GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => General Classical Music Discussion => Topic started by: Siedler on April 20, 2007, 05:34:10 PM

Title: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Siedler on April 20, 2007, 05:34:10 PM
I decided to resurrect this thread from the old board. Since many orchestras and opera houses have announced their next season, what concerts are you planning to attend in season 07/08?


Let's see:
Lahti Symphony Orchestra just announced their new season, so I hope to attend these concerts:

Thu 13.9.2007 / Okko Kamu, conductor Ida Falk Winland, soprano
Schumann: Julius Caesar Overture / Mozart: Arias / Mussorgsky (orch. Gortchakov): Pictures at an Exhibition
Thu 11.10.2007 / Osmo Vänskä, conductor / Martin Fröst, clarinet
Walton: Henry V Suite / Aho: Clarinet Concerto (Finnish premičre) / Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet Suite
Thu 18.10.2007 / Juraj Valčuha, conductor / Peter Jablonski, piano
Suk: Serenade / Lutoslawski: Paganini Variations / Rachmaninov: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini / Dvořák: Symphony No. 6
Thu 1.11.2007 / Hannu Lintu, conductor / Boris Berezovsky, piano / Vladimir Stopitchev, viola / Laulupuu Choir
Berlioz: King Lear Overture / Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 1 / Rogaliov: Et resurrexit / Stravinsky: Firebird
Thu 8.11.2007 / David Porcelijn, conductor / Miriam Fried, violin / Kalevi Kiviniemi, organ
Beethoven: Violin Concerto / Saint-Saëns: Symphony No. 3 'Organ Symphony'
Thu 22.11.2007 / Giordano Bellincampi, conductor / Antti Siirala, piano
Weber: Der Freischütz Overture / Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 / Schumann: Symphony No. 4
Thu 13.12.2007 / Jukka-Pekka Saraste, conductor
Brahms: Symphony No. 3 / Brahms: Symphony No. 2

Thu 31.1.2008 / Carlos Kalmar, conductor / Lilli Paasikivi, mezzo-soprano / Jussi Myllys, baritone / Ain Anger, bass / Dominante Choir
Berlioz: Romeo and Juliet
Thu 7.2.2008 at 19 / Yan Pascal Tortelier, conductor / Ronald Brautigam, piano
Castelnuovo-Tedesco: Winter's Tale / Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No. 1 / Schumann: Konzert-Allegro mit Introduktion / Hindemith: Sinfonische Metamorphosen
Thu 21.2.2008 at 19 / Atso Almila, conductor / Jyrki Lasonpalo, violin
Almila: Symphony No. 3 (world premičre performance) / Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto / Grieg: Symphonic Dances
Thu 3.4.2008 / Andris Nelsons, conductor / Baiba Skride, violin
R. Strauss: Macbeth / Britten: Violin Concerto / Shostakovich: Hamlet, suite from film score

And then opera (Finnish National Opera):
Soile Isokoski – Lieder recital (Strauss / Kuula / Grieg)
Bizet - Carmen
Puccini - La Bohčme
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 21, 2007, 02:49:43 AM
Since many orchestras and opera houses have announced their next season, what concerts are you planning to attend in season 07/08?

I'm not looking so far ahead yet. I've got to get through next week first:

24.04 at the BASF Feierabendhaus in Ludwigshafen:

Sallinen Shadows
Sibelius Violin Concerto
Svendsen Symphony 2

27.04 in Mainz:

Sallinen Kammermusik
Prokofiev Violin Concerto 2
Atterberg Symphony 3

Both concerts feature Lisa Batiashvili violin, Ari Rasilainen conducting the Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on April 21, 2007, 03:25:40 AM
Nothing booked yet for 07-08 - but still have a couple of piano recitals upcoming in June:

6th June Wigmore Hall (London):  Sokolov plays Schubert & Scriabin
- very much looking forward to this.

12 June Barbican (ditto):  Pollini plays Chopin & Liszt.
- will try to take the opportunity to nag him (again) about the non-appearance of the rest of his Beethoven cycle.

Actually I just realised, I do have tickets for Sokolov again in London in May 2008 (no idea what he'll be playing.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on April 21, 2007, 07:38:32 AM
May 15

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Bernard Haitink, conductor
Robert Chen, violin

Beethoven -   Coriolan Overture
Lutoslawski -   Chain 2
Bruckner -   Symphony No. 7

 ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 21, 2007, 11:49:19 AM
May 15

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Bernard Haitink, conductor
Robert Chen, violin

Beethoven -   Coriolan Overture
Lutoslawski -   Chain 2
Bruckner -   Symphony No. 7

 ;D

If I were in Chicago next month, I'd be grinning too.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: bobby quine on April 22, 2007, 06:03:40 AM
Friday April 27: Anderszewski playing Bartok's 3rd Piano Concerto. With the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra and  Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting. Berwald Hall, Stockholm.

Monday April 30:  Sergey Khachatryan playing Bach's Chaconne from Violin Partita no 2, Franck's Violin Sonata and Shostakovich's Sonata for Violin and Piano. Carnegie Hall.

Thursday May 3: Renée Fleming, The Los Angeles Philharmonic and Esa-Pekka Salonen: songs by Strauss and Korngold. Sibelius: Lemminkäinen Suite. Lincoln Center.

Friday & Saturday May 5 and 6: Look and Listen festival.

Thursday May 31: Mahler's Symphony no 5 with Gustavo Dudamel conducting the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra. Stockholm Concert Hall.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Thom on April 28, 2007, 09:24:19 AM
I realise the thread is about concerts yet to come but I want to report about the concert I attended yesterday evening in the Concertgebouw. Maxim Vengerov was to play with the UBS Verbier Festival Chamber Orchestra. Indeed he did play a Mozart Violin Concerto to begin with, then he conducted the Kammersinfonie op. 110a by Shostakovich, very moving because he dedicated this in his introduction to Rostropovich, whom he called his beloved mentor. After the break however he started with a short announcement: due to some pain in his sholder he was not able to complete the programme. He did conduct the sinfonia concertante and symphony 29 by Mozart but I didn't come to see Vengerov conducting. Anyway, it still was a nice concert, great music, and - what the heck - I did see the great man perform a concerto by Mozart!

X
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Guido on April 28, 2007, 09:52:05 AM
Manchester international cello festival 5th May

Programme

BBC Philharmonic, conductor Gianandrea Noseda

Bridge Oration  -- Colin Carr

Britten Cello Symphon  -- Natalia Gutman

- Interval -

Elgar Cello Concerto  --  Ralph Kirshbaum

Walton Cello Concerto  --  Yo-Yo Ma

I can hardly wait!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bunny on April 28, 2007, 11:26:26 AM
I have tickets for the Philadelphia Orchestra doing the Mahler 2nd at Carnegie Hall in early May.  I am really, really, really looking forward to this one!  If there's a cancellation or change of program I am going to be bitterly disappointed.  I'm keeping my fingers crossed...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 30, 2007, 09:30:58 AM
I have tickets for the Philadelphia Orchestra doing the Mahler 2nd at Carnegie Hall in early May.  I am really, really, really looking forward to this one!  If there's a cancellation or change of program I am going to be bitterly disappointed.  I'm keeping my fingers crossed...

I'm going to this, too, and very much looking forward to it.  A live performance of this is almost always an event.  The last time I heard it was with Gergiev and the Kirov (also at Carnegie) about two years ago, and they did a beautiful job with it.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 30, 2007, 10:33:06 AM
This Friday, at the Rosengarten in Mannheim, Hilary Hahn is giving a recital. Just got confirmation our tickets are in the mail. She's playing Mozart and Beethoven, I think...not that it matters. She could play scales all night and I'd still be there ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on April 30, 2007, 10:18:29 PM
This Thursday:

Wagner's Greatest
Claus Peter Flor, conductor
Houston Symphony

"Tannhäuser"
Overture
Arrival of the Guests at Wartburg

"Lohengrin"
Prelude to Act III
Wedding March
Lohengrin's Narrative

Overture to The Flying Dutchman

"Der fliegende Holländer"
Norwegian Sailors' Chorus
Erik's Cavatina

"Die Walküre"
The Ride of the Valkyries
Siegmund's Love Song

"Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg "
Prelude
Walther’s Prize Song
Wach auf! es nahet gen den Tag

Looking forward to this, I've never seen him conduct.

And next Monday:

Houston Chamber Orchestra

Mozart - Piano Concerto in A Major, K. 488
Michael Lowe, conductor and piano

Portraits - Joel McNeely
Written for his wife, LA Chamber Orch. concertmaster Margaret Batjer
Composer as conductor and his wife as soloist

This is neat as he's a fine film composer/conductor and this is his first big concert piece, and his wife is fantastic, actually she recorded with Hilary Hahn on her Bach Violin Concertos CD.

Quote
Thursday May 3: Renée Fleming, The Los Angeles Philharmonic and Esa-Pekka Salonen: songs by Strauss and Korngold. Sibelius: Lemminkäinen Suite. Lincoln Center.

Ooh, I envy you that one! ;D 

Next season some nice concerts here are Dutoit/Argerich with the UBS Verbier Festival Orchestra doing Berlioz and Prokofiev, and later Houston is doing Carmina Burana and Mahler's 2nd, but I have no idea if I'll be here then as school may be finished for me. ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mozart on May 02, 2007, 11:02:21 AM
When I go back to San Diego I'm going to Berliloz Requiem and then a whole Beethoven concert with the prometheus ov, the violin concerto, and the eroica. A nice end to the SD symphony season!

I might also go to the marriage of figaro but I hate being in a room full of equally pompous asses who have the means to dress better than me so I cant go to the opera alone....Then again its my first and favorite opera....
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Cato on May 02, 2007, 11:56:01 AM
Bruckner's 8th Symphony in the Roman Catholic cathedral in Toledo, performed by the Toledo Symphony.

Playing a Bruckner symphony there once a year has become a new tradition for the orchestra.

And that's in Buckeye Land, dudes, not that other town in Old Europe!   ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 02, 2007, 03:24:26 PM
Bruckner's 8th Symphony in the Roman Catholic cathedral in Toledo, performed by the Toledo Symphony.

Playing a Bruckner symphony there once a year has become a new tradition for the orchestra.

And that's in Buckeye Land, dudes, not that other town in Old Europe!   ;D

Amazing. Toledo has an annual Bruckner festival!...albeit a very small one  ;D  I would never have guessed...or maybe I would have: come to think of it, I believe Toledo Bass has mentioned it before.

By the way, congratulations on your return home. I take it you are a native Buckeye?

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bunny on May 02, 2007, 04:25:26 PM
I'm going to this, too, and very much looking forward to it.  A live performance of this is almost always an event.  The last time I heard it was with Gergiev and the Kirov (also at Carnegie) about two years ago, and they did a beautiful job with it.

--Bruce

Let's keep our fingers crossed!  I'm praying for great soloists, great playing and serendipitous synchronicity.  And world peace, of course. ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on May 02, 2007, 06:38:21 PM
Next season, I'll attend 3 Bruckner performances. :D

The Montreal Symphony Orchestra in 2 (Blomstedt) and 5 (Nagano).
The Greater Montreal Metropolitan Orchestra in the 9th (Yannick Nézet-Séguin). NZ replaces Gergiev in Rotterdam in 2007-08, but will remain the OMGM's MD :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on May 02, 2007, 08:50:00 PM
Next Season (Lyric)

La Traviata (Flemming)
La Boheme
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: canninator on May 03, 2007, 03:54:29 AM
I was really excited to see the Zehetmair String Quartet plus a.n.other do the Bruckner and Schubert String Quintets but the cellist has had a road accident so its going to be rescheduled. CSBO is coming to do Sibelius 5 soon. This is all at the Sage in Gateshead, a lovely venue but suffers from only having a Sinfonia and quite conservative musical programmers (although that is changing a bit now).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Cato on May 03, 2007, 07:09:42 AM
Amazing. Toledo has an annual Bruckner festival!...albeit a very small one  ;D  I would never have guessed...or maybe I would have: come to think of it, I believe Toledo Bass has mentioned it before.

By the way, congratulations on your return home. I take it you are a native Buckeye?

Sarge

Yes, born in Dayton, the true home of aviation, not that interloper area called Upper South Carolina!   ;D

And I am assuming ToledoBass will be sawing away furiously for the Bruckner 8th this month!

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 03, 2007, 09:46:28 AM
Next season, I'll attend 3 Bruckner performances. :D

The Montreal Symphony Orchestra in 2 (Blomstedt) and 5 (Nagano).
The Greater Montreal Metropolitan Orchestra in the 9th (Yannick Nézet-Séguin). NZ replaces Gergiev in Rotterdam in 2007-08, but will remain the OMGM's MD :D

Lucky man. My area of Germany has abandoned Bruckner.  >:(

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on May 03, 2007, 12:57:57 PM
In two weeks;

NZSO
Jaap Van Zweden
Freddy Kempf ~ Piano

Beethoven ~ Fidelio Overture
               ~ Piano Concerto #4
               ~ Symphony #5
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on May 03, 2007, 01:42:56 PM
Just been going through the programme for this year's BBC Proms. (I actually have a small dollop of cash this year so thought I might splurge a bit.)

Not much that appealed to me in the first month - but around the middle of August it suddenly steps up a notch, and in rapid succession we get:

   Haitink / Concertgebouw in Bruckner (#8)
   Barenboim / VPO in Bruckner (#4) / Schubert / Ligeti / Bartok
   Abbado / Lucerne Festival Orch in Mahler (#3)
   Gergiev / LSO in Prokofiev
   Jansons / BRSO in Sibelius / Honegger / Beethoven
   Vanska / Lahti SO in Sibelius
   Tilson Thomas / SFSO in Shostakovich (#5) / Mahler (#7)
   Chailly / Gewandhaus in Brahms (#4)
   Levine / Boston SO in Carter / Bartok / Brahms
   Aimard playing Ligeti

And these are just the ones that immediately struck the eye.  Plenty more good stuff too.  Looks like that cash won't be around long...

Anyone else up for any of this?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 03, 2007, 02:04:45 PM
Just been going through the programme for this year's BBC Proms. (I actually have a small dollop of cash this year so thought I might splurge a bit.)

Not much that appealed to me in the first month - but around the middle of August it suddenly steps up a notch, and in rapid succession we get:

   Haitink / Concertgebouw in Bruckner (#8)
   Barenboim / VPO in Bruckner (#4) / Schubert / Ligeti / Bartok
   Abbado / Lucerne Festival Orch in Mahler (#3)
   Gergiev / LSO in Prokofiev
   Jansons / BRSO in Sibelius / Honegger / Beethoven
   Vanska / Lahti SO in Sibelius
   Tilson Thomas / SFSO in Shostakovich (#5) / Mahler (#7)
   Chailly / Gewandhaus in Brahms (#4)
   Levine / Boston SO in Carter / Bartok / Brahms
   Aimard playing Ligeti

And these are just the ones that immediately struck the eye.  Plenty more good stuff too.  Looks like that cash won't be around long...

Anyone else up for any of this?

Dude, those sound amazing! I would kill to go to the Haitink and Barenboim concerts. Alas, I don't think I will have the time off to go to London anytime soon.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on May 03, 2007, 02:14:16 PM
Shame.  I'm going to be getting a posse together for those (and 1 or 2 others, e.g. Abbado).

They will all be broadcast on BBC Radio3 though.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on May 04, 2007, 09:03:05 AM
Kolarac Concert Hall, Belgrade - Saturday 12 May 2007

Leonidas Kavakos / Peter Nagy

Beethoven  Sonata No.6 in A major, Op.30/1
Busoni  Sonata No.2 in E minor, Op.36a
Ysa˙e  Sonata No.3 in D minor Ballade
Bartók  Sonata No.1
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 07, 2007, 06:45:23 AM
This Friday, at the Rosengarten in Mannheim, Hilary Hahn is giving a recital. Just got confirmation our tickets are in the mail. She's playing Mozart and Beethoven, I think...not that it matters. She could play scales all night and I'd still be there ;D

Sarge

Hey, Sarge, how was Hilary? My father just heard her in Düsseldorf and had this to say:

Quote
We heard Hilary Hahn in a huge recital in Duesseldorf last night. Fabulous! She is still a bit reticent about leaving control aside, but it is getting there and, most important, she has achieved a distinct personal profile without forcing anything. Her handwork is absolutely diamond sharp and here I mean seamless bowing above everything else. The program consisted of sonatas by Janacek, Mozart, Tartini (Devil's Trills), Ysaye (No. 2 for solo violin) and Beethoven (the "Kreutzer"). She finished this at about 10:30! And then there were three encores. I still consider her the most promissing violin artist of this century, although she will have a few major contestants, like Batiashvili (who won't be so present on the stage because she wants to lead a "normal" life with husband and kids) and perhaps Fischer and Jansen. All of them should play recitals more often. I realize that the managements are reluctant to organize these (less money and less public interest, which means only the most prominent ones will be asked), but it is of utmost importance for their artistic growth AND for public education.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 07, 2007, 11:42:22 AM
O, I agree with your father. She performed the same program in Mannheim and for me it couldn't have been better chosen (well, maybe I'd have preferred the E minor Mozart sonata...no, come to think of it, the sunnier A major worked better wedged between Janáček and Tartini). The encores were by Paganini, Prokofiev (the March from Love For Three Oranges) and Enesco.

The sheer beauty of her tone was astonishing but I occasionally wished she'd dig a little deeper: the major disappointment was Janáček: it could have been spikier, grittier. I understand what your father means about control: she does seem almost the control-freak on some of her recordings. I think she can underplay the emotion but it was less evident here. Live it's not such a big deal anyway; you just sit back and enjoy the smooth, once-in-a-lifetime ride.

