:10 AM
Hubert Léonard
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2019, 07:58:47 AM
Adrien-François Servais
Yes!
Alas the Servais website isn't yet available in English...but it is really well documented. His granddaughter is "the" Misia Sert !
https://www.servais-vzw.org/halle/

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Servais_door_Godebski.JPG/330px-Servais_door_Godebski.JPG)

Let's hope the Servais villa can be saved:
https://www.youtube.com/v/4awTJEitU1g



Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Draško on February 19, 2019, 08:22:26 AM
Yeah. I thought it had to be a cellist from the original question. I was thinking Franchomme or maybe Offenbach but neither fit the rest of the description. Only when you said Belgian.

Someone can have my spot setting up, if that's how it works. I don't generally know much about composers' biographies.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 19, 2019, 08:58:14 AM


Someone can have my spot setting up, if that's how it works. I don't generally know much about composers' biographies.

You guys fly way above my head :-[.

So getting in where I can! Which work, which was mentioned on this forum in the last week or so, has the heavy brass playing just one note, with the exception of a single trombone which plays two?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 19, 2019, 09:39:19 AM
Yes!
Alas the Servais website isn't yet available in English...but it is really well documented. His grand daughter is "the" Misia Sert ! https://www.servais-vzw.org/halle
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Servais_door_Godebski.JPG/330px-Servais_door_Godebski.JPG) Let's hope the Servais villa can be saved: https://www.youtube.com/v/4awTJEitU1g
Very intriguing & a good reason to pay Halle a visit soon! Many thanks.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 19, 2019, 09:42:11 AM
Adrien-François Servais

Who? Never heard about him.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2019, 11:12:58 AM
Yet I'm sure he will touch the springs of your romantic heart!  :D

https://www.youtube.com/v/4PUW24Vhfdo

Spring, string.... you know what I mean!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 01:45:51 AM
Yet I'm sure he will touch the springs of your romantic heart!  :D

https://www.youtube.com/v/4PUW24Vhfdo

Indeed, beautiful music.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 20, 2019, 01:55:23 AM
Indeed, beautiful music.
And wonderful to see how his statue dominates the Halle market square:  :)
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/Halle%2C_Grote_Markt-PM_46290.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 02:00:56 AM
And wonderful to see how his statue dominates the Halle market square:  :)
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/Halle%2C_Grote_Markt-PM_46290.jpg)

Yes, a nice perspective. Btw, the statue was deisgned and executed by his son-in-law, a Polish sculptor.

Now, how about Irons' quiz? Any ideas, for I have none.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 06:38:40 AM


Now, how about Irons' quiz? Any ideas, for I have none.  :)

A Tone-Poem.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 06:47:31 AM
A Tone-Poem.

In which the brass plays just one note save for a trombone which plays two? Hmmm, is there any such beast? I reckon if there is it's certainly not by a German.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 07:15:52 AM
In which the brass plays just one note save for a trombone which plays two? Hmmm, is there any such beast? I reckon if there is it's certainly not by a German.  :laugh:

 You are right not by a German, and before you ask, not by a Brit either. :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 07:17:35 AM
You are right not by a German, and before you ask, not by a Brit either. :laugh:

The Mystery of Time?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 07:35:34 AM
No. Bear in mind I said not by a Brit.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 20, 2019, 07:38:51 AM
No. Bear in mind I said not by a Brit.
Miloslav Kabeláč is soooo British.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 07:47:08 AM
Miloslav Kabeláč is soooo British.  :D

He's actually Britiš.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 08:14:23 AM
I don't do smoke and mirrors. ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 08:16:11 AM
I don't do smoke and mirrors. ;)

Is this a new hint?  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 20, 2019, 08:17:25 AM
My riddle is much easier...

Quiz!

A well known composer – as described by an equally famous and popular composer.

Here are a few quotes that may help you in identifying him:

“By autumn my meetings with XXX became quite frequent.
...
I have already said that I had found a striking change in him.
...
No matter what one might talk about to him about what or what would be the business in hand, he would break away every minute to attend to all sorts of trivial and workaday cares. A rather large watch dog  suplied him with more than a little for these interruptions and everyday bustle. While taking a walk , the concern about the conduct of his dog and his morals, the endeavours to keep him from courting the canine fair sex, went so far that occasionally he carried the hulk in his arms.
....

All this medley of Christian meekness, backbiting, fondness for beasts, misanthropy, artistic interests, and a triviality worthy of an old maid from a hospice, all were fated to develop into still greater incongruities….”
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 08:20:12 AM
Is this a new hint?  :)

If it isn't by then it is about.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 08:22:11 AM
If it isn't by then it is about.

A symhponic poem about a Brit, then.

Ropartz' La chasse du Prince Arthur?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 08:27:14 AM
A symhponic poem about a Brit, then.

Ropartz' La chasse du Prince Arthur?

No. Think of the greatest Brit ever.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 08:33:00 AM
No. Think of the greatest Brit ever.

A toss between Frank Lampard and Wayne Rooney.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 08:41:29 AM
A toss between Frank Lampard and Wayne Rooney.

 :laugh: :laugh:. At the Hammers we have a song about Frank.

I was more thinking of literary prowess in the great Brits stakes!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 20, 2019, 09:06:51 AM
My riddle is much easier...

Quiz!

A well known composer – as described by an equally famous and popular composer.

Here are a few quotes that may help you in identifying him:

“By autumn my meetings with XXX became quite frequent.
...
I have already said that I had found a striking change in him.
...
No matter what one might talk about to him about what or what would be the business in hand, he would break away every minute to attend to all sorts of trivial and workaday cares. A rather large watch dog  suplied him with more than a little for these interruptions and everyday bustle. While taking a walk , the concern about the conduct of his dog and his morals, the endeavours to keep him from courting the canine fair sex, went so far that occasionally he carried the hulk in his arms.
....

All this medley of Christian meekness, backbiting, fondness for beasts, misanthropy, artistic interests, and a triviality worthy of an old maid from a hospice, all were fated to develop into still greater incongruities….”
Rimsky-Korsakov about his tutor, Balakirev. (I saw his St. Petersburg home, now a museum).  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 09:47:07 AM
:laugh: :laugh:. At the Hammers we have a song about Frank.

I was more thinking of literary prowess in the great Brits stakes!

Yeah, I suspected it's all about Shakespeare.

Tchaikovsky's The Tempest?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: pjme on February 20, 2019, 10:33:11 AM
Rimsky-Korsakov about his tutor, Balakirev. (I saw his St. Petersburg home, now a museum).  :)

Indeed. And you win the Golden Borscht Award!

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_PcEo5caoEvs/SS6WPlYfKwI/AAAAAAAACN0/Rp5bAnnuXVo/s400/88177486_f6ac1b6e00.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 10:53:27 AM
Yeah, I suspected it's all about Shakespeare.

Tchaikovsky's The Tempest?

No, but nearly there. A work by a composer as famous as Tchaikovsky. When I say "about" I mean Shakespeare himself not one of his plays. I think you will get it now, and well deserved too. By the way, it is a great piece.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 20, 2019, 10:57:41 AM
No, but nearly there. A work by a composer as famous as Tchaikovsky. When I say "about" I mean Shakespeare himself not one of his plays. I think you will get it now, and well deserved too. By the way, it is a great piece.

You mean a tone poem about Shakespeare himself? Otomh I have no idea. No, wait, who wrote the music for Shakespeare in Love?  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 11:38:32 AM
You mean a tone poem about Shakespeare himself?

That is exactly what I mean. Shakespeare as a word is a bit long-winded though. ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 20, 2019, 11:53:40 AM
Sibelius’s The Bard? Of course, that bard was another bard, but the description of the piece seems to fit the bill (I’m not much of a sibelian, I must confess—-but that must be obvious by now  :-[).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 20, 2019, 12:39:57 PM
Sibelius’s The Bard? Of course, that bard was another bard
What about Danse macabre, then? 8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 20, 2019, 12:47:32 PM
Sibelius’s The Bard? Of course, that bard was another bard, but the description of the piece seems to fit the bill (I’m not much of a sibelian, I must confess—-but that must be obvious by now  :-[).

Yes. The notes with my Gibson recording start by saying - The Bard has no programmatic idea behind it apart from that suggested by the title.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 20, 2019, 01:01:50 PM
An easy one: I was for some years in a tempestuous relationship with a noted philosopher, and the later part of my output revolves around one book (one of those books probably more talked about than actually read), but I could not complete this cycle as I died at a relatively young age... So, who am I?

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on February 20, 2019, 01:04:35 PM
Yes. The notes with my Gibson recording start by saying - The Bard has no programmatic idea behind it apart from that suggested by the title.

Quote
Erik Tawaststjerna thought that the composer was probably inspired by Runeberg's poem The Bard, although the composer himself disputed this. The working title of The Bard was probably Der Ritter und die Najade. The Naiads of course bring to mind The Oceanides.

There may well have been several extra-musical sources of inspiration. Sibelius himself associated it with the world of the Edda and the Ossianic poems and said that the composition was "something like an ancient Scandinavian ballad from the time of the Vikings".
http://www.sibelius.fi/english/musiikki/ork_muita_bardi.htm
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 21, 2019, 12:37:45 AM
http://www.sibelius.fi/english/musiikki/ork_muita_bardi.htm

It looks like I have led Florestan on a wild goose chase.  :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on February 21, 2019, 12:42:20 AM
It looks like I have led Florestan on a wild goose chase.  :(
It does. Danse macabre was the more correct answer.   :-X
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 21, 2019, 12:50:42 AM
It looks like I have led Florestan on a wild goose chase.  :(

Not exactly, because after posting "otomh I have no idea" I went to sleep.  :D

But the hint was indeed misleading. You might as well have chosen En saga and given Galsworthy as hint.  ;D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 21, 2019, 01:06:54 AM
(one of those books probably more talked about than actually read)

The usual suspects are the Bible, The Wealth of Nations and Das Kapital.


Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 21, 2019, 01:51:59 AM
None of the three, but it was written in the same language as one of those you mention (language that was not the mother tongue of the composer in question)...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 21, 2019, 04:25:16 AM
None of the three, but it was written in the same language as one of those you mention (language that was not the mother tongue of the composer in question)...

Englsih or German, then.

Now, either the composer was gay, or a woman, or the philosopher was a woman. Am I right?  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 21, 2019, 05:42:41 AM
German (the language of the book) ... gay (the composer) ... man (the philosopher)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 21, 2019, 06:54:47 AM
Jean  Barraqué, Michel Foucault, Hermann Broch's The Death of Virgil.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 21, 2019, 07:00:42 AM
Jean  Barraqué, Michel Foucault, Hermann Broch's The Death of Virgil.
Told you It was easy...didn’t know you were so well versed in avant-garde composers, modern Austro-German novels, and post-structuralist  philosophy...  ;)

À vous, cher ami  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 21, 2019, 07:10:43 AM
Told you It was easy...didn’t know you were so well versed in avant-garde composers, modern Austro-German novels, and post-structuralist  philosophy...  ;)

I am not, actually; all I needed was a list of gay composers and the hunch that your man must be French.  :)

Quote
À vous, cher ami  :)

Okay, easy one too: this composer was so succesful and popular in a particular genre that his name become a moniker for it. Yet of all his numerous pupils, some of whom would later become more famous than him, only one of them composed a relatively famous work in that genre. Name the composer, the genre, the pupil and the work.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 21, 2019, 07:24:07 AM
Jean  Barraqué, Michel Foucault, Hermann Broch's The Death of Virgil.

I have read about one-third of The Death of Virgil and a biography of Michel Foucault, both years ago; don't recall Jean Barraque though possibly he gets a mention in the biography. All too long ago to stand an earthly chance.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 22, 2019, 12:50:25 AM
BUMP!

this composer was so succesful and popular in a particular genre that his name become a moniker for it. Yet of all his numerous pupils, some of whom would later become more famous than him, only one of them composed a relatively famous work in that genre. Name the composer, the genre, the pupil and the work.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on February 23, 2019, 12:49:37 AM
BUMP!

I did think Strauss waltz but "numerous pupils" ruled it out.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 02:35:54 AM
Antonio Salieri, opera, Beethoven, Fidelio

No. Does not fit in "his name become a moniker for the genre". Incidentally, though, you got the place of the action right.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 23, 2019, 02:51:36 AM
Corelli, violin sonata?

Missed the hint about Vienna so probably wrong.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 03:09:10 AM
I figured my guess was wrong

No, it was actually a good call.

Quote
but wanted to get the ball rolling and maybe spark something in someone else's mind.  So, Vienna - care to offer a hint e.g. time span?

When he was born, Franz Joseph had not yet acceded to the throne. When he died, the Empire had been abolished for almost 10 years.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 03:25:01 AM
So, the composer was born before December 1848, and died around 1928.

Exactly.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 23, 2019, 03:27:07 AM
How about Robert Fuchs (1847 - 1927)  aka  "Serenaden-Fuchs"

Edit: San Antone beat me to it.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 03:34:56 AM
And Zemlinsky wrote Serenade (Suite) for violin and piano (1895), so

Fuchs, Serenade, Zemlinsky, Serenade for violin/piano.

Yes, Robert Fuchs, but as for the pupil, I thought about Hugo Wolf and his Italian Serenade for string quartet, which I think is more famous (in a relative way, that is) than the Zemlinsky's, which I confess to never hearing about.  :D

Anyway, you got Fuchs right, so it's your turn.

Also, congrats to Biffo for coming up with the right answer.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 03:42:30 AM
Okay, this was rattling around my head yesterday - so I'll go with.

This composer wrote a ballet, which was subsequently made into a musical, which was also later made into a film. Who is the composer and what are the works?

I supppose it's not Tchaikovsky.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 06:17:15 AM
Leonard Bernstein’s Fancy Free, which served as a basis for the musical On the Town and the subsequent film of the same title?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 06:20:18 AM
Leonard Bernstein’s Fancy Free, which served as a basis for the musical On the Town and the subsequent film of the same title?

I first thought of West Side Story but it is not a ballet.

Anyway, should the answer be LB, it would only be more evidence that "les grand esprits se rencontrent".  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 23, 2019, 06:32:22 AM
Bernstein sounds plausible to me.

My first thoughts were Polovtsian Dances, one of several works by Borodin plundered by Robert Wright and George Forrest for the musical and subsequently film Kismet. The 19th century was ruled out early on with Tchaikovsky and the Dances are not a free-standing ballet though first performed as a concert piece.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 06:33:00 AM
I was going to check Wolf but when I saw Zemlinsky had written a serenade I leapt into the fray.

This Serenaden-Fuchs has a most impressive line up of pupils. And no less than the notoriously grumpy Brahms wrote that “Fuchs is a splendid musician, everything is so fine and so skillful, so charmingly invented, that one is always pleased."

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 06:37:11 AM
My first thoughts were Polovtsian Dances, one of several works by Borodin plundered by Robert Wright and George Forrest for the musical and subsequently film Kismet. The 19th century was ruled out early on with Tchaikovsky and the Dances are not a free-standing ballet though first performed as a concert piece.
I was barking up that wrong tree for a while as well...and since I was mixing up  Stranger in Paradise from Kismet with Some Enchanted Evening from South Pacific, I wasn’t really getting anywhere.  ::) ;D

Your turn.
I am a composer who is very, very famous in a specific genre, but wrote one ballet (that was orchestrated by another prestigious composer),  first performed by a legendary ballet company in the town in which I pursued part of my studies (a town you’ll easily identify me with, even if it’s not in my home country).

Who am I, and which is my ballet?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 06:41:16 AM
I am a composer who is very, very famous in a specific genre, but wrote one ballet (that was orchestrated by another prestigious composer),  first performed by a legendary ballet company in the town in which I pursued part of my studies (a town you’ll easily identify me with, even if it’s not in my home country).

Luis de Góngora would've been proud of writing such lines.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 06:44:13 AM
Chopin - Les Sylphides orchestrated by Glazunov?

Les Sylphides is not by Chopin.  He never contemplated, let alone sketched, a ballet. ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 06:46:34 AM
Luis de Góngora would've been proud of writing such lines.  :laugh:
Thank you....I think  ::)

Chopin - Les Sylphides orchestrated by Glazunov? 
Nope. Think closer to home (in a way).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 06:48:06 AM
Nope. Think closer to home (in a way).

Then something to do with US, one way or another.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 06:51:02 AM
Another hint:

My ballet was first performed on the same evening as the most famous work by a composer who spent some years in exile in my home country...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 06:53:52 AM
How do you explain this from Wikipeda? "Les Sylphides (French: [le silfid]) is a short, non-narrative ballet blanc. Its original choreography was by Michel Fokine, with music by Frédéric Chopin orchestrated by Alexander Glazunov.

Read the whole article and you'll understand that Chopin himself has got nothing to do with it.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 06:56:05 AM
Another hint:

My ballet was first performed on the same evening as the most famous work by a composer who spent some years in exile in my home country...

Góngora meets Mallarmé...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 06:58:16 AM
Góngora meets Mallarmé...
You make me blush... I should write for a living!  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:05:23 AM
You make me blush... I should write for a living!  ;D

Is that what they were doing?  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:08:12 AM
I know that - but his music was used.

True, just like Pergolesi's music was used in Pulcinella.  :)

If I understand ritter correctly, we must look for a composer who did write a ballet of his own, albeit only in un-orchestrated sketches.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:16:01 AM
If I understand ritter correctly, we must look for a composer who did write a ballet of his own, albeit only in un-orchestrated sketches.
You understand correctly. The ballet was comissioned, planned and completed as a ballet, but the task of orchestrating it was handed over to another composer (who has an immense list of opus numbers, none of which surprisingly is an original ballet).

Another clue:

The other ballet (by another composer) that was premiered on the same evening as mine, is a prime example of the inclusion of the most typical musical style of my home country in classical music.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:18:30 AM
do you have a guess?

Otomh, knowing Rafael's preferences, my hunch is that the ballet was premiered in Paris by the Ballets Russes. If I'm right, the composer is not French and might possibly be associated, albeit in an oblique way, with Stravinsky.  Other than that, no effing idea, as our dear ritter himself would say.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 23, 2019, 07:18:58 AM
I was barking up that wrong tree for a while as well...and since I was mixing up  Stranger in Paradise from Kismet with Some Enchanted Evening from South Pacific, I wasn’t really getting anywhere.  ::) ;D
I am a composer who is very, very famous in a specific genre, but wrote one ballet (that was orchestrated by another prestigious composer),  first performed by a legendary ballet company in the town in which I pursued part of my studies (a town you’ll easily identify me with, even if it’s not in my home country).

Who am I, and which is my ballet?

Carl Maria von Weber, his 'ballet' Le Spectre de la Rose was actually a piano piece, Introduction to the Dance, Berlioz orchestrated it for insertion into the Paris production of Der Freischutz. The scenario Le spectre etc was added later by Diaghilev (?) and performed on the same evening as the premiere of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:22:14 AM
Otomh, knowing Rafael's preferences, my hunch is that the ballet was premiered in Paris by the Ballets Russes. If I'm right, the composer is not French and might possibly be associated, albeit in an oblique way, with Stravinsky.  Other than that, no effing idea, as our dear ritter himself would say.  ;D

Carl Maria von Weber, his 'ballet' Le Spectre de la Rose was actually a piano piece, Introduction to the Dance, Berlioz orchestrated it for insertion into the Paris production of Der Freischutz. The scenario Le spectre etc was added later by Diaghilev (?) and performed on the same evening as the premiere of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring
It wasn’t the Ballets Russes... ;),and Stravinsky has nothing to do with this...

Giveaway clue: I love the city where my ballet was performed... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:24:28 AM
It wasn’t the Ballets Russes... ;),and Stravinsky has nothing to do with thus...

Giveaway clue: I love the city where my ballet was performed... ;D

A South American composer?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:26:28 AM
A South American composer?
No, not South American...

I insist: “I love the city where my ballet was performed”
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:31:46 AM
No, not South American...

I insist: “I love the city where my ballet was performed”

All I think and post is otomh: Gerswhin?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:33:43 AM
All I think and post is otomh: Gerswhin?
Warm, very warm....but not quite there yet.

“I love [the city]...”
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:34:24 AM
Philadelphia?
No, remember the city is not in my home country...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:36:43 AM
Warm, very warm....but not quite there yet.

“I love [the city]...”

Con todo mi amor,
Sevilla, Sevilla te quiero.


(Heard by me in Madrid, on a radio station, AD 1993)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:40:18 AM
“I love [the city]...”
...every moment of the year...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:43:03 AM
...every moment of the year...

Piazzola?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:45:20 AM
Piazzola?
Frio, frio.... You were sooooo close!  :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:47:03 AM
...every moment of the year...
....because my love....
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:52:49 AM
Ginestera?
Nope...

Newclue: Ella Fitzgerald.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 07:55:29 AM
Warm, very warm....but not quite there yet.

The only ballet by a very famous North American composer, orchestrated by another famous composer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 07:58:12 AM
The only ballet by a very famous North American composer, orchestrated by another famous composer.
That’s it...and the other clues should IMHO have given away the identity of the composer (not the orchestrator) by now...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 08:01:28 AM
That’s it...and the other clues should IMHO have given away the identity of the composer by now...

I love that effing city... Ella Fitzgerald... yeah, it's about as clear as the darkest midnight ever --- but then again I'm not American.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 08:04:37 AM
You don’t have to be American to have heard of this, sung by Ella, or by Frank, or by Maurice... in the springtime, in the summer....
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 08:12:55 AM
You don’t have to be American to have heard of this, sung by Ella, or by Frank, or by Maurice... in the springtime, in the summer....

I vividly remember your's not ever hearing Waves of the Danube...  ;D

I love Paris! So what? (or rather, so who?)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 08:19:49 AM

I love Paris! So what? (or rather, so who?)
Sizzling! You’re there..
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 08:21:00 AM
Sizzling hot! You’re there..

Cole Porter?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 23, 2019, 08:28:38 AM
Cole Porter?

Are you looking for Within the Quota by Cole Porter?


Finally!

Cole Porter, who wrote the song I Love Paris for the musical Can-Can, wrote the ballet Within the Quota (choreography by Jean Borlin) for Rolf de Maré’s Ballets Suedois. The work was orchestrated by Charles Koechlin, and first performed at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées on October 25, 1923. On that same evening, Darius Milhaud’s jazz-infused La création du monde received its world premiere.

Florestan, don’t tell me you had never heard I Love Paris?  ???

So ex aequo Florestan and San Antone, I’d say.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 08:35:42 AM
Florestan, don’t tell me you had never heard I Love Paris?  ???

I have heard it alright, Ella and Maurice included, but I have never known the story behind it.  Thanks for sharing. :)

Quote
So ex aequo Florestan and San Antone, I’d say.  :)

While I'm thinking about mine, I'll gladly let San Antone post his.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 08:58:46 AM
Give it to Florestan since he came up with the composer before I did.

Thanks. Here's an easy one.


My ancestry was threefold, my father was an alcoholic and my stepfather died while I was in my teens. I have never taken any conducting classes yet I was barely 18 when I conducted a famous contemporary work alongside one of my own compositions. I am famous more for my recordings than for my compositions and I died in exile. My name is...?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on February 23, 2019, 09:51:12 AM
Thanks. Here's an easy one.


My ancestry was threefold, my father was an alcoholic and my stepfather died while I was in my teens. I have never taken any conducting classes yet I was barely 18 when I conducted a famous contemporary work alongside one of my own compositions. I am famous more for my recordings than for my compositions and I died in exile. My name is...?

Wild guess: Enescu
Wild guess: Futwangler
Wild guess: Bruno Walter
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 09:56:36 AM
Wild guess: Enescu
Wild guess: Futwangler
Wild guess: Bruno Walter

None of the above, but they all had something in common with my man. Giveaway hint: he was the fellow countryman of one of the above.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on February 23, 2019, 10:30:10 AM
None of the above, but they all had something in common with my man. Giveaway hint: he was the fellow countryman of one of the above.
Silvestri.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 23, 2019, 10:48:03 AM
Silvestri.

Yep. Your turn. Hit us hard and deep.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on February 23, 2019, 04:36:36 PM
Yep. Your turn. Hit us hard and deep.  :)
I played one of the world’s most played instruments, but was one of only of a very few famous virtuosi. I commissioned numerous pieces including concerti. My early recordings were produced by a man who later became famous for working with a well known quartet. I was interned in WW2, and later made an MBE. I recorded original works by RVW, HVL, and Malcolm Arnold.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 24, 2019, 02:32:30 AM
The initial thought is Larry Adler but only Tommy Reilly MBE fits all the criteria. He was interned in Germany during WW2.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on February 24, 2019, 06:45:05 AM
The initial thought is Larry Adler but only Tommy Reilly MBE fits all the criteria. He was interned in Germany during WW2.

Bingo. Born in Guelph, Canada, my home town. Harmonica player.
Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on February 24, 2019, 07:14:45 AM
I had no idea that RVW, HVL, and Malcolm Arnold wrote works for the harmonica. Who is HVL anyway?

 :o
Heitor Villa-Lobos. I knew the Vaughan Williams piece, and like it quite a bit. I think I'll need to listen to the V-L.

https://www.youtube.com/v/Wt2QrXA3A6I
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 24, 2019, 07:29:25 AM
I had no idea that RVW, HVL, and Malcolm Arnold wrote works for the harmonica. Who is HVL anyway?

 :o

RVW wrote his Romance for Harmonica, Strings and Piano for Larry Adler but I only have it played by Tommy Reilly (with Marriner/ASMF).

Now need to think of a new puzzle.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on February 24, 2019, 07:41:15 AM
Incidentally, the producer in the hint was George Martin. You can guess the quartet ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 24, 2019, 07:53:51 AM
This 20th composer studied in Leipzig, Vienna and Paris, feeling a strong affinity with Paris. He toured extensively as a virtuoso pianist including North Africa where his piano was transported by camels. He eventually returned to his native land where he wrote music of a nationalistic or folk idiom.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on February 24, 2019, 07:58:08 AM
RVW wrote his Romance for Harmonica, Strings and Piano for Larry Adler but I only have it played by Tommy Reilly (with Marriner/ASMF).

Now need to think of a new puzzle.
It seems I have Adler's recording with Sargent in the EMI big box as well as a twofer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 26, 2019, 01:43:30 AM
My quiz offering seems to have gone down like a lead balloon, possibly because it is too vague. I wanted to add more yesterday but a Microsoft 'update' put my PC out of action for most of the day. Here is a bit more.

While studying in Leipzig he was, to his irritation, frequently compared to his native country's most famous composer who had studied there in the 19th century. Later he performed this composer frequently and did a great deal of study of his works.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 04:04:40 AM
My quiz offering seems to have gone down like a lead balloon, possibly because it is too vague. I wanted to add more yesterday but a Microsoft 'update' put my PC out of action for most of the day. Here is a bit more.

While studying in Leipzig he was, to his irritation, frequently compared to his native country's most famous composer who had studied there in the 19th century. Later he performed this composer frequently and did a great deal of study of his works.

A Scandinavian?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 26, 2019, 04:18:19 AM
A Scandinavian?

Yes, Scandinavian
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 04:25:09 AM
Geir Tveitt?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 26, 2019, 04:45:05 AM
Geir Tveitt?
I hope you are right, because the only composer I am sure studied in Leipzig was Grieg.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 04:46:26 AM
I hope you are right, because the only composer I am sure studied in Leipzig was Grieg.

That was my line of reasoning too.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 26, 2019, 04:47:04 AM
Geir Tveitt?

Correct!!!!!

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 26, 2019, 04:54:36 AM
I hope you are right, because the only composer I am sure studied in Leipzig was Grieg.

Leipzig has an impressive list of alumni -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Music_and_Theatre_Leipzig#Notable_alumni
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 04:59:25 AM
After a quite successful dress rehearsal, all further performances of this opera were unexpectedly banned by the head of that state. Name it.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 26, 2019, 05:14:21 AM
After a quite successful dress rehearsal, all further performances of this opera were unexpectedly banned by the head of that state. Name it.

Is it Donizetti's Maria Stuarda, banned by the King of Naples because it allegedly upset his wife?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 06:57:08 AM
Is it Donizetti's Maria Stuarda, banned by the King of Naples because it allegedly upset his wife?

Exactly.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 07:02:46 AM
Exactly.  :)
I was gonna say Bomarzo... ;D

Although it’s not my turn, here goes an easy one—kind of complementary to the previous question: what opera was so much to the liking of a head of state, that he demanded it be performed complete again on the evening of the world premiere ?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on February 26, 2019, 09:03:59 AM
Was this the Mozart - Salieri contest when Salieri's Prima la musica prevailed against Der Schauspieldirektor? As both are so short (30-40 minutes or so), the whole piece could easily be given again as an encore. Emperor Joseph II. would have been the monarch.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 09:35:22 AM
Was this the Mozart - Salieri contest when Salieri's Prima la musica prevailed against Der Schauspieldirektor? As both are so short (30-40 minutes or so), the whole piece could easily be given again as an encore. Emperor Joseph II. would have been the monarch.
It was an emperor,  but not Joseph II. The composer was neither Mozart nor Salieri,  but hailed from the same country as one of them. .It was a full length opera. . 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 09:46:34 AM
It was an emperor,  but not Joseph II. The composer was neither Mozart nor Salieri,  but hailed from the same country as one of them. .It was a full length opera. .

Proserpine by Paisiello, encored at the request of Napoleon?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 10:20:26 AM
Proserpine by Paisiello, encored at the request of Napoleon?
Hélas, non! Jo498 was closer.

.... J, K, L.... ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 26, 2019, 10:23:16 AM
Think Cimarosa and Leopold. The name is on the tip of the tongue but escapes me: Il something or other...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 10:25:24 AM
Think Cimarosa and Leopold. The name is on the tip of the tongue but escapes me: Il something or other...
:)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 26, 2019, 10:27:11 AM
:)
I didn't want to look it up. Felt I should know it. When I stop thinking about it, it'll come to me. Or someone here will put me out of my misery.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 10:33:00 AM
I didn't want to look it up. Felt I should know it. When I stop thinking about it, it'll come to me. Or someone here will put me out of my misery.
Someone will sure do that...

It’s considered the longest bis in the history of music... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 10:33:19 AM
Il matrimonio segreto.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 26, 2019, 10:34:51 AM
Il matrimonio segreto.
Yes, That one! Thank you!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 10:39:22 AM
Il matrimonio segreto.
Yes. First performed at the Burgtheater in Vienna on February 2, 1792, in the presence of Emperor Leopold II. He liked it so much that he ordered dinner to be served to the entire troupe, and that they should then perform the opera all over again.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 26, 2019, 10:40:50 AM
Yes, That one! Thank you!

Don't mention it, just give us your quiz.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 26, 2019, 10:47:51 AM
Don't mention it, just give us your quiz.
Since the Oscars just finished, who had the most nominations for an Oscar before winning one? Though he finally won one, he wasn't alive to enjoy it. Max Steiner, his friend, completed his last score.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on February 26, 2019, 11:04:18 AM
That would be Victor Young (who finally—and posthumously—won an Oscar for Around The Workd in 80 Days in 1957).

If my answer is correct, it’s now actually Biffo’s turn (I very inelegantly cut into the game this sfternoon, when he had correctly answered Florestan’s question about Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda). 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on February 26, 2019, 12:44:32 PM
That would be Victor Young (who finally—and posthumously—won an Oscar for Around The Workd in 80 Days in 1957).

If my answer is correct, it’s now actually Biffo’s turn (I very inelegantly cut into the game this sfternoon, when he had correctly answered Florestan’s question about Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda). 
Yes indeedee! :) Next...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 27, 2019, 05:16:05 AM
Hope this isn't too easy.

This child prodigy became well known as a violin virtuoso. He is, however, much better known as a very successful composer in a different branch of music. He lived to a ripe old age but died in poverty in his native Vienna.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 27, 2019, 05:57:43 AM
Hope this isn't too easy.

This child prodigy became well known as a violin virtuoso. He is, however, much better known as a very successful composer in a different branch of music. He lived to a ripe old age but died in poverty in his native Vienna.

I suppose that by "a different branch of music" you mean "not classical", because if his music does indeed belong to "classical" he must be the best kept secret of Austrian / Viennese music.  ;D

EDIT: Finally got him! Ludwig Minkus! I had no effing idea he was a Viennese.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on February 27, 2019, 06:27:24 AM
I suppose that by "a different branch of music" you mean "not classical", because if his music does indeed belong to "classical" he must be the best kept secret of Austrian / Viennese music.  ;D

EDIT: Finally got him! Ludwig Minkus! I had no effing idea he was a Viennese.

Correct again! Minkus was born and died in Vienna but made his reputation as a composer of ballet in St Petersburg. WW1 cut off his pension and royalties from Russia and he died in poverty.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on February 27, 2019, 06:43:29 AM
Well, it appears to be my turn, so...

These two composers are considered as belonging to the same artistic movement, although they never met and there are very few, if any, similarities between their works. One such is that they both wrote at the same age a work for the same forces, bearing the same opus number. Who are they and what are the works?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 04:44:56 AM
BUMP!

These two composers are considered as belonging to the same artistic movement, although they never met and there are very few, if any, similarities between their works. One such is that they both wrote at the same age a work for the same forces, bearing the same opus number. Who are they and what are the works?

Hint:

(https://c.o0bg.com/rf/image_960w/Boston/2011-2020/2018/12/03/BostonGlobe.com/Arts/Images/Rudolph_178.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 02, 2019, 04:51:14 AM
'belonged to the same artistic movement'

All I could think of was serialism and I didn't  get very far with it - too much scope. It did prompt me to listen to Berg's Violin Concerto (Daniel Hope soloist).

After the HINT the answer still eludes me.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 05:10:29 AM
The hint looks to me like Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, which had a song composed by Johnny Marks.  So is one of the composers Joseph Marx?  Joseph Marx coined the term "atonality," an I wonder if that has something to do with it.

Joseph Marx and Richard Welz both wrote a work called Gesang des Lebens.

Is any of this even close?

Nope, not even close.  :)
 
The hint is in the name, not in the character.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 05:14:45 AM
Actually, you're not even close to the composers in question, but by nominating Joseph Marx and Richard Wetz you got it right in one respect.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 05:16:13 AM
So, one of the composers is named Rudolph?

No, but the works in question are the same as another one related to a Rudolph. There, I gave them away.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 05:44:15 AM
Do the composers/works have anything to do with the set of variations based on the tune of Anton Diabelli of which the Diabelli Variations was part?

No, but in naming those variations you come very close to the work related to a Rudolph I alluded to.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 02, 2019, 05:48:03 AM
I am guessing the Rudolph is the Archduke Rudolph, dedicatee of Beethoven's Missa Solemnis. Plenty of other composers have written a Missa solemins (or Messe solenelle), the tedious bit is matching two of them.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 05:50:09 AM
I am guessing the Rudolph is the Archduke Rudolph, dedicatee of Beethoven's Missa Solemnis. Plenty of other composers have written a Missa solemins (or Messe solenelle), the tedious bit is matching two of them.

Hot, burning hot. He was the dedicatee of many Beethoven's works, not just MS. Actually, the one in question bears direct testimony to him (or rather, to his position).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 05:59:28 AM
Must be the Archduke trio.

Yes.

So just find another piano trio op 97 and you have your second composer.

No.

Remember what I wrote:

the works in question are the same as another one related to a Rudolph.

Hint: ask your heart and you'll instantly got half of the answer.

EDIT: I mean "the same" as in the same forces. Sorry for my possibly bad English.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:04:50 AM
This is what you wrote:

Now you say they do not share the same op. number.  ???

No, see my edit above and excuse my English, it's not my native language.

What I mean is that the works do share the same opus number and they are written for the same forces as the Archduke-trio. In short, look for two piano trios. And again: look in your heart.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:11:54 AM
Both Brahms and Shostakovich wrote piano trios op. 8 - but "part of the same movement?"  I will keep looking.

You're almost there. It's not Shostakovich but it starts similarly.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:14:47 AM
Brahms & Reicha both wrote op. 101 piano trios.

At the same age? And are they both considered as belonging to the same movement?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:20:04 AM
Yeah, I didn't confirm those things ...

Look, I have just googled it and the second link listed is the other half of the answer. You're so close, so close...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:26:05 AM
Okay my last guess: Brahms was 20 when he composed his op. 8 and Pfitzer was 20 (depending on the month) when he at least began his op. 8 piano trio.

I had no idea about that, but it's not Pfitzner.

Connect these dots:

Both Brahms and Shostakovich wrote piano trios op. 8 - but "part of the same movement?"  I will keep looking.

You're almost there. It's not Shostakovich but it starts similarly.  ;)


Look, I have just googled it and the second link listed is the other half of the answer. You're so close, so close...



Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:38:06 AM
Okay must be Brahms and Chopin  - so, Sho and Cho are similar ...

(https://i.gifer.com/embedded/download/4sE8.gif)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:45:53 AM
Pfhew ...  :-[

Here's my challenge question:

This composer was not French but studied and lived there, and where he wrote most of his music.  Had he not died so young, he might have gone on to become one of the greatest composers of the 20th century.  At least that was the kind of thing that was said at the time of his death.  His most famous work is a chamber piece. 

Who is he and name the work?

Otomh: Lekeu and his Violin Sonata?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 02, 2019, 06:56:31 AM
My gosh.  That was quick. 

Well, earlier today Andre posted something about it, so I took my chance on that.  :D

Great work. I also love his Piano Trio. Indeed, one of the greatest would-be in the history of Western music.

Quote
I suppose I should try to come up with harder questions ...   >:(   ;D  :laugh:

By all means, please do! AfaIc, it's still your turn. :D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 02, 2019, 09:27:43 AM
Well, if you insist:

This composer could not devote much of his time to music since he had a demanding career which involved constant travel, but he did manage to write music of distinction and is well respected.  He considered chamber music to be his strong suit but his one acknowledged masterpiece is in a different genre altogether.  Some of his later works exhibit influences from his wide ranging exposure to foreign cultures due to his extensive world traveling.

Who is he and what is his masterpiece?

Is it Jean Cras? He fitted in composing with his career as an officer in the French Navy during which he travelled extensively. His opera Polypheme might be his masterpiece though I haven't heard it; I do have recordings of some of his chamber and orchestral works.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 02, 2019, 12:19:40 PM
Pfhew ...  :-[

Here's my challenge question:

This composer was not French but studied and lived there, and where he wrote most of his music.  Had he not died so young, he might have gone on to become one of the greatest composers of the 20th century.  At least that was the kind of thing that was said at the time of his death.  His most famous work is a chamber piece. 

Who is he and name the work?
Lekeu
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 02, 2019, 12:21:09 PM
Well, if you insist:

This composer could not devote much of his time to music since he had a demanding career which involved constant travel, but he did manage to write music of distinction and is well respected.  He considered chamber music to be his strong suit but his one acknowledged masterpiece is in a different genre altogether.  Some of his later works exhibit influences from his wide ranging exposure to foreign cultures due to his extensive world traveling.

Who is he and what is his masterpiece?

Roussell. Ariadne or the last 2 symphonies.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 03, 2019, 05:17:07 AM
Three composers set the same war poem by this poet. Composers 1 and 2 were close friends. Composer 1 and 3 set another war poem by the same poet. Composer 2 wrote an orchestral work in honour of the poet. Name the poet (dead easy, probably), composers 1 - 3 and the poems/works in question.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 03, 2019, 07:18:47 AM
Three composers set the same war poem by this poet. Composers 1 and 2 were close friends. Composer 1 and 3 set another war poem by the same poet. Composer 2 wrote an orchestral work in honour of the poet. Name the poet (dead easy, probably), composers 1 - 3 and the poems/works in question.
Wilfred Owen
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 03, 2019, 07:24:25 AM
Wilfred Owen

No, a different war
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 03, 2019, 07:26:56 AM
No, a different war
So that rulesout Siegfried Sassoon (and composers Rootham and Bliss), I suppose...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 03, 2019, 07:39:15 AM
Walt Whitman
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 03, 2019, 07:49:12 AM
So that rulesout Siegfried Sassoon (and composers Rootham and Bliss), I suppose...

Yes, all those...see below
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 03, 2019, 07:50:08 AM
Walt Whitman

Correct, the rest should be easy
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 03, 2019, 07:54:02 AM
Dirge for Two Veterans from Drum-Taps (1865, American Civil War) by Walt Whitman.
The two close friends are Ralph Vaughan Williams (Dona Nobis Pacem, 1936) and Gustav [von] Holst (A Dirge for Two Veterans, 1914); the third composer is Kurt Weill. Gustav Holst's Walt Whitman Overture and 1919 setting of Whitman's Ode to Death, Kurt Weill with his Four Walt Whitman Songs from 1942.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 03, 2019, 08:01:57 AM
Dirge for Two Veterans from Drum-Taps (1865, American Civil War) by Walt Whitman.
The two close friends are Ralph Vaughan Williams (Dona Nobis Pacem, 1936) and Gustav [von] Holst (A Dirge for Two Veterans, 1914); the third composer is Kurt Weill. Gustav Holst's Walt Whitman Overture and 1919 setting of Whitman's Ode to Death, Kurt Weill with his Four Walt Whitman Songs from 1942.

Spot on! The Walt Whitman Overture is the work I was looking for but the Ode to Death is a bonus

Holst and RVW wrote the Dirge in a friendly competition, RVW later incorporated it into Dona nobis pacem.

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 03, 2019, 09:36:37 AM
OK. This Dutch Baroque composer’s music is heard in three rather famous movies (I saw them all & love them). Yet, he’s a creation by the film director and the music was composed by a compatriot of the filmmaker. Name both composers.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 03, 2019, 09:44:49 AM
OK. This Dutch Baroque composer’s music is heard in three rather famous movies (I saw them all & love them). Yet, he’s a creation by the film director and the music was composed by a compatriot of the filmmaker. Name both composers.

You mean the Baroque composer is fictional, right?

Van den Budenmayer, Zbigniew Preisner. The director is of course Krzysztof Kieślowski.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 03, 2019, 10:30:21 AM
You mean the Baroque composer is fictional, right?

Van den Budenmayer, Zbigniew Preisner. The director is of course Krzysztof Kieślowski.  ;D
Not only is he fictional, the fictional name borders on the absurd: Van [with capital = Belgian] den [probably German, but after 'van den' = "stemming from", ones expects a place name, a very common type of family names in Dutch] Budenmayer [can only be German, but is not a place name]. Zbigniew Preisner & Krzysztof Kieślowski (one of the very best after Tarkovsky) are both correct - your turn.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 03, 2019, 01:02:07 PM
Since it's Florestan setting the next one, let me get my guesses in early

Alexandrescu
Barbu
Lipatti
Celibidache
Constantinescu
Kirkilescu
Enescu
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 03, 2019, 06:19:48 PM
Dirge for Two Veterans from Drum-Taps (1865, American Civil War) by Walt Whitman.
The two close friends are Ralph Vaughan Williams (Dona Nobis Pacem, 1936) and Gustav [von] Holst (A Dirge for Two Veterans, 1914); the third composer is Kurt Weill. Gustav Holst's Walt Whitman Overture and 1919 setting of Whitman's Ode to Death, Kurt Weill with his Four Walt Whitman Songs from 1942.

I will propose a side question while waiting for Florestan...Holst was one of eight composers up to now who have set Whitman's When Lilacs Last Bloomed...  in whole or in part.  Can you name the other seven without consulting Wikipedia?
Only one of the seven is a composer who may be unknown to most GMGers. The most recent one dates from 2004.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: springrite on March 03, 2019, 06:34:59 PM
Since it's Florestan setting the next one, let me get my guesses in early

Alexandrescu
Barbu
Lipatti
Celibidache
Constantinescu
Kirkilescu
Enescu
I'd venture to guess Ciprian Porumbescu instead!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 04, 2019, 12:03:50 AM
Hindemith is the only one I know of. So 4 to go.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 01:28:31 AM
This highly prolific composer and pianist was a pupil of Faure and d'Indy. He wrote 11 symphonies, 13 sinfoniettas and 3 chamber symphonies. One of his works deals with a subject which, according to Wikipedia, was tackled by no less than 17 other composers, last time in 2015. Who is he and what is the work?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 01:29:11 AM
Kirkilescu

You probably meant Kirculescu.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 01:44:06 AM
Mihail Andricu (1894-1974) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihail_Andricu
(but I didn't know him yet, had to google)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 01:46:00 AM
Mihail Andricu (1894-1974) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihail_Andricu
(but I didn't know him yet, had to google)

I could have bet on it, but hey, I googled your Van den Biedermeyer as well, so we're even now.  :D

And besides, googling is allowed, see the OP.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 04:18:13 AM
OK. Not only was he not the bishop of Rome, this very prolific composer never visited Italy and his compositions don't show Italian influences. He's best known for his polyphonic, typically 'Protestant' settings of all 150 Psalms in the Dutch vernacular, making use of all kinds of popular melodies and meant to be sung by the common people, also at home. Who's this contemporary of the last 'European emperor' - he will have met him in person -, living and working in a world that was both Protestant and Catholic?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 04:19:35 AM
OK. Not only was he not the bishop of Rome, this very prolific composer never visited Italy and his compositions don't show Italian influences. He's best known for his polyphonic, typically 'Protestant' settings of all 150 Psalms in the Dutch vernacular, making use of all kinds of popular melodies and meant to be sung by the common people, also at home. Who's this contemporary of the last 'European emperor', living and working in a world that was both Protestant and Catholic?

Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 04:21:08 AM
Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck?
Nope. Nada. Neu.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 04:23:58 AM
contemporary of the last 'European emperor'

Ah, second hallf of the 19th century then. Let the hunt begin.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 04:25:32 AM
Ah, second hallf of the 19th century then. Let the hunt begin.  :D
Renaissance & long before Sweelinck. A usurpator is not an emperor.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 04:30:46 AM
I wonder: why did you start off by talking about Italy, even throwing in a reference to the Pope, if this composer has no connection to that country?  Does his name sound Italian?
Very good questions indeed!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 04:31:42 AM
I wonder: why did you start off by talking about Italy, even throwing in a reference to the Pope, if this composer has no connection to that country?  Does his name sound Italian?

Clemens Non Papa!

But hey, the "last European Emperor" might apply to Charles V as well as Franz Joseph I, not an usurpator but a very legitimate emperor.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 04:39:12 AM
Clemens Non Papa!

But hey, the "last European Emperor" might apply to Charles V as well as Franz Joseph I, not an usurpator but a very legitimate emperor.  :D
Correct, and: not so correct. From a neerlandocentric perspective on Europe, this Franz Joseph is small beer, hardly relevant to us... Besides, Charles V was a Dutchman.  8) Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 04, 2019, 04:44:46 AM
.. Besides, Charles V was a Dutchman.  8) Your turn.
Carlos I de España y V de Alemania. .. Half Spanish, mind you.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: NikF4 on March 04, 2019, 04:47:52 AM
Tough crowd.  8) ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 05:02:17 AM
Correct, and: not so correct. From a neerlandocentric perspective on Europe, this Franz Joseph is small beer, hardly relevant to us..  8)

You are probably the only person on this planet to have a "neerlandocentric perspective on Europe" --- which is all the more hilarious since by your own admission you're a Saxon (and a Low one, for that matter), not a Dutch. I'm not sure, though, that moving the goalposts is a genuine neerlandic cultural trait. "Hardly relevant" is not the same as "usurpator". The former applies to basically all kings of The Netherlands past and present, the latter describes Napoleon I and Napoleon III, not Franz Joseph.   ;D

Quote
Your turn.

This composer started his musical career as a piano child prodigy. At 16 he went on to pursue his musical studies abroad, in a city not exactly famous for its piano school. He continued to perform in concerts in various countries. He became momentarily famous after winning a composition competition sponsored by a notorious mass medium. He eventually returned to his native country where he held an important teaching position and was also involved in a field unrelated to music.



Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 05:15:21 AM
Charles V was a Dutchman.

Incorrect. By his parents he was half Flemish, half Spanish. By his ancestors, he also had German, French and Portuguese blood.

He famously said  "I speak Latin to God, Italian to Women, French to Men, and German to my Horse". No mention is made of Dutch.  ;D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 05:35:25 AM
being born and bred in Gent qualifies him as a Dutchman.  8)

Maurice Maeterlinck was born and bred in Ghent. Is he a Dutchman too?

Quote
Re 2: Dinu Lipatti

Nope.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 05:41:12 AM
Incorrect. By his parents he was half Flemish, half Spanish. By his ancestors, he also had German, French and Portuguese blood.

He famously said  "I speak Latin to God, Italian to Women, French to Men, and German to my Horse". No mention is made of Dutch.  ;D
"German" is your mistranslation for Dutch (his mother tongue, together with French). And unlike you  ;D we don't use an ethnic definition of Dutchness; being born and bred in Gent qualifies him as a Dutchman.  8)

You are probably the only person on this planet to have a "neerlandocentric perspective on Europe" --- which is all the more hilarious since by your own admission you're a Saxon (and a Low one, for that matter), not a Dutch. I'm not sure, though, that moving the goalposts is a genuine neerlandic cultural trait. "Hardly relevant" is not the same as "usurpator". The former applies to basically all kings of The Netherlands past and present, the latter describes Napoleon I and Napoleon III, not Franz Joseph.   ;D

This composer started his musical career as a piano child prodigy. At 16 he went on to pursue his musical studies abroad, in a city not exactly famous for its piano school. He continued to perform in concerts in various countries. He became momentarily famous after winning a composition competition sponsored by a notorious mass medium. He eventually returned to his native country where he held an important teaching position and was also involved in a field unrelated to music.
Re 1: You're mistaken, I'm absolutely very Dutch, as a Low Saxon (but definitely not from Holland, nor is the 'Dutch' language my mother tongue). As to the Dutch kings since 1806: you're correct in assuming they're no kings, but a Napoleonic creation (the first and second kings were actually Napoleon's brother and nephew); the Netherlands being a Republic since 1572, but with hereditary stadtholders now called "kings" for international use (otherwise you wouldn't get it, being used as you are to German loan monarchs). ::) The present 'king', Willem-Alexander, is still a direct descendant not only of these Nassaus, but also of the counts of Holland (i.e. NOT the Netherlands, just Holland) of the Middle Ages. Of course, the real Dutch monarchal tradition is that of the Roman Empire and its emperors, from the first Charles til 1648 (and parts of the Netherlands til 1806 and even 1809).  ;D
Re 2: Dinu Lipatti

Maurice Maeterlinck was born and bred in Ghent. Is he a Dutchman too?
Of course he does, in the sense of the Netherlands as a whole (I can't help you're making use of these odd concepts like "Dutch" (Deutsch) to describe the people and language of the Netherlands.  :o
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 05:55:43 AM
the real Dutch monarchal tradition is that of the Roman Empire and its emperors, from the first Charles til 1648 (and parts of the Netherlands til 1806 and even 1809).  ;D

I'm sure you can find a connection with the royal house of David too.

No, really, I thought your "neerlandocentrism" was just a joke but now I see it's for real. It's good to know, that will spare a lot of my time.

Quote
Of course he does, in the sense of the Netherlands as a whole (I can't help you're making use of these odd concepts like "Dutch" (Deutsch) to describe the people and language of the Netherlands.  :o

Quote from: Merriam-Webster
Definition of dutchman

1 capitalized a archaic : a member of any of the Germanic peoples of Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and the Low Countries
b : a native or inhabitant of the Netherlands
c : a person of Dutch descent
d : german sense 2a

2 : a device for hiding or counteracting structural defects

I can't help you're making use of the archaic concept of Dutch, one which would make Brahms, Mozart and Othmar Schoeck Dutch as well.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 06:04:37 AM
"German" is your mistranslation for Dutch (his mother tongue, together with French).

It's not mine, but anyway if it were so, this would hardly help your case, as it shows that apparently Charles V regarded the Dutch language as little more than mere braying.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 06:09:16 AM
Okay, enough history, linguistics and ethnology, real or fictional, at least from my part. Let's get back on topic.

This composer started his musical career as a piano child prodigy. At 16 he went on to pursue his musical studies abroad, in a city not exactly famous for its piano school. He continued to perform in concerts in various countries. He became momentarily famous after winning a composition competition sponsored by a notorious mass medium. He eventually returned to his native country where he held an important teaching position and was also involved in a field unrelated to music.

Not Lipatti.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 06:22:53 AM
No, really, I thought your "neerlandocentrism" was just a joke
Of course it is; happily you're never seriously pretending there's such a thing as a Romanian either.  :laugh:
I can't help you're making use of the archaic concept of Dutch, one which would make Brahms, Mozart and Othmar Schoeck Dutch as well.
Of course not, 'the Netherlands' referring only to the present day BeNeLux territories (roughly speaking, and those parts of Northern France that belonged to the 'Seventeen Netherlands' in the Early Modern Era). That "Dutch" is confusingly used as sometimes referring to these 17 historical Netherlands, sometimes to the Northern republic only, depending of the specific historical contest, is something we have to live with. In any case: "Flemish" is an anachronism and not used in this historical context; you won't refer to historical Transylvania as a "Romanian land", will you?  8)

Re the composer: Atterberg?


Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 04, 2019, 06:29:53 AM
...

This composer started his musical career as a piano child prodigy. At 16 he went on to pursue his musical studies abroad, in a city not exactly famous for its piano school. He continued to perform in concerts in various countries. He became momentarily famous after winning a composition competition sponsored by a notorious mass medium. He eventually returned to his native country where he held an important teaching position and was also involved in a field unrelated to music.
Henrique Oswald
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 06:52:26 AM
Henrique Oswald

You remembered him form the composers's pictures thread, right?  :)

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 04, 2019, 07:34:11 AM
You remembered him form the composers's pictures thread, right?  :)

Your turn.
Indeed...I try to learn and remember.

OK, let's see (again, very easy):

This composer left his home country and studied in leading European musical centres. When he had settled in a major city, he was accused of espionage by his home country, kidnapped, set on trial and sentenced to life in prison. The international outcry was huge (the petition that was signed reads like an international "who's who" of music at the time), that he was released after two years, returned to his city of choice and never visited his homeland again (can't blame him for that, can we?  ;)).

So, who is he?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 07:38:04 AM
Isang Yun
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 04, 2019, 07:56:25 AM
Told you it was easy...

Back to you, Sir!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 07:57:33 AM
You probably meant Kirculescu.  ;)

Damned auto-correct.

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 08:14:43 AM
Tough crowd.  8) ;D
:laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 08:24:33 AM
Damned auto-correct.

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

I never use it, more often than not it's dead wrong.   :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 08:26:45 AM
Told you it was easy...

Back to you, Sir!

I was court musician for three consecutive monarchs. I wrote the first treatise on "classical" music ever published in that country (not my native one) and composed the first works ever to incorporate elements of that country's traditional music. Who am I and what's the country?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 08:58:30 AM
Is the country Tsarist Russia?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 09:01:54 AM
Hindemith is the only one I know of. So 4 to go.

If I remember correctly, you have at least one of the other settings in your collection as part of a Wergo set of the composer's symphonies.

I will give a clue to the one composer least known at GMG (or more precisely, least mentions that I have seen on GMG).  Two of his works appear in the Sony Black Composers set, although the setting of Lilacs is not one of them.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 09:29:18 AM
Oh, that must be George Walker.  I read up on him when I was listening to his recording of the Liszt sonata and then he died recently and NPR did a feature on him.

Correct. The setting actually won the Pulitzer Prize. 
BTW, if you know the Sessions, you might actually know one of the others.  It's part of a song cycle for soprano and amplified piano.

And a clue to the last composer, actually the first one chronologically.  RVW and Holst were among his pupils.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 09:31:34 AM
Is the country Tsarist Russia?  ::)

No. It has some things in common with it, though.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 04, 2019, 09:49:42 AM
If I remember correctly, you have at least one of the other settings in your collection as part of a Wergo set of the composer's symphonies.
Now it is somewhat creepy that you know my shelves better than I do myself, but I get it:
K.A. Hartmann, 1st Symphony, "Versuch eines Requiems nach Worten von Walt Whitman" (1936, last revisions 1950)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 09:56:51 AM
Now it is somewhat creepy that you know my shelves better than I do myself, but I get it:
K.A. Hartmann, 1st Symphony, "Versuch eines Requiems nach Worten von Walt Whitman" (1936, last revisions 1950)

No, I just remember that you've talked about it before!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 04, 2019, 10:11:52 AM
I will propose a side question while waiting for Florestan...Holst was one of eight composers up to now who have set Whitman's When Lilacs Last Bloomed...  in whole or in part.  Can you name the other seven without consulting Wikipedia?
Only one of the seven is a composer who may be unknown to most GMGers. The most recent one dates from 2004.

Ned Rorem made a Whitman setting but I can't remember what - it is on the same album as the Weill settings in my quixz question  - Songs of War.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 04, 2019, 10:13:54 AM
Maybe I wrote about the box, but I am not even sure I listened to that piece more than once. I have a recollection of some of the other Hartmann symphonies but not the one with singing.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 10:24:18 AM
Ned Rorem made a Whitman setting but I can't remember what - it is on the same album as the Weill settings in my quixz question  - Songs of War.

Is the Rorem you are thinking of part of this?
https://songofamerica.net/song/five-poems-of-walt-whitman/#

He's not one of the answers to this question.  Of the remaining two, one is from the  19th century British Isles and the other is 20th century American.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 10:33:53 AM
No. It has some things in common with it, though.
Teodorico Pedrini (1671–1746), working in Beijing in the services of the Kangxi Emperor (1662–1722), the Yongzheng Emperor (1722–1735), and the Qianlong Emperor (1735–1796).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 10:40:25 AM
When he wrote about Rorem he also mentioned Weill - and then I checked because I remembered that a bit of the poem was spoken in Street Scene, and a song followed loosely based on it.  Does that count?