The Tartini provoked the greatest audience response: lots of yelling, whistling, and foot stomping. It was a great performance. Mrs. Rock claimed it was far superior to Mutter's Devil's Trill; less romantic, closer to a baroque ideal. The highlight for me was the Ysa˙e A minor sonata--even if she underplayed the Dies Irae quotes. Again, it was the beauty that seduced me. I wish she'd record the complete Op.27.

Her partner, Valentina Lisitsa, deserves a mention. She almost stole the show a few times (and looked the part: a gorgeous long mane of blonde hair and quite dramatic gestures while she played: no deferential, second-fiddle accompanist!).

We were in the balcony. We bought the least expensive seats because the online ticket agency claimed the Rosengarten was nearly sold-out, with all the good seats taken. That wasn't the case! We paid 54 Euro a ticket but we moved into a 100 Euro box when it became obvious it wasn't anywhere near sold out. In fact, except for the front row, the entire balcony was empty as were two thirds of the box seats! So your father is right about the relative lack of interest in recitals. Probably only Mutter could sell out the place (or Brendel: I tried to get tickets to his recital in Ludwigshafen later this month but couldn't).

Here's the cover of the program:

(http://photos.imageevent.com/sgtrock/goodmusic/HahnProg.jpg)

Speaking of Batiashvili: again your father is correct. We saw her a few weeks ago (Sibelius, conducted by Rasilainen) and her technique left an indelible impression. In fact, the performance as a whole changed the way I actually hear the concerto now. When she came out for her fourth bow, she had a little girl in tow (maybe three years old). I've never seen a classical artist bring their kid on stage before! Obviously family means much to her.

(http://photos.imageevent.com/sgtrock/goodmusic/IMG_0172s.jpg)

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 07, 2007, 01:20:35 PM
We were in the balcony. We bought the least expensive seats because the online ticket agency claimed the Rosengarten was nearly sold-out, with all the good seats taken. That wasn't the case! We paid 54 Euro a ticket but we moved into a 100 Euro box when it became obvious it wasn't anywhere near sold out. In fact, except for the front row, the entire balcony was empty as were two thirds of the box seats! So your father is right about the relative lack of interest in recitals. Probably only Mutter could sell out the place (or Brendel: I tried to get tickets to his recital in Ludwigshafen later this month but couldn't).

Well, it's a somewhat different story for piano. Any of Argerich, Barenboim, Kissin, Lang would sell out even a big hall like Carnegie in an instant for a solo recital. It's always a bit more difficult for solo violin repertoire that is often unfamiliar territory for most of the audience. How big is the Rosengarten?

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Michel on May 08, 2007, 03:23:10 AM
Fidelio at Covent Garden later this year.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 08, 2007, 04:04:25 AM
Well, it's a somewhat different story for piano. Any of Argerich, Barenboim, Kissin, Lang would sell out even a big hall like Carnegie in an instant for a solo recital. It's always a bit more difficult for solo violin repertoire that is often unfamiliar territory for most of the audience. How big is the Rosengarten?

The Mozartsaal holds 2300. The Musensaal, where the Staatsphilharmonie now performs, holds considerably less.

I just noticed one upcoming event is apparently sold out: Anna Netrebko & Rolando Villazon. ticket prices range from Euro 128 to 485  :o ...opera fans are insane ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on May 08, 2007, 05:32:35 AM
Fidelio at Covent Garden later this year.

Isn't that next month?

I might go to the Janacek, but that's about all.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Michel on May 08, 2007, 06:47:38 AM
I suppose I said later this year because it seems like it, given I have yet to book the ticket!

I would like to have seen Tosca, but that was sold out, not unsuprisingly.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on May 08, 2007, 07:36:38 AM
I don't know how popular Fidelio is going to be ...

I'm holding off on booking the Janacek on the assumption it may not be that popular and they start offering discounts.  For Bluebeard's Castle they ended up the week beforehand sending out pleading emails offering front-stalls seats for the price of the benches up in nose-bleed territory - so eventually I caved in and said Oh All Right ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Michel on May 08, 2007, 07:46:55 AM
Wow!

Did I tell you I saw Opera North's Duke Bluebeard production once? I was literally on the front row of the skeletal production where at one point, John Tomlinson's saliva landed on my face - satisfying!

And better yet, because there was a "Busted" concert outside, which in rehersal they could apparently hear inside Leed's Town Hall, they offered everyone a free ticket (which I understand the council then paid for, due to their piss poor planning -- although during the performance I heard not a peep).

So, in sum, I got within swinging distance of Tomlinson for nothing!

I suppose there are Janacek nuts out there, and very enthusiastic they are. But it may pay to hold fire. Fidelio certainly hasn't sold out, nowhere near yet.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 08, 2007, 12:15:32 PM
Tonight:

Mahler: Symphony No. 2

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach, Conductor
Simona Šaturová, Soprano
Yvonne Naef, Mezzo-Soprano
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale
David Hayes, Director

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 08, 2007, 01:24:03 PM
Tonight:

Mahler: Symphony No. 2

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach, Conductor
Simona Šaturová, Soprano
Yvonne Naef, Mezzo-Soprano
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale
David Hayes, Director

--Bruce


Ooh!  :o Have fun! Eschenbach is doing Bruckner 7 at Ravinia this summer. Will be nice to have him back in Chicago for a few concerts.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 08, 2007, 01:27:50 PM
Ooh!  :o Have fun! Eschenbach is doing Bruckner 7 at Ravinia this summer. Will be nice to have him back in Chicago for a few concerts.

Thanks!  I have generally admired Eschenbach's work, despite the seemingly huge number of naysayers.  And the Philadelphia Orchestra should be commended for its professionalism in producing some excellent work with him, despite all the behind-the-scenes reports that they don't really get along. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on May 08, 2007, 01:52:04 PM
But it may pay to hold fire. Fidelio certainly hasn't sold out, nowhere near yet.

Yeah, I just checked, there does seem to be plenty of availability.  But I baulk at paying 50 quid for a seat which would probably cost me about a quarter of that in Vienna.  If they get to the stage of offering discounts, though, I'd be up for it.

So, in sum, I got within swinging distance of Tomlinson for nothing!

Why were you think of swinging for John Tomlinson?  And more to the point, what were you thinking of swinging at him?  I once very nearly swung for Owain Arwel Hughes after hearing him deliver the most clotted, greasy and repellent Nielsen #4 it's ever been my misfortune to hear.  He was only a short leap from my usual seat - but the lady wife felled me with a punch before I could take two steps.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Michel on May 08, 2007, 01:55:35 PM
I would never want to swing at him, of course. Perhaps I should have said patting distance. And even if John gave a terrible performance, not sure this is possible, I would be a little concerned as he is a big chap.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bunny on May 08, 2007, 06:20:15 PM
Tonight:

Mahler: Symphony No. 2

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach, Conductor
Simona Šaturová, Soprano
Yvonne Naef, Mezzo-Soprano
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale
David Hayes, Director

--Bruce


Just came home from this.  Excellent, excellent, excellent, although I did miss the organ in the finale.  I don't know if they have an electronic organ, but I sure do miss the old pipe organ they used to have.  If the organ was playing, it didn't have the heft of a regular one.  If there is an organ in Carnegie Hall I wish someone would let me know where they are keeping it.  You used to be able to see the pipes in the back of the stage years ago, but now they are nowhere in evidence.  I know at one time there was an electronic organ there that was similar to the one in the Riverside Church.

Just to let everyone know, there was another standing ovation in Carnegie, and they deserved it.  Eschenbach conducted without a score, which is the first time in a long time that I've seen a conductor do that for Mahler!  More often for Mozart or Beethoven or any of the shorter symphonies.  Tonight, unfortunately, I wanted to throw some mentos at some unknown individual (couldn't find the ricola at the bottom of my handbag), but my hubby prevented me from launching the missiles.  Tragically, towards the end of the 1st movement, there was someone with a cellphone ringing a few rows behind us.  Hopefully Bruce wasn't in the same part of the auditorium and it didn't bother him the way it did everyone in my section.  It really was a mood breaker and afterwards there was coughing, throat clearing and the noise of people shifting in their seats. >:(

Luckily it was close to the end of the 1st movement, and everyone was able to settle down for the rest of the symphony.  Btw, there was no intermission -- just a few minutes pause between the 1st and 2nd movements.  The 3rd, 4th, and 5th movements flowed into each other seamlessly. The Urlicht was sung beautifully and the climax was as thrilling as I could wish.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on May 09, 2007, 01:18:08 AM
Interesting.  I heard Eschenbach conduct Bruckner #8, and thought it one of the very worst I'd heard.  But his recent CD of Zemlinsky's Lyric Symphony is probably the best I've heard.  So maybe he's just variable.  Certainly the Philadelphians have been in rare form in recent years, if the downloads from their site are anything to go by.

Glad you enjoyed the concert.  A fine Resurrection is indeed an experience to savour.  (My first was Tennstedt - still remember it.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 09, 2007, 06:36:59 AM
Just came home from this.  Excellent, excellent, excellent, although I did miss the organ in the finale.  I don't know if they have an electronic organ, but I sure do miss the old pipe organ they used to have.  If the organ was playing, it didn't have the heft of a regular one.  If there is an organ in Carnegie Hall I wish someone would let me know where they are keeping it.  You used to be able to see the pipes in the back of the stage years ago, but now they are nowhere in evidence.  I know at one time there was an electronic organ there that was similar to the one in the Riverside Church.

Just to let everyone know, there was another standing ovation in Carnegie, and they deserved it.  Eschenbach conducted without a score, which is the first time in a long time that I've seen a conductor do that for Mahler!  More often for Mozart or Beethoven or any of the shorter symphonies.  Tonight, unfortunately, I wanted to throw some mentos at some unknown individual (couldn't find the ricola at the bottom of my handbag), but my hubby prevented me from launching the missiles.  Tragically, towards the end of the 1st movement, there was someone with a cellphone ringing a few rows behind us.  Hopefully Bruce wasn't in the same part of the auditorium and it didn't bother him the way it did everyone in my section.  It really was a mood breaker and afterwards there was coughing, throat clearing and the noise of people shifting in their seats. >:(

Luckily it was close to the end of the 1st movement, and everyone was able to settle down for the rest of the symphony.  Btw, there was no intermission -- just a few minutes pause between the 1st and 2nd movements.  The 3rd, 4th, and 5th movements flowed into each other seamlessly. The Urlicht was sung beautifully and the climax was as thrilling as I could wish.

Lovely write-up, Bunny!  I totally agree, first with missing the organ a bit.  Carnegie must be one of the few of the world's great halls that is missing an organ, and in pieces like this one, it's a bit of a shame.  You could hear the organ a bit, but it didn't have nearly the power that it should have had.  But never mind!  Everything else was utterly shattering. 

A favorite moment: in the final movement, the first huge percussion crescendo, with the snare drum louder...louder...and then even much louder than some in the hall probably expected.  Eschenbach drew out this sequence to a rather insane length, but it was so thrilling I didn't care.  The first entrance of the chorus -- one of my favorite moments in music, period -- was about as magical as it gets, and the two singers were excellent, especially the mezzo.

Considering the very public problems between Eschenbach and the orchestra, this must have been a little bit of sweet validation for him.  Certainly he and everyone onstage deserved the ovation.

I did hear that cellphone, far away from my seat in the center balcony, but thankfully was able to forget about it soon after.  What was marginally more bothersome for awhile upstairs was the sound of a truck backing up on 57th Street, outside, coming through an open door on the side.  (Carnegie was built long before principles of total sound isolation found their way into concert hall design.)  Anyway, a thoughtful patron stood up and v-e-r-y q-u-i-e-t-l-y closed it.  I wish I could have thanked him for his little good deed for the day. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 09, 2007, 07:26:19 AM
Tomorrow night, Aimard in (yet another) fascinating evening:

Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Piano
Tamara Stefanovich, Piano
Daniel Ciampolini, Percussion
Joseph Gramley, Percussion

PETER EÖTVÖS Kosmos for 2 Pianos
GYÖRGY KURTÁG Selections from Játékok
STEVE REICH Clapping Music
LIGETI "Fém" from Études pour piano, No. 8 (adapted for piano and percussion)
NANCARROW Studies for Player Piano Nos. 2 & 9 (arr. for two pianos)
AIMARD (arr.) "Počme de chambre", after Ligeti's Počme symphonique for 100 Metronomes
LIGETI "Fanfares" from Études pour piano, No. 4 (adapted for piano and percussion)
BARTÓK Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Cato on May 09, 2007, 07:28:35 AM
Bruckner's 8th Symphony in the Roman Catholic cathedral in Toledo, performed by the Toledo Symphony.

Playing a Bruckner symphony there once a year has become a new tradition for the orchestra.

And that's in Buckeye Land, dudes, not that other town in Old Europe!   ;D

Just bought the ticket, paid for by my sons: early Father's Day present!  Nice, well-behaved 20-somethings!   0:)     0:)

GMG member Toledobass might be able to tell us how rehearsals are going!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bunny on May 09, 2007, 07:34:02 AM
Thanks for the kind words, Bruce!

I wonder if this one is going to be recorded?  It certainly sounds ready for the can, and would be a worthy follow-up for their great Mahler 6th.  Whatever one has to say about Eschenbach, it cannot be denied that the man is one of the great Mahler conductors around today.  The Mahler 4th I heard earlier in the season with the same forces did not have the same sheen or polish that this one had.  If I could pick out the biffs and rough patches in that, then it really needed more rehearsal.  It also suffered from a soloist who didn't have enough volume although from what I could hear, her voice was silvery and with good range for the song.

Lovely write-up, Bunny!  I totally agree, first with missing the organ a bit.  Carnegie must be one of the few of the world's great halls that is missing an organ, and in pieces like this one, it's a bit of a shame.  You could hear the organ a bit, but it didn't have nearly the power that it should have had.  But never mind!  Everything else was utterly shattering. 

A favorite moment: in the final movement, the first huge percussion crescendo, with the snare drum louder...louder...and then even much louder than some in the hall probably expected.  Eschenbach drew out this sequence to a rather insane length, but it was so thrilling I didn't care. The first entrance of the chorus -- one of my favorite moments in music, period -- was about as magical as it gets, and the two singers were excellent, especially the mezzo.

Considering the very public problems between Eschenbach and the orchestra, this must have been a little bit of sweet validation for him.  Certainly he and everyone onstage deserved the ovation.

I did hear that cellphone, far away from my seat in the center balcony, but thankfully was able to forget about it soon after.  What was marginally more bothersome for awhile upstairs was the sound of a truck backing up on 57th Street, outside, coming through an open door on the side.  (Carnegie was built long before principles of total sound isolation found their way into concert hall design.)  Anyway, a thoughtful patron stood up and v-e-r-y q-u-i-e-t-l-y closed it.  I wish I could have thanked him for his little good deed for the day. 

--Bruce

I'll bet Mahler would have approved of that variation from the score!  He was, from all I have read, an extremely dramatic conductor, and one who wasn't afraid to "make things his own."  Another great moment is after the Urlicht, when you hear the brass playing that great theme from Wagner.  It was an electrifying moment!  I was holding my breath and unable to breathe until the music "exhaled."  My husband was on the edge of his chair and the near hysterical woman on the other side of him had her eyes rolling back in her head!  (I wonder if she was able to get home safely.  Although I always find a Mahler symphony and transcendent experience, her reactions were so exaggerated that we both began to wonder if she were completely, well, sane. :o )   As soon as the music stopped, the audience erupted.  I'll bet it sounded thunderous up in the balcony, especially if you were in the music lovers' corner, where the applause snaps and explodes as it hits the back wall of the auditorium. 

I was lucky enough to be in one of those areas of the parquet which is right next to prime p. (cheaper and same sound ;D).  The outside noises are not particularly audible there, or in the first tier where we have our other subscriptions as soon as the ushers close the box door.  What is also abominable is the way the subway noises filter into Zankel Hall.  That hall is used for the Baroque series as well as other small ensemble groups and it is appallingly lacking in sound proofing.  The accoustic of the room is nothing to write home about, either.  Extremely bright and dead, despite all the wood panelling.  To have groups as wonderful as the The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra or the English Concert, or Le Concert des Nations (next season) competing with the sound of a subway train is awful.  I've sat all over that hall and have yet to find seats that offer great sound.  Yet, if I want to hear these wonderful authentic period instrument groups, I am stuck in Zankel.  The trustees of the organization should be shot for shortchanging the public when they converted the old cinema into that hall.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Don Giovanni on May 09, 2007, 08:32:40 AM
I'm looking forward to the Proms this year. We have access to a box so I'm going to try and go to as many as possible.

I hope to see as much Mahler as I can. This year: symphonies 1, 3, 7, 9.


Anyone else going to the Proms?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on May 09, 2007, 08:38:50 AM
I'm quite jealous of Bruce and bunny who got to hear M2 - I really wanted to, but moved too late. As for recording, I hope they release it as a CD, but if they don't it will most likely appear as a downloadable file from the Philly Orchestra's website (in lossless FLAC!).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Michel on May 09, 2007, 09:24:59 AM
Good lord, I forgot that the proms schedule is out. I have looked through and as usual too much popular crap that isn't worth it.

I will be going to one concert, however, that I can greatly looking forward to:

Bruckner 8 - Concertebouw Haitink

And I may go to his Wagner prom, just because it might "sound" nice.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on May 09, 2007, 09:39:26 AM
Good lord, I forgot that the proms schedule is out. I have looked through and as usual too much popular crap that isn't worth it.

I haven't looked at the schedule proper, but from Choo Choo's post earlier on, there seem to be quite a few great concerts. Mind you, I agree that there's probably a lot of dross as well that Choo Choo didn't bother to post about.