No, the connection there seemed too loose.

The setting in question, as I said, was for soprano and amplified piano.  The instrument might give you a clue even if you have never heard the setting.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 10:44:32 AM
Teodorico Pedrini (1671–1746), working in Beijing in the services of the Kangxi Emperor (1662–1722), the Yongzheng Emperor (1722–1735), and the Qianlong Emperor (1735–1796).

Proficiaat! Jouw beurt!

Please, please, please let me know how you say the above in Low Saxon.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 11:00:09 AM
Please, please, please let me know how you say the above in Low Saxon.  8)
There's no, or rather: there are several orthographies. In my variant: Pette of, oen beu'te!  ;D (https://nds-nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nedersaksies_woordenboek)

OK. This Latin American composer with a Dutch name is regarded the first national composer of his country, making use of traditional music and also heavenly influencing its musical development. He served as a kapellmeister, wrote for Notas y Letras, composed over 180 compositions and brought forth a number of other composers bearing his name.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 11:23:46 AM
There's no, or rather: there are several orthographies. In my variant: Pette of, oen beu'te!  ;D (https://nds-nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nedersaksies_woordenboek)

Thanks a lot! Only one word similar to Dutch.  :laugh:

Quote
OK. This Latin American composer with a Dutch name is regarded the first national composer of his country, making use of traditional music and also heavenly influencing its musical development. He served as a kapellmeister, wrote for Notas y Letras, composed over 180 compositions and brought forth a number of other composers bearing his name.

Hubert de Blanck, born in Utrecht, died in Havana.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 12:04:37 PM
Thanks a lot! Only one word similar to Dutch.  :laugh:

Hubert de Blanck, born in Utrecht, died in Havana.  8)
As 't knep zit ie dr oarig noast. In other (Saxon) words: wrong.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 04, 2019, 12:56:34 PM
As 't knep zit ie dr oarig noast.

Is dit een menselijke taal? 't lijkt echt op Karel V's spreken tegen zijn paard.  :laugh:

En cuanto a tu compositor, no tengo ni puta idea.  ;D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 01:03:48 PM
The composer that comes to mind with amplified piano is Crumb.  Did he set it?

Got it.
Quote
Composer George Crumb (born 1929) set the Death Carol in his 1979 work Apparition (1979), an eight-part song cycle for soprano and amplified piano.

So that leaves only the well known composer from the British Isles.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 01:32:04 PM
Aha!

The New Grove includes this work in their list for Charles Villiers Stanford:

Elegiac Ode (W. Whitman), solo vv, chorus, orch, Norwich, 1884

IMSLP describes it as "Based on Whitman's ode to the memory of President Abraham Lincoln (as are Hindemith and Sessions' later When Lilacs Last ... Requiems.)"

 8)

Indeed! Wikipedia says at one point more people knew the poem through Stanford's setting than knew the poem itself.

I will leave it up to you to decide if you want to pose a question and keep this alternative thread going.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 01:54:54 PM
Low Saxon served and developed as the lingua franca of the Hanseatic League - and survived as the typical self-esteem of the bourgeoisie and petit-bourgeoisie in Hanseatic towns (the pater familias in Lübeck in Thomas Mann's Buddenbrooks, as you may recall, speaks only, and mostly intermittingly, Low Saxon and French, never German). It all changed with the mass media of the last century, as everywhere in Europe (yet I myself grew up with nothing but Low Saxon and my mother could hardly speak Dutch at all).

As to the composer's language: su idioma efektivamente looks gusta esaki - perhaps that helps?  8)

Jan Gerard Palm.

[I recognized that sentence as being in Papiamento, and googled for composers from the Netherlands Antilles.  But honestly I never heard of him before.]
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 02:00:10 PM
Is dit een menselijke taal? 't lijkt echt op Karel V's spreken tegen zijn paard.  :laugh:

En cuanto a tu compositor, no tengo ni puta idea.  ;D
Low Saxon served and developed as the lingua franca of the Hanseatic League (that's why Peter the Great learnt it as a youth in the merchants' district of Moscow) and survived in modern times as a typical of the cultural self-esteem of the bourgeoisie in Hanseatic towns (the pater familias in Lübeck in Thomas Mann's Buddenbrooks, as you may recall, speaks only, and mostly intermittingly, Low Saxon and French, never German). It all changed with the mass media of the last century, as everywhere in Europe (yet I myself grew up with nothing but Low Saxon and my mother could hardly speak Dutch at all).

As to the composer's language: su idioma efektivamente looks gusta esaki - perhaps that helps?  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 02:01:31 PM
Jan Gerard Palm.

[I recognized that sentence as being in Papiamento, and googled for composers from the Netherlands Antilles.  But honestly I never heard of him before.]
A truly national composer, namely Curaçao's; your turn.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 04, 2019, 02:04:08 PM
The only Papiamento I remember is Kesi Yena...  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 02:06:40 PM
The only Papiamento I remember is Kesi Yena...  ;D
  :-X ::) :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 02:14:26 PM
My question
This biracial composer was a priest, kappelmeister* to a European royal family, wrote approximately 400 works, most of them religious in nature, and conducted the first performances of Mozart's Requiem and Haydn's Creation in his country.

* word used as a general term. Do not take it as a reference to any specific area or language
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 02:24:44 PM
José Mauricio Nunes Garcia, Brazil?

I thought that would be harder!
You are correct. Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 02:34:46 PM
Well, I knew about him because there is a nexus for me with composers who wrote Requiems and those from Brazil.  I'll have to think a bit for a good question.

I knew of him because the Requiem is included in that Black Composers set
For the rest
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/José_Maurício_Nunes_Garcia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/José_Maurício_Nunes_Garcia)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 04, 2019, 02:49:50 PM
French composer. He was one of the leading chanson and motet composers of his day.  His place in musical history has undergone a decisive change since relatively recently we have learned that many stylistic and technical features he innovated, were for a long time credited to a younger (and much more famous) contemporary. 

Name the composer and the younger contemporary.
Ockeghem and des Prés?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Draško on March 04, 2019, 03:02:23 PM
Busnois and Josquin?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 03:59:29 PM
Nope.  The younger contemporary is correct, but not the composer.
Binchois and Josquin
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 04:01:59 PM
Incidentally, our knowledge of Josquin took a serious hit a few years ago. Scholars had assumed he was the Josquin referred to in certain documents, and it now seems he wasn’t. Ie his life story as we thought we knew it was the result of conflating him with another Josquin. So we know a lot less than we imagined.
I rather like this outcome.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 04:44:33 PM
Wrong.

You're on to something - follow up.
Josquin and Josquin??
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 04:54:54 PM
No you are right that our dating of Josquin des Prez was incorrect and we now place him about a decade later than had been thought (because of the mix up with the other Josquin).  The subject of my question, a composer who we assumed had been influenced by Josquin, we now think it was actually the other way around.
Ah.
Hmmm.
I don’t know the dating changes etc, but from the clue it needs to be a heavy hitter from around Josquin's demise. I only know a few of those.
Gombert? He's my first thought. Or Pierre de la rue?

Other guesses: Isaac? Brumel?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 04:57:43 PM
Jean Mouton?  Loyset Compere?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 05:12:38 PM
You are half right.   ;)

If it's one of those two, I would go for Compere, as being not as well known and better fitting the description "older contemporary" of JdP.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 05:23:22 PM
Okay, this one should be easy.

I am a moderately well known composer, but if you mention my name to most people they would associate it with  smiling milk maids, schoolboys in lederhosen, and similar figures.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 06:14:38 PM
Okay, this one should be easy.

I am a moderately well known composer, but if you mention my name to most people they would associate it with  smiling milk maids, schoolboys in lederhosen, and similar figures.
Goldmark.

Added: Kalman.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 07:22:02 PM
Goldmark.

Added: Kalman.

Not even close.
Okay.  Goldmark was 7 when the mystery composer died. Goldmark and Kalman were koniglich, the mystery composer was kaiserlich.
And the last word of my original question is itself a clue.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 07:37:53 PM
Not even close.
Okay.  Goldmark was 7 when the mystery composer died. Goldmark and Kalman were koniglich, the mystery composer was kaiserlich.
And the last word of my original question is itself a clue.
Ha!
Hummel.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 04, 2019, 07:46:43 PM
Ha!
Hummel.

Correct. Your turn
(https://cdn.catawiki.net/assets/marketing/uploads-files/50935-2db8400f9c4a27439572aadbd0f43a12c88d3cfd-story_inline_image.png)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 04, 2019, 08:14:29 PM
Moderate on the difficulty scale.

I was a professor of music. My students include two famous conductors, both famous for their conducting and also well known for their sexual exploits, one scandalously so. I wrote a lot of music, including seven symphonies but am more well known for choral music. I too studied in  Leipzig, like so many GMG quizzes did, and as an undergraduate at a famous university I was 65 out of 66 in my class. I was not born in England but spent most of my career there.  I am an Anglican.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 04, 2019, 10:34:25 PM
Moderate on the difficulty scale.

I was a professor of music. My students include two famous conductors, both famous for their conducting and also well known for their sexual exploits, one scandalously so. I wrote a lot of music, including seven symphonies but am more well known for choral music. I too studied in  Leipzig, like so many GMG quizzes did, and as an undergraduate at a famous university I was 65 out of 66 in my class. I was not born in England but spent most of my career there.  I am an Anglican.
At first sight: Stanford?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 05, 2019, 01:51:02 AM
Is the Rorem you are thinking of part of this?
https://songofamerica.net/song/five-poems-of-walt-whitman/#

He's not one of the answers to this question.  Of the remaining two, one is from the  19th century British Isles and the other is 20th century American.

Now that I am back at home I can answer your question. The Rorem piece I was thinking of was An incident from War Scenes. It is on the album Songs of War from Simon Keenlyside and Malcolm Martineau.

As an aside, Reconciliation from the  work in your link was also set by Vaughan Williams in Dona nobis pacem. I will have to see if I can find the Five poems etc on Spotify.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 05, 2019, 07:41:54 AM
At first sight: Stanford?
Damn you guys are good. Charles Villiers Stanford.
Conductors: Stokowski (had an affair with Garbo), Goosens (adultery scandal)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 08:00:20 AM
Damn you guys are good. Charles Villiers Stanford.
Conductors: Stokowski (had an affair with Garbo), Goosens (adultery scandal)
Many thanks; knew about Goossens and met Stanford's antecedents when in Dublin, a couple of years ago; have his seven symphonies of course (he's the teacher of RVW and Holst).  ;)

OK. This composer taught a young composer who was named after the first composer's country of origin. Name both.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 05, 2019, 08:12:24 AM
...

OK. This composer taught a young composer who was named after the first composer's country of origin. Name both.
Composer Vincenzo Ferroni (1858 -1934 ) was the teacher of composer Italo Montrmezzi at the Milan Conservatory. ..

But something tells me these aren't  the blokes you're looking for. .. ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 05, 2019, 08:12:56 AM
Many thanks; new about Goossens, and met Stanford's antecedents when in Dublin, a couple of years ago; have his seven symphonies of course (he's the teacher of RVW and Holst).  ;)

OK. This composer taught a young composer who was named after the first composer's country of origin. Name both.
Perhaps Donald Swann was born in Flanders?  ;)
Don’t give a hint yet, I am just joking.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 08:19:35 AM
Composer Vincenzo Ferroni (1858 -1934 ) was the teacher of composer Italo Montrmezzi at the Milan Conservatory. ..
But something tells me these aren't  the blokes you're looking for. .. ;)
Correct #notcorrect  ;D The pupil's second name is actually identical to the teacher's country of origin.  ::)

Perhaps Donald Swann was born in Flanders?  ;)  Don’t give a hint yet, I am just joking.
:D (had to google the joke; they're no household names at this side of the pond).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2019, 08:21:49 AM
Stanford and Ireland
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 08:22:20 AM
Stanford and Ireland
Knew I could count on you! Your turn.  ;D
(BTW thought it was funny that Ken B didn't recognize 'his own' composer.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2019, 08:29:25 AM
This was so close to the question before that it was comparably easy.

Which composer anticipated both 4'33 and a notorious movie scene featuring Meg Ryan? Name the composer and the two pieces!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 08:48:58 AM
Alphonse Allais,  Funeral March for the Obsequies of a Deaf Man?  But I have no idea of the second answer.

Must be something related to the (in)famous Meg Ryan orgasm in a restaurant.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2019, 08:52:57 AM
Alphonse Allais,  Funeral March for the Obsequies of a Deaf Man?  But I have no idea of the second answer.
No. I have never heard of this composer or piece. Maybe there are several anticipations.

Note that it is the same composer who wrote these two among other not quite as provocative pieces. He is moderately well known, I'd say.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on March 05, 2019, 08:54:07 AM
Must be something related to the (in)famous Meg Ryan orgasm in a restaurant.  :D
Yeah, I figured out that there must be some Ryan movie with a scene like that from the question...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2019, 08:55:56 AM
Yes, you got the correct movie scene.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2019, 09:00:25 AM
No, I am looking for a different composer, from before electroacustic music became relevant.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 09:02:12 AM
No. I have never heard of this composer or piece.

He's much more famous as a writer than as a composer. I even doubt there is one single CD out there with his "music".  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 09:03:58 AM
Charles Ives with his Mosaic Quartet and ...  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 09:04:29 AM
Yeah, I figured out that there must be some Ryan movie with a scene like that from the question...

If you haven't watched it, rectify the situation asap. She faked it so good as to make any porn starlet envious. ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on March 05, 2019, 09:07:14 AM
Charles Ives with his Mosaic Quartet and ...  ::)
No. ;)

If you haven't watched it, rectify the situation asap. He faked it so good as to make any porn starlet envious. ;)
Hm, purely in the interest of science..
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 09:10:10 AM
Hm, purely in the interest of science..

I can't remember the movie otomh, though. White Nights in Seattle, maybe?  ??? No, definitely not. Her partner in the movie was a guy who hosted the Oscars a few times.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on March 05, 2019, 09:13:00 AM
I can't remember the movie otomh, though. White Nights in Seattle, maybe?  ??? No, definitely not. Her partner in the movie was a guy who hosted the Oscars a few times.
When Harry Met Sally, apparently. The Internet knows this stuff.  0:)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 09:14:36 AM
When Harry Met Sally, apparently. The Internet knows this stuff.  0:)

That's it, yes.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2019, 09:21:14 AM
The Harry & Sally movie is pretty decent, as far as I remember. The one taking place in Seattle is later, Email for you, I think. (The better 1990s Seattle movie is "Singles" - I spent one year there as an exchange student in 95/96.)

The composer I am looking for has a few more "experimental" pieces but he was quite versatile and is probably better known for fairly "normal" piano, chamber and orchestral music. A few recordings with him playing his own piano music exist.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 09:26:04 AM
The composer I am looking for has a few more "experimental" pieces but he was quite versatile and is probably better known for fairly "normal" piano, chamber and orchestral music. A few recordings with him playing his own piano music exist.

As far as I know, Cage acknowledged Satie as an inspiration. I doubt this is the answer, though.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 09:31:30 AM
Erwin Schulhoff, In futurum (from Fünf Pittoresken, 1919) for piano & Sonata Erotica for female voice solo (1919) "in which a soprano spends several minutes faking a carefully notated orgasm".
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 09:33:24 AM
Erwin Schulhoff, In futurum (from Fünf Pittoresken, 1919) for piano & Sonata Erotica for female voice solo (1919) "in which a soprano spends several minutes faking a carefully notated orgasm".

This Schulhoff was either a Dutch, or a Saxon, or both, right?  >:D  :P

Serious question: did you know all that beforehand or google it? (there's nothing wrong with googling, mind you, I do it all the time --- I'm just curious).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 09:36:59 AM
This Schulhoff was either a Dutch, or a Saxon, or both, right?  >:D  :P

Serious question: did you know all that beforehand or google it? (there's nothing wrong with googling, I'm just curious).
Check for yourself, because you don't seem to understand: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German
I had a vague idea about Schulhoff, and googled him.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 09:44:09 AM
Check for yourself, because you don't seem to understand: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German

I checked it long time ago, but thanks anyway. You must have missed the emoticons I put at the end. And anyway, the smallest book in the world is the anthology of Deutsch/Dutch humor, or so I've been told.  >:D :P

Quote
I had a vague idea about Schulhoff, and googled him.

Excellent. All jokes aside (and I hope you don't hold any grudge against me for constantly poking fun at you), you are very  knowledgeable. Kudos to you, sincerely and friendly.  :-*
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2019, 10:06:27 AM
Erwin Schulhoff, In futurum (from Fünf Pittoresken, 1919) for piano & Sonata Erotica for female voice solo (1919) "in which a soprano spends several minutes faking a carefully notated orgasm".

Yes, this is the correct answer!
Schulhoff is far more famous for his more serious or jazz-inspired music but he had a very experimental dada strain as well.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 10:09:23 AM
Yes, this is the correct answer!
Schulhoff is far more famous for his more serious or jazz-inspired music but he had a very experimental dada strain as well.

Now be prepared for something similar to the national composer of Sint Maarten.  >:D :P
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 10:48:09 AM
Now be prepared for something similar to the national composer of Sint Maarten.*)  >:D :P
Good idea. The composer under question was born in what can be considered the last remnant of your favourite empire, the Holy Roman, where his (his!) father worked in the service of the monarch. However, he spent much of his life in a kingdom not far away, which had more opportunities to offer for his - very succesful - musical career, also in the service of the monarch.*) After WWII his remnants were reburied in the capital of his country of origin. He composed operas, symphonies, concertos and chamber music, but is probably best known for his masses, other choral works and also organ music.  ::)

*) On my cd shelves he's classified under his country of origin of which he can be considered the 'national composer' :D


Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 05, 2019, 10:50:58 AM
I confess to missing some of these jokes completely. I had to google.  Based on my experience it never occurred to me you could get a recording of a woman's orgasm onto just one side of an LP ...

 8) :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 11:28:03 AM
Good idea. The composer under question was born in what can be considered the last remnant of your favourite empire, the Holy Roman, where his (his!) father worked in the service of the monarch. However, he spent much of his life in a kingdom not far away, which had more opportunities to offer for his - very succesful - musical career, also in the service of the monarch.*) After WWII his remnants were reburied in the capital of his country of origin. He composed operas, symphonies, concertos and chamber music, but is probably best known for his masses, other choral works and also organ music.  ::)

*) On my cd shelves he's classified under his country of origin of which he can be considered the 'national composer' :D

He has been already nominated before - Josef Gabriel Rheinberger, a native of Liechtenstein, composer of some of the most beautiful chamber music I've ever heard.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 11:30:28 AM
I confess to missing some of these jokes completely. I had to google.  Based on my experience it never occurred to me you could get a recording of a woman's orgasm onto just one side of an LP ...

 8) :laugh:

Which reminds me: when was the last time you checked your sex life thread?  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2019, 11:34:20 AM
He has been already nominated before - Josef Gabriel Rheinberger.  8)
Liechtenstein (only surviving princedom of the HRR), represented on my shelves by composers Rheinberger, Marco Schädler, Jürg Hanselmann and Matthias Frommelt (performed by the Liechtenstein SO).  8) Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 11:52:45 AM
A very easy one.

This composer and instrumentist was prompted to follow a musical career after hearing, in his native city, a recital of another composer and instrumentist from a different country. He even got a letter of recommendation to study with the latter, but the whole thing came to nothing. His (quiet and withdrawn) life was spent alternately in two cities and although he was, according to the unanimous testimonies of those who have heard him playing, a first class virtuoso, he never played his music in public. He is best remembered for one work, composed for his own instrument and inspired by a fellow countryman poet.

Who is he?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 05, 2019, 12:38:31 PM

(BTW thought it was funny that Ken B didn't recognize 'his own' composer.  8)
*thumbs desperately through the Faber Big Book Of Excuses*
I was thrown off thinking about that not very well composer James Northern Ireland.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 05, 2019, 12:49:15 PM
A very easy one.

This composer and instrumentist was prompted to follow a musical career after hearing, in his native city, a recital of another composer and instrumentist from a different country. He even got a letter of recommendation to study with the latter, but the whole thing came to nothing. His (quiet and withdrawn) life was spent alternately in two cities and although he was, according to the unanimous testimonies of those who have heard him playing, a first class virtuoso, he never played his music in public. He is best remembered for one work, composed for his own instrument and inspired by a fellow countryman poet.

Who is he?

J s Bach
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2019, 12:53:05 PM
J s Bach

No. Does he fit in all the hints?

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 06, 2019, 03:00:35 AM
*thumbs desperately through the Faber Big Book Of Excuses* I was thrown off thinking about that not very well composer James Northern Ireland.
James Northern Ireland, let me guess ... this one, perhaps?
                             (https://i.pinimg.com/originals/9c/25/06/9c25061fa9ca1917f23017cfe86c0ebc.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 06, 2019, 05:55:01 AM
This composer and instrumentist was prompted to follow a musical career after hearing, in his native city, a recital of another composer and instrumentist from a different country. He even got a letter of recommendation to study with the latter, but the whole thing came to nothing. His (quiet and withdrawn) life was spent alternately in two cities and although he was, according to the unanimous testimonies of those who have heard him playing, a first class virtuoso, he never played his music in public. He is best remembered for one work, composed for his own instrument and inspired by a fellow countryman poet.

Hint: he married one of his pupils.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 07, 2019, 12:59:52 AM
Hint: he married one of his pupils.
Almost every single teacher did.  :D The specifications are a bit too general, I'm afraid: no indication of time, place, or even instrument. Could be anyone on this planet during the last couple of ages, from bamboo flautist to sitar player.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 07, 2019, 01:11:40 AM
... The specifications are a bit too general, I'm afraid: no indication of time, place, or even instrument. ....
Very true to our dear Andrei's quiz style.... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 07, 2019, 04:32:59 AM
Very true to our dear Andrei's quiz style.... ;D

"A very easy one",
he said,
"best remembered",
he said, not difficult at all, he said, so,
"Who is he?",
he said.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 06:02:19 AM
Also, if he didn't have a public career, unless you happened to have stumbled onto this person's biography, how are we to have ever known about him/her?

He didn't have a public career as performer. As a composer he is not that obscure. You know him alright.

Time: he recorded his complete works for his instrument, in stereo.

Place: the two cities where he spent his life are major cultural, financial, industrial and political centres; they are both capitals but only one of them is the capital of a state. There are three official languages spoken in these two cities; all are related but only two are mutually intelligible.

Instrument: stringed, although sometimes used percussively.

There, I gave him away.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 06:15:51 AM
Mompou?

Himself. When he was 9 he heard Gabriel Faure performing in Barcelona and decided on a musical career as well. He got a letter of recommendation to Faure himself signed by Granados but because of his (Mompou's) extremely shy nature he never made use of it. He spent his life either in Barcelona or in Paris. Musica callada is inspired by the poetry of St. John of the Cross. He married Carmen Bravo.

Told you it was very easy.  :D

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 06:19:30 AM
Well, it wasn't easy until you gave us more information.

Ask and you shall receive.  ;)

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 07:17:57 AM
This composer/conductor is almost as famous for what he said as for what he wrote or performed.

This screams Stravinsky but I'm not sure about the other hints.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 07, 2019, 07:40:35 AM
Bernstein?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 07, 2019, 07:47:56 AM
Himself. When he was 9 he heard Gabriel Faure performing in Barcelona and decided on a musical career as well. He got a letter of recommendation to Faure himself signed by Granados but because of his (Mompou's) extremely shy nature he never made use of it. He spent his life either in Barcelona or in Paris. Musica callada is inspired by the poetry of St. John of the Cross. He married Carmen Bravo.

Told you it was very easy.  :D

Your turn.
It's only easy if you know the answer. I did not, even after you supposedly gave it all away. The whole train of questions we've gotten lately - well I find them difficult. His father was related to the composer who left the country and named his son after the old country, but then returned only to have a daughter named after his friend. Oh, and he slept with his student and died in poverty. Whatever....
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 07, 2019, 07:56:42 AM
Boulez?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 07, 2019, 07:58:43 AM
Boulez?


My thought exactly...but Jo got there first (if it's correct).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 07, 2019, 07:59:13 AM
A good guess but not correct.
The problem is: more than one composer-conductors seem to qualify. Apart from Bernstein and Boulez, one could also think of Antal Doráti, and more. Can you offer one more specific trait?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 01:06:17 PM
Until Jo comes up with his quiz, let me tell you a fairy tale.

Once upon a time, about a hundred years ago, in a far away land whose inhabitants are worldwide known for their mad love for football and carnivals, there were three brothers. Each time their mother called them for dinner, the name of three very famous composers were heard. Each time their schoolmaster called them, the name of a very famous instrument-maker was heard. The brother who bore the name of the greatest of the three composers eventually became a composer himself. All three composers were extremely succesfull in one particular genre but the greatest of them was equally succesfull in many other ones.

Name the three composers and the brother in question.

(Note to self: if this will still be considered cryptic and lacking in specifics, never ever post any other quiz.)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 07, 2019, 01:08:50 PM
Until Jo comes up with his quiz, let me tell you a fairy tale.

Once upon a time, about a hundred years ago, in a far away land whose inhabitants are worldwide known for their mad love for football and carnivals, there were three brothers. Each time their mother called them for dinner, the name of three very famous composers were heard. Each time their schoolmaster called them, the name of a very famous instrument-maker was heard. The brother who bore the name of the greatest of the three composers eventually became a composer himself. All three composers were extremely succesfull in one particular genre but the greatest of them was equally succesfull in many other ones.

Name the three composers and the brother in question.

(Note to self: if this will still be considered cryptic and lacking in specifics, never ever post any other quiz.)
My first thought is Camargo Mozart Guarnieri and family. If he had a family.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 01:10:03 PM
My first thought is Camargo Mozart Guarneri and family.

Correct.

I am relieved, I can still post here.  :laugh:

Who are the other two composers, though?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 07, 2019, 01:10:10 PM
Name the three composers and the brother in question.
Mozart Camargo, Rossine [a misspelling], Bellini & Verdi Guarnieri.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 01:12:43 PM
Mozart Camargo, Rossine [a misspelling], Bellini & Verdi Guarnieri.

Correct but Ken got there before you.  :)

In Portuguese Rossine is actually right in terms of pronunciation.  ;D

And I never knew there was also a fourth broither named Bellini, which should have been Belline anyway.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 07, 2019, 01:14:23 PM
Correct.

I am relieved, I can still post here.  :laugh:

Who are the other two composers, though?
Rossini, Bellini, and verdi. http://www.pianosociety.com/pages/guarnieri/ (http://www.pianosociety.com/pages/guarnieri/)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 07, 2019, 01:15:50 PM
I claim the prize!

Now I need a quiz that will beat Christo.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 07, 2019, 01:19:10 PM
I claim the prize!

It's yours alright!  8)

Quote
Now I need a quiz that will beat Christo.

If it were about a Saxon it would really make my day.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 07, 2019, 01:21:38 PM
I claim the prize!

Now I need a quiz that will beat Christo.
D--n.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 07, 2019, 01:30:56 PM
I have a good quiz in mind,  good because the hint is a funny aphorism, but Christo would nail it in seconds so I need to come up with another one ...
*thinking*
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 07, 2019, 02:37:20 PM
I was a friend of Stravinsky and Antheil, as well as writers such as Hemingway. I set verses by Renaissance poets, appeared often on radio, and stirred much controversy. I used complex meters like 19/32. My music is not much performed nowadays. I spent time in prison.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 07, 2019, 03:01:49 PM
Ezra Pound?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on March 07, 2019, 03:57:07 PM
Cowell?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 07, 2019, 05:31:00 PM
Ezra Pound?
Damn you guys are good. Yes, Pound.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on March 07, 2019, 11:38:31 PM
Damn you guys are good. Yes, Pound.

I think you mean that ritter is good!
 8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 12:01:33 AM
I think you mean that ritter is good!
 8)
He's seen so often Pounding on the table, here, that everybody knows him!  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 12:33:00 AM
Damn you guys are good. Yes, Pound.
Thanks. There’s some luck involved...Several pages back, Florestan was asking about what I interpreted as “poet (or philosopher) - composers”, and doing some research, the name of Pound came up—I don’t know his music, but now know it’s been recorded.. The prison bit in Ken’s question sort of gave it away, too. BTW, many years ago, I was reading the Cantos. At the beginning, my reaction was “Damn, this is good!”. Several cantos later, I was saying to myself “Damn, I’m not understanding anything”.   :-[ ;D

So, a quick and easy question: what’s the longest composition ever performed (actually, being performed)?

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 01:02:06 AM
So, a quick and easy question: what’s the longest composition ever performed (actually, being performed)?
According to Wikipedia: Organ²/ASLSP (As Slow as Possible) - a musical piece by John Cage and the subject of one of the longest-lasting musical performances yet undertaken. It was originally written in 1987 for organ and is adapted from the earlier work ASLSP 1985; a typical performance of the piano version lasts 20 to 70 minutes. In 1985, Cage opted to omit the detail of exactly how slowly the piece should be played. The performance of the organ version at St. Burchardi church in Halberstadt, Germany began in 2001 and is scheduled to have a duration of 639 years, ending in 2640.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 01:08:17 AM
According to Wikipedia: Organ²/ASLSP (As Slow as Possible) - a musical piece by John Cage and the subject of one of the longest-lasting musical performances yet undertaken. It was originally written in 1987 for organ and is adapted from the earlier work ASLSP 1985; a typical performance of the piano version lasts 20 to 70 minutes. In 1985, Cage opted to omit the detail of exactly how slowly the piece should be played. The performance of the organ version at St. Burchardi church in Halberstadt, Germany began in 2001 and is scheduled to have a duration of 639 years, ending in 2640.
Spot on. Your turn, Christo. :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 01:19:27 AM
OK, something similar.  8)

Which piece by which composer was the first ever to be performed (by who?) in space - and heard on the radio (actually in my year of birth)?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 01:27:09 AM
According to the Smithsonian it was "Jingle Bells" (by James Lord Pierpont) played on a harmonica by Wally Schirra and small bells played by Thomas P. Stafford.
That gives a whole new meaning to the idea of “music of the spheres “  ::) ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 01:27:15 AM
According to the Smithsonian it was "Jingle Bells" (by James Lord Pierpont) played on a harmonica by Wally Schirra and small bells played by Thomas P. Stafford.
A good one! But I had just turned 4, at that moment.  8)

That gives a whole new meaning to the idea of “music of the spheres “  ::) ;D
;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 01:35:24 AM
A good one! But I had just turned 4, at that moment.  8)
 ;D
Very sorry! I meant to say: good attempt, but wrong answer!  :P
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 01:39:55 AM
Okay, then the Smithsonian is wrong.
The very first performance was four years earlier (in my birthyear).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 01:53:59 AM
In 1961 Yuri Gargarian (while waiting to launch) asked for music, as the countdown continues, technicians eventually manage to pipe records of Russian love songs into the capsule.

But he wasn't in space.
Not yet. But OK, right performer: on his return to earth he sang a song by Shostakovich:
http://history-is-made-at-night.blogspot.com/2007/06/yuri-gagarin-first-song-in-space.html
Your turn!  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 02:19:09 AM
I suppose the movement is Fluxus, the composer is John Cage, but am not sure of the work. Musicircus, perhaps?

Not my cup of tea, I must say. A person who used to be close to me was a great admirer of Joseph Beuys (another Fluxus "luminary"); I couldn't understand his enthusiasm...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 02:43:42 AM
Thanks.

Another easy one (while we wait for Florestan to come up with something like "I composed 200 piano sonatas that have never been performed, and my name only appears in the birth registry of some remote outpost of the Habsburg empire. What was my dog's name? " ;D).

France had its Les six, and, somewhat later, Spain had its own (numbered) group. Name the group, and at least 3 of its members.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 02:52:16 AM
Very good. Back to you.... ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 02:52:35 AM
Another easy one (while we wait for Florestan to come up with something like "I composed 200 piano sonatas that have never been performed, and my name only appears in the birth registry of some remote outpost of the Habsburg empire. What was my dog's name? " ;D).
Trick question of course: composers will only own cats.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 03:03:19 AM
This composer eventually became internationally well known and has influenced countless composers but during his lifetime his music was virtually unknown.  However, not entirely unknown.  Another very famous composer had this to say about him:

"There is a great Man living in this Country – a composer. He has solved the problem how to preserve one's self-esteem and to learn. He responds to negligence by contempt. He is not forced to accept praise or blame. His name is ...."

Name both composers.
Schoenberg about Ives (I happened to know).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 04:49:54 AM
OK. Which performer-composer had a vivid interest in both philosophy and science, wrote a philosophical treatise, lectured on natural phenomena (and published about them) and owned a telescope to observe meteorites and other cosmic events?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 04:54:34 AM
OK. Which performer-composer had a vivid interest in both philosophy and science, wrote a philosophical treatise, lectured on natural phenomena (and published about them) and owned a telescope to observe meteorites and other cosmic events?  ::)
William Herschel, a.k.a. Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 04:56:25 AM
William Herschel, a.k.a. Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel?
Not that I'm aware of, did he do all this?  :o
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 05:03:23 AM
Not that I'm aware of, did he do all this?  :o
Perhaps not all that...but he did have a telescope AFAIK.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 08, 2019, 05:04:54 AM
William Herschel, a.k.a. Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel?
Did he perform as well? Also not sure about the writings in philosophy. But he definitely owned a telescope! His sister is a better choice as she definitely performed his music, but again not aware she wrote anything on philosophy. So I'm thinking it's someone else (though it's the one I immediately thought of too).
 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 05:24:39 AM
Wikipedia says he played the violin, the oboe and the organ... Doesn't mention if he was any good at it, tough  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 05:32:23 AM
Wikipedia says he played the violin, the oboe and the organ... Doesn't mention if he was any good at it, tough  :D
The one we're looking for - at least you are  ;D - was very renowned both as a performer and as a composer (and still is).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 05:46:07 AM
Saint-Saëns?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: NikF4 on March 08, 2019, 05:47:31 AM
OK. Which performer-composer had a vivid interest in both philosophy and science, wrote a philosophical treatise, lectured on natural phenomena (and published about them) and owned a telescope to observe meteorites and other cosmic events?  ::)

Koechlin?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 08, 2019, 06:02:18 AM
Koechlin?
Nope.

Saint-Saëns?

YESSS! "Saint-Saëns studied geology, archaeology, botany, and lepidoptery and was an expert at mathematics. He held discussions with Europe's finest scientists and wrote scholarly articles on acoustics, occult sciences, Roman theatre decoration, and ancient instruments. He wrote a philosophical treatise, Problèmes et Mystères, which spoke of science and art replacing religion, his pessimistic and atheistic ideas foreshadowing Existentialism. He was a member of the Astronomical Society of France, lectured on mirages, had a telescope made to his own specifications, and even planned concerts to correspond to astronomical events such as solar eclipses".

Your turn.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 06:15:38 AM
Nope.

YESSS! "Saint-Saëns studied geology, archaeology, botany, and lepidoptery and was an expert at mathematics. He held discussions with Europe's finest scientists and wrote scholarly articles on acoustics, occult sciences, Roman theatre decoration, and ancient instruments. He wrote a philosophical treatise, Problèmes et Mystères, which spoke of science and art replacing religion, his pessimistic and atheistic ideas foreshadowing Existentialism. He was a member of the Astronomical Society of France, lectured on mirages, had a telescope made to his own specifications, and even planned concerts to correspond to astronomical events such as solar eclipses".

Your turn.  ;D
I do hope he was better at all that than he was at composing music.  ::)  Just kidding, of course.  ;)

This young composer, later to became arch-famous, dedicated one of his early pieces to his teacher (who is also relatively well known). After the dedicatee had read it, he returned it to the student with corrections in red ink. The young composer shouted something that could be translated as "You are full of sh**!" at his teacher, and never returned to class with him.

Some time later, when the piece in question was to be published, the editor asked the composer whether the dedication should be maintained. It's reported the composer grabbed a letter opener and started stabbing his manuscript until it was almost shredded to pieces.  ??? ;D

Who was the (later to become arch-famous) composer, who was the teacher, and what work was it?

 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 08, 2019, 06:34:21 AM
Someone even more irate and choleric than Beethoven!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 06:56:26 AM
At that young age, yes...he later mellowed (a bit).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 07:20:43 AM
Stravinsky
Nope. ..but the student did have a close rapport with Igor Fyodorovich,.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 08, 2019, 07:46:23 AM
Another easy one (while we wait for Florestan to come up with something like "I composed 200 piano sonatas that have never been performed, and my name only appears in the birth registry of some remote outpost of the Habsburg empire. What was my dog's name? " ;D).

You actually gave me a splendid idea. I can hardly wait for my turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 08, 2019, 07:54:39 AM
The incident with the manuscript is stuck somewhere in the back of mind but refuses to show itself. Meanwhile I can only guess at Pierre Boulez (again) - he had a rancorous falling out with his teacher Rene Leibowitz. Boulez had a rapport with Stravinsky as a conductor.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 08, 2019, 07:56:42 AM
The incident itself describes quite well Tchaikovsky and Rubinstein quarrelling over the former's First Piano Concerto.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 08:02:01 AM
The incident itself describes quite well Tchaikovsky and Rubinstein quarrelling over the former's First Piano Concerto.
Only one word in that sentence coincides with what we’re looking for...and can we really say that either of the men you mention had any kind of rapport with Stravinsky?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 08, 2019, 08:09:22 AM
Only one word in that sentence coincides with what we’re looking for...and can we really say that either of the men you mention had any kind of rapport with Stravinsky?

Oh, I wasn't suggesting this was the solution, I was just thinking out loud.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 08:12:29 AM
Oh, I wasn't suggesting this was the solution, I was just thinking out loud.  :)
Fair enough...and I suppose you know me well enough as to infer i wouldn’t include Tchaikovsky in my question (this is a clue in itself, kinda).  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 08, 2019, 08:13:13 AM
Fair enough...and I suppose you know me well enough as to infer i wouldn’t include Tchaikovsky in my question (this is a clue in itself, kinda).  ;)

What about biffo's suggestion above? You might have missed it.

The incident with the manuscript is stuck somewhere in the back of mind but refuses to show itself. Meanwhile I can only guess at Pierre Boulez (again) - he had a rancorous falling out with his teacher Rene Leibowitz. Boulez had a rapport with Stravinsky as a conductor.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 08:19:54 AM
What about biffo's suggestion above? You might have missed it.
Sorry, I indeed missed it. :-[

Spot on. The incident is reported in Joan Peyser’s gossipy biigraphy of Boulez. The work was Boulez’s Première sonate.

Biffo’s turn... :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 08, 2019, 08:50:39 AM
Probably too easy!

This long-lived composer was born in Russian Poland but subsequently lived and studied in Warsaw, Vienna and Dresden. He eventually finished up in London. He is best known for his film music and allegedly turned down the opportunity to write a 'concerto' now named after his childhood home.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 08, 2019, 09:45:15 AM
Probably too easy!

This long-lived composer was born in Russian Poland but subsequently lived and studied in Warsaw, Vienna and Dresden. He eventually finished up in London. He is best known for his film music and allegedly turned down the opportunity to write a 'concerto' now named after his childhood home.

Andrzej Panufnik?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 08, 2019, 10:26:00 AM
Andrzej Panufnik?
Unlikely. I thought of him too, but found no connection to Dresden, and the film that features the Warsaw Concerto (Dangerous Moonlight) being from 1941, when AFAIK Panufnik was trapped in Warsaw, I doubt they thought about him for that piece.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 08, 2019, 10:50:28 AM
Not Panufnik
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 08, 2019, 11:08:28 AM
Allan Gray alias Józef Żmigrod.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 08, 2019, 01:01:03 PM
Allan Gray alias Józef Żmigrod.

Nope
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 08, 2019, 01:03:33 PM
OK. Which performer-composer had a vivid interest in both philosophy and science, wrote a philosophical treatise, lectured on natural phenomena (and published about them) and owned a telescope to observe meteorites and other cosmic events?  ::)
Herschel
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 08, 2019, 01:04:57 PM
Someone even more irate and choleric than Beethoven!
Florestan.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on March 08, 2019, 07:13:53 PM
Mischa Spoliansky?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 09, 2019, 12:28:53 AM
Mischa Spoliansky?
It's him, your turn!  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on March 09, 2019, 01:00:56 AM
It's him, your turn!  :D

Born into a Jewish family but baptised into the Russian Orthodox Church. Initially studied Biology at university. I married the daughter of a famous composer. One of my pupils is much better known than I am. Another (slightly) better known composer dedicated one of his symphonies to me. Only three of my five symphonies have been recorded.

Who am I ?

A walk in the park for you lot.
 :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: The new erato on March 09, 2019, 01:48:06 AM
Steinberg I Guess
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on March 09, 2019, 02:04:17 AM
Steinberg I Guess

Excellent! Your turn.
 :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: The new erato on March 09, 2019, 02:10:59 AM
This composer wrote a number of mazurkas, some waltzez and nocturnes, a few chamber pieces and two piano concertos. He studied with a Polish composer, and died in Paris.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 09, 2019, 02:30:41 AM
This composer wrote a number of mazurkas, some waltzez and nocturnes, a few chamber pieces and two piano concertos. He studied with a Polish composer, and died in Paris.
Frédéric Chopin did all that....  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: The new erato on March 09, 2019, 02:37:06 AM
Chopins major teachers as a young talent before he moved to Paris were Czech and Silesian (which at the time weren't Polish according to wikipedia)…..  This composer also numbered Kalkbrenner as an occasional teacher…..
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 09, 2019, 02:39:53 AM
Frédéric Chopin did all that....  :)

Probably too obvious. I thought of Szymanowski but he didn't write two piano concertos and died in Lausanne.

The composer himself may not be Polish so I might be barking up the wrong tree. Did Chopin have pupils?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: The new erato on March 09, 2019, 02:41:08 AM
Periodically taught by Chopin according to sources.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 09, 2019, 02:41:45 AM
Chopins major teachers as a young talent before he moved to Paris were Czech and Silesian (which at the time weren't Polish according to wikipedia)….. 
But perhaps he had a Pole as a minor teacher in his childhood ... ;D

The hunt continues... :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 09, 2019, 02:43:13 AM
Chopins major teachers as a young talent before he moved to Paris were Czech and Silesian (which at the time weren't Polish according to wikipedia)…..  This composer also numbered Kalkbrenner as an occasional teacher…..

Thomas Tellefsen?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: The new erato on March 09, 2019, 02:45:41 AM
Thomas Tellefsen?
Exactly. From my hometown of Trondheim, Norway.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 09, 2019, 02:51:41 AM
Exactly. From my hometown of Trondheim, Norway.

A bit of a cheat really, once you mentioned Kalkbrenner it was easy. I am afraid he is just a name to me and I don't think I have any of his music; perhaps I should explore it.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: The new erato on March 09, 2019, 02:54:25 AM
A bit of a cheat really, once you mentioned Kalkbrenner it was easy. I am afraid he is just a name to me and I don't think I have any of his music; perhaps I should explore it.
I felt I needed to give ritter some clues.... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 09, 2019, 02:57:12 AM
I felt I needed to give ritter some clues.... ;D
But ritter, alas, was too slow... :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 09, 2019, 03:19:10 AM
I need some time to think up a worthwhile challenge. If any one has an idea of their own please fill in the gap.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 09, 2019, 03:29:31 AM
I’ll fill the gap... ;)

This man was one of the most revered performers of his time, travelling the world with his art. He’s especially connected to one composer, and he himself wrote many works (in that composer’s style, but that have lapsed into obscurity). His four children also were performers, one of them acquiring legendary status, another one almost the same (and also composed), and a third one made an important contribution to medical science (not unrelated to the family’s performing tradition.

So, who was this man?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 09, 2019, 06:59:50 AM
I’ll fill the gap... ;)

This man was one of the most revered performers of his time, travelling the world with his art. He’s especially connected to one composer, and he himself wrote many works (in that composer’s style, but that have lapsed into obscurity). His four children also were performers, one of them acquiring legendary status, another one almost the same (and also composed), and a third one made an important contribution to medical science (not unrelated to the family’s performing tradition.

So, who was this man?

Sounds like The Jackson Five!  ;D

The correct answer being actually Manuel Garcia, worldwide famous tenor asscoiated particuarly with Mozart's operas, father of Maria Malibran, Pauline Viardot-Garcia and Manuel Garcia jr, baritone, inventor of the laryngoscope.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 09, 2019, 07:18:43 AM
Sounds like The Jackson Five!  ;D

The correct answer being actually Manuel Garcia, worldwide famous tenor asscoiated particuarly with Mozart's operas, father of Maria Malibran, Pauline Viardot-Garcia and Manuel Garcia jr, baritone, inventor of the laryngoscope.
The one and only... :)

The composer I was thinking of that he was connected with was actually Rossini, but Mozart will do as well (García and his daughter, legendary soprano Maria Malibran, gave the first performance of Don Giovanni in America (in New York in 1827, with the support of Lorenzo de Ponte, no less).

I have these two (Rossinian-sounding) operas by García in my collection:

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-eUeKIaqMqIc/UZrXL29CGkI/AAAAAAAAktw/eRt-EnnLDDo/s1600/il+califfo+portada.PNG)  (http://www.centrodedocumentacionmusicaldeandalucia.es/export/sites/default/publicaciones/imagenes/chisciote.jpg)

Daughter Pauline Viardot, a mezzo, composed as well (there’s some CDs other mudic). BTW, Werner Schroeter’s  The Death of Maria Malibran is one of the strangest films I’ve ever seen (but that was many years ago, and I have little recollection of it).

Your turn, Florestan (unless Biffo is ready with his question—he graciously let me cut in while he prepared his challenge).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 09, 2019, 07:33:21 AM
Your turn, Florestan


As promised, inspired by your splendid idea.

Bow, bow! Oh, sorry, hello! Please excuse me, I am a Newfoundland dog. My master was a composer and pianist, more famous in the latter capacity, although his piano concerto is rather well-known and extremely taxing for performers and audiences alike. He was the native of a country which is an open-air museum of art history, full of blossoming lemon trees and beautiful songs. While very young he accepted a teaching position in a country where cranes fly past many dark woods and lakes. While there, he was entouraged by a circle of artists (including a very famous composer, a writer, a conductor and a painter --- the latter two were actually brothers). I was always present at their meetings so eventually they proclaimed me honorary convener and decided to name their group after my name. My master even composed a suite inspired by our (sic!) meetings. My name is Lesko, what's the name of my master?

NB: I offer for free the 6-CD complete piano works of this composer (downloads) to anyone who names it without googling.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 09, 2019, 07:36:25 AM
Busoni
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 09, 2019, 07:39:55 AM
Busoni

That was quick. Google or no Google? Please be honest.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 09, 2019, 07:44:33 AM
That was quick. Google or no Google? Please be honest.  :)
Google  :( although my first thought was Busoni from the description of his career but I did not know about his dog. When I googled I saw Leskovites. I had heard that name (and forgotten it) but had no idea it was connected to a dog.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 09, 2019, 07:47:24 AM
Google 

I knew it! But you could have refrained from spoiling the party of those who might have tried to give it a go without Google.  ;D

Your turn (says grudgingly).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 09, 2019, 07:48:23 AM
I fear this is a gimme for a certain player but I like the clue so much ...

This composer once described himself as
Quote
English by birth, Canadian by adoption, Irish by descent, Scotch by absorption.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 09, 2019, 07:51:43 AM
I knew it! But you could have refrained from spoiling the party of those who might have tried to give it a go without Google.  ;D

Your turn (says grudgingly).
With the kind of hair trigger sharp shooters we have here, who can nail Ezra freakin Pound as a composer in minutes?  Not a chance!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 09, 2019, 07:52:11 AM
Healey Willan
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 09, 2019, 08:06:02 AM
Healey Willan
Google?

Yes. My great aunt was an organist and a private student of his. His choral and organ pieces get performed regularly in Canada, but the orchestral music rarely.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 09, 2019, 08:12:24 AM
Google?

English-born Canadian composers.  ;D

My family name has become very famous in the last two decades, especially among kids and youngsters, but this has got nothing to do with me. My godmother gave me a first name after an artist who was her brother, or so she claimed. I was a composer and pianist praised by a very famous composer and pianist who nevertheless declined to be my teacher. I premiered two of his works in my own country. Who am I?

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 01:31:00 AM
BUMP!

My family name has become very famous in the last two decades, especially among kids and youngsters, but this has got nothing to do with me. My godmother gave me a first name after an artist who was her brother, or so she claimed. I was a composer and pianist praised by a very famous composer and pianist who nevertheless declined to be my teacher. I premiered two of his works in my own country. Who am I?

Hint: his last concert was the first performance of Brahms's A German Requiem in that country, in a version with two-piano accompaniment.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 02:14:43 AM
BUMP!

Hint: his last concert was the first performance of Brahms's A German Requiem in that country, in a version with two-piano accompaniment.
Still no idea... :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 11, 2019, 02:20:29 AM
Before the hint I thought of Biber (because of the pop starlet with a similar name).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: vandermolen on March 11, 2019, 02:54:14 AM
Before the hint I thought of Biber (because of the pop starlet with a similar name).
Me too.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 03:41:20 AM
Before the hint I thought of Biber (because of the pop starlet with a similar name).

Me too.

Biber was not a pianist, though.  :D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 03:43:11 AM
Cipriani Potter?

Yes. Not a relative of Harry Potter. Praised by Beethoven who nevertheless declined to teach him. Premiered the latter's 3rd and 4th piano concertos in England.

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 11, 2019, 03:47:45 AM
BUMP!

Hint: his last concert was the first performance of Brahms's A German Requiem in that country, in a version with two-piano accompaniment.

Subsidiary question: What is the connection between this performance and one of the leading lights of the 20th century avant garde?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 04:09:17 AM
Subsidiary question: What is the connection between this performance and one of the leading lights of the 20th century avant garde?
Cipriani Potter played one of the pianos (it was the version of the German Requiem with piano duo accompaniment), and one Julius Stockhausen was the conductor (I haven't been able to identify any family links between Julius and Karlheinz, though).

Of course I googled all this. Never heard of Potter before. The name Cipriani mainly has culinary connotations for me.. ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 11, 2019, 04:13:40 AM
Cipriani Potter played one of the pianos (it was the version of the German Requiem with piano duo accompaniment), and one Julius Stockhausen was the conductor (I haven't been able to identify any family links between Julius and Karlheinz, though).

Of course I googled all this. Never heard of Potter before. The name Cipriani mainly has culinary connotations for me.. ;)
This guy:

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 11, 2019, 04:51:48 AM
Cipriani Potter played one of the pianos (it was the version of the German Requiem with piano duo accompaniment), and one Julius Stockhausen was the conductor (I haven't been able to identify any family links between Julius and Karlheinz, though).

Of course I googled all this. Never heard of Potter before. The name Cipriani mainly has culinary connotations for me.. ;)

I couldn't find any connection between Julius (friend of Brahms) and Karlheinz other than the name. I just noticed it when reading the sleeve notes for The Sixteen's recording of the two-piano version of the Requiem.

I had heard of Cipriani Potter but don't recall ever hearing any of his music.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 11, 2019, 04:55:53 AM
My deferred question, probably a lot easier.

This prolific composer wrote three symphonies and other large scale symphonic works. He also wrote a number of symphonic (or tone) poems, one based on a very famous story in his native land the other with a connection to a famous sailing ship.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 11, 2019, 06:40:42 AM
This prolific composer wrote three symphonies and other large scale symphonic works. He also wrote a number of symphonic (or tone) poems, one based on a very famous story in his native land the other with a connection to a famous sailing ship.
Rachmaninov?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 06:57:18 AM
Rachmaninov?

With only 45 opus-numbered works he can hardly qualify as prolific.  :)

Rimsky-Korsakov? Sadko and Sheherezade / Sindbad's Ship?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 07:11:46 AM
Augusta Holmes and her dramatic symphony The Argonauts. Of course, she was a "she", not a "he"...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 07:14:25 AM
Augusta Holmes and her dramatic symphony The Argonauts. Of course, she was a "she", not a "he"...

If you're right, which is the other tone poem, the one based on a very famous French story? Can't find it. Plus: The Argonauts is not a tone poem but a dramatic symphony for voices, choir and orchestra. Would you call La Damnation de Faust a tone poem?  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 11, 2019, 07:23:27 AM
Not Rachmaninov, Rimsky of Holmes

Berlioz called his Faust a dramatic legend, definitely not a symphonic poem.

The composer is not French.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 07:24:17 AM
And her three symphonies? Where are they?

https://www.musicologie.org/Biographies/h/holmes_augusta.html (https://www.musicologie.org/Biographies/h/holmes_augusta.html)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 11, 2019, 07:26:47 AM
The famous sailing ship is not in the title of the symphonic poem and it is a real ship not a legendary one.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 07:27:00 AM
If you're right, which is the other tone poem, the one based on a very famous French story? Can't find it.
Lutèce? Belle au bois dormant Andromède, Pologne and Irlande surely would't qualify.. ;D

Quote
Plus: The Argonauts is not a tone poem but a dramatic symphony for voices, choir and orchestra. Would you call La Damnation de Faust a tone poem?  ;D
So now we resort to semantics and nitpicking?  :D

And her three symphonies? Where are they?

https://www.musicologie.org/Biographies/h/holmes_augusta.html (https://www.musicologie.org/Biographies/h/holmes_augusta.html)
Les Argonautes, symphonie dramatique (1880)
Ludus pro patria, ode-symphonie (1888)
Au pays bleu, suite symphonique (c.1888)

I know, I know, I'm making her fit with a shoehorn, as we say in Spain... ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 07:30:18 AM
Les Argonautes, symphonie dramatique (1880)
Ludus pro patria, ode-symphonie (1888)
Au pays bleu, suite symphonique (c.1888)

None of them is a symphony, plus you count Les Argonautes twice,  first as a symphony and then as a tone poem.  ;D

Quote
I know, I know, I'm making her fit with a shoehorn, as we say in Spain... ;D

You do just that, yes.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 07:46:10 AM
The famous sailing ship is not in the title of the symphonic poem and it is a real ship not a legendary one.

Did it have a shipwreck or sink?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 11, 2019, 07:47:52 AM
Did it have a shipwreck or sink?

No, it has survived and is now moored in London.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 07:58:48 AM
No, it has survived and is now moored in London.
George Whitefield Chadwick, who wrote three symphonies, and a tone poem on Robert Burns's Tam o'Shanter (where the name of the Cutty Sark is taken from)? And the famous story from his homeland would be Rip van Winkle...

P.S.: If my answer is right, I'd gladly let San Antone cut in (he seems to have challenge ready, and I'll be offline fir a wile).

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 11, 2019, 08:10:00 AM
George Whitefield Chadwick, who wrote three symphonies, and a tone poem on Robert Burns's Tam o'Shanter (where the name of the Cutty Sark is taken from)? And the famous story from his homeland would be Rip van Winkle...

Correct - Cutty Sark is the nickname of the witch who chases Tam.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 11, 2019, 09:04:23 AM
This world renowned instrumentalist has performed widely and has released recordings of repertory from Bach to Ades.  He is known for having a distinctive sound on his instrument.  While he is the only truly professional musician everyone in his family played an instrument and he has been quoted saying that playing together as a family was an integral part of his musical development.

His surname is an European variation indicating his ethnic ancestry.

Although he has not composed music he is the author of two published books for children on the lives of composers.

Who is he?
I had no idea until the last clue. I may still be wrong, but Stephen Isserlis wrote two books for children, one about Beethoven and the other about Handel. I was looking at them not too long ago to buy.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 11, 2019, 09:57:04 AM
Question: What is the name of the movie and what is the name of the opera that appears in it?

Hint: In this movie (a personal favorite), we see the main characters in a high speed chase interspersed with scenes from the opera being performed live on stage. Despite the attempted murder of the pope, the pope himself leads the audience to great applause for the performance. This is not a recent movie, but it is in color. This movie, along with a movie from the time (Frisco Kid) got me into these screwball comedies.  A fairly famous musician also made his American debut in this movie.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on March 11, 2019, 10:11:55 AM
Foul Play, with The Mikado?

I had to look up the opera. If I'm right I'm shocked that his could be anyone's favorite movie.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 10:13:00 AM
Yep, you got it.

What ethnicity is this, Isserlis?  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 11, 2019, 10:19:04 AM
Foul Play, with The Mikado?

I had to look up the opera. If I'm right I'm shocked that his could be anyone's favorite movie.
Correct! Dudley Moore made his American debut in the movie. I didn't say it was my favorite, but it is a favorite. It's pretty silly, but it's a light, fun caper. Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase are so young here. It still makes me laugh. Anyway, since I also like Anton Rubinstein and crossover, I guess there is no helping me.

Anyway, you're up.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on March 11, 2019, 10:21:27 AM
Correct! Dudley Moore made his American debut in the movie. I didn't say it was my favorite, but it is a favorite. It's pretty silly, but it's a light, fun caper. Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase are so young here. It still makes me laugh. Anyway, since I also like Anton Rubinstein and crossover, I guess there is no helping me.

Anyway, you're up.