Just been going through the programme for this year's BBC Proms. (I actually have a small dollop of cash this year so thought I might splurge a bit.)

Not much that appealed to me in the first month - but around the middle of August it suddenly steps up a notch, and in rapid succession we get:

   Haitink / Concertgebouw in Bruckner (#8)
   Barenboim / VPO in Bruckner (#4) / Schubert / Ligeti / Bartok
   Abbado / Lucerne Festival Orch in Mahler (#3)
   Gergiev / LSO in Prokofiev
   Jansons / BRSO in Sibelius / Honegger / Beethoven
   Vanska / Lahti SO in Sibelius
   Tilson Thomas / SFSO in Shostakovich (#5) / Mahler (#7)
   Chailly / Gewandhaus in Brahms (#4)
   Levine / Boston SO in Carter / Bartok / Brahms
   Aimard playing Ligeti

And these are just the ones that immediately struck the eye.  Plenty more good stuff too.  Looks like that cash won't be around long...

Anyone else up for any of this?

The Haitink Bruckner is definitely tasty, but the Mahler performances should be good too. Also the Vanska Sibelius. I saw him lead a very powerful Kullervo last year. We're getting Jansons and MTT up here in Edinburgh as well.

I'm looking forward to the Proms this year. We have access to a box so I'm going to try and go to as many as possible.

I hope to see as much Mahler as I can. This year: symphonies 1, 3, 7, 9.


Anyone else going to the Proms?


DG, how does a box work? Does it mean you have access to every performance?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bunny on May 09, 2007, 10:10:41 AM
I'm quite jealous of Bruce and bunny who got to hear M2 - I really wanted to, but moved too late. As for recording, I hope they release it as a CD, but if they don't it will most likely appear as a downloadable file from the Philly Orchestra's website (in lossless FLAC!).

Oh my!  How soon would that be available for download! :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 09, 2007, 10:13:59 AM
Bunny and Bruce, thanks for your write-ups. Wish I could have been there.

I heard Eschenbach conduct Bruckner #8, and thought it one of the very worst I'd heard. 

Really? When/where was this? I heard Eschenbach do the most magical Bruckner 8 I have ever heard with the NYPO a few years back (98/99 or so, I think). He is variable, though. I heard him do an atrociously distended Dvorak 9th as well.


Tomorrow night, Aimard in (yet another) fascinating evening:

Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Piano
Tamara Stefanovich, Piano
Daniel Ciampolini, Percussion
Joseph Gramley, Percussion

PETER EÖTVÖS Kosmos for 2 Pianos
GYÖRGY KURTÁG Selections from Játékok
STEVE REICH Clapping Music
LIGETI "Fém" from Études pour piano, No. 8 (adapted for piano and percussion)
NANCARROW Studies for Player Piano Nos. 2 & 9 (arr. for two pianos)
AIMARD (arr.) "Počme de chambre", after Ligeti's Počme symphonique for 100 Metronomes
LIGETI "Fanfares" from Études pour piano, No. 4 (adapted for piano and percussion)
BARTÓK Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

--Bruce


He's doing the same in Chicago this Sunday. Unfortunately, I will be on the West Coast, so I will have to miss it. But I will be back to hear Haitink's Tuesday night performance of Bruckner 7 with the CSO!  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bunny on May 09, 2007, 10:47:15 AM
Interesting.  I heard Eschenbach conduct Bruckner #8, and thought it one of the very worst I'd heard.  But his recent CD of Zemlinsky's Lyric Symphony is probably the best I've heard.  So maybe he's just variable.  Certainly the Philadelphians have been in rare form in recent years, if the downloads from their site are anything to go by.

Glad you enjoyed the concert.  A fine Resurrection is indeed an experience to savour.  (My first was Tennstedt - still remember it.)

I think Eschenbach can be variable.  The Mahler 2 last night was phenomenal.  His Mahler 4 from a few months ago was very indifferent.  It wasn't awful, but it felt like a work in progress: poor choice of soloist (Marisol Montalvo), and rough play from the orchestra which was surprising considering how well they sounded before the intermission when they did the Berg Violin Concerto with Leonidas Kavakos.


The Bruckner 9th I heard him conduct a few weeks later was, again, totally wonderful -- incredible playing by the orchestra.  The Mozart Violin Concerto No. 5 with Gil Shaham was also executed extremely well even though it was a last minute substitution when Quasthoff had to withdraw at the last moment because of the "flu."  He had been scheduled to sing the Kindertoten Lieder. (Boy am I sorry about that!)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Don Giovanni on May 09, 2007, 11:21:37 AM


DG, how does a box work? Does it mean you have access to every performance?

The company that my dad works for played a role in the construction of the Royal Albert Hall. They have their own box there and they get tickets for 90% of the performances (and nearly every prom). I've been going to the proms for about two years and this year looks like the one I will enjoy the most - last year didn't really have anything spectacular.


The Haitink Bruckner is definitely tasty, but the Mahler performances should be good too. Also the Vanska Sibelius. I saw him lead a very powerful Kullervo last year. We're getting Jansons and MTT up here in Edinburgh as well.


I saw Haitink do Mahler's 2nd about a year ago. All I can say is that it was phenomenal.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on May 09, 2007, 04:07:39 PM
Yes Eschenbach can indeed be variable - when he's on his A-game, there's very few that equal or surpass him. If he's not... well... let's just say the difference is very notable.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bunny on May 09, 2007, 08:12:11 PM
Yes Eschenbach can indeed be variable - when he's on his A-game, there's very few that equal or surpass him. If he's not... well... let's just say the difference is very notable.

It's funny, after the Mahler 4th which I had found disappointing, my husband, who had only heard it before when Rattle conducted the Berliners, said, "Now I know why you didn't like Rattle's performance.  This was so much more exciting and it sounded better too." I then asked him how he could say that when the orchestra's play was so rough and the singer couldn't be heard, and he replied that it didn't matter because the singer when Rattle performed was just awful looking and sounding (Kozena in a very unfortunate white outfit) although he admitted  it was easier to hear her.  I guess he would rather have not been able to hear her.  And, he added that the symphony wasn't as exciting and just didn't sound as nice.  I suppose he was referring to the lean sound of the Berliners compared to the still lush and silky Philadelphia strings, and the fact that Rattle's version of the 4th is extremely flaccid and the tension never comes to climax.  The Berliners, however, play like angels individually.  If there is a missed note or horn biff no one can tell, they are such fine instrumentalists.  I guess perfection is sometimes an overrated commodity. 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 10, 2007, 08:44:32 AM
Just added this one into the mix, on Sunday afternoon at Carnegie:

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Nicolas Hodges, Piano

Elliott Carter: Three Illusions
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3, "Scottish"
Elliott Carter: Dialogues for Piano and Orchestra
Mozart: Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter"

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 11, 2007, 09:14:34 AM
Tomorrow night, Aimard in (yet another) fascinating evening:

Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Piano
Tamara Stefanovich, Piano
Daniel Ciampolini, Percussion
Joseph Gramley, Percussion

PETER EÖTVÖS Kosmos for 2 Pianos
GYÖRGY KURTÁG Selections from Játékok
STEVE REICH Clapping Music
LIGETI "Fém" from Études pour piano, No. 8 (adapted for piano and percussion)
NANCARROW Studies for Player Piano Nos. 2 & 9 (arr. for two pianos)
AIMARD (arr.) "Počme de chambre", after Ligeti's Počme symphonique for 100 Metronomes
LIGETI "Fanfares" from Études pour piano, No. 4 (adapted for piano and percussion)
BARTÓK Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

Well this was pretty amazing, I must say.  Aimard conceived the entire thing performed straight through, without intermission, and the middle section (from Reich through the Ligeti "Fanfares") was done without pauses between the works.  Aimard's arrangement of the "Počme symphonique" was amusing, for the four musicians at two pianos, each solemnly hitting a single note, over and over...well, metronomically!

The Bartok was totally great -- very crisp, slightly jazzy and lean -- and the two percussionists were just marvelous.  At the end, bravos and Aimard and the others came out four times to acknowledge the applause. 

He's doing another recital/talk tonight, also at Zankel, but alas, I'll be at Falstaff in Philadelphia. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on May 11, 2007, 01:27:13 PM
I guess perfection is sometimes an overrated commodity. 

It is - I'd much rather have a technically flawed but emotionally riveting performance than a technically perfect uninvolving one. Have you heard any of the Ondine recordings of the Philly Orchestra with Eschenbach?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 11, 2007, 01:50:37 PM
Just bought the ticket, paid for by my sons: early Father's Day present!  Nice, well-behaved 20-somethings!   0:)     0:)

GMG member Toledobass might be able to tell us how rehearsals are going!

Sorry Folks,

I don't follow this thread often so I've missed all the mentions of the upcoming Bruckner 8.  It has been an ongoing tradition to play a Bruckner concert in the wonderful space of the Rosary Cathedral.  The funny thing to me is that it is a giveaway concert to those who subscribe to our Mozart and More series. I don't think most of the audience knew what they were in for that first Bruckner concert, but I think they've come to enjoy the annual offering.  It surely is well attended and well recieved.  We had played Bruckner under a different conductor before in our main hall but it was not well recieved due to poor performances.  Sanderling has a way of being so musically convincing that a level of trust with the audience was developed that I think they just come along for the ride now, basically expecting it to be good.  I always look forward to this concert (I surely can't say that about all my collegues.)  Bruckner's music is very special to Sanderling and I believe the 8th is his favorite.  He's been very detailed in rehearsal and the concert should come off well.  Of course I wish there were another performance for all of the taxing work we've put in over the past week,  oh well.  Next year is the 9th preceded by Messaien's L'Ascension and next week is Beethoven 9 (I believe this is the last symphony that we've needed to play to complete the entire cycle)!!!  A busy and exciting 2 weeks at work. :D   


Allan

PS.  The reason I came to the thread was to post that I'm looking forward to Rosenkavalier at the Cleveland Orchestra in early June.   ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Cato on May 12, 2007, 04:20:40 PM
Thanks for the update on the Bruckner 8th Symphony from Toledobass!

Best Wishes for tomorrow!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Cato on May 14, 2007, 04:36:56 AM
The concert I was looking forward to is now in the past:  the Toledo Symphony played Bruckner's Symphony #8 in the cathedral yesterday, and it was a wonderful experience: Bruckner's divine music    0:)    belongs quite rightly in cathedrals!
Conductor is Stefan Sanderling, who took a few things at times a little too slowly for my taste, but certainly the tempi were not indefensible.

GMG member Toledobass performed in this, and the bass sound was smooth and filling.  The brass of course are key to Bruckner, and they filled the cathedral's space when needed.  There was an almost immediate standing ovation (this one was deserved!).

I was surrounded by 20-somethings (one of them my son, a newly degreed mathematician) and some teenage boys, who were unaccompanied by parents.  So I was wondering what the reaction would be, but should not have been so skeptical: they seemed to become more and more engrossed.  When the finale charged in, they seemed as enraptured as the rest of the audience.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on May 14, 2007, 04:38:57 AM
I was surrounded by 20-somethings (one of them my son, a newly degreed mathematician) and some teenage boys, who were unaccompanied by parents.  So I was wondering what the reaction would be, but should not have been so skeptical: they seemed to become more and more engrossed.  When the finale charged in, they seemed as enraptured as the rest of the audience.

This does not surprise me in the least.

-- Nor does it surprise me that Allan acquitted himself so brilliantly!  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 14, 2007, 04:53:57 AM
The concert I was looking forward to is now in the past:  the Toledo Symphony played Bruckner's Symphony #8 in the cathedral yesterday, and it was a wonderful experience: Bruckner's divine music    0:)    belongs quite rightly in cathedrals!
Conductor is Stefan Sanderling, who took a few things at times a little too slowly for my taste, but certainly the tempi were not indefensible.

GMG member Toledobass performed in this, and the bass sound was smooth and filling.  The brass of course are key to Bruckner, and they filled the cathedral's space when needed.  There was an almost immediate standing ovation (this one was deserved!).

I was surrounded by 20-somethings (one of them my son, a newly degreed mathematician) and some teenage boys, who were unaccompanied by parents.  So I was wondering what the reaction would be, but should not have been so skeptical: they seemed to become more and more engrossed.  When the finale charged in, they seemed as enraptured as the rest of the audience.

Thanks for the review, Cato. It makes me sad I couldn't have been home to experience it (and next month the Cleveland Orchestra is doing Rosenkavalier! ARRRGGGHHH!!!...the first time in three years I won't be in Ohio in June...damn...)

Interesting observation about the young people in the audience. I've had a few concert experiences recently that give me hope for classical music's future: there was a much younger audience than I'm used to in Berlin for the Mahler cycle. Both Hélčne Grimaud and Hilary Hahn have, apparently, hordes of young fans, as young as eight or nine!...and the kids I saw at their concerts acted like they were seeing a famous pop star. Very encouraging.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Cato on May 14, 2007, 05:10:18 AM
Thanks for the review, Cato. It makes me sad I couldn't have been home to experience it (and next month the Cleveland Orchestra is doing Rosenkavalier! ARRRGGGHHH!!!...the first time in three years I won't be in Ohio in June...damn...)

Interesting observation about the young people in the audience. I've had a few concert experiences recently that give me hope for classical music's future: there was a much younger audience than I'm used to in Berlin for the Mahler cycle. Both Hélčne Grimaud and Hilary Hahn have, apparently, hordes of young fans, as young as eight or nine!...and the kids I saw at their concerts acted like they were seeing a famous pop star. Very encouraging.

Sarge

I am moving to Columbus in July, and so will be 90 minutes away from the Cleveland Orchestra and from the Cincinnati Symphony.  I am not acquainted with the Columbus Symphony and how well or what they play.

Certainly the Toledo Symphony would not have been able to tackle Bruckner 20 years ago.  They began to improve greatly under previous conductor Andrew Massey, and that continues with Stefan Sanderling.  A good number of young women populate the orchestra: principal trumpeter these days is a woman, and her cheeks were puffed out and rosy yesterday as if she were a June bride!   8)

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 14, 2007, 05:53:26 AM
I am moving to Columbus in July, and so will be 90 minutes away from the Cleveland Orchestra and from the Cincinnati Symphony.  I am not acquainted with the Columbus Symphony and how well or what they play.

I've got relatives in Columbus (one niece is a professor at Ohio State, a nephew an executive at Abercrombie and Fitch) and visit often but I've never heard the orchestra. I'm impressed with the area, though. Columbus has really exploded and it's not the provincial backwater it once was.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Cato on May 14, 2007, 06:08:58 AM
I've got relatives in Columbus (one niece is a professor at Ohio State, a nephew an executive at Abercrombie and Fitch) and visit often but I've never heard the orchestra. I'm impressed with the area, though. Columbus has really exploded and it's not the provincial backwater it once was.

Sarge

When we lived there in the 70's, "cowtown"    :o    was not an unknown epithet for it from people in Dayton, Cincy, and Cleveland!   8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: AB68 on May 14, 2007, 06:46:19 AM
My planned musical events

May 24- Oslo Concerthouse, Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra/Jukka Pekka Saraste
            Varese-Ameriques
            Beethoven-Symphony no.3 "Eroica"
May 26- Köln Opera
            Händel-"Giulio Cesare in Egitto" (premiere)
June 08- Laeiszhalle, Hamburg, NDR Sinfonieorchester/Christoph von Dohnanyi
            Daniel Barenboim, piano
            Brahms-Piano concerto no.1
            Schumann-Symphony no.2
June 09- Laeiszhalle, Hamburg, NDR Sinfonieorchester/Christoph von Dohnanyi
            Daniel Barenboim, piano
            Schumann-symphony no.4
            Brahms-Piano concerto no.2
June 27- Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, Koninklijk Concertgebouworkest/Mariss Jansons
            Mitsuko Uchida, piano
            Wagner-Tannhaüser Overture
            Mozart-Piano Concerto no.25
            Brahms-Symphony no.1
June 29- Prague Opera,Theatre of the Estates
             Mozart-Don Giovanni
       
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 14, 2007, 08:22:51 AM
Thanks for the review, Cato. It makes me sad I couldn't have been home to experience it (and next month the Cleveland Orchestra is doing Rosenkavalier! ARRRGGGHHH!!!...the first time in three years I won't be in Ohio in June...damn...)


Sarge

Sarge Sarge Sarge $:).  The yearly operas at the Cleveland Orchestra are my favorite concerts to attend.  I've always thought Franz does best when there are voices on stage.  There's always a great excitement in the audience for these things and I can't wait for this one coming up.  (For added fun, the Mrs. will be singing some miniscule part.)  They cost a fortune to put on so I hope they are able to keep the tradition ongoing.



Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on May 17, 2007, 02:58:27 PM
Tonight! An all Beethoven programme.

BEETHOVEN Fidelio Overture
BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 4
BEETHOVEN Symphony No 5


NZSO
PIETARI INKINEN Conductor
FREDDY KEMPF Piano


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 18, 2007, 06:54:07 AM
This Sunday afternoon:

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Michelle DeYoung, Mezzo-Soprano

R. STRAUSS: Der Bürger als Edelmann Suite, Op. 60
SCHOENBERG: "Lied der Waldtaube" ("Song of the Wood Dove") from Gurrelieder (arr. Erwin Stein)
AMBROISE THOMAS: Overture to Mignon
BERLIOZ: La Mort de Cléopâtre
RAVEL: Daphnis et Chloé Suite No. 2

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on May 18, 2007, 01:35:28 PM
Tonight! An all Beethoven programme.

BEETHOVEN Fidelio Overture
BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 4
BEETHOVEN Symphony No 5


NZSO
PIETARI INKINEN Conductor
FREDDY KEMPF Piano




Great concert last night.

It was the new Music Director Emeritus, Pietari Inkinen, first performance with the NSZO as conductor and he was sensational;totally committed to the material with the orchestra responding in kind.

Freddy Kempf was very fluid with the 4th PC delivering a moving and powerful interpretation. After 4 curtain calls he gave us a brief encore of a Schumann piece. I don't know what it was.

After intermission we had the sonic glory of Beethovens 5th symphony which in the wrong hands could sound a bit hackneyed but last night it was a superb journey from darkness to light. The energy and power in the final movement was goosebumps teritory. We left the concert hall elated  :)

Great quote from Beethoven in the programme;

'Life is short, Art is eternal'
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 18, 2007, 01:46:07 PM
After intermission we had the sonic glory of Beethovens 5th symphony which in the wrong hands could sound a bit hackneyed but last night it was a superb journey from darkness to light. The energy and power in the final movement was goosebumps teritory. We left the concert hall elated  :)

A good reading of the Beethoven Fifth -- i.e., in which neither the conductor nor the players take it for granted -- is an experience to treasure.  Sounds like you got one!  Thanks for the report.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on May 18, 2007, 09:02:14 PM
A good reading of the Beethoven Fifth -- i.e., in which neither the conductor nor the players take it for granted -- is an experience to treasure.  Sounds like you got one!  Thanks for the report.

--Bruce

Yes, I groaned when I saw it on the seasons programme but it tured out to be a real treat. Just goes to show that even an 'ol warhorse in the rights hands can be magical  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on May 19, 2007, 01:16:12 PM
Well, I just subscribed to the Philly orchestra for the '07-'08 season. I may have missed M2 but there's NO way I'm going to miss M8 :) So of course I'm looking forward to them all...

Saturday 9A 2007-2008 Series
Philadelphia Orchestra 2007-2008 Season

   
Verizon Hall
   
Schubert, Mozart, and Haydn
October 27, 2007    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Nicholas McGegan,  conductor
Stephen Hough,  piano
SCHUBERT  Overture in C major "in the Italian Style"
MOZART  Piano Concerto No. 21, K. 467
MOZART  Chaconne from Idomeneo
HAYDN  Symphony No. 100 ("Military")

Ravel and Roussel
November 10, 2007    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Stéphane Denčve,  conductor
Vincent Dubois,  organ
HIGDON  blue cathedral
POULENC  Organ Concerto
RAVEL  Suite from Mother Goose
ROUSSEL  Suite No. 2 from Bacchus and Ariadne

Rattle Conducts Schumann
December 1, 2007    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Simon Rattle,  conductor
Christine Brandes,  soprano
Heidi Grant Murphy,  soprano
Bernarda Fink,  mezzo-soprano
Joseph Kaiser,  tenor
Mark Padmore,  tenor
Luca Pisaroni ,  bass-baritone
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale,  David Hayes, music director
SCHUMANN  Das Paradies und die Peri


Bernstein Festival: West Side Story
January 10, 2008    ( Thu, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach,  conductor
Time for Three,
Zachary De Pue, violin
Nicolas Kendall, violin
Ranaan Meyer, double bass
TCHAIKOVSKY  Romeo and Juliet
HIGDON  Concerto 4-3, for string trio and orchestra
BERNSTEIN  Symphonic Dances from West Side Story

Bernstein Festival: Bernstein, Barber and Bell
February 2, 2008    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Rossen Milanov,  conductor
Joshua Bell,  violin
BERNSTEIN  Three Dance Episodes from On the Town
BARBER  Violin Concerto
BERNSTEIN  Songs from West Side Story, for violin and orchestra
STRAVINSKY  Petrushka
STRAVINSKY  Scherzo ŕ la russe

Serkin Plays Mozart
March 1, 2008    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Robert Spano,  conductor
Peter Serkin,  piano
STRAVINSKY  Dumbarton Oaks
STRAVINSKY  Capriccio, for piano and orchestra
MOZART  Concert-Rondo in D major, K. 382, for piano and orchestra
RACHMANINOFF  Symphony No. 1

A Musical Space Odyssey
April 12, 2008    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Vladimir Jurowski,  conductor
Nikolaj Znaider,  violin
LIGETI  Atmosphčres
BRAHMS  Violin Concerto
R. STRAUSS  Also sprach Zarathustra
J. STRAUSS  "On the Beautiful Blue Danube" Waltz

Symphony of a Thousand
May 3, 2008    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach,  conductor
Christine Brewer,  soprano
Michaela Kaune,  soprano
Marisol Montalvo,  soprano
Stephanie Blythe,  mezzo-soprano
Charlotte Hellekant,  mezzo-soprano
Paul Groves,  tenor
Franco Pomponi,  baritone
James Morris,  bass
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale,  David Hayes, music director
Westminster Symphonic Choir,  Joe Miller, music director
Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia,  Alan Harler, music director
MAHLER  Symphony No. 8 ("Symphony of a Thousand")

All Schubert
May 17, 2008    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach,  conductor
SCHUBERT  Symphony in B minor ("Unfinished")
SCHUBERT  Symphony in C major ("Great")
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 19, 2007, 01:17:52 PM
Next Tuesday and Wednesday at P.S. 122, the International Contemporary Ensemble (http://www.iceorg.org) is doing:

Luigi Nono: A floresta é jovem cheja de vida (The Forest is Young and Full of Life) (1966)

From their website: In the 1960's Italian composer Luigi Nono turned to theater and electronics to express his political sentiments outside of the constraints of the concert hall.  Nono's bold anti-war statement blends his experiments with the human voice, traditional instruments and electronic playback into a self-contained dramatic work.  ICE is proud to present this work in collaboration with world-renowned soprano Tony Arnold and director Habib Azar.

PS, just saw stingo's post with all those tasty-looking Philly items...I will definitely be at the M8, too (maybe more than once)!

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Michel on May 19, 2007, 01:47:55 PM
For me, one piece, twice:

PARSIFAL

First in Covent Garden with Haitink in the pit late 07, second in Paris in early 08.

I can't wait!!!

Does anyone fancy going to see Haitink do Bruckner's 8 at the proms?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 19, 2007, 09:26:37 PM
Ravel and Roussel
November 10, 2007    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Stéphane Denčve,  conductor
Vincent Dubois,  organ
HIGDON  blue cathedral
POULENC  Organ Concerto
RAVEL  Suite from Mother Goose
ROUSSEL  Suite No. 2 from Bacchus and Ariadne

That should be outstanding! Deneve is excellent. I'd love to have an opportunity to hear that repertoire from someone like him who cares about it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on May 20, 2007, 11:10:10 AM
This year, I have the following to look forward to:

May 22nd (http://www.wigmore-hall.org.uk/concerts/concert_details.cfm?e=33960)

May 29th (http://www.cadoganhall.com/showpage.php?pid=348)

July 26th (http://www.barbican.org.uk/music/event-detail.asp?ID=5205)

I'm also waiting to hear if I've managed to secure a ticket to this BBC Proms 2007 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/2007/whatson/1807.shtml) concert. If I have, then I'll be sat overlooking the orchestra, which is something I've always wanted to do at the Royal Albert Hall.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: SimonGodders on May 20, 2007, 01:40:18 PM
For me, one piece, twice:

PARSIFAL

First in Covent Garden with Haitink in the pit late 07, second in Paris in early 08.

I can't wait!!!

Does anyone fancy going to see Haitink do Bruckner's 8 at the proms?

Not really, Bruckner doesn't 'float my boat', but wouldn't mind seeing this fella' do the Beethoven Violin Concerto:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/2007/whatson/0509.shtml#prom69

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mozart on May 20, 2007, 03:57:48 PM
hu. Aug 16
   

8:00 PM
   

The Grand Tour: Mozart in Vienna
Classical Thursdays: TH2
 
        

Artists:
Los Angeles Philharmonic; Nicholas McGegan,  conductor; Shai Wosner, piano

Program:
Mozart: Five Contradances, K. 609
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K. 466 Listen
Mozart: Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter" Listen
   
 

wahh I wont be able to go
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 21, 2007, 03:11:55 PM
Sunday afternoon (yesterday) - concert entitled Young at Heart with Midori - as the title would suggest, a varied program w/ interest for kids (in fact, a lot of youngsters in attendance!):

Britten - The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra
JS Bach - Double Violin Concerto - Midori + invited guest
Ravel - Mother Goose Suite
Bruch - Violin Concerto, No. 1 w/ Midori

One highlight was the Bach - the 'guest' was the 17 y/o 'concertmaster' of the Winston-Salem Youth Symphony - a gal who did quite well playing along w/ Midori front stage!  I'm sure that it was a thrill - tonight Midori is appearing w/ the Youth Symphony - she is spending 5 days or so here doing all sorts of these activities - I was not aware that she is so involved in these types of endeavors (admire her for these tremendous efforts).

Midori & the W-S Symphony did the Bruch quite well - my 'home' version is w/ Accardo & Kurt Masur (a wonderful Philips Duo w/ three Bruch Violin Concs., Serenade, & Scottish Fantasy) - interesting contrast, and liked both approaches.   :D

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 24, 2007, 07:16:53 AM
This Saturday night:

New York Philharmonic
Lorin Maazel, conductor
Julian Rachlin, violin

Rimsky-Korsakov: Russian Easter Festival Overture
Saint-Saëns: Violin Concerto No. 3     
Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra

The Bartók is still an alltime favorite, and my hunch is that it may play to Maazel's strengths.  I don't recall ever hearing the Saint-Saëns, so that will be interesting. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on May 24, 2007, 09:54:22 AM
This Saturday night:

New York Philharmonic
Lorin Maazel, conductor
Julian Rachlin, violin

Rimsky-Korsakov: Russian Easter Festival Overture
Saint-Saëns: Violin Concerto No. 3     
Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra

The Bartók is still an alltime favorite, and my hunch is that it may play to Maazel's strengths.  I don't recall ever hearing the Saint-Saëns, so that will be interesting. 

--Bruce


If the violin concerto is anything like his piano concerti, it should be quite enjoyable.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on May 24, 2007, 11:44:20 AM
Saint-Saens' Third Violin Concerto is terrific. You'll love it, Bruce. :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on May 25, 2007, 07:57:05 PM
My favourite piece among those is the Rimsky Russian Easter Overture  :D. Somehow, I doubt the brass will do it justice though. It requires fullness of tone bordering on the brazen and raucous. In my experience (Masur era broadcasts) the NYPO brass section doesn't fit that description.

Bruce, I'm almost sure you'll recognize the tunes of the Saint-Saens concerto (esp. the final movement). It sizzles!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on June 02, 2007, 05:48:15 PM
Modern cello on Sunday night:
Artists: Rohan de Saram and David Hetherington

Programme:
Luciano Berio (Italy, 1925-2003) Sequenza XIV (2002)
Santiago Lanchares (Spain, 1952) – Espera, Luz, Espera*** (2006) for solo cello
James Dillon (Scotland, 1950) – Eos (1999) for solo cello
Iannis Xenakis (Greece/France 1922-2001) – Kottos (1977) for solo cello
Alexander Shchetynsky (Ukraine, 1960) Pas de Deux (1996) for 2 cellos
Sven Lyder Kahrs (Norway, 1959) – Mais tes désir ont la couleur du vent*** (2004)
Guido Baggiani (Italy, 1932) – Duo Concertante*** (1991) for 2 cellos
Brian Current (Canada, 1972) – *New work** (2007) for 2 cellos

Should be fun: I don't know any of the pieces other than the Xenakis, which I love (and have heard live within the last calendar year!). I know roughly what to expect with the Berio and Dillon pieces: anyone have opinions regarding the other people on the program list.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 04, 2007, 04:51:07 AM
The Staatskapelle Dresden will be in Mannheim next week, Dutoit conducting, Lisa Batiashvili violin:

Ravel Ma Mčre L'oye

Prokofiev Violin Concerto #2 G minor

Rimsky-Korsakov Scheherazade

We had dinner with my parents-in-law last night and they gave us their subscription tickets: front row balcony  :)

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on June 04, 2007, 04:59:24 AM
This coming Saturday my wife and I will be attending Beethoven's Choral Fantasy & Symphony No. 9 as performed by the Colorado Symphony and:

Jeffrey Kahane, music director and piano | Duain Wolfe, conductor | Pamela Coburn, soprano | Susan Platts, mezzo-soprano | Richard Clement, tenor | Nathan Berg, Bass | CSO Chorus

I have never seen either live, so looking forward to it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 04, 2007, 05:55:40 AM
Modern cello on Sunday night:
Artists: Rohan de Saram and David Hetherington

Programme:
Luciano Berio (Italy, 1925-2003) Sequenza XIV (2002)
Santiago Lanchares (Spain, 1952) – Espera, Luz, Espera*** (2006) for solo cello
James Dillon (Scotland, 1950) – Eos (1999) for solo cello
Iannis Xenakis (Greece/France 1922-2001) – Kottos (1977) for solo cello
Alexander Shchetynsky (Ukraine, 1960) Pas de Deux (1996) for 2 cellos
Sven Lyder Kahrs (Norway, 1959) – Mais tes désir ont la couleur du vent*** (2004)
Guido Baggiani (Italy, 1932) – Duo Concertante*** (1991) for 2 cellos
Brian Current (Canada, 1972) – *New work** (2007) for 2 cellos

Should be fun: I don't know any of the pieces other than the Xenakis, which I love (and have heard live within the last calendar year!). I know roughly what to expect with the Berio and Dillon pieces: anyone have opinions regarding the other people on the program list.

Wow, great program -- I don't know any of these composers, other than the same three you do.  Please report back.  And I don't know Hetherington, but have admired Rohan de Saram for years. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 04, 2007, 06:26:02 AM
The Staatskapelle Dresden will be in Mannheim next week, Dutoit conducting, Lisa Batiashvili violin:

Ravel Ma Mčre L'oye

Prokofiev Violin Concerto #2 G minor

Rimsky-Korsakov Scheherazade

We had dinner with my parents-in-law last night and they gave us their subscription tickets: front row balcony  :)

Sarge

Oooh! Dutoit does a stunning Sheherazade. He just conducted that here in Chicago a few months ago and it was easily the best I have heard live.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 04, 2007, 06:31:10 AM
Oooh! Dutoit does a stunning Sheherazade. He just conducted that here in Chicago a few months ago and it was easily the best I have heard live.

Yes, I was thinking this is a program right up Dutoit's alley.  I have heard Lisa Batiashvili several times in the last year or so, and she's marvelous.  I would love to hear her do that Prokofiev.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 04, 2007, 06:38:22 AM
Mahler 6, Orchestre metropolitain du Grand Montreal, Yannick Nezet-Seguin. Next Monday, June 11.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 04, 2007, 06:42:37 AM
Oooh! Dutoit does a stunning Sheherazade. He just conducted that here in Chicago a few months ago and it was easily the best I have heard live.

Yes, I was thinking this is a program right up Dutoit's alley.  I have heard Lisa Batiashvili several times in the last year or so, and she's marvelous.  I would love to hear her do that Prokofiev.

--Bruce

That's good to know, O. I knew the Ravel would be outstanding. I'm really looking forward to hearing this concert.

We heard Batiashvili a couple of months ago. The Sibelius. It was stunning; I mean that literally. I wasn't expecting such great playing. She made me hear Sibelius new.

O, you mentioned your father saying how impressed he was with her, too, but that her family life came first. Mrs. Rock is wondering if we'll see her daughter again. In Ludwighafen, they came out together for a bow  :)

(http://photos.imageevent.com/sgtrock/berlin/Bat.jpg)

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on June 04, 2007, 09:55:31 AM
Mahler 6, Orchestre metropolitain du Grand Montreal, Yannick Nezet-Seguin. Next Monday, June 11.

I'm so envious ...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 05, 2007, 06:02:43 AM
I'll let you know if your envy is justified!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on June 06, 2007, 05:22:59 AM
I've been waiting all year for this (http://www.clevelandorchestra.com/html/performance/viewByMonth.asp?m=6&y=2007#6/7/2007).

Anyone else in Ohio gonna be there?
Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on June 06, 2007, 06:53:02 AM
I'll let you know if your envy is justified!

Please do! The 6th along with Das Lied are my favourite Mahler works. I've seen a disappointing performance of Das Lied, but haven't had a chance to see the 6th live.

I have to confess to a somewhat childish fascination for the hammer blows. I would love to experience that visually. Can you keep an eye out for that for me? :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 07, 2007, 05:04:30 PM
I will. They are great fun to watch - actually the best part of an otherwise forgettable performance from 2 years ago. The hammerblower holds that big mallet up in the air for a few seconds before slamming it down full tilt. The whole thing is visually more impressive than the actual sound produced. I suspect recorded performances are miked to make it sound bigger.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on June 09, 2007, 09:45:31 PM
This coming Saturday my wife and I will be attending Beethoven's Choral Fantasy & Symphony No. 9 as performed by the Colorado Symphony and:

Jeffrey Kahane, music director and piano | Duain Wolfe, conductor | Pamela Coburn, soprano | Susan Platts, mezzo-soprano | Richard Clement, tenor | Nathan Berg, Bass | CSO Chorus

I have never seen either live, so looking forward to it.


:o :o :o

Wowzers! I'd say have a good time, but that would be like telling you to breathe. (Uneccessary)

 ;D

It was awesome George.  The Choral Fantasy has not been played live by the Colorado Symphony for 20 years and is a favorite of mine.  And the 9th....well, its the 9th!  ;D  Wife and I had a great time and took it in with another couple after a very nice two and half hour dinner. 