We all have our guilty pleasures. I like Smokey and the Bandit. And who am I to talk, I recognized the film instantly. I couldn't place the title but I remembered it had Goldie Hawn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 10:24:06 AM
What ethnicity is this, Isserlis?  :D

Okay, according to Wikipedia "The name 'Isserlis' is one of many European variations of the Hebrew name 'Israel'.[7] To me this looks like bull. I even doubt that there are "many" European variations of "Israel".
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on March 11, 2019, 10:35:33 AM
Ok, I've made a big mistake, I'm not a quiz type and I have to make up a quiz. This will be a doozie!

This person toured Europe as a child and later became one of the most famous composers in the history of the continent. Despite this there are rumors that his sister Nannerl was even smarter. His music is known to everyone on this board except MI.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on March 11, 2019, 10:59:50 AM
Blimey. Even I know that! Mozart.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on March 11, 2019, 11:00:32 AM
Blimey. Even I know that! Mozart.

Next quiz is on you, then! :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on March 11, 2019, 11:31:15 AM
Well, this is topical. ;) Which famous figure of classical music said in 1927 "I do not think good jazz is harmful. And the highbrows of music who do not like good jazz are snobs".
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 11, 2019, 12:21:44 PM
Well, this is topical. ;) Which famous figure of classical music said in 1927 "I do not think good jazz is harmful. And the highbrows of music who do not like good jazz are snobs".
Copland.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on March 11, 2019, 12:39:24 PM
Neither.

"Apart from a few lessons from Weingartner, I am self-taught; I watched many rehearsals under such conductors  as Nikisch, Motti and Richard Strauss - and Francisco de Lacerda, a Portuguese who impressed me especially, he was my model more then anyone else."
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 11, 2019, 12:57:53 PM
Neither.

"Apart from a few lessons from Weingartner, I am self-taught; I watched many rehearsals under such conductors  as Nikisch, Motti and Richard Strauss - and Francisco de Lacerda, a Portuguese who impressed me especially, he was my model more then anyone else."
Hmmm. Karl Bohm possibly. He studied law.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on March 11, 2019, 01:06:25 PM
No, but there is a similarity. The study part.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 01:08:19 PM
Böhm studied with Eusebius Mandyczweski (that’s the kind of name one wouldn’t forget  ;D), and I really don’t see good old Karl defending jazz...

EDIT:

Josef Krips studied with Weingartner and Mandyczweski...could Krips be our mystery man?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 01:11:12 PM
Böhm studied with Eusebius Manyczweski (that’s the kind of name one wouldn’t forget  ;D), and I really don’t see good old Karl defending jazz...

Mandyczewsky, actually.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 01:12:04 PM
Mandyczewsky, actually.  ;D
Yep...honest typo this time around.  :-[
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on March 11, 2019, 01:22:03 PM
Ken B was not referring to music when he said "study".
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 11, 2019, 01:26:16 PM
Ernest Ansermet?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 11, 2019, 01:26:23 PM
Ken B was not referring to music when he said "study".
Walter Braunfels?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Irons on March 11, 2019, 01:36:38 PM
Ernest Ansermet?

Well done. Ansermet it is.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 01:23:57 AM
Well done. Ansermet it is.

The father of this composer and pianist was born on an island, her mother on another island, and he was born on the latter. He took piano lessons from his sister, a composer in her own right. As a child prodigiy he composed his first song at 11. He studied with a composer who would later become (in)famous because of his daughter. He composed piano works, songs and music for stage and film. One of his greatest hits was nominated for an Academy Award but lost to another song --- and in retrospect the jury was obviously right.

Name the composer, his teacher and the reason why the jury was right.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 12, 2019, 02:41:59 AM
Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona - he studied with Joaquín Nin, father of Anaïs Nin (sexually abused by her father). His song “Always in my heart” (Siempre en mi Corazón) was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song in 1942, but lost to “White Christmas” by Irving Berlin. "The version sung by Bing Crosby is the world's best-selling single with estimated sales in excess of 50 million copies worldwide. Other versions of the song, along with Crosby's, have sold over 50 million copies."
(I know him mainly because of Leo Brouwer, the grandson of his sister Ernestina Lecuona).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 03:04:52 AM
Just listened to Siempre en mi Corazon sung by Placido Domingo. I can't imagine it selling 50 million copies but with a less cheesy accompaniment it would  be an enjoyable song.  If I never hear White Christmas again as long as I live I won't mind.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 03:58:02 AM
Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona - he studied with Joaquín Nin, father of Anaïs Nin (sexually abused by her father). His song “Always in my heart” (Siempre en mi Corazón) was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song in 1942, but lost to “White Christmas” by Irving Berlin. "The version sung by Bing Crosby is the world's best-selling single with estimated sales in excess of 50 million copies worldwide. Other versions of the song, along with Crosby's, have sold over 50 million copies."
(I know him mainly because of Leo Brouwer, the grandson of his sister Ernestina Lecuona).

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 12, 2019, 04:18:18 AM
In his American exile Thomas Mann met left-handed pianist Paul Wittgenstein on the beach. The latter had recently cooperated with a composer whose oratorio had just been premiered in the Third Reich. There’s a widespread speculation, yet unproven, that this oratorio stood as a model for a famous creation in Thomas Mann’s novel, Doctor Faustus. Name both composers and both works. 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 04:28:01 AM
In his American exile Thomas Mann met left-handed pianist Paul Wittgenstein on the beach. The latter had recently cooperated with a composer whose oratorio had just been premiered in the Third Reich. There’s a widespread speculation, yet unproven, that this oratorio stood as a model for a famous creation in Thomas Mann’s novel, Doctor Faustus. Name both composers and both works.

When I read Doctor Faustus many years I ago I was struck at the resemblance between the oratorio written by Adrian Leverkuhn and Der Buch mit sieben Siegeln (1935-37) by Franz Schmidt. I can't remember the name of the Leverkuhn work but Schmidt wrote Concertante Variations on a Theme of Beethoven for Piano (left hand alone) with orchestra for Paul Wittgenstein.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 04:32:30 AM
I can't remember the name of the Leverkuhn work

Apocalypsis cum figuris.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 12, 2019, 04:39:03 AM
Apocalypsis cum figuris.
Apocalipsis cum figuris #thanks
When I read Doctor Faustus many years I ago I was struck at the resemblance between the oratorio written by Adrian Leverkühn and Das Buch mit sieben Siegeln (1935-37) by Franz Schmidt. I can't remember the name of the Leverkühn work but Schmidt wrote Concertante Variations on a Theme of Beethoven for Piano (left hand alone) with orchestra for Paul Wittgenstein.
Great to learn! Your turn.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 04:40:05 AM
Apocalypsis cum figuris.

Thanks, saves me digging out the novel from the vaults.  Also thought that Leverkuhn's Violin Concerto was based on Berg's and his Faust on Busoni with a touch of Berlioz.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 04:43:21 AM
Thanks, saves me digging out the novel from the vaults.  Also thought that Leverkuhn's Violin Concerto was based on Berg's and his Faust on Busoni with a touch of Berlioz.

Much easier to identify the sources than the Vinteuil sonata.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 04:51:25 AM
This composer had a meteoric rise to fame and royal patronage led to a glittering career. A change of regime led to exile in France. Most of his works listed in his inventory were lost in the years after his death.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 04:56:59 AM
This composer had a meteoric rise to fame and royal patronage led to a glittering career. A change of regime led to exile in France. Most of his works listed in his inventory were lost in the years after his death.

Was he European?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 05:02:59 AM
Was he European?

Yes, though his works have been found as far afield as Munich and the New World.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 05:10:03 AM
This composer had a meteoric rise to fame and royal patronage led to a glittering career. A change of regime led to exile in France.

So, either a change from monarchy to republic, or a change of dinasty. Hmmm....
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 12, 2019, 05:44:13 AM
Jakub Reys (or Polak), born in Poland around 1540 and died in Paris, 1605?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 05:50:01 AM
Jakub Reys (or Polak), born in Poland around 1540 and died in Paris, 1605?

No, our composer died roughly a century later
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 07:48:46 AM
No, our composer died roughly a century later

Around 1700, then. Now, which regime changes occurred around that time? Otomh, the 1688 Gorious Revolution in England and possibly the War of Spanish Succession (1700-1714). Am I even close?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 08:00:24 AM
Around 1700, then. Now, which regime changes occurred around that time? Otomh, the 1688 Gorious Revolution in England and possibly the War of Spanish Succession (1700-1714). Am I even close?

Yes, very close, it was the latter.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 08:07:28 AM
Yes, very close, it was the latter.

Sebastián Durón.

Never ever heard of him before.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 08:11:54 AM
Sebastián Durón.

Never ever heard of him before.  :)

Correct! I have a modest amount of Spanish baroque but hadn't heard of Duron until I bought an album of his music from Albert Recasens and La Grande Chapelle.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 08:15:46 AM
I also had a brother who was like me a musician and a composer. A man of great talent, far more gifted than I. He died very young ... alas ... alas! He killed himself in the prime of life.

Which very famous composer said that, and whom was he referring to?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 12, 2019, 08:20:19 AM
Mahler. Brother Otto.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 08:25:01 AM
Google or not, it's your turn.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 12, 2019, 08:38:35 AM
I was stabbed by a prostitute. My last, unfinished, composition was about a man stabbed by a prostitute.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 08:38:59 AM
I was stabbed by a prostitute. My last, unfinished, composition was about a man stabbed by a prostitute.

Claude Vivier?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 12, 2019, 08:47:22 AM
Claude Vivier?
I knew I could rely on you for all things murderous male prostitute Andrei!  ;)

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 09:40:06 AM
I knew I could rely on you for all things murderous male prostitute Andrei!  ;)

Not only male. This composer died while having intercourse with a female prostitute but after hearing her testimony the jury found her innocent. Who was he and what happened?  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 12, 2019, 09:47:56 AM
Not only male. This composer died while having intercourse with a female prostitute but after hearing her testimony the jury found her innocent. Who was he and what happened?  ;D
How can we forget that one! There are quite a few unusual deaths, but that is a doozy.  Koczwara Kocswara Koszwara. Something like that. I forget! :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 09:49:18 AM
How can we forget that one! There are quite a few unusual deaths, but that is a doozy.  Koczwara Kocswara Koszwara. Something like that. I forget! :)

Kotzwara.  :D

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 12, 2019, 10:01:54 AM
Not only male. This composer died while having intercourse with a female prostitute but after hearing her testimony the jury found her innocent. Who was he and what happened?  ;D
Maybe Scarpia is right about quickies after all.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 12, 2019, 10:11:31 AM
There are numerous operas based on Shakespeare's plays. Name 5 operas based on Shakespeare's plays that used a different title. For example, Otello is essentially the same as Othello and doesn't count. Translations don't count unless they are different in spirit.  It's ok to reuse plays (with different opera titles) if desired.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 10:14:33 AM
There are numerous operas based on Shakespeare's plays. Name 5 operas based on Shakespeare's plays that used a different title. For example, Otello is essentially the same as Othello and doesn't count. Translations don't count unless they are different in spirit.  It's ok to reuse plays (with different opera titles) if desired.

I don't understand this question.  ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 12, 2019, 10:23:29 AM
I don't understand this question.  ???
You want 5 operas based on a Shakespeare Play that don't use the same title. So Hamlet (Thomas) and Otello (Verdi) don't count. But if Thomas had called his opera Death in Scotland or Verdi had called his Iago, they would count.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 10:25:24 AM
You want 5 operas based on a Shakespeare Play that don't use the same title. So Hamlet (Thomas) and Otello (Verdi) don't count. But if Thomas had called his opera Death in Scotland or Verdi had called his Iago, they would count.

Ah, okay, now I got it.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 12, 2019, 10:27:43 AM
Ah, okay, now I got it.
I was going to say yes to your example, but you stole it right back! :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 10:29:49 AM
I was going to say yes to your example, but you stole it right back! :)

That's because I felrt it was superfluous.  :D

Here you are, five:


Béatrice et Bénédict
Die Ermordung Cäsars
Das Liebesverbot
At the Boar's Head
Die Geisterinsel
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 12, 2019, 10:33:57 AM
That's because I felrt it was superfluous.  :D

Here you are, five:


Béatrice et Bénédict
Die Ermordung Cäsars
Das Liebesverbot
At the Boar's Head
Die Geisterinsel

Looks good! Anyone want to name some more?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 12, 2019, 10:36:04 AM
Anyone want to name some more?

Yes, please do!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 12, 2019, 10:37:17 AM
You left out several of the most famous ones
Bellini: I capuleti e i montecchi (Romeo & Juliet)
Verdi: Falstaff (The merry wives of Windsor)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 12, 2019, 10:49:25 AM
You left out several of the most famous ones
Bellini: I capuleti e i montecchi (Romeo & Juliet)
Verdi: Falstaff (The merry wives of Windsor)

The Bellini isn't based on Shakepeare but a different literary source. To nitpick 'At the Boars Head' is derived from more than one play. The musical part of Purcell's Fairy Queen has no connection with Shakespeare or even the action of the play embedded in it.

Add RVW  Sir John in Love - Merry Wives etc
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 12, 2019, 11:23:14 AM
Shylock (1979) by composer Hans Kox, who died two weeks ago. 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 12, 2019, 11:35:49 AM
The Bellini isn't based on Shakepeare but a different literary source. To nitpick 'At the Boars Head' is derived from more than one play. The musical part of Purcell's Fairy Queen has no connection with Shakespeare or even the action of the play embedded in it.

Add RVW  Sir John in Love - Merry Wives etc
The Bellini is an interesting one, since the source is the same that Shakespeare used for his play (from Luigi Da Porto).

Smetana wrote an unfinished opera called Viola that was based on Twelfth Night. Henze wrote an opera (Venus and Adonis) based on a poem of Shakespeare (that one I stumbled upon when checking a couple of the possible answers). Salieri also wrote a Falstaff.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 01:24:29 AM
Here's an easy one: these two composers were one-hit wonders and it's possible that people know their works alright but have no idea about who composed them. Although they were born and lived on different continents (they were contemporary during the short life of the younger of them), their hits have two things in common. Name the composers and the works.

Hint: La mer. (sic!)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 13, 2019, 07:00:37 AM
Hint: La mer. (sic!)
Sea sic?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 13, 2019, 07:03:44 AM
Here's an easy one: these two composers were one-hit wonders and it's possible that people know their works alright but have no idea about who composed them. Although they were born and lived on different continents (they were contemporary during the short life of the younger of them), their hits have two things in common. Name the composers and the works.

Hint: La mer. (sic!)
So I want to say Thomas Arne and some yank to be named later. Rule Britannia. Columbia Gem of the Ocean.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:06:02 AM
So I want to say Thomas Arne and some yank to be named later. Rule Britannia. Columbia Gem of the Ocean.

Nope.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 13, 2019, 07:08:25 AM
Nope.
But there should now be a hint.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:13:26 AM
But there should now be a hint.

La mer, 2nd movement. The title.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: The new erato on March 13, 2019, 07:16:08 AM
La mer, 2nd movement. The title.
That is why you are vague?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:20:11 AM
That is why you are vague?

 :D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:28:08 AM
Okay, two more hints.

(https://cdn10.bigcommerce.com/s-ey7tq/products/3425/images/4748/FIMEX-2__20654.1407858966.380.380.jpg?c=2) (https://romaniadacia.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/europe-romania-danube-river-gorges-canyon-iron-gates-national-park.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 07:28:53 AM
I can only come up with Reger's Im Spiel der Wellen (after Böcklin). But one could hardly call Reger a one hit-wonder (more a zero-hit wonder  ;D ).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 07:31:20 AM
Okay, two more hints.

(https://cdn10.bigcommerce.com/s-ey7tq/products/3425/images/4748/FIMEX-2__20654.1407858966.380.380.jpg?c=2) (https://romaniadacia.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/europe-romania-danube-river-gorges-canyon-iron-gates-national-park.jpg)
Oh, of course, the world-renowned Mexican fjords... :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:31:54 AM
I can only come up with Reger's Im Spiel der Wellen (after Böcklin). But one could hardly call Reger a one hit-wonder (more a zero-hit wonder  ;D ).

You are probably one of the few persons in the civilized world who have admittedly never ever heard one of this hits, and quite possibly neither the other one.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:33:59 AM
Oh, of course, the world-renowned Mexican fjords... :D

That's not a fjord, actually. A delta lies not far away.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 07:36:37 AM
You are probably one of the few persons in the civilized world who have admittedly never ever heard one of this hits, and quite possibly neither the other one.  ;)
OK then...one is Ion Ionavici's ultra-maga-super famous Waves of the Danube, and the other? Moncayo's Huapango? What on earth has the latter to do with the sea, or waves, or whatever.... ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:39:40 AM
OK then...one is Ion Ivanovici's ultra-maga-super famous Waves of the Danube,

Bingo! (I edited your spelling of his name)

Quote
and the other? Moncayo's Huapango? What on earth has the latter to do with the sea, or waves, or whatever.... ???

Nothing to do because it is not the right answer.

Hint for you only:

(https://p1.akcdn.net/full/250483490.plic-pentru-felicitari-130x190-mm-500-buc-cutie-gpv.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 07:43:01 AM
Juventino Rosas: Sobre las olas. You were right!!! Never heard it, or heard of it!  :D ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:49:26 AM
Juventino Rosas: Sobre las olas. You were right!!! Never heard it, or heard of it!  :D ::)

Am I right in presuming you have also never heard (of) something called "España cañí"?  ;D

Anyway, your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 13, 2019, 07:53:29 AM
I gotta say Andrei, my answer fits your clue better than yours does!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 07:57:47 AM
I gotta say Andrei, my answer fits your clue better than yours does!

Why, of course, "Over the Waves" and "Waves of the Danube" have nothing in common  --- except they both are waltzes and they both are about waves.

Was Thomas Arne, who died in 1778, contemporary with Thomas a'Becket, who was born in 1808? Plus, how could they have been born on different continents if they were both born in England?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 08:04:43 AM
Am I right in presuming you have also never heard (of) something called "España cañí"?  ;D

Anyway, your turn.
España cañí, of course...and Suspiros de España as well. Even Paquito el chocolatero.... ;D

Let's see. This playwright, widely regarded as one of the greats of all time, contributed the libretto to an opera which holds a singular position in the history of music (even if the work itself is rarely performed--but there's at least two commercial recordings of it--and its composer is not really well known).

A hint: Possibly the most famous composer from the playwright's homeland wrote what is possibly his least-known composition as incidental music to one of  this playwright's more famous works.

So, who's the playwright, whose the unknown composer of the "singular" opera, what opera is it (and, for bonus points, who's the famous composer and what's his forgotten composition)?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 08:15:33 AM
One of those rare cases in which the hint is even more obscure than the question.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 08:19:19 AM
Second hint, then:

(https://cdn.monq.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Blend-Ingredient-Lime-210x210.png)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 08:23:47 AM
Love of the Three Limes?  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: NikF4 on March 13, 2019, 08:24:19 AM
Love of the Three Limes?  ;D

 ;D

e: don't get me wrong, because I love such exchanges and the insights they ultimately lead to. It's all good.  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 08:27:14 AM
Third hint:

(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/ws/660/amz/worldservice/live/assets/images/2015/07/10/150710142400_purpura_promos__624x351_thinkstock.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 08:28:58 AM
Third hint:

(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/ws/660/amz/worldservice/live/assets/images/2015/07/10/150710142400_purpura_promos__624x351_thinkstock.jpg)

In Romanian urban folklore mauve is associated with harlots.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 08:32:48 AM
And in Rome, with emperors... I thought you guys were the most direct descendants of ancient Rome  ;D

Fourth hint:

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2d/Rosa_%27Mister_Lincoln%27_1964.jpg/1024px-Rosa_%27Mister_Lincoln%27_1964.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 08:35:23 AM
Limes, Roman emperors and red roses. Must be a lousy libretto.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 13, 2019, 08:36:08 AM
I don't see the significance of the limes but Goethe wrote a sequel to The Magic Flute that was set (or intended to be set) by Paul Wranitzky.

Beethoven wrote incidental music to Goethe's Egmont and also the lesser known setting of Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage

Edit: The hints were added while I was typing and so I am probably wrong.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 08:37:44 AM
Limes, Roman emperors and red roses. Must be a lousy libretto.  :D
Not limes, but only one. Not emperors, but what they wore. Not necessarily red, the rose.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 08:43:36 AM
Fifth hint:

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-kLNfCLA9kcQ/ThtkgfLs2sI/AAAAAAAAAL4/PfZDokQ1ICk/s200/pj41_CAULDRON_18_480.jpg)
You need to speak some Spanish to understand this one...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 08:50:51 AM
There was a lime in acient Rome
Which wore purple clothes at home.
It also had a nose
In the form of a rose,
And a cauldron made of chrome.


Am I close?  ;D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 09:00:24 AM
There was a lime in acient Rome
Which wore purple clothes at home.
It also had a nose
In the form of a rose,
And a cauldron made of chrome.


Am I close?  ;D
That's by Wordsworth, isn't it?   ;D Be it as it may, I'm afraid you're not close at all...

Sixth clue (I'm running out of clues here):

(https://www.elviragonzalez.es/fotos/foto_1473_p.jpg)
Again, Spanish required (Andrei, you can manage this!), and this clue goes in tandem with the previous one...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 13, 2019, 09:01:13 AM
Wikipedia -

Celos aun del aire matan ("Jealousy, even groundless, still kills") is a 1660 opera in three acts - originally performed over three days - by Juan Hidalgo de Polanco to a libretto by Pedro Calderón de la Barca.[1][2]

Still no wiser
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 09:04:14 AM
Okay, based on your last hint (caldera)

Celos aun del aire matan ("Jealousy, even groundless, still kills") is a 1660 opera in three acts - originally performed over three days - by Juan Hidalgo de Polanco to a libretto by Pedro Calderón de la Barca.[1][2]

Manuel de Falla wrote incidental music for Calderon's El gran teatro del mundo.

If these are indeed the answers, what on earth have the first three hints got to do with them?  ???

EDIT: Biffo beat me to it.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 09:09:19 AM
Almost there...it is Calderón, but the opera is another one, which I insist holds a singular position in the history of music.

Back to hint 2, which has relation to that "singular position"...

(https://cdn.monq.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Blend-Ingredient-Lime-210x210.png)

...and hints 3 and 4 (which relate to the opera as such):

(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/ws/660/amz/worldservice/live/assets/images/2015/07/10/150710142400_purpura_promos__624x351_thinkstock.jpg)  (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2d/Rosa_%27Mister_Lincoln%27_1964.jpg/1024px-Rosa_%27Mister_Lincoln%27_1964.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 13, 2019, 09:28:07 AM
La Purpura de la Rosa? First opera written in the 'new world'?

And composed by Tomas de Torrejon y Velasco...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 09:36:09 AM
La Purpura de la Rosa? First opera written in the 'new world'?
That's it! La púrpura de la rosa, by Tomás Torrejón y Velasco is the first (or, at least, the first surviving) opera written and performed in America. The libretto by Calderón had originally been intended for Juan de Hidalgo.

The work was first given in Lima on 19 October 1701. It's been recorded twice AFAIK, conducted by René Clemencic and Gabriel Garrido. I saw it fully staged, under Garrido, in the Teatro de la Zarzuela here in Madrid in the late 90s.

mc ukrneal turns (or Biffo's, who got very close)...  :)

EDIT: There's actually four recordings of the work...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 13, 2019, 09:39:57 AM
I can't do one now, so Biffo you are up!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 13, 2019, 09:54:55 AM
I can't do one now, so Biffo you are up!

I can't do one until tomorrow  (18:00 here) so anyone can feel free to have a go.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 09:55:24 AM
That's it! La púrpura de la rosa, by Tomás Torrejón y Velasco is the first (or, at least, the first surviving) opera written and performed in America. The libretto by Calderón had originally been intended for Juan de Hidalgo.

The work was first given in Lima on 19 October 1701. It's been recorded twice AFAIK, conducted by René Clemencic and Gabriel Garrido. I saw it fully staged, under Garrido, in the Teatro de la Zarzuela here in Madrid in the late 90s.

mc ukrneal turns (or Biffo's, who got very close)...  :)

EDIT: There's actually four recordings of the work...

Lime as a hint for Lima... really?  ;D

And the last one , what's its meaning?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 10:05:00 AM
Lime as a hint for Lima... really?  ;D
Subtle, isn't it?
Quote
And the last one , what's its meaning?
Pedro Calderón (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-kLNfCLA9kcQ/ThtkgfLs2sI/AAAAAAAAAL4/PfZDokQ1ICk/s200/pj41_CAULDRON_18_480.jpg) de la Barca (https://www.elviragonzalez.es/fotos/foto_1473_p.jpg)

Get it?  ;D

BTW, that barca is by Miquel Barceló. It's an impressive large-scale canvas currently being exhibited at te Galería Elvira González here in Madrid.

EDIT:  I'd say Florestan is up (he also got very close, but a split second after Biffo).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 10:25:48 AM
Subtle, isn't it?

Too subtle for me, apparently.  :D

Quote
Pedro Calderón (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-kLNfCLA9kcQ/ThtkgfLs2sI/AAAAAAAAAL4/PfZDokQ1ICk/s200/pj41_CAULDRON_18_480.jpg) de la Barca (https://www.elviragonzalez.es/fotos/foto_1473_p.jpg)

Get it?  ;D

I had got calderon, I needed no boat.  :D

Quote
BTW, that barca is by Miquel Barceló. It's an impressive large-scale canvas currently being exhibited at te Galería Elvira González here in Madrid.

I could have stared at it for a thousand years before realizing it's a boat.  ;D

Quote
EDIT:  I'd say Florestan is up (he also got very close, but a split second after Biffo).

Tomorrow. Meanwhile if you have another good one (this last was very interesting), go for it.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 13, 2019, 10:30:03 AM
Too subtle for me, apparently.  :D

I had got calderon, I needed no boat.  :D

I could have stared at it for a thousand years before realizing it's a boat.  ;D

Tomorrow. Meanwhile if you have another good one (this last was very interesting), go for it.

I thought it was a blue whale
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 10:33:18 AM
I thought it was a blue whale

 :laugh:

I had no effing idea what it was.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 10:49:01 AM
Tomorrow. Meanwhile if you have another good one (this last was very interesting), go for it.
Back to me by default, then...

An easy one:
I wrote a segment of one of my most famous compositions (a collection, rather) inspired only by a postcard sent to me by a fellow composer. Who am I, who was my colleague, and what was pictured on that card?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 13, 2019, 10:52:20 AM
I'll inject one

(https://www.fulcrumgallery.com/product-images/P680667-10/sistine-chapel-ceiling-the-creation-of-adam-detail-of-god-the-father-150812.jpg)

(https://natgeo.imgix.net/factsheets/thumbnails/UnderstandingTheBlueWhale_whale.jpg?auto=compress,format&w=1024&h=560&fit=crop)

Name the composer I am thinking of.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 13, 2019, 11:18:54 AM
An easy one:
I wrote a segment of one of my most famous compositions (a collection, rather) inspired only by a postcard sent to me by a fellow composer. Who am I, who was my colleague, and what was pictured on that card?

La puerta del vino (Preludes) by Claude Debussy, inspired by the postcard Manuel de Falla sent him from Granada, depicting the Alhambra gate of this name.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: NikF4 on March 13, 2019, 11:24:47 AM
Back to me by default, then...

An easy one:
I wrote a segment of one of my most famous compositions (a collection, rather) inspired only by a postcard sent to me by a fellow composer. Who am I, who was my colleague, and what was pictured on that card?
La puerta del vino (Preludes) by Claude Debussy, inspired by the postcard Manuel de Falla sent him from Granada, depicting the Alhambra gate of this name.

You guys bust my chops sometimes. 8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 13, 2019, 11:27:27 AM
La puerta del vino (Preludes) by Claude Debussy, inspired by the postcard Manuel de Falla sent him from Granada, depicting the Alhambra gate of this name.
Correct! Your turn...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 11:47:52 AM
Here's mine.  ;D

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Great_Wave_off_Kanagawa2.jpg/800px-Great_Wave_off_Kanagawa2.jpg) (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Force_examples.svg/1200px-Force_examples.svg.png) (https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52c31c1fe4b0d825d8158a20/57861d0a1b631b3aa7b63f82/56d3be08c6fc087c73025db4/1468411566763/?format=2500w)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 13, 2019, 11:50:48 AM
Correct! Your turn...