Next season the 5th, 6th, and 7th are on the menu....hope to catch a couple of 'em, as it is our goal to see all 9 of them live....and with two little ones, this may not be the easiest of plights.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Guido on June 10, 2007, 02:45:07 AM
LSO Gerghiev doing Mahler 6 and Tischenko cello concerto played by Tim Hugh
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 10, 2007, 02:57:45 AM
I will. They are great fun to watch - actually the best part of an otherwise forgettable performance from 2 years ago. The hammerblower holds that big mallet up in the air for a few seconds before slamming it down full tilt. The whole thing is visually more impressive than the actual sound produced.

Yes, I agree. A few of us in the old forum came to that conclusion: it works better live; it's more a theatrical and dramatic device than a purely musical one and I think it's very effective. Mahler really hammers home his point  ;D  I saw Segerstam conduct the 6th and he added the third blow. Fantastic!

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on June 10, 2007, 06:48:27 AM

...... (and your signature).  :)

Well, with just having discovered coffee at 42 (in the past couple of weeks) and Sarge posting all the viewing he has done of Twin Peaks, the signature was inevitable.  And as for being drowsy?  Not a chance.  I had a cup before, during, and after dinner.....add LvB to the mix and I was as alert as a fox hearing the horn and the hounds.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 12, 2007, 05:09:23 AM
Yesterday night  was the closing concert of Montreal's Orchestre métropolitain and they chose the Mahler 6th to end their season. Young maestro Yannick Nézet-Séguin gave a short but highly informative comment on the work. They played it without any filler and it lasted about 80 minutes. First movement exposition repeat was observed, and the andante was placed second. This was a very interesting departure from the usual movement order. Although I'm familiar with it (can be programmed that way on any recording), hearing it live brought a different slant on the work's architecture and tonal/emotional picture.  Now that I've heard it, I must say I prefer  the standard order (Scherzo-Andante).

Overall I'd say it was a truly magnificent presentation. Some sections of the orchestra (brass esp.) clearly outclass the more famous MSO band. Both conductor and orchestra play as men and women possessed, in total contrast with the boring and lackluster Nagano-MSO concerts. The orchestra's tonal palette is much more european than the clearer, more refined MSO. They play with plenty of warmth and colour, and a compactness of ensemble sound that  makes it sound a lot like the BSO. Nézet-Séguin has interesting ideas about the work. He presents a supercharged yet clear-headed view of the "Tragic", with no eccentricities.  Cellos and esp. double basses dig into their lines with a ferocity that brought a startling clarity and depth to the tonal foundation of the work. Yes, the hammerblows were powerfully done, but more importantly, the whole orchestra erupted with startling power at the crucial moments (end of I, climax of the Andante, and the whole second part of the Finale). I've heard the 6th about a hundred times on records and yet Mahler's punches to the solar plexus still came out of nowhere with tremendous power.

Some scrambling and confusion in the fugal portions of the last movement was noticeable, but better that shortlived blot than a whole evening of soulless professionalism. Clearly the OMGM is edging out the MSO in excitment and visceral commitment, and they're not far behind in corporate excellence. Nézet-Séguin is a real dynamo on the podium. Barely 30 years old, his charming and unassuming demeanor (he's barely 5'3") conceal a bundle of energy and a startling sense of hitting a work's 'hot buttons' with unerring precision and flair. If he's guest conducting in your area, don't miss him!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on June 12, 2007, 05:11:24 AM
From what I've heard of Yannick Nézet-Séguin (not enough, that's for sure) I think he's going to be a remarkable conductor. I'm envious. ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 12, 2007, 11:28:22 AM
Nézet-Séguin is a real dynamo on the podium. Barely 30 years old, his charming and unassuming demeanor (he's barely 5'3") conceal a bundle of energy and a startling sense of hitting a work's 'hot buttons' with unerring precision and flair. If he's guest conducting in your area, don't miss him!

Many thanks for this good write-up of a conductor completely off my radar, not to mention this excellent-sounding Montreal orchestra.  (I didn't realize that the city had a second one.)  He definitely sounds like someone to watch, especially if he's already tackling the Mahler Sixth.

This Saturday, I'm hearing Riccardo Muti again with the New York Philharmonic.  If the program isn't quite as interesting as last week's (Cherubini Overture in G major, Beethoven "Emperor" with Lang Lang, and Hindemith Sancta Susanna in concert) I'm still looking forward to it.

Rossini: Semiramide Overture     
Schubert: Symphony No. 3     
Dvorák: Symphony No. 5

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 12, 2007, 11:31:22 AM
You might see him in New York. NYPO General Manager Zarin Mehta was in the audience at the concert
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 12, 2007, 11:32:09 AM
You might see him in New York. NYPO General Manager Zarin Mehta was in the audience at the concert.

Thank you, "Eagle Eyes!"  ;D  That does bode well...

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 12, 2007, 11:35:18 AM
It's not me, but the local La Presse critic who spotted him :D. He's the brother of conductor Zubin and formerly GM of the MSO. He's kept solid ties with our cultural scene. Someone must have tipped him of a promising concert 250 miles up north!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 12, 2007, 12:58:18 PM
This Friday night:

NZSO

PROGRAMME
DVORÁK Cello Concerto
NIELSEN Helios Overture
NIELSEN Symphony No 4 The Inextinguishable

FEATURED ARTISTS
ARVO VOLMER Conductor
GAUTIER CAPUÇON Cello

PERFORMANCE INFO
Dvorák's Cello Concerto, written in America in the mid-1890s, has an underlying mood of elegiac yearning, speaking of deep feelings for a dying sister-in-law.  Her favourite Dvorák song is movingly quoted in both the adagio and the finale's revised coda.  Nielsen, the major Danish twentieth-century symphonist, is doubly represented by his Helios Overture and the Fourth Symphony.  The Inextinguishable, composed in 1915, a continuous span of four movements, affirms the craving for life against a background of menacing violence.
 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
GAUTIER CAPUÇON

Gautier Capuçon was born in Chambery, France in 1981 and began playing the cello at the age of five. He studied at the Conservatoire National Superieur de Musique in Paris and in 1999 was awarded first prize by the Maurice Ravel Music Academy of Saint-Jean-de Luz, and First Prize in the Andre Navarra Competition in Toulouse.

ARVO VOLMER
Arvo Volmer is from Estonia.  In 2003 he was appointed Music Director of the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra and Music Director and Chief Conductor of the Estonian National Opera in Tallinn.  He was the prize winner at the international Nikolai Malko competition in Copenhagen.

I promise a review :)

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on June 12, 2007, 01:13:25 PM
This one:

BBC Prom 7 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/2007/whatson/1807.shtml)

Ticket arrived this morning. Choir stalls - so, overlooking the orchestra.

Can't wait. :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 12, 2007, 02:52:00 PM
This one:

BBC Prom 7 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/2007/whatson/1807.shtml)

Ticket arrived this morning. Choir stalls - so, overlooking the orchestra.

Can't wait. :)

I thought about that one, but decided not (can't go to everything ::).)  I hope you'll post a review.  I'll be listening to (and recording) the broadcast.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 12, 2007, 02:57:14 PM
Meanwhile I have just booked for the Kronos Quartet at end July, performing:

Henryk Gorecki String Quartet No 3 Piesni Spiewaja (..songs are sung)

Terry Riley The Cusp of Magic

Both UK premieres.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 12, 2007, 02:59:06 PM
I thought about that one, but decided not (can't go to everything ::).)  I hope you'll post a review.  I'll be listening to (and recording) the broadcast.

True, but its fun trying ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on June 12, 2007, 03:05:35 PM
I thought about that one, but decided not (can't go to everything ::).)  I hope you'll post a review.  I'll be listening to (and recording) the broadcast.

I'll certainly try to write up my thoughts. :)

Is it being broadcast on radio or TV?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 12, 2007, 03:10:28 PM
I'll certainly try to write up my thoughts. :)

Is it being broadcast on radio or TV?

Radio 3.  Last year the broadcast quality was, to say the least, "variable" (apparently, they'd just got new digital signal processing equipment, and - according to the press release at the time - "hadn't quite worked out how to use it yet."  That's for damn sure.)  I'm hoping they'll have ironed out the bugs by this time.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 12, 2007, 04:01:15 PM
This Saturday, I'm hearing Riccardo Muti again with the New York Philharmonic.  If the program isn't quite as interesting as last week's...I'm still looking forward to it.

Rossini: Semiramide Overture     
Schubert: Symphony No. 3     
Dvorák: Symphony No. 5

--Bruce

i don't know Bruce. Looks damn interesting to me. I mean, how often is that Schubert and that Dvorak symphony programmed? Fifty years ago, a hundred, Rossini kicked off a lot of concerts but how often do we hear him today? He's become a rarity and thé few times I have heard him in concert, it was absolutely delightful. This is a concert I wouldn't mind seeing myself.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 12, 2007, 05:03:53 PM
Bruce, I totally agree with sarge. It sure looks like an interesting evening to me. Better this than, say yet another Schubert 8 and Dvorak 9.

Wanderer, this looks like a mighty good program. Let us know how good (presumably) Capuçon was. And how the timpani battle in the Nielsen "looks" like in concert!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 12, 2007, 05:09:07 PM
Wanderer, this looks like a mighty good program. Let us know how good (presumably) Capuçon was. And how the timpani battle in the Nielsen "looks" like in concert!

Will do. The Timpani battle will be interesting to 'see'. And the NZSO reports they have been getting numorous requests for large photos of Capuçon  ;D

(http://www.konzerthaus-dortmund.de/binary.ashx?id=149608&view=image&select=EAA)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 12, 2007, 06:00:27 PM
Yeah, he's a hottie. The Capuçon brothers should play in the Brahms Double. That would be quite interesting. I wonder if any concert agency has thought of that?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 12, 2007, 06:18:26 PM
Yeah, he's a hottie. The Capuçon brothers should play in the Brahms Double. That would be quite interesting. I wonder if any concert agency has thought of that?

Heres the story http://www.nzherald.co.nz/topic/story.cfm?c_id=264&objectid=10445266
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 14, 2007, 02:49:49 PM
Oooh! Dutoit does a stunning Sheherazade. He just conducted that here in Chicago a few months ago and it was easily the best I have heard live.

You were right, O. It was absolutely stunning. Dutoit surprised me, though. I thought we'd get a fast, supercharged Sheherazade but the first movement reminded me...don't laugh...of Celibidache's version. It was immense, and slow, which is how I picture the sea and is the way I like this music to go (favorite versions are Rostropovich and Celi). The Dresden brass lived up to their reputation. Among the wind soloists, the gentleman wearing the 60s do, playing the clarinet, was especially memorable. Only one complaint:  even though the build-up to it was thrilling, the actual shipwreck in the Finale was underwhelming.

Lisa Batiashvili called in sick and we heard instead Boris Belkin in the Prokofiev G minor. I've never heard him live and I own few recordings, but his Tchaikovsky with Ashkenazy has long been my favorite so it was interesting to finally see him. He played the concerto flawlessly. It must be part of him now.

Dutoit's Mother Goose was excellent of course and the delicacy of the Dresden band was quite breathtaking.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 14, 2007, 03:01:07 PM
You were right, O. It was absolutely stunning. Dutoit surprised me, though. I thought we'd get a fast, supercharged Sheherazade but the first movement reminded me...don't laugh...of Celibidache's version. It was immense, and slow, which is how I picture the sea and is the way I like this music to go (favorite versions are Rostropovich and Celi). The Dresden brass lived up to their reputation. Among the wind soloists, the gentleman wearing the 60s do, playing the clarinet, was especially memorable. Only one complaint:  even though the build-up to it was thrilling, the actual shipwreck in the Finale was underwhelming.

Lisa Batiashvili called in sick and we heard instead Boris Belkin in the Prokofiev G minor. I've never heard him live and I own few recordings, but his Tchaikovsky with Ashkenazy has long been my favorite so it was interesting to finally see him. He played the concerto flawlessly. It must be part of him now.

Dutoit's Mother Goose was excellent of course and the delicacy of the Dresden band was quite breathtaking.

Sarge, thanks for the report. Good to hear Dutoit lived up to expectations.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 14, 2007, 04:11:46 PM
Putting together a wedding-anniversary trip to Vienna in November, found a 5-day period when there's:

Day #1:  Musikverein - Cleveland Orchestra in Bruckner #9 (Welser-Möst)
Day #2:  Musikverein - Cleveland Orchestra in Mahler #2 (Welser-Möst)
Day #3:  Staatsoper - Tosca (Carignani)
Day #4:  Musikverein - BRSO in Bruckner #7 (Jansons)
Day #5:  Staatsoper - Queen Of Spades (Ozawa)

Just as well the wife likes music, really ... or I'd have had to go on my own. ;D

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 14, 2007, 04:31:44 PM
Day #1:  Musikverein - Cleveland Orchestra in Bruckner #9 (Welser-Möst)
Day #2:  Musikverein - Cleveland Orchestra in Mahler #2 (Welser-Möst)
Day #3:  Staatsoper - Tosca (Carignani)
Day #4:  Musikverein - BRSO in Bruckner #7 (Jansons)
Day #5:  Staatsoper - Queen Of Spades (Ozawa)

Wow! That sounds great. BTW, Carignani, in case you don't know him, is GMD at the Frankfurt Opera. Should be very good. I have heard him there a couple of times when I was still living in Frankfurt.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 14, 2007, 04:40:45 PM
Putting together a wedding-anniversary trip to Vienna in November, found a 5-day period when there's:

Day #1:  Musikverein - Cleveland Orchestra in Bruckner #9 (Welser-Möst)
Day #2:  Musikverein - Cleveland Orchestra in Mahler #2 (Welser-Möst)

Day #3:  Staatsoper - Tosca (Carignani)
Day #4:  Musikverein - BRSO in Bruckner #7 (Jansons)
Day #5:  Staatsoper - Queen Of Spades (Ozawa)

I now know where I'm going to be in November.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 14, 2007, 04:45:59 PM
Wow! That sounds great. BTW, Carignani, in case you don't know him, is GMD at the Frankfurt Opera. Should be very good. I have heard him there a couple of times when I was still living in Frankfurt.

No, I don't know him at all.  That's good to hear.  Thanks.

The only thing I'm not totally happy about is Welser-Möst, whom I've seen/heard several times now, and TBH haven't been all that impressed - but the chance to hear the Clevelanders in those two is too good to miss (and he has to be good at something, right?)

There's also Gardiner with the Orchestre Révolutionaire and the Monteverdi Choir doing Ein deutsches Requiem at the Konzerthaus a couple of days later ... and Norrington conducting the Camerata Salzburg (excellent band) with Jonathan Biss in a series of Wagner / Beethoven / Brahms programmes ... just spoiled for choice.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 14, 2007, 04:47:11 PM
I now know where I'm going to be in November.

Sarge

Excellent.  I know some good places to eat.

(I envy you your Staatskapelle Dresden concert.  Never heard them live yet.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 14, 2007, 04:57:46 PM
Actually the concert which excites me the most is the BRSO / Jansons Bruckner #7.  If this were anyone else then I wouldn't bother - I really don't need yet another B7 - but I saw Jansons conduct the Concertgebouw in B3 this February - and for a piece that I thought I knew well, it was astounding.  Not just the best Bruckner #3 I've heard - or even the best Bruckner I've heard - but damn near the best anything I've heard.  I admire Jansons enormously.  Can't wait to hear what he does with #7  - and with the BRSO! - in the Musikverein!  We are in sell-a-kidney territory here.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on June 14, 2007, 05:00:54 PM
Actually the concert which excites me the most is the BRSO / Jansons Bruckner #7.  If this were anyone else then I wouldn't bother - I really don't need yet another B7 - but I saw Jansons conduct the Concertgebouw in B3 this February - and for a piece that I thought I knew well, it was astounding.  Not just the best Bruckner #3 I've heard - or even the best Bruckner I've heard - but damn near the best anything I've heard.  I admire Jansons enormously.  Can't wait to hear what he does with #7  - and with the BRSO! - in the Musikverein!  We are in sell-a-kidney territory here.

Then here's something for an appetiser:

Anton Bruckner: Symphonie Nr. 4 Es-dur
Aufnahme am 2. April 2004 beim Luzerner Osterfestival im Kultur- und
Kongresszentrum
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks
Mariss Jansons
Digital Satellite broadcast
http://rapidshare.com/files/34614490/Jansons_Bru4.zip.001  (http://rapidshare.com/files/34614490/Jansons_Bru4.zip.001)
http://rapidshare.com/files/34620769/Jansons_Bru4.zip.002. (http://rapidshare.com/files/34620769/Jansons_Bru4.zip.002.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 14, 2007, 05:04:53 PM
Thank you for that.  I'm onto it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 14, 2007, 05:06:05 PM
Then here's something for an appetiser:

Anton Bruckner: Symphonie Nr. 4 Es-dur
Aufnahme am 2. April 2004 beim Luzerner Osterfestival im Kultur- und
Kongresszentrum
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks
Mariss Jansons
Digital Satellite broadcast
http://rapidshare.com/files/34614490/Jansons_Bru4.zip.001  (http://rapidshare.com/files/34614490/Jansons_Bru4.zip.001)
http://rapidshare.com/files/34620769/Jansons_Bru4.zip.002. (http://rapidshare.com/files/34620769/Jansons_Bru4.zip.002.)

Thank you! Hvala! Danke!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on June 14, 2007, 05:09:06 PM
CSO, Beethoven's 9th (June 23rd)

Herbert Blomstedt, conductor
Annalena Persson, soprano
Ingeborg Danz, mezzo-soprano
Robert Künzl, tenor
Matthias Goerne, bass
Chicago Symphony Chorus
Duain Wolfe, chorus director
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 15, 2007, 01:07:38 PM
We are in sell-a-kidney territory here.