OK. I was born in a musical family on an island that was once Venetian and my family name is derived from an Italian word for 'harbour boy'. I studied and lived in Central Europe, but was forced to flee in 1933, in the same month as my teacher. Both my teacher's influence and folk music have a major impact on my compositions, resulting in two radically different styles. 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 13, 2019, 11:55:07 AM
Nikos Skalkottas?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 13, 2019, 12:26:37 PM
Nikos Skalkottas?
A boy working in the Venetian harbour of Negroponte, as it was then called, but probably better known as Euboea, Evia or Εύβοια, was a "scalzotto"; hence his name. His teacher of course Schönberg. Your turn.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 13, 2019, 05:01:56 PM
Here's mine.  ;D

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Great_Wave_off_Kanagawa2.jpg/800px-Great_Wave_off_Kanagawa2.jpg) (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Force_examples.svg/1200px-Force_examples.svg.png) (https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52c31c1fe4b0d825d8158a20/57861d0a1b631b3aa7b63f82/56d3be08c6fc087c73025db4/1468411566763/?format=2500w)

Einstein on the Beach?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 13, 2019, 05:32:41 PM
Alan Hovhaness, And God Created Great Whales.
Ahh, you fell into the trap!
In the first we see a wrap and the second one we see blue
So Gershwin.

 ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 12:31:18 AM
Einstein on the Beach?

No.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 12:32:46 AM
Come on, guys, this is really easy.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Great_Wave_off_Kanagawa2.jpg/800px-Great_Wave_off_Kanagawa2.jpg) (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Force_examples.svg/1200px-Force_examples.svg.png) (https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52c31c1fe4b0d825d8158a20/57861d0a1b631b3aa7b63f82/56d3be08c6fc087c73025db4/1468411566763/?format=2500w)

Supplementary hint:

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cc/Sentiero_del_Viandante_DSC_6340_%2814020554463%29.jpg/1200px-Sentiero_del_Viandante_DSC_6340_%2814020554463%29.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 01:03:32 AM
My first guess was Quantum Electrodynamics.

But now: Nono: Como una ola de fuerza y luz
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 01:05:06 AM
Nono: Como una ola de fuerza y luz

Yep!  8)

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 01:16:39 AM
I only understood the supplementary hint after I solved it.

This composer also had to emigrate. She is virtually unknown (I have never encountered any of her music) but her family's history if fairly well known, mostly because her husband and daughter were somewhat famous in two fields other than music. Her son also distinguished himself in still another field.
Name as many family members as possible.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 01:23:34 AM
Ahh, you fell into the trap!
In the first we see a wrap and the second one we see blue
So Gershwin.

 ;)

I gotta say Ken, San Antone's answer fits your clue better than yours does!  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 14, 2019, 01:38:17 AM
I only understood the supplementary hint after I solved it.
I still don't understand it  :-[
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 01:42:39 AM
I guess it is Lake Como

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Como
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 14, 2019, 02:10:38 AM
I guess it is Lake Como

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Como
A, I see... :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 03:47:27 AM
This composer also had to emigrate. She is virtually unknown

Then how on earth are we supposed to identify her? Google "virtually unknown female composers", I guess. ;D

We need more hints. Did she emigrate for political reasons or because of her ethnicity? Some indications about her time and place woudl be nice as well.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 14, 2019, 04:13:18 AM
Then how on earth are we supposed to identify her? Google "virtually unknown female composers", I guess. ;D

You have lots of clues. Her family has a 'fairly well known history' and her husband and daughter were 'somewhat famous' in fields other than music (that narrows it down greatly)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 04:17:17 AM
You have lots of clues. Her family has a 'fairly well known history' and her husband and daughter were 'somewhat famous' in fields other than music (that narrows it down greatly)

Yes, surely, I can think of, what, about two dozens fields other than music?  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 04:34:13 AM
Yes, one will never find the composer without the family. (But this was similar with the purple rose of Mexico question above.)

Here is one more clue that will make it probably too easy for some. The daughter is still alive (in her 90s) and the family's fate is probably best known through a series of books she wrote (so the daughter is, among other things, a writer). But the husband of the composer to be found was overall the most prominent member of the family, albeit in a more ephemeric field.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 04:42:19 AM
The daughter is still alive (in her 90s)

Thanks. Born around 1930 --- that would place the composer's year of birth around 1900.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 04:51:51 AM
Close enough, although the still living daughter was born closer to 1920 than 1930. The husband was about 30 years older than the wife, he was also a writer of sorts, cf. the description of his trade above.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 04:52:44 AM
Close enough, although the still living daughter was born closer to 1920 than 1930. The husband was about 30 years older than the wife, he was also a writer of sorts, cf. the description of his trade above.

More ephemerical than a writer proper --- journalist?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 14, 2019, 05:29:33 AM
I find most of the composer questions quite difficult and not easy as some of you have implied. It's only easy if you know the answer. And please remember that many people might follow the thread for the answers, so there is a lot of potential learning going on. I know more  about musical compositions  because I have focused on that over the lives of the composers, so I have a better chance of knowing those. So please be kind.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 05:39:04 AM
The husband was best known in a certain field out journalism where he was the most famous and feared in his time and place, but apparently he also wrote poems and other stuff. Despite his prominence I think that many people younger than ca. 50 (but this depends on the country they grew up in) would know of the family mainly through one book of the still living daughter.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 06:06:56 AM
The husband was best known in a certain field out journalism where he was the most famous and feared in his time and place, but apparently he also wrote poems and other stuff.

A critic, apparently. Fashion? Literary?

A hint about the place would be most helpful.

Quote
Despite his prominence I think that many people younger than ca. 50 (but this depends on the country they grew up in) would know of the family mainly through one book of the still living daughter.

In my case (younger than 50, grew up in Romania) that remains to be verified.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 14, 2019, 06:13:35 AM
A critic, apparently. Fashion? Literary?

A hint about the place would be most helpful.
Seconded. I checked hundreds of feared critics & their famous daughters of all Sudan, Paraguay, and New Zealand, but alas.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 06:44:52 AM
O.k. there are not really dozens of countries with a sufficiently large population and literary/theatre scene that a homme de lettres can become a prominent public intellectual with critic as a main job. From how many of these countries did people have to emigrate in the 1930s? Still a dozen options? probably not...
And how many who emigrated as children wrote moderately famous books about it? There are probably still a few options but if one takes the intersection it should narrow it down quite a bit.

And sorry, it probably does not help to be Romanian. The somewhat famous book seems best known in English (original) and German.

Last hint, although this probably will not help because it is even more obscure. The son of the composer and the critic, brother of the writer, achieved an uncommon distinction in the country the family emigrated to. He had a successful career in a non-artistic field and held a certain public office and supposedly was the first person in that position not born on home soil since the high middle ages.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 14, 2019, 06:47:51 AM
From how many of these countries did people have to emigrate in the 1930s?
That helps a lot - because how could we know they were forced to leave in the 1930s - and spoke German???  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 07:05:26 AM
You could know this by "triangulation". Daughter in her 90s now, mother born around 1900, father ca. 30 years older. Emigrated as a family, so probably not when the daughter was 25 but the daughter must have been old enough to remember so she could write books about it. This basically leaves the 30s and 40s. One can go with the most probable in a quiz without being certain, that's actually kind of the point, I'd have thought.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 07:11:31 AM
Emigrated as a family

This doesn't follow logically from your original post, sorry.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 07:14:38 AM
No, it doesn't. But neither is it some extraordinary additional assumption. They emigrated from Germany and ended up in Britain. An extremely rare and unlikely case in the first half of the 20th century, nobody would ever have thought of...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 14, 2019, 07:21:41 AM
Well, pick your choice: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British_people_with_German_ancestry  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 07:23:30 AM
Easy! Do some triangulation with this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_female_composers_by_birth_date (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_female_composers_by_birth_date)

 ;D



Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 14, 2019, 07:39:46 AM
Easy! Do some triangulation with this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_female_composers_by_birth_date (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_female_composers_by_birth_date)

 ;D
Had already - before the latest confessions - consulted both lists, based on the speculation that the family left for the UK (and not the US). Who can better?  ;D
I would guess this is a Jewish family leaving Germany during the rise of Hitler.
Or an equivalent to the Mann family (my very first thought).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 07:42:20 AM
I would guess this is a Jewish family leaving Germany during the rise of Hitler.

From the original post it could have been anything from a Russian aristocrat fleeing the Bolsheviks to an Italian left-wing intellectual fleeing Mussolini's regime to an Austrian Jew leaving after the Anschluss.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 07:47:49 AM
Refugees in the 30s or 40s ... that covers a lot of ground. Most of Europe, much of eastern Asia...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 14, 2019, 08:19:46 AM
Congrats, San Antone. How did you achieve the impossible? How did you exclude all the Samoans, Manjurians and Martians?

I am sorry that I severely misjudged the question due to local bias. The thing is that while Weissmann is indeed obscure, Alfred Kerr was one of the three or four most famous German language literary/theatre critics of the 20th century (and together with Austrian Karl Kraus the dominant critic of the early 20th century). And the first of Judith Kerr's books "When Hitler stole pink rabbit" has been extremely popular in Germany since the mid-70s, including a TV production. So I really thought I had to start in very general terms and had given it away with the first two additional hints or so.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 08:32:12 AM
Another female composer - American - claims she has not received credit due her because of her association with a famous older composer who used her ideas as his own. 

Name both composers.
Feldman and Brunita Marcus
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 08:42:57 AM
Was it too easy?  Oh, well, I guess we need those to break it up.  But it is Bunita, no "r".  Your turn.
Well my Hovhaness was pretty easy. I don’t believe her claim, but I listened to some of her music and enjoyed it.

Another easy one. Name the composer.

(https://opimedia.azureedge.net/-/media/Images/MEN/Editorial/Blogs/Natural-Health/Aluminum-and-Microbes-Research-Linking-these-Factors-to-Dementia/Aluminum-and-Dementia.jpg?h=358&w=550&la=en&hash=D4964D89C252190F7E2424DAF471F4EFC408D1E4)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 08:58:01 AM
Bent Sørensen?

Nope

(https://www.hadadbros.com/images/com_hikashop/upload/thumbnails/1200x800/8120_245g_h26.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 14, 2019, 09:08:47 AM
May I now interpolate my much delayed question? After the rigours and obscurities of the past couple of days this one is dead easy; it should take most people about 10 seconds but longer to google all the subsidiary details.

This female composer is well known despite having a very small output. She was a complete slapper and pathological liar. Prior to her marriage she had a string of passionate but apparently unconsummated relationships with a number of men, all much older than herself. The last of these was her teacher, a well known composer who later married the sister of an even better known composer.

After marriage our composer made up for lost time and threw herself at any passing expressionist painter, architect, poet .... the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker.

Her step-father was, in his day, a noted landscape painter. He later became an enthusiastic Nazi and committed suicide when the Third Reich collapsed.

Out composer's daughter had an even more complex married life. Aged 16 she married an obscure musician, mainly to escape her ghastly mother. She subsequently married a well known composer, a publisher and a reasonably well known conductor. She became a noted artist though she struggled when she went out of fashion. Possibly her best known work, for music-lovers, is a bust of a well known US conductor.

Name a many of these interesting people as you choose and also the elephant in the room.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 09:22:23 AM
Does Chanukkah have significance or is the menorah to signify the composer is Jewish?
(https://previews.123rf.com/images/candyman/candyman1007/candyman100700177/7358660-3d-silver-star-of-david.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 09:28:59 AM
My guess is the composer is Julia Weissman (Julia Anna Franziska Kerr born in Weisbaden as Julia Anna Franziska Weismann was a German composer), married to Alfred Kerr the parents of Judith Kerr, author of children's books.

Kerr was born in Berlin, the daughter of Alfred Kerr (1867–1948), a German-Jewish theatre critic who had changed his name from Kempner to Kerr in 1887, by his marriage to Julia Weismann [de] (1898-1965), the daughter of a Prussian politician. Judith Kerr had a brother, Michael (Sir Michael Robert Emanuel Kerr (1 March 1921 – 14 April 2002) was a British jurist, lawyer and author. His career eventually led him to the High Court, where he believed that he was the first senior judge born an alien since the 12th century.).

In 1933, just before the Nazis came to power, the family left Germany, fearful because Alfred Kerr had openly criticized the Nazis. Alfred Kerr's books were burned by the Nazis shortly after he fled Germany. The family travelled first to Switzerland and then on to France, before finally settling in Britain, where Judith Kerr has lived ever since. She subsequently became a naturalised British subject.

 8)

Never ever heard about any of them before --- and I had a big hunch this would indeed prove be the case.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 09:40:59 AM
Is this a new hint or just to clarify that the composer in question is Jewish?
Clarification.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 10:07:35 AM
Robert Kahn ( as in "can")?
Nope.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 10:09:13 AM
Well my Hovhaness was pretty easy. I don’t believe her claim, but I listened to some of her music and enjoyed it.

Another easy one. Name the composer.

(https://opimedia.azureedge.net/-/media/Images/MEN/Editorial/Blogs/Natural-Health/Aluminum-and-Microbes-Research-Linking-these-Factors-to-Dementia/Aluminum-and-Dementia.jpg?h=358&w=550&la=en&hash=D4964D89C252190F7E2424DAF471F4EFC408D1E4)

Pablo de Sarasate.  ;D (beer was his beverage of choice)

Alternately, someone from the Darmstadt school (ie, more garbage than music).  >:D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 14, 2019, 10:22:55 AM
Charles-Valentin Alkan
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 10:24:44 AM
This female composer is well known despite having a very small output. She was a complete slapper and pathological liar. Prior to her marriage she had a string of passionate but apparently unconsummated relationships with a number of men, all much older than herself. The last of these was her teacher, a well known composer who later married the sister of an even better known composer.

After marriage our composer made up for lost time and threw herself at any passing expressionist painter, architect, poet .... the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker.

A googling of "nymphomaniac composers" yielded no signifcant results. The hunt goes on.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 10:27:31 AM
Charles-Valentin Alkan
Indeed. ALuminum CAN
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 10:29:42 AM
A googling of "nymphomaniac composers" yielded no signifcant results. The hunt goes on.  ;D
You insist on a composer? If you broaden your search to include engineers, teachers, waitresses, nurses you'll have more luck.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 14, 2019, 10:36:04 AM
Indeed. ALuminum CAN

Confession,  I googled 'jewish composers' then kicked myself when I saw one of my favourite composers of piano music on the first page.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 10:37:29 AM
You insist on a composer? If you broaden your search to include engineers, teachers, waitresses, nurses you'll have more luck.

Yes, as of late this thread has gone astray. Name a composer whom not even the Devil has heard of but whose second cousin had a somewhat famous affair with a waiter whose great great-uncle wrote a book about the most famous fortune teller of the composer's country of adoption. 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 10:52:47 AM
Alma Maria Mahler Gropius Werfel (born Alma Margaretha Maria Schindler)

Daughter Anna married Ernst Krenek, sculpted a bust of Bruno Walter.

I'm still on the hunt for the butcher, the baker and the mailman.  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 14, 2019, 10:55:30 AM
I was posting the same name: Alma Mahler, step-father Carlo Moll, daugther Anna Justine Mahler (the sculptor) ETC. But Andrei should continue.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 14, 2019, 11:09:58 AM
Alma Mahler was part of my first challenge question, and definitely had an active love life. But I am confused since Zemlinsky's sister married Arnold Schoenberg but the hint does not to match up with that scenario, since Zemlinsky was not better known than Schoenberg.
Exactly the same consideration kept me from yelling 'Alma' at first sight.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 11:19:50 AM
After all the integral-serialist-triple-counterpoint-on-an-inverted-dodecaphonic-canon-style intricacies of the latest quizes, this one should be a piece of cake.

Name a work and the composer following these visual hints.

(https://wonderopolis.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/910.jpg) (https://i.guim.co.uk/img/static/sys-images/Music/Pix/pictures/2008/10/17/RollingStones276.jpg?width=300&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=90e0bd139f95f744b33ed0ed1e641525) (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/14-01-10-tbh-013.jpg/220px-14-01-10-tbh-013.jpg) (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTtwRkBi-CD5zApjVa3FvBswJt6FH4-GKRzz0ONdYucREgO61mj) (https://www.johnholland.com.au/media/1257/bulk-liquids-berth-2.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 14, 2019, 02:44:28 PM
Sorry,  got the sister the wrong way round.

Bruno Walter was not the conductor I was thinking of. Anna heard him conduct Mahler 2 and preferred his interpretation to that of BW. If she also made a bust of Walter, many apologies.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 03:38:12 PM
After all the integral-serialist-triple-counterpoint-on-an-inverted-dodecaphonic-canon-style intricacies of the latest quizes, this one should be a piece of cake.

Name a work and the composer following these visual hints.

(https://wonderopolis.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/910.jpg) (https://i.guim.co.uk/img/static/sys-images/Music/Pix/pictures/2008/10/17/RollingStones276.jpg?width=300&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=90e0bd139f95f744b33ed0ed1e641525) (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/14-01-10-tbh-013.jpg/220px-14-01-10-tbh-013.jpg) (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTtwRkBi-CD5zApjVa3FvBswJt6FH4-GKRzz0ONdYucREgO61mj) (https://www.johnholland.com.au/media/1257/bulk-liquids-berth-2.jpg)
Sheep - its fans
Stones - cannot get satisfaction from it

So far, La Mer, whic fits the harbor too.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 14, 2019, 03:49:51 PM
After all the integral-serialist-triple-counterpoint-on-an-inverted-dodecaphonic-canon-style intricacies of the latest quizes, this one should be a piece of cake.

Name a work and the composer following these visual hints.

(https://wonderopolis.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/910.jpg) (https://i.guim.co.uk/img/static/sys-images/Music/Pix/pictures/2008/10/17/RollingStones276.jpg?width=300&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=90e0bd139f95f744b33ed0ed1e641525) (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/14-01-10-tbh-013.jpg/220px-14-01-10-tbh-013.jpg) (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTtwRkBi-CD5zApjVa3FvBswJt6FH4-GKRzz0ONdYucREgO61mj) (https://www.johnholland.com.au/media/1257/bulk-liquids-berth-2.jpg)
Shepherd Jagger, The Emperor's Shoe Oil
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on March 14, 2019, 10:53:57 PM
The Shepherd on the Rock   Franz [Beckenstrasser) Schubert (Shoe Berth)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 14, 2019, 10:58:05 PM
The Shepherd on the Rock   Franz Schubert (Shoe Berth)

Correct. Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on March 14, 2019, 11:09:56 PM
My composer-conductor remembered his homeland with a symphony written while touring, one of the movements is a reminiscence of one of the visited ports so its name is somewhat misleading.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 12:44:29 AM
Alf Hurum perhaps?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 04:40:27 AM
Alf Hurum perhaps?
Or Jean Martinon?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on March 15, 2019, 08:29:50 AM
Maybe there's more than one correct answer, the one I'm looking for suffered a loss of reputation when the remark of the conductor of a later work to the effect of "Long live Sousa" was misheard as a call for support of revolution.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 08:51:45 AM
Maybe there's more than one correct answer, the one I'm looking for suffered a loss of reputation when the remark of the conductor of a later work to the effect of "Long live Sousa" was misheard as a call for support of revolution.
Matthijs Vermeulen & Cornelis Dopper, of course!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on March 15, 2019, 09:07:36 AM
RIGHT!  The  scherzo of the "Amsterdam" Symphony (#6) is a reminiscence of Vancouver's Chinatown which was near by when he visited with the Savage Opera Company.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 10:18:42 AM
RIGHT!  The  scherzo of the "Amsterdam" Symphony (#6) is a reminiscence of Vancouver's Chinatown which was near by when he visited with the Savage Opera Company.
Good to learn (didn't know  ;D). Cornelis Dopper's hometown, however, was the provincial town of Stadskanaal, where six years ago I attended the - rather belated - premiere of his 1934 Requiem (for soloists, choir and orchestra). His symphonies are OKish, IMHO, No. 7 perhaps most, but one piece really stands out and should be a curtain riser: the Ciaconna Gotica, a set of fantastic variations for orchestra (1919).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on March 15, 2019, 11:03:13 AM
Good to learn (didn't know  ;D). Cornelis Dopper's hometown, however, was the provincial town of Stadskanaal,.
..

Which is why I used the word "homeland".


your turn...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 11:51:27 AM
OK. One of the legendary stories in Shostakovich' Testimony, if Solomon Volkov can be trusted,  8) is about a pianist. One day Stalin heard a live concert on the radio with one of his favourite pieces and ordered for the record of it by this specific artist - which he thought he had heard - to be brought to his dacha near Moscow. No one dared tell him that there was no such disc and the pianist and a bunch of orchestra players were hurriedly convened in a recording studio. The third consecutive conductor (the first two overwhelmed by the stress) managed to complete a recording well into the night. A single disc was produced and brought to Stalin's dacha early in the morning. The story goes that it lay on Stalin's turntable when he suffered his stroke in 1953.

Name the piece and the artist - and what she wrote Stalin to thank him for the gift he had bestowed on her.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 15, 2019, 12:00:59 PM
OK. One of the legendary stories in Shostakovich' Testimony, if Solomon Volkov can be trusted,  8) is about a pianist. One day Stalin heard a live concert on the radio with one of his favourite pieces and ordered for the record of it by this specific artist - which he thought he had heard - to be brought to his dacha near Moscow. No one dared tell him that there was no such disc and the pianist and a bunch of orchestra players were hurriedly convened in a recording studio. The third consecutive conductor (the first two overwhelmed by the stress) managed to complete a recording well into the night. A single disc was produced and brought to Stalin's dacha early in the morning. The story goes that it lay on Stalin's turntable when he suffered his stroke in 1953.

Name the piece and the artist - and what she wrote Stalin to thank him for the gift he had bestowed on her.  ;D
Mozart, a piano concerto I think. Not sure the story is true.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 12:07:53 PM
Mozart, a piano concerto I think. Not sure the story is true.
if Solomon Volkov can be trusted,  8)

Close, very close. Not the exact piece, artist and letter to Stalin (according to Volkov's story) yet.  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 15, 2019, 12:09:42 PM
Close, very close. Not the exact piece, artist and letter to Stalin (according to Volkov's story) yet.  ;)
Maria Yudina, 23
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 12:18:26 PM
Maria Yudina, 23

>> Soon afterwards, the story goes, Yudina was surprised to receive a letter containing 20,000 rubles, sent at the order of Stalin. She wrote him: "I thank you for your aid. I will pray for you day and night and ask the Lord to forgive your great sins before the people and the country. The Lord is merciful and He’ll forgive you. I gave the money to my church.”
Stalin reportedly read the letter as his secretary – who had already prepared her arrest warrant – awaited his reaction. But he put the letter aside and said nothing. Nine years later, as Stalin lay on his deathbed, Yudina’s recording of the Mozart concerto was playing on a record player nearby. << https://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/latest/maria-yudina-stalin

Your turn.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 15, 2019, 01:06:16 PM
I was named after a poet, and my son was named for a poem. My daughter was also a composer. What was her name?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 15, 2019, 01:31:19 PM
(Gwendolen) Avril Coleridge-Taylor, daughter of Samuel and sister of Hiawatha.

Papa of course being Samuel Coleridge-Taylor.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 01:32:27 PM
I was named after a poet, and my son was named for a poem. My daughter was also a composer. What was her name?
Avril Coleridge-Taylor
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 15, 2019, 01:35:09 PM
We seem to have tied. But I will defer to Christo. His riddles are much better than mine.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 15, 2019, 01:55:40 PM
Both correct of course. In view of Jeffrey's gesture, you are up Christo.

PS I heard some of papa Samuel's chamber music recently and liked it a lot.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 15, 2019, 02:19:27 PM
Both correct of course. In view of Jeffrey's gesture, you are up Christo.

PS I heard some of papa Samuel's chamber music recently and liked it a lot.
I am honoured, but I prefer a new mystery from Jeffrey. Honestly, I learn a lot from him (and I myself have already offered too many riddles). After you, Sir! ;D

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 15, 2019, 02:26:51 PM
I am honoured, but I prefer a new mystery from Jeffrey. Honestly, I learn a lot from him (and I myself have already offered too many riddles). After you, Sir! ;D

What a brilliant meta clue!
The answer is: Remo Giazotto, who hid his light under the bushel of Albinoni.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 15, 2019, 04:51:41 PM
I am honoured, but I prefer a new mystery from Jeffrey. Honestly, I learn a lot from him (and I myself have already offered too many riddles). After you, Sir! ;D

Panic!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 15, 2019, 04:59:35 PM
Panic!

Actually that's a good topic.

Two composers are involved. Both performed on the same instrument.Both are said to have suffered stage fright, and usually performed only to small audiences in semi-informal settings because of that. The first composer is very famous. The second composer is not famous, and his reputation as a composer derives from a set of works based on a set of works by the first composer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 16, 2019, 12:30:15 AM
Actually that's a good topic.

Two composers are involved. Both performed on the same instrument.Both are said to have suffered stage fright, and usually performed only to small audiences in semi-informal settings because of that. The first composer is very famous. The second composer is not famous, and his reputation as a composer derives from a set of works based on a set of works by the first composer.
Is this about the Diabelli Variations, perhaps?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 16, 2019, 12:42:27 AM
Chopin and Godowsky?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 16, 2019, 09:57:37 AM
Is this about the Diabelli Variations, perhaps?

No. That would reverse the relation. The less famous composer based his work on that of the very famous composer.
In fact
Chopin and Godowsky?

Is exactly the answer.

So it's Jo's turn to pose a question.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 16, 2019, 10:16:54 AM
No. That would reverse the relation. The less famous composer based his work on that of the very famous composer.
In fact
Is exactly the answer.

So it's Jo's turn to pose a question.
Heh. I figured it was Chopin and, so I googled for the and. Never found Godowsky, whom I have heard of, but just barely.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 16, 2019, 10:22:21 AM
Connect G. F. Handel and Sean Connery with a plausible musico-historical chain that includes a well-known 20th century composer. There are around 4 intermediate links in that chain although some are not explicitly musical. (I have a specific solution in mind but there might be plausible alternatives.)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 16, 2019, 10:40:57 AM
Connect G. F. Handel and Sean Connery with a plausible musico-historical chain that includes a well-known 20th century composer. There are around 4 intermediate links in that chain although some are not explicitly musical. (I have a specific solution in mind but there might be plausible alternatives.)

John Addison composed the music for A Bridge To Far, in which Sean Connery playes the rol of Major General Urquhart (commander at the bridge; I'm living in that neighbourhood). Addison studied oboe with Leon Goossens, the great oboist. Handel was also an oboist in his early years and always writes for the oboe with great ingenuity. Four steps.  :P
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 16, 2019, 10:42:08 AM
Connect G. F. Handel and Sean Connery with a plausible musico-historical chain that includes a well-known 20th century composer. There are around 4 intermediate links in that chain although some are not explicitly musical. (I have a specific solution in mind but there might be plausible alternatives.)
Fireworks - Firebird - From Russia with Love
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 16, 2019, 10:45:49 AM
Is exactly the answer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_Godowsky (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_Godowsky)

I know that Wikipedia is not the most accurate of sources, but still I have to ask: where does it say Godowsky had stage fright? It describes him as a "virtuoso". Which virtuoso ever had stage fright? ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 16, 2019, 10:46:02 AM
Or ... (https://i.pinimg.com/originals/b1/7e/31/b17e31ae0fc159e40823bcbf86e7ad63.jpg)

 ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 16, 2019, 10:50:18 AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_Godowsky (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_Godowsky)

I know that Wikipedia is not the most accurate of sources, but still I have to ask: where does it say Godowsky had stage fright? It describes him as a "virtuoso". Which virtuoso ever had stage fright? ;D

I don't always use Wikipedia!
https://www.cmuse.org/famous-classical-musicians-who-suffered-from-stage-fright/

BTW, your message inbox is full again.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 16, 2019, 11:05:22 AM
your message inbox is full again.

Not any more.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 16, 2019, 12:02:00 PM
Fireworks - Firebird - From Russia with Love
The associations are too loose but one of these links is basically correct.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 16, 2019, 12:05:43 PM
John Addison composed the music for A Bridge To Far, in which Sean Connery playes the rol of Major General Urquhart (commander at the bridge; I'm living in that neighbourhood). Addison studied oboe with Leon Goossens, the great oboist. Handel was also an oboist in his early years and always writes for the oboe with great ingenuity. Four steps.  :P
The composer is far better known than Addison. The connections I am looking are mostly a little tighter although this is of course debatable. The movie I am looking for is some more iconic in the career of Connery.)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 16, 2019, 12:17:18 PM
The associations are too loose but one of these links is basically correct.
Actually all the links are correct and by “loose” you simply mean “not the ones I had in mind”.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 16, 2019, 12:24:16 PM
Yes, of course. As I am the one who asked the riddle, the point is precisely to find out what I had mind. But you certainly knew this before, smartie.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 16, 2019, 12:28:11 PM
The composer is far better known than Addison. The connections I am looking are mostly a little tighter although this is of course debatable. The movie I am looking for is some more iconic in the career of Connery.)
Sean Connery was the narrator in a 1966 recording of Peter and the Wolf, conducted by Antal Dorati (here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqgRJY7YThSvoXTow8Xh1CChBPe6APO4d). Moving forward from Handel to Prokofiev can be done in any two or three steps you wish - but I see that you now add an iconic Sean Connery movie to your requirements.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 16, 2019, 12:30:06 PM
Well I do think Fireworks Firebird is fair. Balanchine. Connery I read wrote a ballet that Balanchine read.

Hmm I also see Connery studied dance and ballet with Yat Malmgren, a Swedish ballet dancer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 16, 2019, 12:38:11 PM
Handel (Belshazzar) - Walton (Belshazzar's Feast) - Walton (Henry V) - Connery (The Man Who Would be King)
That last is a leap but I like this chain!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 16, 2019, 12:49:21 PM
Handel (Belshazzar) - Walton (Belshazzar's Feast) - Walton (Henry V) - Connery (The Man Who Would be King)
This is quite good but I have a considerably easier one in mind.

I did not "add more iconic movie" to the requirements. I gave this as an additional hint after one suggestion had been made.

The loosest step is the next from Handel, the rest is very straightforward. The type of connection is
historical-theatrical - theatrical - theatrical-familial - theatrical (in the wide sense that theatre, opera, movies, ballett could all be included).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 16, 2019, 01:06:04 PM
Handel's opera Giulio Cesare (1724) was based on Shakespeare, as are Romeo and Juliet & the accidental music for Hamlet by Prokofiev, who also composed Peter and the Wolf,  that was recorded in 1966 with Sean Connery as the narrator.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 16, 2019, 01:13:28 PM
You already forgot that it involves a famous movie not Peter and the Wolf.
And Handel's Caesar is not based on Shakespeare.
The first connection is hard to make more precise without giving it away (despite being somewhat vague). The second one is roughly "x wrote piece based on y", the third I cannot make more precise without giving it away. The fourth is "acted in a movie together with".
So now it's probably easier working historically backwards.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 16, 2019, 02:31:32 PM
In the Robin Hood movie Robin and Marian (1976), Sean Connery's partner is Audrey Hepburn, who played Natasha Rostov in War and Peace, based on Tolstoy's novel that was also used for Prokofiev's opera War and Peace - Sean Connery the narrator in the 1966 production of Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf BTW  :D - &tc.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on March 16, 2019, 03:53:23 PM
Handel Water Music, Bridge over Troubled Water, A Bridge Too Far, Sean Connery (in A Bridge too Far...)  ?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 16, 2019, 06:39:15 PM
Handel Water Music, Bridge over Troubled Water, A Bridge Too Far, Sean Connery (in A Bridge too Far...)  ?


Handel (Belshazzar) - Walton (Belshazzar's Feast) - Walton (Henry V) - Connery (The Man Who Would be King)

Handel, Coronation Anthems; Connery, The Man Who Would Be King
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 18, 2019, 04:40:14 AM
The first connection is that of contemporary artist active in a similar artistic field with a famous piece that bears both general connections to one of the main genres of Handel as well as a more specific one related to a particular occurence that involved major performers of certain Handelian pieces (this last one might not make it easier).
The second one is roughly "Well known 20th century composer wrote music for piece based on y",
the third is twofold with both a personal relation to well known 20th century composer and professional (like performing in the piece of the step before)
The fourth is "person of step before acted in a movie together with Sean Connery". The movie was already mentioned further above and it's more famous than the one with the bridge.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 18, 2019, 05:31:01 AM
The Threepenny Opera was (partly) a parody of the kind of opera Handel wrote.
Kurt Well wrote a version of the above
Lotte Lenya sang in the Weill piece
She also appeared with Connery in From Russia with Love as Rosa Klebb
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 18, 2019, 05:57:38 AM
Exactly. The parody was actually called "Beggar's Opera" by John Gay.
Apart from generally making fun of opera seria it contained a scene with fighting female protagonists based on the competition of two primadonne (Cuzzoni and Bordoni) and their fans. Lotte Lenya was married to Weill and also performed in the Threepenny opera.

I think I am not going to put any quizzes anymore as I apparently cannot find the proper questions for this audience.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 18, 2019, 06:12:07 AM
Exactly. The parody was actually called "Beggar's Opera" by John Gay.
Apart from generally making fun of opera seria it contained a scene with fighting female protagonists based on the competition of two primadonne (Cuzzoni and Bordoni) and their fans. Lotte Lenya was married to Weill and also performed in the Threepenny opera.

I think I am not going to put any quizzes anymore as I apparently cannot find the proper questions for this audience.

Sorry, should have remembered the correct title, my head was spinning by the time I had read the question half-a-dozen times. I have Britten's tarted up version of Gay. Also vaguely remembered some romantic connection between LL and KW - didn't realise they were married.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 18, 2019, 06:40:46 AM
Something a bit easier.

This opera was written by a committee. One of the contributors is very well known. Another contributor, as well as being a composer, was a singer and instrumentalist. He is probably best known for appearing in an opera by the well known composer where he was able to display both his performance skills. Name the composers, operas and any other members of the committee - two of them have a connection with the second opera as well.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 18, 2019, 06:45:12 AM
I think I am not going to put any quizzes anymore as I apparently cannot find the proper questions for this audience.

Nothing wrong AT ALL with your puzzle; I loved it and do hope you will continue to make them. Feel very sorry if we can't deal with the fun & confusion of it!  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 19, 2019, 05:56:38 AM
This opera was written by a committee. One of the contributors is very well known. Another contributor, as well as being a composer, was a singer and instrumentalist. He is probably best known for appearing in an opera by the well known composer where he was able to display both his performance skills. Name the composers, operas and any other members of the committee - two of them have a connection with the second opera as well.
The only opera written by a collective that I know - I was thinking about it immediately - is Reconstructie (1968) about Che Guevarra, written by Louis Andriessen, Reinbert de Leeuw, Misha Mengelberg, Peter Schat, Jan van Vlijmen, with a libretto by Hugo Claus and Harry Mulisch. Louis Andriessen wrote a couple of other operas. Good start?  ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 19, 2019, 07:11:42 AM
My best guess:

Der Stein der Weisen, oder die Zauberinsel (German for The Philosopher's Stone, or the Enchanted Isle) is a two-act singspiel jointly composed by Johann Baptist Henneberg, Benedikt Schack, Franz Xaver Gerl, Emanuel Schikaneder, and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1790 (K. 592a). Benedikt Emanuel Schack was a composer and tenor of the Classical era, a close friend of Mozart and the first performer of the role of Tamino in Mozart's opera The Magic Flute.

That's the one I was looking for,  never heard of the other two possibilities but thanks for the effort.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 19, 2019, 09:57:19 AM
Probably pretty easy compared to the recent challenges - but, here's mine:

As a university student the subject of this challenge and three other amateur musicians devoted themselves to studying and performing the literature for piano trio and piano quartet.  The ensemble focused on the works of Mozart, Beethoven, Ries, Dussek and Onslow but the mainstay of the group's repertory was a specific piano trio by a famous composer.

Although he continued his university studies (which was a stipulation of his inheritance) his focus shifted entirely to music and he is known to us as a composer.

Name the composer and the famous piano trio.


Was he a Frenchman?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 19, 2019, 10:08:59 AM
Inheritance suggest Poulenc. Fame suggests Archduke Trio
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 19, 2019, 10:12:58 AM
Was he a Frenchman?
Who else would perform Onslow?  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 19, 2019, 10:17:03 AM
Who else would perform Onslow?  :D
Everything I have heard by Onslow has been excellent.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 19, 2019, 10:32:57 AM
A hint about his nationality would be most helpful. As for the time, I suspect the second half of the 19C.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 19, 2019, 11:02:02 AM
The nationality of the famous composer of the piano trio (of whom the future composer was a great admirer) was Austrian.

Haydn's Gypsy?

Quote
You are off regarding the time period.

20C, then (I guess the first half of the 19C is out of the question).

Our composer played the piano or the violin?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 19, 2019, 12:12:16 PM
Not many famous trios. It would have a name.

Ghost Trio by LvB

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 19, 2019, 12:17:29 PM
Not many famous trios. It would have a name.

Ghost Trio by LvB

The trio's composer is Austrian and not Haydn. Therefore, Mozart or Schubert.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 19, 2019, 12:32:24 PM
It's a Schubert trio (I suspected this from the beginning) but I have no clue about the composer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 19, 2019, 12:39:00 PM
Another hint, time period is within a year or two of the famous composer dying, young.

Schubert, around 1830.

You don't mean the composer is Schumann, do you?  :laugh:

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 19, 2019, 12:39:35 PM
The trio's composer is Austrian and not Haydn. Therefore, Mozart or Schubert.
Or Hummel
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 19, 2019, 12:39:53 PM
Everything I have heard by Onslow has been excellent.

Ditto.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 20, 2019, 01:52:30 AM
I deduced Schumann fairly quickly yesterday (law studies, inheritance) but could find no reference to him playing piano trios by Schubert or anyone else - biographical details online are surprisingly thin for a major composer. Now it seems the trio in question is by Schubert - how about Piano Trio No 2 in E flat major, D 929. If that is wrong I'll let someone else guess the other one.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 20, 2019, 03:15:45 AM
I deduced Schumann fairly quickly yesterday (law studies, inheritance) but could find no reference to him playing piano trios by Schubert or anyone else - biographical details online are surprisingly thin for a major composer.

And Onslow? Was he known outside France?

Quote
Now it seems the trio in question is by Schubert - how about Piano Trio No 2 in E flat major, D 929. If that is wrong I'll let someone else guess the other one.

Well, if it's not D 929 then it should be D 898. Or even D 897.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 20, 2019, 03:16:51 AM
It is Schubert, but he died in 1828.

I know. I was referring to the time Schumann played it.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 20, 2019, 04:51:23 AM
It is the trio in E-flat, D. 929 - published posthumously a month after Schubert died.  Schumann heard it first most likely at the Wieck house and became almost obsessed with it.  He and three friends from university in Heidelberg rehearsed it and performed it privately possibly a half dozen times.

What's your source for their playing Onslow as well? It strikes me as rather odd.

Quote
You and Florestan appear to have solved it together - y'all decide between you who is up.

I'll let Biffo have his turn.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 20, 2019, 05:27:10 AM
This book, "Crossing Paths: Schubert, Schumann, and Brahms" by John Daverio where this paragraph appears:

"In the weeks and months after these initial encounters, references to Schubert’s trio appear frequently in Schumann’s diaries. Moreover, the period encompassed by these references—late November 1828 through mid-March 1829—coincides almost exactly with Schumann’s participation in a group he had organized for the express purpose of studying the literature for piano trio and piano quartet. Comprised of three amateur string players (Johann Friedrich Täglichsbeck, violin; Christoph Soergel, viola; Christian Glock, cello), with Schumann himself at the keyboard, the ensemble focused on the chamber music for piano and strings of Mozart, Beethoven, Ferdinand Ries, J. L. Dussek, Prince Louis Ferdinand, and Georges Onslow. But the mainstay of the group’s repertory was Schubert’s Piano Trio in E flat, which figured in its sessions of 7 December 1828 and 19 January, 31 January, and 13 March 1829."

Thanks. The irony is that I have this book but didn't manage to read it. I also have Daverio's "Schumann: Herald of a New Poetic Age" and guess what? Exactly, haven't read it either.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 20, 2019, 05:38:58 AM
What's your source for their playing Onslow as well? It strikes me as rather odd.

I'll let Biffo have his turn.

Thanks!

Incidentally, for those still wondering, Anna Mahler sculpted a bust of William Steinberg.

Now I will have to put my thinking cap on.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 20, 2019, 05:56:15 AM
This fiery-tempered composer studied in Leipzig (where else!) but when he returned to his native land he clashed with the musical establishment and so founded his own music college. He mainly enjoyed success with his stage music. This includes incidental music to a stage play based on a well-known (in his native land) legend. This legend also inspired a cycle of poems that became a massive work by a well known German composer and is probably the best known version of this legend.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 20, 2019, 06:19:24 AM
I am guessing the poetry is Gurre-Lieder by Jens Peter Jacobsen. Delius wrote a song cycle based on his poems called Fennimore and Gerda.

Am I close?

Spot on with the literary source, not Delius however.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 20, 2019, 06:42:30 AM
Ole Olsen

You panicked me there in case I had missed something - Olsen studied in Leipzig but otherwise doesn't fit the profile of our fiery-tempered composer. Also, wrong nationality.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 22, 2019, 01:40:52 AM
This fiery-tempered composer studied in Leipzig (where else!) but when he returned to his native land he clashed with the musical establishment and so founded his own music college. He mainly enjoyed success with his stage music. This includes incidental music to a stage play based on a well-known (in his native land) legend. This legend also inspired a cycle of poems that became a massive work by a well known German composer and is probably the best known version of this legend.

This hasn't had much of a response for a couple of days, either it is too obscure or contributors are quizzed out so here is a hint.

Another much better known composer possibly (not certain) played the violin in the theatre orchestra for the incidental music mentioned above. An exotic fairy tale links both composers.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 22, 2019, 03:50:39 AM
This hasn't had much of a response for a couple of days, either it is too obscure or contributors are quizzed out so here is a hint.

Another much better known composer possibly (not certain) played the violin in the theatre orchestra for the incidental music mentioned above. An exotic fairy tale links both composers.

Are they listed here?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Danish_classical_composers (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Danish_classical_composers)

 :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 22, 2019, 04:15:06 AM
Are they listed here?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Danish_classical_composers (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Danish_classical_composers)

 :laugh:

Yes, both of them!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 22, 2019, 04:53:52 AM
Svendsen and Nielsen?

Nielsen is one of them but not the main subject of the question.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 22, 2019, 05:42:14 AM
I can only find three composers who studied in Leipzig and are older than Nielsen:

Joseph Marie François Volkmar Busch
Christian Frederik Emil Horneman
Johann Adolf Scheibe

Of those Horneman is my best guess since he founded a music conservatory.  Also, Horneman's best known work, along with the four-movement suite drawn from incidental music for the Holger Drachmann drama Gurre (also the basis for Arnold Schoenberg's Gurrelieder).

None of the composers I looked up from the Danish list were described as having a fiery temper.  And I've heard of none of these guys.

Horneman is the correct answer.

The only music I have by him is the incidental music to Gurre coupled with two overtures, one of them to his opera Aladdin, apparently his masterpiece. The booklet note describes him as 'a fiery soul and his temper got in the way of both his productivity and acceptance by the musical establishment'.

Nielsen wrote incidental music to a different version of Aladdin.

I hadn't heard of him either until the disc came my way in a Chandos Mystery Box, several years ago.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 22, 2019, 06:26:01 AM
I think most of us have heard of the subject of my challenge question. In fact, it might be quite easy:

This composer was prolific and wrote symphonies, concertos, operas, and numerous other works in many genres. His teacher was famous, and our composer published a book of reminiscences about him. He had a successful career in several major cities but at the time of his death he was a forgotten figure.  Today, however, much of his repertory has been recorded.

Beeethoven's pupil Ferdinand Ries?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 22, 2019, 06:27:27 AM
I think most of us have heard of the subject of my challenge question. In fact, it might be quite easy:

This composer was prolific and wrote symphonies, concertos, operas, and numerous other works in many genres. His teacher was famous, and our composer published a book of reminiscences about him. He had a successful career in several major cities but at the time of his death he was a forgotten figure.  Today, however, much of his repertory has been recorded.
Ries?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 22, 2019, 06:32:08 AM
I think most of us have heard of the subject of my challenge question. In fact, it might be quite easy:

This composer was prolific and wrote symphonies, concertos, operas, and numerous other works in many genres. His teacher was famous, and our composer published a book of reminiscences about him. He had a successful career in several major cities but at the time of his death he was a forgotten figure.  Today, however, much of his repertory has been recorded.

Ferdinand Ries, pupil of Beethoven fits the bill - more so than Anton Schindler who also wrote a biography of the great man but left very little music
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 22, 2019, 06:45:43 AM
You're all right!  See, I said it would be easy.  Decide amongst yourselves whose turn it is.

 8)

I am part way through reading Jan Swafford's biography of Beethoven so he has been on my mind recently.

I am happy to let anyone else have a go while I exhume another obscure Scandinavian composer (only joking about the last bit).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 22, 2019, 07:03:11 AM
(http://www.donnareed.org/images/donna/drf023.gif)

(http://www.lifeisbutadish.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Parmesan-Chicken-Baked-Ziti-2.jpg)

Easy one.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 22, 2019, 07:06:22 AM
This composer studied in his home country with three of her most famous composers and teachers. He wrote a ballet in which the most famous three dancers of the same country performed. He then went on to study abroad, in a city where he met a famous poet and a famous painter and wrote music for the latter's attempt at experimental theatre.

Back in his country he met another composer whose fame rests on another field though. Together they composed music inspired by, and in the service of, that other field. This music has been recorded in its entirety.

Both these composers were born in the same country and both had different ethnic backgrounds than the majority of their fellow countrymen.

Name them.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 22, 2019, 07:15:47 AM
Reed Ziti?
:laugh:
Yes. Donna. ziti. Donizetti.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 01:29:25 AM
Bump!

This composer studied in his home country with three of her most famous composers and teachers. He wrote a ballet in which the most famous three dancers of the same country performed. He then went on to study abroad, in a city where he met a famous poet and a famous painter and wrote music for the latter's attempt at experimental theatre.

Back in his country he met another composer whose fame rests on another field though. Together they composed music inspired by, and in the service of, that other field. This music has been recorded in its entirety.

Both these composers were born in the same country and both had different ethnic backgrounds than the majority of their fellow countrymen.

Name them.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 25, 2019, 01:41:06 AM
So sue me, but I am going to put forward a challenge out of order - probably easy

This composer was not spectacularly gifted nor a prodigy but he possessed a work ethic that made up for any lack of innate talent. He excelled in symphonic as well as chamber music.  It might be easy to think that two younger contemporaries overshadowed him, but he is a major figure and his entire oeuvre is available in recordings.

Gabriel Fauré?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 25, 2019, 02:01:09 AM
So sue me, but I am going to put forward a challenge out of order - probably easy

This composer was not spectacularly gifted nor a prodigy but he possessed a work ethic that made up for any lack of innate talent. He excelled in symphonic as well as chamber music.  It might be easy to think that two younger contemporaries overshadowed him, but he is a major figure and his entire oeuvre is available in recordings.

First thought - Max Bruch
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 03:25:07 AM
Vincent d'Indy?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 25, 2019, 03:31:54 AM
This composer studied in his home country with three of her most famous composers and teachers. He wrote a ballet in which the most famous three dancers of the same country performed. He then went on to study abroad, in a city where he met a famous poet and a famous painter and wrote music for the latter's attempt at experimental theatre.

Back in his country he met another composer whose fame rests on another field though. Together they composed music inspired by, and in the service of, that other field. This music has been recorded in its entirety.

Both these composers were born in the same country and both had different ethnic backgrounds than the majority of their fellow countrymen.

Name them.


Getting nowhere with this.

Seem to have gone down a blind alley considering Spanich/Catalan composers. Misread the posting so wasted time on Cocteau. Examined the various luminaries of the Ballets russes (including Picasso) to no avail.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 03:44:12 AM
Getting nowhere with this.

Seem to have gone down a blind alley considering Spanich/Catalan composers. Misread the posting so wasted time on Cocteau. Examined the various luminaries of the Ballets russes (including Picasso) to no avail.

In one aspect you're getting warm in the last sentence.

The painter and the composers were fellow countrymen. They all died abroad, two of them in the same town.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 25, 2019, 03:55:25 AM
In one aspect you're getting warm in the last sentence.

The painter and the composers were fellow countrymen. They all died abroad, two of them in the same town.

Manuel de Falla sort of fits some of this. He worked in Paris and died in exile in Argentina. El amor brujo, a mixture of song and dance, was written for Pastora Imperio and performed by her and her brother Victor Rojas in Madrid (1915). Later a revised version was performed in Paris. El sombrero de tres picos was written for  Diaghilev and performed in London with sets by Picasso.

Stlll  no idea about the other composer and the music written in Spain by both of them.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 03:58:38 AM
Manuel de Falla sort of fits some of this. He worked in Paris and died in exile in Argentina. El amor brujo, a mixture of song and dance, was written for Pastora Imperio and performed by her and her brother Victor Rojas in Madrid (1915). Later a revised version was performed in Paris. El sombrero de tres picos was written for  Diaghilev and performed in London with sets by Picasso.

Stlll  no idea about the other composer and the music written in Spain by both of them.

This is as cold as ice. 

In the last sentence of your preceding post there is a word that hopefully will put you on the right track --- a word, mind you, not a name.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 04:55:47 AM
No.

Nope.

Give us a hint.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 25, 2019, 04:56:59 AM
This is as cold as ice. 

In the last sentence of your preceding post there is a word that hopefully will put you on the right track --- a word, mind you, not a name.

Well it hasn't.

One last question before I give up: Is jazz the connection between the two composers?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 05:01:05 AM
Well it hasn't.

One last question before I give up: Is jazz the connection between the two composers?

No, not jazz. And don't give up: the key word is russes  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 25, 2019, 05:24:30 AM
As a teacher, there were some complaints.

"I never learned anything with Haydn!"
 - L.v. Beethoven
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 25, 2019, 05:32:00 AM
No, not jazz. And don't give up: the key word is russes  ;)

If this means we are back with obscure female Russian composers I really do give up.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 25, 2019, 05:42:44 AM
I think the key to Florestan's question should be the cooperative project of the two composers. (And why female? "her" refers to the country, I think.) I have no idea but such cooperations are comparably rare.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 05:54:59 AM
I, for one, don't have the foggiest idea of what Florestan is trying to get at. He said "warmer" about the word russes, but does that mean someone is Russian in the riddle?

Once again, the questions go like this: "I composed some music, had a friend, lived in one city and then in another, and once drank a glass of wine at a bar. Who am I?"  ::) :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 06:27:16 AM
I think the key to Florestan's question should be the cooperative project of the two composers.

Yes. And in the project music was important but not the main goal.

Quote
(And why female? "her" refers to the country, I think.)

Indeed. Both composers were men.

I, for one, don't have the foggiest idea of what Florestan is trying to get at. He said "warmer" about the word russes, but does that mean someone is Russian in the riddle?

Oh my God! You still didn't get that all three (the two composers and the painter) were Russian?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 06:28:06 AM
Once again, the questions go like this: "I composed some music, had a friend, lived in one city and then in another, and once drank a glass of wine at a bar. Who am I?"  ::) :D

Not at all. In that case I would have asked you to name the bar.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 25, 2019, 06:31:43 AM
This composer studied in his home country with three of her most famous composers and teachers. He wrote a ballet in which the most famous three dancers of the same country performed. He then went on to study abroad, in a city where he met a famous poet and a famous painter and wrote music for the latter's attempt at experimental theatre.

Back in his country he met another composer whose fame rests on another field though. Together they composed music inspired by, and in the service of, that other field. This music has been recorded in its entirety.

Both these composers were born in the same country and both had different ethnic backgrounds than the majority of their fellow countrymen.

Name them.

Prokofiev and Eisenstein.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 06:33:13 AM
Prokofiev and Eisenstein.

Was Eisenstein a composer? He doesn't even fit in the role of the painter. Was Prokofiev a non-Russiian ethnically?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 25, 2019, 06:34:38 AM
Was Eisenstein a composer? He doesn't even fit in the role of the painter. Was Prokofiev a non-Russiian ethnically?
He was. He was Ukrainian.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 06:38:21 AM
He was. He was Ukrainian.

If you put it this way, then the two composers' ethnical background was not in nations belonging to the same language family as the Russian.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 06:43:28 AM
Have exhausted the list of pupils of Rimsky, and not arrived at any result... :(
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 06:47:41 AM
Have exhausted the list of pupils of Rimsky, and not arrived at any result... :(

The list you consulted is obviously not complete.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 06:53:55 AM
Time for giving them away, it seems.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/BlaueReiter.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 06:59:53 AM
Gurdjieff and de Hartmann?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 07:00:18 AM
Gurdjieff and de Hartmann?

Yep. Did you have an epiphany?  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on March 25, 2019, 07:02:09 AM
Time for giving them away, it seems.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/BlaueReiter.jpg)
I'm confused. Isn't the painting by Kandinsky?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 07:04:56 AM
I'm confused. Isn't the painting by Kandinsky?

It's the cover of the Blaue Reiter Almanac, in which Thomas de Hartmann published an article titled "Anarchy in Music". He composed the music for Kandinsky's Der Gelbe Klang.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_de_Hartmann (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_de_Hartmann)

http://www.gurdjieff.org/mangan1.htm (http://www.gurdjieff.org/mangan1.htm)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 07:07:11 AM
Yep. Did you have an epiphany?  :D
Kinda....but, to paraphrase good ol' Pierre: "I thought we were talking about composers".  :D

It was the Blaue Reiter that did it, which led to Kandinsky, and the rest is history. It's de Hartmann who studied with Rimsky et al., no? I think that other guy didn't have any formal musical training...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 25, 2019, 07:07:27 AM
If you put it this way, then the two composers' ethnical background was not in nations belonging to the same language family as the Russian.
But, but .... Gurdjieff was Greek-Armenian: both Indo-European languages and as such 'belonging to the same language family as the Russian'. For that reason, I was looking after Estonian composer Artur Kapp, who cooperated with composer-author Julius Kaljuvee.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 07:09:15 AM
But, but .... Gurdjieff was Greek-Armenian: both Indo-European languages and as such 'belonging to the same language family as the Russian'. For that reason, I was looking after Estonian composer Artur Kapp, who cooperated with composer-author Julius Kaljuvee.  ;D

Neither Greek nor Armenian is a Slavic language.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 07:11:56 AM
Kinda....but, to paraphrase good ol' Pierre: "I thought we were talking about composers".  :D

It was the Blaue Reiter that did it, which led to Kandinsky, and the rest is history. It's de Hartmann who studied with Rimsky et al., no?

Yes. His ballet The Pink Flower was performed by Vaslav Nijinsky, Michel Fokine and Anna Pavlova.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 25, 2019, 07:13:06 AM
Neither Greek nor Armenian is a Slavic language.
Slavic is not a language family, but only a group within the language family, like Greek and like Armenian: all of them part of the Indo-European language family (unlike Estonian, which is Finno-Ugric or Uralic, if you like. Shown in a simple map:
(https://slideplayer.it/46/11663128/big_thumb.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 07:17:16 AM
Florestan, you should know better by now than discuss geography and that kind of things with our dear Christo!  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 07:21:22 AM
Florestan, you should know better by now than discuss geography and that kind of things with our dear Christo!  :D

Actually, he gave me an excellent idea. Next time I'll pick up an Icelandic composer and give as hint for his language a photo of Yerevan.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 07:21:52 AM
A quick one:

One of my works was praised through the roof by a very famous author, when said author saw it in a theatre in a country which was not home either to him or to me. Nowadays, I'm almost completely forgotten (although at least two of my works--including that highly praised one--have been recorded). To be honest, my only remaining claim to fame is being mentioned by the famous author.

Who am I?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 07:29:19 AM
I presume the very famous author is not Charles Burney, although he looks like a good candidate.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 25, 2019, 07:31:52 AM
Florestan, you should know better by now than discuss geography and that kind of things with our dear Christo!  :D
The point is, with his hint about the language family, he excluded all of Rimsky's students with the exception of two Estonians: Rudolf Tobias and Artur Kapp, AFAIK. I was naturally digging up their most hidden secrets.  :D

One of my works was praised through the roof by a very famous author, when said author saw it in a theatre in a country which was not home either to him or to me. Nowadays, I'm almost completely forgotten (although at least two of my works--including that highly praised one--have been recorded). To be honest, my only remaining claim to fame is being mentioned by the famous author. Who am I?

Giovanni Pacini?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 07:36:22 AM
I presume the very famous author is not Charles Burney, although he looks like a good candidate.
Non, il n'est pas M. Burney.  ;)  To be honest, he's infinitely more famous that Burney, who I must confess I had never even heard of until today.

The famous author was recently mentioned in the "favourite villains" thread on GMG.
The point is, with his hint about the language family, he excluded all of Rimsky's students with the exception of two Estonians: Rudolf Tobias and Artur Kapp, AFAIK. I was naturally digging up their most hidden secrets.  :D
Ah, yes, they both hail form one of the, what was it?, 10 Baltic states.  ;)
Quote
Giovanni Pacini?
Close, but not quite. Pacini is mega-famous compared to the composer we're looking for..
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 10:31:06 AM
The famous author was recently mentioned in the "favourite villains" thread on GMG.

What obscure composer did Goethe praise to the roof?  ???
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 11:05:44 AM
What obscure composer did Goethe praise to the roof?  ???
Seit wann ist Goethe ein Franzose?  ;) But he did have something in common with our author, their love for this:

(https://ideasinfood.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/lemonblossom.jpg)

Next hint: Not only was the famous author mentioned in the “villains” thread, one of his books deals with music (actually, with one composer). That composer was far more famous (far more!) than the one we’re looking for. This other composer was from the country in which the author listened to the highly-praised work, but died in the author’s home country.