I'll be using that quote... ;D

Seriously, that line-up of concerts sounds amazing.  (I guess we don't have a "jealous" icon.)  I am becoming a big fan of Welser-Möst, based on the orchestra's appearances at Carnegie the last few years.  And I heard Jansons in three concerts with the BRSO last fall in three concerts, all excellent.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 15, 2007, 01:08:58 PM
Okay, had this concert last night:

NZSO
DVORÁK Cello Concerto
NIELSEN Helios Overture
NIELSEN Symphony No 4 The Inextinguishable

FEATURED ARTISTS
ARVO VOLMER Conductor
GAUTIER CAPUÇON Cello

It was a less than full town hall; maybe the Nielsen scared them off ???

They opened with the Helios Overture which I was unfamiliar with but this didn't hinder my enjoyment of this wonderful piece. The opening deep cellos and basses with the horn calls reminded me of Wagner. The build in the middle with the whole orchestra was spine tingleling stuff and the contrapuntal section with the strings was fascinating.

Next up was the featured soloist with Dvoraks beautiful cello concerto. Capucon looks very young [25] and I wondered if he had the [life] experience to bring the piece to life. Turned out he was an exceptional player and interpreter bringing lots of nuance and power to what at times is a difficult work to play. The ending was suitably uplifting and inspiring. He did a brief encore of a humorous piece featuring lots of pizzicatto and 'hammer-on' technique. It was quite slight really. Note: Hes grown his hair quite long and had to keep sweeping it out of his eyes during the performance. When he was given his bouquet at the end he made a big effort to struggle through the orchestra to present the flowers to the pretty, young flautist ;)

After interval we were treated to the NZSO's first ever performance of Neilsen's epic Symphony #4. I found I enjoyed 'seeing' this work more than just 'hearing' it. I could appreciate the grinding dissonances of the opposing keys and the call and response of the flute and horn and of course the titantic timpani 'duel' in the final section. The duel was very exciting with both players thwacking the heck out of their instruments and creating a massive feeling of power or 'life-force'.

Overall another thrilling live performance from the NZSO. Bravo!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 15, 2007, 01:13:15 PM
The only thing I'm not totally happy about is Welser-Möst...

I am becoming a big fan of Welser-Möst, based on the orchestra's appearances at Carnegie the last few years.

I haven't heard W-M live very often but did hear him conduct a Bruckner Seventh (with the LPO). Although he played it faster than I normally like, he won me over by the end--and the coda was thrilling...probably better than I've ever heard it before. On that basis, I'm having no second thoughts about that Bruckner Ninth.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on June 15, 2007, 01:13:55 PM
Okay, had this concert last night:

NZSO
DVORÁK Cello Concerto
NIELSEN Helios Overture
NIELSEN Symphony No 4 The Inextinguishable

FEATURED ARTISTS
ARVO VOLMER Conductor
GAUTIER CAPUÇON Cello

It was a less than full town hall; maybe the Nielsen scared them off ???

They opened with the Helios Overture which I was unfamiliar with but this didn't hinder my enjoyment of this wonderful piece. The opening deep cellos and basses with the horn calls reminded me of Wagner. The build in the middle with the whole orchestra was spine tingleling stuff and the contrapuntal section with the strings was fascinating.

Next up was the featured soloist with Dvoraks beautiful cello concerto. Capucon looks very young [25] and I wondered if he had the [life] experience to bring the piece to life. Turned out he was an exceptional player and interpreter bringing lots of nuance and power to what at times is a difficult work to play. The ending was suitably uplifting and inspiring. He did a brief encore of a humorous piece featuring lots of pizzicatto and 'hammer-on' technique. It was quite slight really. Note: Hes grown his hair quite long and had to keep sweeping it out of his eyes during the performance. When he was given his bouquet at the end he made a big effort to struggle through the orchestra to present the flowers to the pretty, young flautist ;)

After interval we were treated to the NZSO's first ever performance of Neilsen's epic Symphony #4. I found I enjoyed 'seeing' this work more than just 'hearing' it. I could appreciate the grinding dissonances of the opposing keys and the call and response of the flute and horn and of course the titantic timpani 'duel' in the final section. The duel was very exciting with both players thwacking the heck out of their instruments and creating a massive feeling of power or 'life-force'.

Overall another thrilling live performance from the NZSO. Bravo!


So you're expectations were met? Preparing for this concert by listening to Rostropovich certainly must have created some truly high expectations, indeed.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 15, 2007, 01:19:42 PM
So you're expectations were met? Preparing for this concert by listening to Rostropovich certainly must have created some truly high expectations, indeed.

Well, the Dvorak wasn't quite as engaging as it could have been but it was still excellent :) The Neilsen was the highlight for me :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 15, 2007, 01:23:26 PM
Okay, had this concert last night:

NZSO
DVORÁK Cello Concerto
NIELSEN Helios Overture
NIELSEN Symphony No 4 The Inextinguishable

FEATURED ARTISTS
ARVO VOLMER Conductor
GAUTIER CAPUÇON Cello

It was a less than full town hall; maybe the Nielsen scared them off ???


I hope people were energized by the Nielsen and want to hear more!  He seems very underplayed in the United States: I've heard the Helios once, I think, and the symphony maybe once, too.  (And that symphony is the most popular of the six.)

Thanks for that great report.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on June 15, 2007, 09:10:10 PM
I haven't heard W-M live very often but did hear him conduct a Bruckner Seventh (with the LPO). Although he played it faster than I normally like, he won me over by the end--and the coda was thrilling...probably better than I've ever heard it before. On that basis, I'm having no second thoughts about that Bruckner Ninth.

Sarge

He always seems to take swifter tempos than most.  I've enjoyed lots of his stuff this year but he just butchered Rosenkavalier.  I'll be trying to hear the Bruckner and Mahler here in Cleveland though. 

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 16, 2007, 02:41:37 AM
I've enjoyed lots of his stuff this year but he just butchered Rosenkavalier.

That's interesting.  One of the other options was W-M conducting Arabella at the Staatsoper.

The impression he gives me is of trying to create an exciting performance by stirring up activity, but how far that reaches below the surface, I'm not so sure.  I'm much less keen on his LPO Bruckner #5 than I was - in fact, my enthusiasm for it has declined in inverse proportion to my increasing fondness for this piece - and I thought his recording of #8 with the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra was, frankly, a pretty crude effort.

But the Clevelanders are a superb ensemble - and certainly know how to play Bruckner - so maybe (I'm hoping) the combination will be more positive.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on June 16, 2007, 08:04:03 AM
That's interesting.  One of the other options was W-M conducting Arabella at the Staatsoper.

The impression he gives me is of trying to create an exciting performance by stirring up activity, but how far that reaches below the surface, I'm not so sure.  I'm much less keen on his LPO Bruckner #5 than I was - in fact, my enthusiasm for it has declined in inverse proportion to my increasing fondness for this piece - and I thought his recording of #8 with the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra was, frankly, a pretty crude effort.

But the Clevelanders are a superb ensemble - and certainly know how to play Bruckner - so maybe (I'm hoping) the combination will be more positive.

Yes I think you are correct in your analysis of his conducting.  For me he gets into trouble when he doesn't allow the music to breath.  By constantly pushing to get to the next moment he misses the chance to let the line unfold and have a life.  That's why I've always thought he's done better when singers are on the stage but this recent Rosenkavalier has proved me wrong.  When things don't work in his interpretations I find him to be unlistenable,  but when things work well he creates some marvelous stuff.


Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 16, 2007, 12:15:21 PM
He always seems to take swifter tempos than most.  I've enjoyed lots of his stuff this year but he just butchered Rosenkavalier.

And he's to be the music director in Vienna?...oh my  ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 16, 2007, 12:35:17 PM
But the Clevelanders are a superb ensemble - and certainly know how to play Bruckner - so maybe (I'm hoping) the combination will be more positive.

His Bruckner Fifth last fall with Cleveland (at Carnegie) was one of the best Bruckner performances I've ever heard.  Might just be his empathy with the piece, but I suspect there's more than that.  The LPO one that he recorded was (I hear) done when he really wasn't in synch with the group, but I think he and Cleveland are more on the same wavelength.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Papageno on June 16, 2007, 01:11:52 PM
Don Giovanni
Die Zauberflote
Enfuhrung aus dem Serail
Requiem - Mozart
Carmen
Tosca
Orfeo ed Euridice - Gluck
and some Schubert, Haydn and Mahler
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: sidoze on June 16, 2007, 01:16:13 PM
Then here's something for an appetiser:

Anton Bruckner: Symphonie Nr. 4 Es-dur
Aufnahme am 2. April 2004 beim Luzerner Osterfestival im Kultur- und
Kongresszentrum
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks
Mariss Jansons
Digital Satellite broadcast
http://rapidshare.com/files/34614490/Jansons_Bru4.zip.001  (http://rapidshare.com/files/34614490/Jansons_Bru4.zip.001)
http://rapidshare.com/files/34620769/Jansons_Bru4.zip.002. (http://rapidshare.com/files/34620769/Jansons_Bru4.zip.002.)

OT: do you get these links from the Yahoo operashare group?

As for me, I'm not looking forward to any concerts. I looked through the Lucerne summer programme and the Bad Kissingen festival. Not for me this year. I'm going to hang out in Shoreditch instead. Now that's a class name.  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on June 16, 2007, 04:45:55 PM
OT: do you get these links from the Yahoo operashare group?

They probably come from there but I just picked that up reposted at rmcr
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on June 18, 2007, 08:34:19 PM
Yesterday night  was the closing concert of Montreal's Orchestre métropolitain and they chose the Mahler 6th to end their season. Young maestro Yannick Nézet-Séguin gave a short but highly informative comment on the work. They played it without any filler and it lasted about 80 minutes. First movement exposition repeat was observed, and the andante was placed second. This was a very interesting departure from the usual movement order. Although I'm familiar with it (can be programmed that way on any recording), hearing it live brought a different slant on the work's architecture and tonal/emotional picture.  Now that I've heard it, I must say I prefer  the standard order (Scherzo-Andante).

Overall I'd say it was a truly magnificent presentation. Some sections of the orchestra (brass esp.) clearly outclass the more famous MSO band. Both conductor and orchestra play as men and women possessed, in total contrast with the boring and lackluster Nagano-MSO concerts. The orchestra's tonal palette is much more european than the clearer, more refined MSO. They play with plenty of warmth and colour, and a compactness of ensemble sound that  makes it sound a lot like the BSO. Nézet-Séguin has interesting ideas about the work. He presents a supercharged yet clear-headed view of the "Tragic", with no eccentricities.  Cellos and esp. double basses dig into their lines with a ferocity that brought a startling clarity and depth to the tonal foundation of the work. Yes, the hammerblows were powerfully done, but more importantly, the whole orchestra erupted with startling power at the crucial moments (end of I, climax of the Andante, and the whole second part of the Finale). I've heard the 6th about a hundred times on records and yet Mahler's punches to the solar plexus still came out of nowhere with tremendous power.

Some scrambling and confusion in the fugal portions of the last movement was noticeable, but better that shortlived blot than a whole evening of soulless professionalism. Clearly the OMGM is edging out the MSO in excitment and visceral commitment, and they're not far behind in corporate excellence. Nézet-Séguin is a real dynamo on the podium. Barely 30 years old, his charming and unassuming demeanor (he's barely 5'3") conceal a bundle of energy and a startling sense of hitting a work's 'hot buttons' with unerring precision and flair. If he's guest conducting in your area, don't miss him!

Thanks for the review - sounds like it was phenomenal. Nézet-Séguin guest conducted here a few months earlier, but unfortunately, I couldn't make it that night. He got great reviews though, and yours is a pretty high endorsement, so I'm keen to see him when he comes again the next season.

Incidentally, I'm a scherzo-andante person too. I find the scherzo follows on quite naturally from the 1st movement and the andante softens you up for the 'pow' of the finale :).

Everyone seems to be going to great concerts. Is Edinburgh the only town on a summer hiatus ???? There doesn't seem to be anything on until the Festival in August :-\.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 19, 2007, 04:45:03 AM
Reading next season's schedule at the Gewandhaus, I noticed these concerts in the Grosser Saal, one on Saturday, one Sunday, first weekend in May: We're there!

Alban Berg Quartet

Haydn Op.77/1
Berg SQ3
Beethoven Op.132


MDR SO, conducted by Stefan Solyom

Sibelius En Saga
Sibelius VC
Shostakovich 10


Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 19, 2007, 08:57:01 AM
This coming Saturday, Lorin Maazel and the New York Philharmonic, with Deborah Voigt, in a program that looks like it could be a winner.  "Befreit" is one of my favorite Strauss songs.

R. Strauss: “Befreit,” “Lied der Frauen,” “Morgen!,” “Frühlingsfeier”
Mahler: Symphony No. 7

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 19, 2007, 09:08:20 AM
This coming Saturday, Lorin Maazel and the New York Philharmonic, with Deborah Voigt, in a program that looks like it could be a winner.  "Befreit" is one of my favorite Strauss songs.

R. Strauss: “Befreit,” “Lied der Frauen,” “Morgen!,” “Frühlingsfeier”
Mahler: Symphony No. 7

--Bruce

Maazel used to play the Mahler 7 almost like Klemperer...at least the outer movements. I wonder if he still does. Take a stop watch, Bruce, and let me know, will ya?  ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on June 19, 2007, 09:14:50 AM
Reading next season's schedule at the Gewandhaus, I noticed these concerts in the Grosser Saal, one on Saturday, one Sunday, first weekend in May: We're there!

Alban Berg Quartet

Haydn Op.77/1
Berg SQ3
Beethoven Op.132


MDR SO, conducted by Stefan Solyom

Sibelius En Saga
Sibelius VC
Shostakovich 10

Interesting.  I've been trying to put together a Leipzig/Dresden week of events for a long time now - and thought I had one in May this year ... until the Gewandhaus changed the programme late in the day from Bruckner #6 to Schmidt #2 (MDRSO again - fine band.)  Must have another look for next year.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on June 19, 2007, 09:16:23 AM
Maazel used to play the Mahler 7 almost like Klemperer...at least the outer movements. I wonder if he still does. Take a stop watch, Bruce, and let me know, will ya?  ;D

One BSO concert, I was following along in a score while they played the Schoenberg Chamber Symphony No. 1, something music students have been doing, oh, about since the days of Berlioz — following live music with score in hand, I mean, not listening to Schoenberg  0:)

At the interval, an usher told me I couldn't do that, somebody or other found it "distracting."  I forebore to offer any retort, since I was not going to follow a score through the Beethoven Opus 125 anyway.

I can inly imagine what the usher would have had to say, if I had brandished a stopwatch in Symphony Hall!  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 19, 2007, 09:22:08 AM
Maazel used to play the Mahler 7 almost like Klemperer...at least the outer movements. I wonder if he still does. Take a stop watch, Bruce, and let me know, will ya?  ;D

Sarge

 ;D  I'll see if I can come up with some timings.  (PS, I don't think I've heard Klemperer's Seventh...worth it?  I love the piece...fave recordings are Abbado's, both of them, and Chailly.)

I have (perhaps surprisingly) really, really enjoyed Maazel's Mahler over the last few years.  His First was incredible, one of the best I've ever heard of that piece, and his Fifth and Sixth were quite good, too.

PS, sorry meant to comment: it's a year off, but both of those concerts in Leipzig sound great.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 19, 2007, 03:53:00 PM
I hope people were energized by the Nielsen and want to hear more!  He seems very underplayed in the United States: I've heard the Helios once, I think, and the symphony maybe once, too.  (And that symphony is the most popular of the six.)

Thanks for that great report.

--Bruce

Heres the review from the NZ Herald (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/category/story.cfm?c_id=18&objectid=10446232)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 19, 2007, 04:33:50 PM
I can inly imagine what the usher would have had to say, if I had brandished a stopwatch in Symphony Hall!  8)

Yes, the score on your lap, stopwatch in one hand, baton in the other, front row center  ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 19, 2007, 04:38:22 PM
Interesting.  I've been trying to put together a Leipzig/Dresden week of events for a long time now - and thought I had one in May this year ... until the Gewandhaus changed the programme late in the day from Bruckner #6 to Schmidt #2 (MDRSO again - fine band.)  Must have another look for next year.

Yes, we do that too. Both Berlin and Dresden are close to Leipzig, making it easy to see concerts in two or three cities over a week's holiday.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 19, 2007, 05:07:37 PM
PS, I don't think I've heard Klemperer's Seventh...worth it?

Uh...it's such an individual, even eccentric reading, I can't answer that for you. I love it--it actually is my favorite version--but really slow, glacial tempos don't bother me. I have infinite patience ;D

Klemp was very near the end when he recorded the Seventh. Ensemble is scrappy (they probably had trouble following his beat). After the slow introduction he launches the Allegro at exactly the same tempo! and maintains that slow pace until the end. It can seem interminable. One needs to set aside an entire afternoon for this movement...at least it can feel like that ;D

The first Nachtmusik, though, is just....perfect. Again, very slow, and at this speed the music becomes almost pointilistic; it reminds me of Webern. It really does appear to be staring into the future. The second Nachtmusik is really lovely; nothing weird about it and features the trademark Klemperer transparency and detail. He captures the music's atmosphere perfectly, I think. The Rondo-Finale is again very slow. Maazel, no speed demon, takes a little over 20 minutes in his Vienna recording. Klemp takes more than 24. Surely too slow but I think it's fascinating...and I love the way this speed emphasizes that sudden descent, that dark, hesitant moment that occurs just before the blazing, triumphant final notes.