This must have given everything away... ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 25, 2019, 11:36:03 AM
John Hullah, Dickens
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 11:42:43 AM
Hullah (a name completely unknown to me until now) was English, as was Dickens. Remember, our mystery composer and our mystery author hailed from different countries, and the highly-praised work was seen onstage by the author in yet another country.

One correction: It turns out the mystery composer was born in the country (as we know it today) where the performance of the work made such a strong impression on the famous author. But his family hailed from a neighbouring country (which usually claims the composer as one of their own). Sorry for this.  :-[
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 25, 2019, 01:19:14 PM
I mentioned Stendahl in the Villains thread. He wrote a life of Rossini. For a time he was French consul in Trieste, a city that has changed hands more than once. Perhaps our mystery composer is from that city ..... or Slovenia,  or Italy,  or Austria usw.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 25, 2019, 01:30:35 PM
Shaw praised Raff to the skies. But Raff is no longer so obscure.
Thomas Mann wrote a book about a composer who is famous, but I have no idea what obscure work he might have praised.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 01:30:59 PM
I mentioned Stendahl in the Villains thread. He wrote a life of Rossini. For a time he was French consul in Trieste, a city that has changed hands more than once. Perhaps our mystery composer is from that city ..... or Slovenia,  or Italy,  or Austria usw.
Stendhal is right...But he saw the opera (yes, it’s an opera) in Milan. As mentioned above, my mystery composer was actually born in Itsly, but his family hailed from a neighbouring country which is not Austria, nor Slovenia, nor France...

We’re almost there!  :) 
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 01:34:05 PM
This is what Stendhal had to say about that opera:

“His work is the firmest, the most inflamed, the most dramatic I've ever heard. There is not a moment of languor”.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 25, 2019, 01:35:43 PM
Metastasio
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 25, 2019, 01:36:27 PM
Metastasio
Sarro
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 01:42:47 PM
Sarro
Metastasio was a poet AFAIK, and I cannot find anything linking Stendhal with Domenico Sarro (who died some 40 years before Stendhal was born).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 10:24:35 PM
Seit wann ist Goethe ein Franzose?  ;)

In you original post you did not specify tha author was French nor gave any hint in this direction.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 10:32:24 PM
Stendhal is right...But he saw the opera (yes, it’s an opera) in Milan. As mentioned above, my mystery composer was actually born in Itsly, but his family hailed from a neighbouring country which is not Austria, nor Slovenia, nor France...

We’re almost there!  :)

Switzerland then. Is he listed here?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronological_list_of_Italian_classical_composers (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronological_list_of_Italian_classical_composers)

Yes, he is. Carlo Soliva.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 25, 2019, 10:33:57 PM
Carlo Soliva, La testa di bronzo (1816)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 25, 2019, 10:35:36 PM
Carlo Soliva, La testa di bronzo (1816)
Switzerland then. Is he listed here?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronological_list_of_Italian_classical_composers (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronological_list_of_Italian_classical_composers)
He is.  :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 10:39:23 PM
He is.  :D

I edited my post while you typed yours. You beat me to it by a few seconds. :D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 25, 2019, 10:41:26 PM
Not only was the famous author mentioned in the “villains” thread, one of his books deals with music (actually, with one composer).

Actually, at least two of his books deals with music and three composers, not one. Here's a quiz for you: name the books and the composers.  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 25, 2019, 10:43:57 PM
I edited my post while you typed yours. You beat me to it by a few seconds. :D
I saw your list only after I posted his name - Stendhal was my clue (I'm not that much into early 19th c Swiss-Italian opera).  8)
(I actually beat you by almost two minutes: my 02:33:57 versus you clocking 02:35:52).  >:D

Happily, we're able to share Stendhal's enthusiasm:
https://www.youtube.com/v/I0mSgTIhIWg&list=RDI0mSgTIhIWg&start_radio=1&t=41
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 25, 2019, 11:35:49 PM
Yes! Carlo Evasio Soliva’s La Testa di Bronzo (libretto by Felice Romani). I believe it’s Christo’s turn... :) Well done!

When Stendhal saw at La Scala in Milan, he said “That little Soliva has the scanty figure of a man of genius“.

The work has been recorded. It is quite charming (I was listening to it again last night):



The only other work by Soliva that has been recorded AKAIK is Giulia e Sesto Pompeo.

In you original post you did not specify tha author was French nor gave any hint in this direction.
But I answered in French after your guess of an Englishman. Thought that would be seen as a clue to the writer’s nationality.  ;)

Actually, at least two of his books deals with music and three composers, not one. Here's a quiz for you: name the books and the composers.  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Having read (and enjoyed) Vie de Rossini many years ago, I had forgotten about the book dealing with Haydn, Mozart and Metastasio (which I haven’t read :-[).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 26, 2019, 12:25:59 AM
OK. A quick one: this composer from another country joined Bartók during one of his famous field trips in order to learn the trade from him. Both, in their later scientific records of the expedition (which I read) came to a comparable conclusion: the typical pentatonicism of the folk music they found pointed towards a common origin (with Hungarian folk music) in Central Asia. He created an impressive oeuvre not unlike that of Bartók, his inspirator. Who is this national composer - and which region did they explore together?  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2019, 01:09:16 AM
Ahmed Adnan Saygun, Anatolia.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 26, 2019, 01:23:29 AM
Ahmed Adnan Saygun, Anatolia.
The young Saygun it was, in November 1936, and together they explored the music of the mountain dwellers of the Osmaniye region (not exactly Anatolia but further South-East):
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/66/Osmaniye_in_Turkey.svg/1200px-Osmaniye_in_Turkey.svg.png) (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSv-Mi7TFu62KpIBDEGjAK4TT1l0-vjzhg4HMhrLgLAiIuRzMx1)
Your turn.  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2019, 01:54:04 AM
I removed my quiz as it contained a factual error which I spotted right after posting and could find no way of correcting it whuile preserving the quiz. I'll have to think about a new one but don't have time right now. If anyone else wants to play, feel free to do it.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 26, 2019, 01:57:44 AM
I removed my quiz as it contained a factual error* which I spotted right after posting and could find no way of correcting it whuile preserving the quiz. I'll have to think about a new one but don't have time right now. If anyone else wants to play, feel free to do it.
* Like 'Russian, Armenian and Greek don't belong to the same language family'?  ??? :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2019, 02:03:55 AM
* Like 'Russian, Armenian and Greek don't belong to the same language family'?  ??? :laugh:

I now officially proclaim you the GMG obsessive-hairsplitter-and-nitpicker in residence.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 26, 2019, 02:49:11 AM
I now officially proclaim you the GMG obsessive-hairsplitter-and-nitpicker in residence.
Thanks, feel honoured. In Dutch it's called a miereneuker, which translates as 'Ameisenbumser' (German) or 'ant f***er', BTW.
That said, which contemporary composer wrote a symphony in which these little creatures are dancing on war music? Name both.  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2019, 03:56:31 AM
Thanks, feel honoured. In Dutch it's called a miereneuker, which translates as 'Ameisenbumser' (German) or 'ant f***er', BTW.

You should however ponder the fact that this behavior is amusing for a while but exhibited in continuous manner it becomes annoying.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 26, 2019, 04:11:32 AM
You should however ponder the fact that this behavior is amusing for a while but exhibited in continuous manner it becomes annoying.
Did I ever misbehave??? Really? (Apparently you can't bear being caught for such a mistake - but that's just part of this game and nothing else).   ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2019, 04:12:30 AM
TD

This composer, born in a city which currently lies in a different country than back then, was a child prodigy pianist. The list of those who praised him looks like a brief who's who in piano playing and teaching at the time. A famous composer-pianist accepted him as pupil although in so doing he broke two of his teaching rules. The same composer praised him in the warmest, most emotional terms. Starting at 13 he gave concerts in three very important cities, to great acclaim. Yet today his music is rarely, if ever, performed and recorded --- for a reason. Name the composer and the reason. As a bonus, name the rules the famous composer broke.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 26, 2019, 04:22:18 AM
Did I ever misbehave??? Really?

I didn't say that. One can be annoying without misbehaving.

Quote
(Apparently you can't bear being caught for such a mistake - but that's just part of this game and nothing else).   ;D

And just what such grave mistake have I done? From my post and its immediate context (Ukrainian-born Prokofiev) anyone for whom hairsplitting-cum-nitpicking is not a second nature would have correctly inferred that the languages I referred to were not Slavic. Or perhaps you would contend that Russian is related to Ukrainian in just the same way it is related to Greek or Armenian? It's like my saying that Paris doesn't lie in the vicinity of Riga, and your retorting that yes it does since both lie in Europe and if you look at the world's map they are actually much closer than Ushuaia and Ulan-Bator.

Whatever.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 27, 2019, 01:16:53 AM
This composer was not spectacularly gifted nor a prodigy but he possessed a work ethic that made up for any lack of innate talent. He excelled in symphonic as well as chamber music.  It might be easy to think that two younger contemporaries overshadowed him, but he is a major figure and his entire oeuvre is available in recordings.

Joseph Marx?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 27, 2019, 03:28:36 AM
Haydn again
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 27, 2019, 03:36:01 AM
A major publication named me "the worst composer", but that is nonsense since I never lived in Darmstadt. I admired Bach and Mozart...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 27, 2019, 03:48:48 AM
Haydn again

Haydn, not spectacularly gifted?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 27, 2019, 03:49:25 AM
A major publication named me "the worst composer", but that is nonsense since I never lived in Darmstadt. I admired Bach and Mozart...

Probably not Sibelius.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 27, 2019, 04:32:03 AM
Haydn, not spectacularly gifted?
Not compared to Mozart and beethoven, no. And the work ethic fits as does complete works recorded.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 27, 2019, 04:42:21 AM
Not compared to Mozart and beethoven, no. And the work ethic fits as does complete works recorded.

Okay but then again how about "lack of innate talent"? Does Haydn fit in that too?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 27, 2019, 04:59:16 AM
How many quizzes are going on here?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 27, 2019, 05:31:49 AM
How many quizzes are going on here?

Currently, two I think.

This composer, born in a city which currently lies in a different country than back then, was a child prodigy pianist. The list of those who praised him looks like a brief who's who in piano playing and teaching at the time. A famous composer-pianist accepted him as pupil although in so doing he broke two of his teaching rules. The same composer praised him in the warmest, most emotional terms. Starting at 13 he gave concerts in three very important cities, to great acclaim. Yet today his music is rarely, if ever, performed and recorded --- for a reason. Name the composer and the reason. As a bonus, name the rules the famous composer broke.

Plus an older one, unsolved yet:

This composer was not spectacularly gifted nor a prodigy but he possessed a work ethic that made up for any lack of innate talent. He excelled in symphonic as well as chamber music.  It might be easy to think that two younger contemporaries overshadowed him, but he is a major figure and his entire oeuvre is available in recordings.

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 27, 2019, 05:34:54 AM
Currently, two I think.

Plus an older one, unsolved yet:

Thank you.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 27, 2019, 05:59:00 AM
Probably not Sibelius.
He wrote solo cello suites
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 27, 2019, 06:00:48 AM
He wrote solo cello suites

Max Reger?

Oh, that's the third one. I forgot to inform Biffo about it, sorry.  :)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 27, 2019, 06:20:06 AM
Boccherini - answer for any of the quizzes
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: ritter on March 27, 2019, 07:47:04 AM
He wrote solo cello suites
Max Reger...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 27, 2019, 09:03:16 AM
Max Reger?

Oh, that's the third one. I forgot to inform Biffo about it, sorry.  :)
Ye
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 27, 2019, 10:09:09 AM
Currently, two I think.

Even a short third one, offered when you declined:
That said, which contemporary composer wrote a symphony in which these little creatures are dancing on war music? Name both.  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: North Star on March 27, 2019, 12:22:53 PM
Even a short third one, offered when you declined:
That's Kalevi Aho's 'Insect Symphony', drawing on material from his opera based on Karel Čapek's Pictures from the Insects' Life. The little creatures are ants.

I guess we don't need more questions at the moment...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 27, 2019, 12:54:40 PM
We seem to have three active questions at the moment: Florestan's, San Antone's, and Ken's.

I have no idea of the answers to any of the three.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: listener on March 27, 2019, 02:47:48 PM
A major publication named me "the worst composer", but that is nonsense since I never lived in Darmstadt. I admired Bach and Mozart...
Bortkiewicz     (referring to the Margaret Mitchell recording on (US) Decca Lp many years ago of the heavily cut piano concerto and Indian Fantasy?)  in High Fidelity or the other magazine at the time (c.1962)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 27, 2019, 03:19:44 PM
I thought someone had answered my question correctly with Haydn (despite Florestan's complaints).   ;)

Can you speak up? Hard to hear.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: JBS on March 27, 2019, 04:37:14 PM
I thought someone had answered my question correctly with Haydn (despite Florestan's complaints).   ;)

So that was the answer?  I was also thrown off by the "lack of innate talent", which I would dispute.
Quote
Haydn's parents had noticed that their son was musically gifted and knew that in Rohrau he would have no chance to obtain serious musical training. It was for this reason that, around the time Haydn turned six, they accepted a proposal from their relative Johann Matthias Frankh, the schoolmaster and choirmaster in Hainburg, that Haydn be apprenticed to Frankh in his home to train as a musician. Haydn therefore went off with Frankh to Hainburg and he never again lived with his parents.
[Wikipedia]
We put some of that down to normal parental pride, but he had enough signs of talent at age six to attract Frankh's interest.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 28, 2019, 12:54:53 AM
I was thinking that compared to Mozart, Haydn's accomplishments were the result of disciplined work.  Of course he was very talented - but his work ethic is what I think of as exemplary more so than the kind of spectacular prodigious talent of Mozart.

And yet in your original post you wrote this:

This composer was not spectacularly gifted nor a prodigy but he possessed a work ethic that made up for any lack of innate talent.

Haydn and "lack of innate talent" are hardly on the same page --- at least in my book. As for "not spectacularly gifted", I'd say that a guy whose catalogue amounts to hundreds of works, in every genre available to him, of which at least several dozens were big hits then and have remained so until this very day doesn't fit in that either. One can disciplinedly work 12 hours a day, seven hours a week, 52 weeks a year, but without "innate talent" and "spectacular gifts" one can't produce half quarter of Haydn's masterpieces.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: DaveF on March 28, 2019, 01:34:53 AM
A major publication named me "the worst composer", but that is nonsense since I never lived in Darmstadt. I admired Bach and Mozart...

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26113.0.html (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26113.0.html) ?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 28, 2019, 04:16:00 AM
Blah, blah, blah ...  ;D And yet, despite all of this someone guessed the correct answer. Get over it. 8)


As far as I'm concerned, Haydn is emphatically not the right answer for "lack of innate talent", but if it makes you and Ken feel smart, be my guests.


Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Gurn Blanston on March 28, 2019, 04:37:27 AM
I thought someone had answered my question correctly with Haydn (despite Florestan's complaints).   ;)

::)

Nice to start the day with a good laugh, makes things go better.

Even the canard about him not being a fine musician could/should be questioned. I would submit that the keyboard, for example, which wasn't his best instrument, he could play better than Schubert, who couldn't even play a great many of the works he wrote (thus he wrote simplified versions for himself).

Unless you are willing to concede that composition is not a talent, I would submit that all the hard work in the world can't replace genius. Every single composer who was contemporary with and for the following century readily admitted that Haydn was the most talented composer of the Age.

And hell, I'm not even debating this, just stating the obvious stuff. Yes, he was a hard worker. But he also had a full and rich life when NOT working.

OK, I'm awake now... :D

8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 28, 2019, 04:41:18 AM
Unless you are willing to concede that composition is not a talent, I would submit that all the hard work in the world can't replace genius. Every single composer who was contemporary with and for the following century readily admitted that Haydn was the most talented composer of the Age.

And hell, I'm not even debating this, just stating the obvious stuff.

Thank you very much for this, Gurn. I agree 150 %.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 28, 2019, 04:45:39 AM
Here - solve this one

Lame.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 28, 2019, 05:58:25 AM
Had I not hidden the identity with a little misdirect, the answer would have been so obvious as to not pose any challenge at all. 

Next time I'll post a quiz about Brahms and give as hint that the composer had no beard in his heydays. A little misdirect, you know.  :D

Quote
"lighten up".  It's supposed to be a game ...  ::)

Okay, I lightened up. The answer to your last quiz is the author of one of the best symphonies you gratuitously dislike. Now, do you have a solution for my quiz?  :-*
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 28, 2019, 06:34:09 AM
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26113.0.html (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,26113.0.html) ?
Not quite a MAJOR publication.  :D

The Rough Guide named Reger the Worst Composer
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Ken B on March 28, 2019, 06:36:43 AM


As far as I'm concerned, Haydn is emphatically not the right answer for "lack of innate talent", but if it makes you and Ken feel smart, be my guests.
Oh Andrei. I don’t need San Antone to make me feel smart. I just need you!  >:D  ;)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 29, 2019, 08:22:34 AM
Oh Andrei. I don’t need San Antone to make me feel smart. I just need you!  >:D  ;)

I aim to please, so go on, solve my quiz.   :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

(looks like I just wrote a two line poem rhyming please with quiz; you might make me feel smart as well...  8) )





Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on March 29, 2019, 09:00:50 AM
I aim to please, so go on, solve my quiz.   :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

(looks like I just wrote a two line poem rhyming please with quiz; you might make me feel smart as well...  8) )

I take it we are still looking for the child prodigy pianist etc?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 29, 2019, 09:08:13 AM
I take it we are still looking for the child prodigy pianist etc?

Yes. This is what his teacher said about him:

My God! What a child! Nobody has ever understood me as this child has...It is not imitation, it is the same sentiment, an instinct that makes him play without thinking as if it could not have been any other way. He plays almost all my compositions without having heard me [play them], without being shown the smallest thing - not exactly like me [because he has his own cachet], but certainly not less well
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 29, 2019, 09:34:20 AM
Carl Filtsch (28 May 1830 – 11 May 1845), 'a Transylvanian pianist and composer. He was a child prodigy, and student of Frédéric Chopin' (Wikipedia).

That's Kalevi Aho's 'Insect Symphony', drawing on material from his opera based on Karel Čapek's Pictures from the Insects' Life. The little creatures are ants.
Correct BTW.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 29, 2019, 10:58:20 AM
Carl Filtsch (28 May 1830 – 11 May 1845), 'a Transylvanian pianist and composer. He was a child prodigy, and student of Frédéric Chopin' (Wikipedia).

I knew I was giving him away with that quote.  ;D

The reason why his music is rarely played or recorded is that there is not much of it, he died at 15. In accepting him as pupil, Chopin broke two of his rules: never take a child as pupil, never give a pupil more than one lesson a week.

Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 29, 2019, 11:04:32 AM
I knew I was giving him away with that quote.  ;D
The joke is that I googled it in French (and only after posting discovered this English version in the short Wikipedia entry)  8)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 29, 2019, 11:06:52 AM
The joke is that I googled it in French

Wait, you mean you took my English quote, translated it into French and google the result?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 29, 2019, 11:09:19 AM
Wait, you mean you took my English quote, translated it into French and google the result?
Always do, depending on the language under suspicion.  ::)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 29, 2019, 11:17:40 AM
Always do, depending on the language under suspicion.  ::)

Google Translate?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 29, 2019, 11:25:10 AM
Last summer I visited Filtsch's native town Sebeș (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈsebeʃ]; German: Mühlbach; Hungarian: Szászsebes; Transylvanian Saxon dialect: Melnbach)  --- Wikipedia's describing it as a city is greatly exaggerated. Very nice. We ate in a cosy restaurant, a traditional Transylvanian Saxon dish. While strolling the town center after the lunch, my attention was caught by a memorial plaque affixed on an old house. THat's how I learned about poor Carl Filtsch. Youtube has his complete works (sic!, they are about a handful).
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 29, 2019, 01:09:38 PM
Last summer I visited Filtsch's native town Sebeș (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈsebeʃ]; German: Mühlbach; Hungarian: Szászsebes; Transylvanian Saxon dialect: Melnbach)  --- Wikipedia's describing it as a city is greatly exaggerated. Very nice. We ate in a cosy restaurant, a traditional Transylvanian Saxon dish. While strolling the town center after the lunch, my attention was caught by a memorial plaque affixed on an old house. That's how I learned about poor Carl Filtsch. Youtube has his complete works (sic!, they are about a handful).
Great story, very nice town - and it's all on the internet, even musical activities celebrating him locally:
(https://scontent-lht6-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/66385422d81fd4afd690ea268db2f0f4/5CB6274E/t51.2885-15/e35/44673025_248096779396317_725570154014392176_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-lht6-1.cdninstagram.com&se=7&ig_cache_key=MTkwNjkzNzE3NzY3OTY3Mzk2Mw%3D%3D.2)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b3/Sebes%2C_str_Lucian_Blaga_10-12.jpg)(https://www.sebesinfo.ro/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/bust-pianist-cf-sebes-aug-2018.jpg)(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/b4TQZO6k6To/hqdefault.jpg)(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/pw4QWjwqPJQ/maxresdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on March 29, 2019, 01:29:31 PM
Naxos has two discs with Chopin pupils, I have the one with piano only (I guess someone loved it on another internet forum...) but it's been too long I listened to it.


 

Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on March 29, 2019, 11:48:40 PM
Filtsch's grave in the San Michele cemetery in Venice

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f0/Carl_Filtsch%27s_grave.jpg/800px-Carl_Filtsch%27s_grave.jpg)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on March 30, 2019, 02:31:08 AM
OK, another composer riddle. This one, known to his compatriots as 'the Hyena', was active both in ethnomusicology and in early electronic music (but also wrote for orchestra and classical ensembles). In front of me lies a Kent State University monograph on his life and work claiming that he worked with 'all the giants' of 20th-century music and was performed in all major concert halls. What intrigued me once, was that in his early years, in the capital of his country,* he met Béla Bartók - whose example he followed in his own ethnomusicological undertakings.


* a big city, nowadays a metropolis (I visited it last year again and in the past bought cds there by this national composer, at the Opera)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on April 01, 2019, 02:08:07 AM
OK, another composer riddle. This one, known to his compatriots as 'the Hyena', was active both in ethnomusicology and in early electronic music (but also wrote for orchestra and classical ensembles). In front of me lies a Kent State University monograph on his life and work claiming that he worked with 'all the giants' of 20th-century music and was performed in all major concert halls. What intrigued me once, was that in his early years, in the capital of his country,* he met Béla Bartók - whose example he followed in his own ethnomusicological undertakings.


* a big city, nowadays a metropolis (I visited it last year again and in the past bought cds there by this national composer, at the Opera)

Halim El-Dabh
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on April 01, 2019, 04:20:54 AM
Halim El-Dabh
Egyptian composer - Cairo, when I was there, in July, people told me that the actual number of inhabitants has grown over 25 million - Halim El-Dabh or 'the Hyena' (1921–2017) composed one of the earliest known works of tape music, in 1944, and later worked at the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center, though I knew him from ballet music he wrote for Martha Graham (including Clytemnestra (1958) and Lucifer (1975). As a boy he met with Béla Bartók in 1932, during a music conference in Cairo, and he himself later made field trips from Egypt to Ethiopia, later also West-Africa and Brasil.
(https://www.ibraaz.org/usr/library/images/main/essay_bradley_nov15_1.jpg) (https://s.s-bol.com/imgbase0/imagebase3/large/FC/8/0/5/0/1001004001910508.jpg) (http://static1.squarespace.com/static/524ad679e4b031f96a6c0653/526b469fe4b0a8c914719978/592ee07617bffcc76bda53a2/1524689829663/Halim+El-Dabh+with+Oromo+Cowgirls+in+Ethiopia.jpg?format=1500w)
Your turn!  ;D
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on April 02, 2019, 12:14:52 AM
This composer and violinist was a real weirdo. He played Beethoven's violin sonatas as church music (in this he was partnered by a very good friend of his, also a composer, more of whom below). He was famous for the beauty of his solos in operatic music (some of them were written expressly for him) and also for the fact that he played all the time with his back turned to the stage so as to not see the immoral actions taking place there. He was a pioneer of viola d'amore revival. He premiered a famous work written by a fanous composer for a famous instrumentist who commissioned the work but eventually declined to play it. His lofty artistic and humanitarian idea(l)s had a heavy impact on his good friend the composer mentioned in the second sentence of his post, whose compositional style would undergo a radical change partly as a result of that. Later in life he became depressive and rumor has it that he committed suicide by starving himself to death (that would contradict his fervent devotion, though).

Who was he?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 02, 2019, 12:20:35 AM
This composer and violinist was a real weirdo. He played Beethoven's violin sonatas as church music (in this he was partnered by a very good friend of his, also a composer, more of whom below). He was famous for the beauty of his solos in operatic music (some of them were written expressly for him) and also for the fact that he played all the time with his back turned to the stage so as to not see the immoral actions taking place there. He was a pioneer of viola d'amore revival. He premiered a famous work written by a fanous composer for a famous instrumentist who commissioned the work but eventually declined to play it. His lofty artistic and humanitarian idea(l)s had a heavy impact on his good friend the composer mentioned in the second sentence of his post, whose compositional style would undergo a radical change partly as a result of that. Later in life he became depressive and rumor has it that he committed suicide by starving himself to death (that would contradict his fervent devotion, though).

Who was he?

Chrétien Urhan - deeply religious violin, viola and viola d'amore player - gave the first performance of Berlioz' Harold en Italie
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on April 02, 2019, 12:28:35 AM
Chrétien Urhan - deeply religious violin, viola and viola d'amore player - gave the first performance of Berlioz' Harold en Italie

Played Beethoven's Kreutzer sonata during a mass, Franz Liszt at the piano.

I knew it was easy. Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 02, 2019, 12:31:13 AM
Played Beethoven's Kreutzer sonata during a mass, Franz Liszt at the piano.

I knew it was easy. Your turn.

Harold gave it away. Now have to put my thinking cap on.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 02, 2019, 03:31:08 AM
Probably too easy but running out of inspiration.

Our composer is probably now only remembered for two works, one of the a Requiem mass. The Requiem was either badly performed, cancelled by the family or withdrawn by the composer as the fee offered was considered an insult. In any case, the composer withdrew the work, only permitting it to be played at his own funeral. After that it became quite popular. It was played, in a tarted up version, at the memorial service for a very well known composer.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Christo on April 02, 2019, 03:41:32 AM
Our composer is probably now only remembered for two works, one of the a Requiem mass. The Requiem was either badly performed, cancelled by the family or withdrawn by the composer as the fee offered was considered an insult. In any case, the composer withdrew the work, only permitting it to be played at his own funeral. After that it became quite popular. It was played, in a tarted up version, at the memorial service for a very well known composer.
Luigi Cherubini (1760-1842)?
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 02, 2019, 03:48:15 AM
Luigi Cherubini (1760-1842)?

Nope!
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on April 02, 2019, 03:51:32 AM
Salieri? I know he had his requiem performed at his funeral. But Not sure about the rest.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 02, 2019, 04:17:47 AM
Salieri? I know he had his requiem performed at his funeral. But Not sure about the rest.

No, not Salieri either.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Florestan on April 02, 2019, 05:50:50 AM
He's somewhere here. Good luck in finding him.  :laugh:

http://www.requiemsurvey.org/composers.php (http://www.requiemsurvey.org/composers.php)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Jo498 on April 02, 2019, 07:42:13 AM
Jean Gilles? (played at Rameaus funeral and was overall rather famous in the 18th century)
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 02, 2019, 07:50:55 AM
Jean Gilles? (played at Rameaus funeral and was overall rather famous in the 18th century)

Correct! Your turn.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: mc ukrneal on April 02, 2019, 09:03:51 AM
Jean Gilles? (played at Rameaus funeral and was overall rather famous in the 18th century)
What is the second work he's remembered for? I think that part of the riddle was a bit of a stretch...
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 02, 2019, 09:09:24 AM
What is the second work he's remembered for? I think that part of the riddle was a bit of a stretch...

I will give a fuller explanation tomorrow,  I am not at home right now.
Title: Re: Quiz.
Post by: Biffo on April 03, 2019, 01:03:04 AM
Jean Gilles (1668 - 1705). His fame, such as it is, was largely posthumous and rested with two works - the Requiem and the motet Diligam te, Domine, both being played quite frequently in the decades after his death. The Requiem was used at numerous high-profile funerals including that of Louis XV.

In 1764 a version of the Requiem was prepared for a Memorial Service for Rameau, probably by Francois Rebel and Francois Francoeur. The work was revised and several new movements inserted, mainly using music recycled from Rameau's opera Castor et Pollux.

The unadulterated version is available from Herreweghe and La Chapelle Royale (harmonia mundi) (and probably others). Rameau's Funeral is available from Skip Sempe and Collegium Vocale Gent (Paradizo)