Of course YMMV

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 28, 2007, 06:58:42 AM
More long range planning. BASF sent me the schedule for all concerts that will take place in the firm's Feierabendhaus during the 2007-08 season. The most exciting recital, at least the one I'm looking forward to the most, will take place in March: Grigory Sokolov returning to Ludwigshafen. Program has not yet been announced.

Chamber music includes the Elgar Violin Sonata...never heard that live before. Some of the string quartets in the lineup:

Leipzig: Mendelssohn #4 E minor
            Piazzola Four for Tango
            Schulhof Five Pieces for String Quartet
            Shostakovich 8 C minor     

Auryn:   Haydn D major op.76/6
            Widmann Fantasia for Clarinet solo
            Widmann "Jagdquartett" String Quartet #3 (2003)
            Mozart Clarinett Quintet

Gewandhaus:  two different concerts and programs in one day, combining Romantic and Contempory music for string quartet


Some may remember the abbreviations thread at the old forum. My local band is a pain to spell out (Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz) and there is no satisfactory abbreviation that people recognize. The situation has just gotten worse. They've changed their name to:

Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz

I guess the first name wasn't long enough. Mrs. Rock said they were forced to change their name to avoid confusion with the equally famous Polish Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz at Cracow.

Anyway, the DSPR-P's conductor, Ari Rasailainen, continues to program an interesting variety of musc; this year perhaps a tad more on the beaten path than usual. Concerts include:

Bartok PC 3 with Radu Lupu
Bruckner 9

Sibelius Swan of Tuonela
Strauss - Four Last Songs with Christine Oelze
Tchaikovsky - Symphony #6

Penderecki - Concerto Grosso for 3 cellos and orchestra
Shostakovich - Symphony #15
(this is going to be wildly popular with the bald and blue-hairs  ;D )

Bach/Webern - Ricercare
Berg - VC
Brahms - Symphony 4

Debussy - La Mer
Mozart - PC 27
Schumann - Symphony #3


Sarge

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on June 28, 2007, 08:04:14 AM
Penderecki - Concerto Grosso for 3 cellos and orchestra
Shostakovich - Symphony #15
(this is going to be wildly popular with the bald and blue-hairs  ;D )

They'll be able to tap along with the Rossini quotations, eh?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Tancata on June 28, 2007, 08:19:48 AM
 :D :D :D

Just had to give vent to my excitement!

One of my friends who lives in Edinburgh is putting on a show at the (Fringe) festival this year. He rings me up offering free accommodation for a week or so on the condition I go to the performance!

I check the mouth-watering program and tickets are still available for lots of stuff, so I book myself into:

Monteverdi - L'Orfeo / Jordi Savall  ;D ;D ;D - fully staged version (looks like the same production as on Savall's DVD) including some great singers: Montserrat Figueras, Furio Zanasi, Arianna Savall and Antonio Abete!!!

Mark Padmore  :o :o :o- Bach Cantatas and Arias 0:)

and

Monteverdi - Madrigals from Book 6 / Rinaldo Alessandrini  :o :o :o ;D

This all fell into place within the space of 30 minutes! Tickets were not expensive, and travel won't be too bad because I'm going to be in England just beforehand so I can probably catch a train...

For someone who spends most of his time in Dublin, which is about as provincial as it gets where Early Music and Opera are concerned...Jordi Savall, Mark Padmore and Rinaldo Alessandrini over the space of three days is pretty exciting (and I'm sure my mate's production will be excellent too!!!).

Is there anything outstanding I missed in the 11th-16th August period?  :P
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on June 28, 2007, 08:55:12 AM

Penderecki - Concerto Grosso for 3 cellos and orchestra
Shostakovich - Symphony #15
(this is going to be wildly popular with the bald and blue-hairs  ;D )

Sarge

You might as well give them a call now and find out what the replacement program is going to be Sarge.  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 28, 2007, 01:05:18 PM
They'll be able to tap along with the Rossini quotations, eh?

Yeah, and I'm thinking that since this is a German audience, they should recognize the Wagner quotes too. But I worry...at their age it'll probably just really confuse them.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 28, 2007, 01:09:43 PM
You might as well give them a call now and find out what the replacement program is going to be Sarge.  ;D

That's what I'm thinking, Bogey. When the governing body see the alarming decline in new subscriptions, and cancellations of long-standing ones, we'll probably end up getting the Schumann PC and Beethoven Fifth instead.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 28, 2007, 01:12:11 PM
That's what I'm thinking, Bogey. When the governing body see the alarming decline in new subscriptions, and cancellations of long-standing ones, we'll probably end up getting the Schumann PC and Beethoven Fifth instead.

Sarge

I'd be happy to sign some kind of petition.  ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on June 28, 2007, 01:32:13 PM
I'd be happy to sign some kind of petition.  ;D

--Bruce

Thanks, Bruce. I may have to start one. I'm not kidding. The crowd that attends the DSPR-P concerts abhors anything newer than Brahms. I'm amazed Rasilainen has programmed the Berg VC again. Three years ago fully half the audience refused to clap, not even a polite, acknowledgment that Zimmerman had performed it brilliantly. We were sitting to the side and could see backstage. The violinist did not want to come back out and Rasilainen actually pushed him out. You know when the soloist reappears, the ovation usually builds back up, a crescendo. This was a diminuendo. It actually got quieter, much quieter. Quite embarrassing.

When Sallinen's Shadows was performed, Rasilainen had a struggle of wills with part of the audience. The applause was tepid and a large part of the audience wasn't clapping. He refused to leave the stage and kept pointing at parts of the auditorium that were sitting on their hands. He stared at them, pointed at them, and made clapping motions, then waved his hand back towards the orchestra, asking the audience to at least applaud the skill of the players. The standoff went on for quite some time. He was obviously pissed.

It's a weird crowd. Shadows is not a difficult, ugly, dissonant piece of music. It's quite user friendly with an interesting orchestration, including a piano that makes some great noises. The work has some gorgeous, fullblown romantic melodies. With even a little effort, it's an easy piece to enjoy. Oh well...at least I appreciated it.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 28, 2007, 01:42:31 PM
When Sallinen's Shadows was performed, Rasilainen had a struggle of wills with part of the audience. The applause was tepid and a large part of the audience wasn't clapping. He refused to leave the stage and kept pointing at parts of the auditorium that were sitting on their hands. He stared at them, pointed at them, and made clapping motions, then waved his hand back towards the orchestra, asking the audience to at least applaud the skill of the players. The standoff went on for quite some time. He was obviously pissed.

That is an amazing story; I have never seen anything like that here in New York.  (Not that it hasn't happened, of course.)  If anything, the applause will be polite rather than frenzied, but I've never seen an instance of little or no applause. 

I have a CD of the Sallinen (on Finlandia), and although it's a sober piece, I totally agree: it's hardly "difficult" to listen to.  (I have never heard it live, nor have I even seen it programmed here.)  But the real shocker is probably the reaction to the Berg -- and with Zimmerman, no less!   

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 28, 2007, 01:56:07 PM
Makes you wonder why they even bother showing up. It's not like they wouldn't know what they're getting themselves into.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on June 28, 2007, 02:17:26 PM
Makes you wonder why they even bother showing up. It's not like they wouldn't know what they're getting themselves into.

Modernist martyrs they are!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on June 30, 2007, 08:27:48 AM
Hey, I'm going to l'Orfeo and the Padmore recital too 0:).

Should get together for a post-concert drink :).

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Maciek on June 30, 2007, 08:36:50 AM
Upon Tancata's request, I've merged one of his topics with this one. You can now find his original post here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,429.msg47263.html#msg47263) (that's 10 posts above). Novitate's post right above mine was orginally a reply right after Tancata's post. Sorry for the commotion... :-[
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 02, 2007, 03:06:35 PM
Off to see this production of  Lucia di Lammermoor (http://www.nzopera.com/productions/2007/lucia.cfm) next Thursday  :)

I'll be learning it over the next week or so with this recorded version:

(http://images-jp.amazon.com/images/P/B0000041OY.09.LZZZZZZZ.jpg)

I've also bought this to watch over the weekend:

(http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/images/records/dg0734109.jpg)

Doing my homework ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 11, 2007, 12:24:54 PM
Friday night I'm going to hear a brand-new group called Riot, a trio with saxophone, guitar and accordion.  (I know, I know...just how did they arrive at this instrumentation?)

They have a cool (if minimal) website (http://www.riotnyc.com/), and the players are among the best in New York.  Of the five composers listed, I've heard music by Richard Carrick (director of the Either/Or Festival) but none of the others. 

As usual, highly eager to hear what this group has uncovered.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on July 11, 2007, 12:28:02 PM
Friday night I'm going to hear a brand-new group called Riot, a trio with saxophone, guitar and accordion.

The Birth of Death-Metal Polka
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 11, 2007, 12:31:44 PM
The Birth of Death-Metal Polka

Could very well be!   8)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on July 11, 2007, 02:03:25 PM
Friday night I'm going to hear a brand-new group called Riot, a trio with saxophone, guitar and accordion.  (I know, I know...just how did they arrive at this instrumentation?)



That spring spent in Paris?

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 12, 2007, 09:32:38 AM
And next week, Sō Percussion and Matmos are doing two nights (http://www.lincolncenter.org/show_events_list.asp?eventcode=14842) as part of the Lincoln Center Festival.  I've heard Sō Percussion in some great concerts of Steve Reich, David Lang and others, and heard the two guys who are Matmos when they opened for Björk a few years ago.  The concerts next week are an hour long, with no intermission.  I may go to both nights, since the guest artists are different: harpist Zeena Parkins on the 20th, and Dave Douglas on trumpet on the 21st.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 12, 2007, 04:11:03 PM
Next Friday 20th July I'm off to this:

NZSO

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto
SIBELIUS En Saga
SIBELIUS Symphony No 5

FEATURED ARTISTS
PIETARI INKINEN Conductor
LEILA JOSEFOWICZ Violin

PERFORMANCE INFO
The Violin Concerto cost Mendelssohn more time than its effortless spontaneity would suggest. Sibelius's En Saga, a tone-poem without a programme, features inspired Sibelian national-Romanticism and his unerring mastery of the orchestra.  Repeated patterns (ostinati) abound, preparing us for the logic and taut organisation of the Fifth Symphony, with its sweeping power and energy.  Begun in the dark days of World War One, it was revised as the Russian Revolution was just about to embroil Finland in civil war.


Should be good :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 13, 2007, 07:01:58 AM
Josefowicz is excellent.  I heard her a few years ago in John Adams' Road Movies, an entertaining work for violin and piano.  And with the two Sibelius pieces, sounds like you have another great evening to look forward to.  (And En Saga doesn't seem to be done all that much.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on July 14, 2007, 07:27:43 AM
She is indeed - seems to be an advocate for Adams' work as I heard her play Adams' Violin Concerto in Philadelphia...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Tancata on July 14, 2007, 02:54:39 PM
In some ways, this doesn't look too hopeful. But...

It's a Handel opera! In Dublin!

Handel - Orlando

September 29th, 2007 - The Helix theatre, Dublin

Directed by Annilese Miskimmon
Conductor Christian Curnyn (who?  8))

Sung in English  >:( >:( :o >:( :-X

No details as yet about the singers... hmmm ..... And yet, I booked two tickets already...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: orbital on July 15, 2007, 05:20:12 PM
Not a concert, but I found an invitation for this play in my mailbox. For those in and around NYC, it may be interesting.
http://www.mvdaily.com/news/item.cgi?id=301230

Opus
A world-renowned string quartet struggles to prepare for its highest-profile performance ever, when the violist and founder of the quartet mysteriously disappears. When a young woman is hired as a replacement, her musical gifts inspire the musicians, and they decide at short notice to abandon their friendly Pachelbel Canon program and replace it with Beethoven's difficult Opus 131. The rehearsal room becomes a pressure cooker as passions rise, personalites clash and the musicians are forced to tackle the ephemeral nature of their life's work.

Primary Stages presents the play Opus by Michael Hollinger, 24 July until 1 September 2007 in New York, USA.

Information: primarystages.com

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on July 16, 2007, 03:57:17 AM
I missed Olivier Latry yesterday. It was so darn gorgeous a day that i decided for a bike ride instead of sitting on a wood bench for 2 hours. Oh, well: I'll read the review in today's paper.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 20, 2007, 02:49:30 PM
Next Friday 20th July I'm off to this:

NZSO

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto
SIBELIUS En Saga
SIBELIUS Symphony No 5

FEATURED ARTISTS
PIETARI INKINEN Conductor
LEILA JOSEFOWICZ Violin

PERFORMANCE INFO
The Violin Concerto cost Mendelssohn more time than its effortless spontaneity would suggest. Sibelius's En Saga, a tone-poem without a programme, features inspired Sibelian national-Romanticism and his unerring mastery of the orchestra.  Repeated patterns (ostinati) abound, preparing us for the logic and taut organisation of the Fifth Symphony, with its sweeping power and energy.  Begun in the dark days of World War One, it was revised as the Russian Revolution was just about to embroil Finland in civil war.


Should be good :)


Wonderful concert last night  :)

En Saga was powerful in its majestic sweep of conveying oceans and storms. The 'build' was superb and the dimenuendo glorious; some twit clapped VERY loudly before the conductors arms came to rest at his side and literally startled the conductor ::)

LEILA JOSEFOWICZ was amazing performing Mendelsshons violin concerto. She was expressive both with her virtuoso playing and her facial expressions and body movements; quite an exceptional talent.

Sibelius' #5 followed the break and was suitably impressive with the way it develops from fragments of ideas into full blown themes. The conclusion of the recapitulation of the first movement was stunning as were the six chords that conclude the symphony.

All in all another great night with the NZSO :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 20, 2007, 02:55:53 PM
En Saga was powerful in its majestic sweep of conveying oceans and storms. The 'build' was superb and the dimenuendo glorious; some twit clapped VERY loudly before the conductors arms came to rest at his side and literally startled the conductor ::)


Some twit indeed.  Sometimes people are too eager to applaud after quiet endings, when a little silence would only enhance the experience.

But never mind...sounds like a terrific concert.  :D 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 24, 2007, 06:28:49 AM
This Saturday, a sold-out concert I've been looking forward to for months, part of the International Keyboard Institute & Festival (http://www.ikif.org/schedule.aspx), held every year at Mannes College of Music.

Marc-André Hamelin  

Haydn: Sonata in F major, Hob. XVI: 23
Haydn: Sonata in B flat major, Hob. XVI: 41
Alexis Weissenberg: Sonate en état de jazz (Sonata in a state of jazz)  (1982)
Chopin: Barcarolle, op. 60
Chopin: Third Ballade, op. 47
Hamelin: Etude no. 8 -- 'Erlkoenig' (after Goethe) (2007) (New York Premiere)
Hamelin: Etude no. 7 (2006)
Leopold Godowsky: Symphonic Metamorphoses on Johann Strauss' 'Wine, Women and Song'

I'm most looking forward to the Weissenberg (a friend actually knows this piece), the two Etudes, the Godowsky and (hopefully) an encore or two. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on July 24, 2007, 06:45:21 AM
If you happen to be in Bucharest in September there are quite a lot of interesting concerts (http://www.festivalenescu.ro/eng/program.html) in the "George Enescu" International Festival.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 24, 2007, 06:51:16 AM
If you happen to be in Bucharest in September there are quite a lot of interesting concerts (http://www.festivalenescu.ro/eng/program.html) in the "George Enescu" International Festival.

That's a great line-up!  I wasn't familiar with this, and aside from all the Enescu, there is a huge amount of Romanian contemporary music.  And delights like Gergiev and Rotterdam... :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on July 24, 2007, 07:00:58 PM
Mr. B,  I'll be holding my breath until you report on the Hamelin recital! Just a look at the program makes the mouth water! Of course it helps that it contains what is for me the most beautiful piano piece ever (not hard to guess, I suppose ;))
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 25, 2007, 05:57:15 AM
Mr. B,  I'll be holding my breath until you report on the Hamelin recital! Just a look at the program makes the mouth water! Of course it helps that it contains what is for me the most beautiful piano piece ever  (not hard to guess, I suppose ;))

Hm..."the most beautiful piano piece ever"...you mean, the Godowsky?  ;D

In any case, I will certainly report on it!

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: bobby quine on July 25, 2007, 11:58:03 AM
August 4th, Monteverdi's L'Orfeo at the  Drottningholms Slottsteater (http://www.dtm.se/engelsk/eframes_index.html/) (built in 1766)

August 24th, Mahler and Sibelius with Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting the Gothenburg SO

September 8, Emerson SQ performing Beethoven Quartet op 18:4, Webern, Saariaho and Beethoven op 135

...and of course, September 30th, Beethoven's 8th and Strauss' Eine Alpensinfonie with Dudamel conducting the Gothenburg SO!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mozart on July 26, 2007, 03:07:29 AM
My first concert

    
JACOB'S MASTERWORKS #1
Oct 5th & Oct 7th
Lehar: Gold and Silver Waltz
Brahms: Violin Concerto
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, Pastoral


What a thrill!


and number 2 right here for sure

    
JACOB'S MASTERWORKS #5
Nov 16th, Nov 17th & Nov 18th
Webern: Im Sommerwind
Mozart: Clarinet Concerto
Schubert: Symphony No. 8 (Unfinished)
Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis



Omg what a season so far

    
JACOB'S MASTERWORKS #6
Dec 7th, Dec 8th & Dec 9th
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9
 

Are you kidding me?

SPECIAL: ONE NIGHT ONLY: Royal Philharmonic Orchestra with San Diego Symphony
Jan 24th
Weber: Oberon, Overture
Beethoven: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7

    
JACOB'S MASTERWORKS #11
Mar 29th
Shostakovich: Festive Overture
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5, Emperor
Strauss: Also sprach Zarathustra
 


I love it!


But theres not much else, too little Mozart. And lots of russian crap in between those.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on July 26, 2007, 03:13:26 AM
Looking forward to this evening: Mozart's The Magic Flute (in English) at London's Barbican Centre.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mozart on July 26, 2007, 03:15:02 AM
Looking forward to this evening: Mozart's The Magic Flute (in English) at London's Barbican Centre.

Nice!

An evil man tried to molest me  :) Haha try to hold a straight face if that line should come up.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on July 26, 2007, 01:01:49 PM
The September Gala at the CSO, of course. Muti conducting; featuring Tchaikovsky's 6th.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on July 26, 2007, 01:02:40 PM
Nice!

An evil man tried to molest me  :) Haha try to hold a straight face if that line should come up.

What?  ???
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mozart on July 26, 2007, 03:29:35 PM
What?  ???


Its from the Mackeras cd. I crack up everytime at the end of act 1 pamina sings an evillll mannn tried to molleesttt mee. Its hilarious.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 26, 2007, 03:31:02 PM
Looking forward to this evening: Mozart's The Magic Flute (in English) at London's Barbican Centre.

Looking forward to your report Mark :)

The Magic Flute was my first opera last year [in German] but I'd learnt it in English. :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Iago on July 26, 2007, 05:01:01 PM
Going to Los Angeles on Tuesday to visit my cardiologist (just routine).
Noticed that MTT is conducting the LA Philharmonic in the Beethoven Ninth that night. So I think I'll stick around LA for that.
Trouble of course is, it's at the Hollywood Bowl and not Disney Hall.
And for those you that have never visited the Hollywood Bowl I might tell you that it's in a lovely setting, but the amplification system is just slightly better than atrocious, access roads and parking are almost non-existent and you just might be seated near crying babies.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on July 26, 2007, 05:07:00 PM

Its from the Mackeras cd. I crack up everytime at the end of act 1 pamina sings an evillll mannn tried to molleesttt mee. Its hilarious.

Alright, then...  ::)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on July 26, 2007, 05:10:15 PM
Going to Los Angeles on Tuesday to visit my cardiologist (just routine).
Noticed that MTT is conducting the LA Philharmonic in the Beethoven Ninth that night. So I think I'll stick around LA for that.
Trouble of course is, it's at the Hollywood Bowl and not Disney Hall.
And for those you that have never visited the Hollywood Bowl I might tell you that it's in a lovely setting, but the amplification system is just slightly better than atrocious, access roads and parking are almost non-existent and you just might be seated near crying babies.


Which GMG members are you referring to?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Iago on July 26, 2007, 05:29:04 PM
Which GMG members are you referring to?

GMG  members very rarely "cry". But they do "whine" very often.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mozart on July 26, 2007, 07:56:37 PM
Alright, then...  ::)

Here, try not to laugh at this.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on July 27, 2007, 06:24:58 PM
Here, try not to laugh at this.




yawn...   :-\
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 29, 2007, 02:54:51 PM
Looking forward to this evening: Mozart's The Magic Flute (in English) at London's Barbican Centre.

How was this Mark?  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 30, 2007, 06:29:40 AM
Sunday afternoon, August 12, the American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME) (http://www.acmemusic.org/) is doing this program outdoors, at the Noguchi Museum (http://www.noguchi.org/index.html):

Kevin Volans: String Quartet No. 1 "White Man Sleeps" (1986)
Louis Andriessen: Workers' Union (1975)
Terry Riley: In C (1964)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on July 30, 2007, 06:45:58 AM
Sunday afternoon, August 12, the American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME) (http://www.acmemusic.org/) is doing this program outdoors, at the Noguchi Museum (http://www.noguchi.org/index.html):

Kevin Volans: String Quartet No. 1 "White Man Sleeps" (1986)
Louis Andriessen: Workers' Union (1975)
Terry Riley: In C (1964)

--Bruce

Nice programme!  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 30, 2007, 06:49:32 AM
Nice programme!  :D

Isn't it!  And I now have the score to Workers' Union, to follow along!

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on July 30, 2007, 07:15:05 AM
This morning I received the Autumn 07 programme for the Barbican in London, and have  booked:

Prokofiev Symphony No.5
Guibaidulina Violin Concerto No.2
LSO / Previn / Mutter

Tishchenko orch. Shostakovich Cello Concerto No.1
Mahler Symphony No.6
LSO / Gergiev

Mozart Piano Concerto No.21
Bruckner Symphony No.5
Orchestre de la Suisse Romande / Janowski / Lugansky

For the OSR concert I had the unusual experience of being the 1st person to book on-line, with my pick of the entire range of bookable seats.  The Gergiev I expected to be already sold out - and it is, just about - except that I happened along just after some generous soul had returned tickets for a couple of the best seats in the house.  Very happy about both of those.  (I have some off-air recordings of Janowski conducting "his" Monte Carlo orchestra in Bruckner, and they're pretty good.)

There are a few more decent-looking programmes as well, these were the ones that galvanised me into instant action.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on July 30, 2007, 07:26:56 AM
Splendid, Nigel!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 30, 2007, 07:30:42 AM
Splendid, Nigel!

Truly!  Three great ones...  I heard Gergiev do the Mahler 6 a few years back with the New York Philharmonic...it was sensational. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on July 30, 2007, 08:12:23 AM
Instead of doing some work, I've been checking the concert schedules for the next few months ... seems like we have a few more good things coming up.  Pollini (at last!) interrupts his perpetual "greatest hits" tour for an evening of Schoenberg, Berg and Nono.  Aimard plays Messiaen.  A complete LvB sonata cycle by Barenboim.  Zimerman.  Ansdnes.  Rozhdestvensky returns, with Beethoven, Mahler, Sibelius.  Jansons with the BRSO.  The Concertgebouw.  I can hear my credit card whimpering even as I type this... ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on July 30, 2007, 10:40:51 AM
How was this Mark?  :)

Sorry, Chris. Forgot to report back on the evening in the company of Armonico Consort Opera with the Orchestra of the Baroque. Terrifically fun production, emphasising the 'pantomime' element of the work to amusing effect. Semi-staged, lots of fun props and a few cheeky jokes - plus a clever little 'audience participation' piece which turned out to be how they got Sinead Pratschke on stage prior to her appearance later as Papagena.

The orchestral side was lovely and not in the least distracting from the acting, and the real stand out performances came from Elin Manahan Thomas as Pamina, and Timothy Travers-Brown as Monostatos, who was a comical delight and a great singer. The Barbican's notoriously dry acoustic robbed the singing of some of its punch, and the biggest disappointment was watching Jacquelyn Parker struggle somewhat with that famously high section of the Queen of the Night's Act II aria. It worked, but only just.

Only other noteworthy vocal performances came from Anna Bolton as Second Lady (quite honestly, she could've played Pamina just as well as Manahan Thomas), and William Townsend as the Old Priest/Armed Man. The evening's Sarastro - Ronald Nairne - was so-so (I've heard better basses), and the Three Boys (two of whom were actually girls) just didn't gel harmonically, making their parts rather painful to listen to. The other big disappointment was Tamino (Mark Wilde) who neither looked like the protagonist hero nor sang very convincingly.

If you want to hear this work in English, the Chandos set with Mackerras is superb and blows away what I heard on the night. It has a better Papageno, too: I saw Thomas Guthrie (also the director), and while he wasn't bad, his acting far exceeded his singing, which lacked sufficient projection.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 30, 2007, 01:36:15 PM
Sorry, Chris. Forgot to report back on the evening in the company of Armonico Consort Opera with the Orchestra of the Baroque. Terrifically fun production, emphasising the 'pantomime' element of the work to amusing effect. Semi-staged, lots of fun props and a few cheeky jokes - plus a clever little 'audience participation' piece which turned out to be how they got Sinead Pratschke on stage prior to her appearance later as Papagena.

The orchestral side was lovely and not in the least distracting from the acting, and the real stand out performances came from Elin Manahan Thomas as Pamina, and Timothy Travers-Brown as Monostatos, who was a comical delight and a great singer. The Barbican's notoriously dry acoustic robbed the singing of some of its punch, and the biggest disappointment was watching Jacquelyn Parker struggle somewhat with that famously high section of the Queen of the Night's Act II aria. It worked, but only just.

Only other noteworthy vocal performances came from Anna Bolton as Second Lady (quite honestly, she could've played Pamina just as well as Manahan Thomas), and William Townsend as the Old Priest/Armed Man. The evening's Sarastro - Ronald Nairne - was so-so (I've heard better basses), and the Three Boys (two of whom were actually girls) just didn't gel harmonically, making their parts rather painful to listen to. The other big disappointment was Tamino (Mark Wilde) who neither looked like the protagonist hero nor sang very convincingly.

If you want to hear this work in English, the Chandos set with Mackerras is superb and blows away what I heard on the night. It has a better Papageno, too: I saw Thomas Guthrie (also the director), and while he wasn't bad, his acting far exceeded his singing, which lacked sufficient projection.

Excellent report Mark, thanks :)

I have the Chandos English version which is excellent, although I'm sticking to operas in their original language from now on.

Like you, I wouldn't have gone near an opera a few years ago but now I'm a true believer!

Currently watching Wagners Ring cycle on dvd [one Act per night] and its fantastic.

By the way The Magic Flute was my first live opera experience and it was great BUT my second live opera experience was Faust and that literally blew me away...wow! :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on July 30, 2007, 02:04:48 PM
Excellent report Mark, thanks :)

I have the Chandos English version which is excellent, although I'm sticking to operas in their original language from now on.

Like you, I wouldn't have gone near an opera a few years ago but now I'm a true believer!

Currently watching Wagners Ring cycle on dvd [one Act per night] and its fantastic.

By the way The Magic Flute was my first live opera experience and it was great BUT my second live opera experience was Faust and that literally blew me away...wow! :)

Only other opera I've heard (again, in English) is Bartok's Duke Bluebeard's Castle. Really loved it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 31, 2007, 01:40:49 PM
Only other opera I've heard (again, in English) is Bartok's Duke Bluebeard's Castle. Really loved it.

Yeah, they did Bluebeards Castle here last year. Half staged like the Magic Flute version you saw. I didn't attend but it got great reviews so I maybe should have ???
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on July 31, 2007, 02:36:54 PM
Yeah, they did Bluebeards Castle here last year. Half staged like the Magic Flute version you saw. I didn't attend but it got great reviews so I maybe should have ???

It's quite a psychologically deep work, and a tad disturbing in places. The ending really shocked me! :o
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on August 05, 2007, 05:16:57 PM
Next Thursday:

APN News & Media Premier Series 2007 Concert 10

Thu 16 Aug 2007 8:00pm - Auckland Town Hall THE EDGE®

APO

Farr Horizons

 
Marc Taddei           Conductor
NZ Trio Justine Cormack Violin, Ashley Brown Cello, Sarah Watkins Piano
 
Ives   Three Places in New England
Farr   Triple Concerto
Interval 
Prokofiev  Romeo and Juliet Suite

To celebrate great New Zealand composer Gareth Farr, the APO’s new Composer-in-Residence, we present the Auckland premiere of a work he considers one of his greatest: the Triple Concerto. Written for Auckland’s New Zealand Trio, Farr’s concerto is in turns haunting, lyrical and tempestuous. It is complemented by the evocative vignettes of Charles Ives’ Three Places in New England, and the passion and power of Prokofiev’s masterpiece Romeo and Juliet, one of the favourites of the repertoire.

I haven't had any Ives or Prokofiev in concert yet so this should be interesting :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on August 07, 2007, 07:28:44 PM
I was contacted by the Philadelphia Orchestra regarding my purchase of an extra ticket for the May 3rd performance. They could not accommodate my request (for the other seat to be by my subscribed seat) as both the 2nd and 3rd tier were not available. So I opted for 1st tier front row. Perhaps I'll take that one when I go to hear the symphony....
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on August 16, 2007, 02:30:53 PM
Next Thursday:

APN News & Media Premier Series 2007 Concert 10

Thu 16 Aug 2007 8:00pm - Auckland Town Hall THE EDGE®

APO

Farr Horizons

 
Marc Taddei           Conductor
NZ Trio Justine Cormack Violin, Ashley Brown Cello, Sarah Watkins Piano
 
Ives   Three Places in New England
Farr   Triple Concerto
Interval 
Prokofiev  Romeo and Juliet Suite

To celebrate great New Zealand composer Gareth Farr, the APO’s new Composer-in-Residence, we present the Auckland premiere of a work he considers one of his greatest: the Triple Concerto. Written for Auckland’s New Zealand Trio, Farr’s concerto is in turns haunting, lyrical and tempestuous. It is complemented by the evocative vignettes of Charles Ives’ Three Places in New England, and the passion and power of Prokofiev’s masterpiece Romeo and Juliet, one of the favourites of the repertoire.

I haven't had any Ives or Prokofiev in concert yet so this should be interesting :)


Great concert last night!

Even attended the pre-concert talk which was a first as it was a later concert than usual.

The Ives was wonderful. The whole thing threatened to blow apart during the chaotic climax of the second movement but they held it all together perfectly. Hearing/seeing this piece live was great to hear the different themes and tunes coming from different parts of the orchestra as it seemed their were literally several things happening at once. A ripple of amusement went around the audience at its conclusion.

The Farr premier was a treat. It was a 'triple concerto' performed with the NZ trio and orchestra so it was quite unique. Very dynamic at times and at others conjuring images of the sea and even some Asian themes. It received a very enthusiastic response from the rapt audience.

After the break it was a suite made up of Prokofiev's three Romeo & Juliet suites. Basically all the best bits made for an exciting musical ride; at the crashing conclusion to The Death of Tybalt there was a brief ripple of applause to which the conductor looked to the audience and said 'its good eh?!'

Another wonderful evening of classical art music :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on August 17, 2007, 02:51:32 PM
Thanks, SW, sounds like a really terrific concert.  The Ives does "threaten to blow apart" in places...part of its excitement! 

And the rest of the concert sounds great, too - would have liked to hear the Farr. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: sound67 on August 18, 2007, 07:40:28 PM
Having decided to visit the Proms for a week after all, I'm looking forward to the premiere of John Adams' "Doctor Atomic Symphony", which he will also be conducting

http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/2007/whatson/2108.shtml

Unfortunately, most of the rest of this week's roster is pretty much what you can listen to in concert on any given Sunday (Bruckner 8th, Mahler 3rd, Wagner).

Thomas
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on August 24, 2007, 06:10:54 AM
Today I got the programme for the "Sibelius & Beyond" festival of Finnish music in London this autumn.  Headline is probably the complete cycle of Sibelius symphonies from Salonen and the LAPO, but plenty other events in various venues around town featuring a whole range of modern Finnish composers.

The one which I would definitely attend if I were around at the time (which I won't be) is a free lunchtime concert in the Royal Academy of Music on Marylebone Road on the 2nd November, at which Segerstam will be conducting his own 173rd Symphony.  Not too many other opportunites to hear that particular piece, I'm guessing.

London has a strong Finnish community.  Another not-to-be-missed event is always the annual Christmas Fair in the Finnish Church in Rotherhithe, where you can buy a whole range of produce including some amazing liqueurs that I've never been able to find anywhere else (and believe me, I've tried.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on August 24, 2007, 06:14:57 AM
Today I got the programme for the "Sibelius & Beyond" festival of Finnish music in London this autumn.  Headline is probably the complete cycle of Sibelius symphonies from Salonen and the LAPO, but plenty other events in various venues around town featuring a whole range of modern Finnish composers.

They also have a complete Sibelius cycle going on in LA in October, with - can it be a coincidence? - the LAP/Salonen, too.

The one which I would definitely attend if I were around at the time (which I won't be) is a free lunchtime concert in the Royal Academy of Music on Marylebone Road on the 2nd November, at which Segerstam will be conducting his own 173rd Symphony.  Not too many other opportunites to hear that particular piece, I'm guessing.

173?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on August 24, 2007, 06:17:19 AM
173?

Yes.  Not 172 or 174, but 173. 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on August 24, 2007, 06:30:51 AM
Yes.  Not 172 or 174, but 173. 

You mean Launching Thoughts into Nexties... and not Enjoying newly tuned pianos... nor Welcoming returning birds solemnly... 

Big mistake if you ask me...   ;D



http://www.fimic.fi/fimic/fimic.nsf/mainframe?readform&segerstam+leif (http://www.fimic.fi/fimic/fimic.nsf/mainframe?readform&segerstam+leif)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on August 27, 2007, 02:03:32 AM
September 21st, Bucharest

Evgeny Kissin / London SO / Sir Colin Davis

Beethoven

Piano Concerto no. 5 Emperor
Symphony no. 3 Eroica

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 27, 2007, 02:19:00 AM
Tonight:

Mariss Jansons/BRSO

Strauss Zarathustra
Sibelius 2

And tomorrow night:

same lot,

Beethoven Egmont
Debussy La mer
Shosta 5

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on August 27, 2007, 03:33:44 PM
Just received my season tickets to the Philly Orchestra- I'm quite excited to see/hear them again.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on August 27, 2007, 10:47:53 PM
Tonight:

Mariss Jansons/BRSO

Strauss Zarathustra
Sibelius 2

And tomorrow night:

same lot,

Beethoven Egmont
Debussy La mer
Shosta 5



That looks like those "greatest classical hits" programs Jansons seems to do almost exclusively now. But then, why not? Especially when it's on tour. Have fun.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 29, 2007, 02:59:12 PM
That looks like those "greatest classical hits" programs Jansons seems to do almost exclusively now. But then, why not? Especially when it's on tour. Have fun.

Lol, M, the Edinburgh Festival is hardly the centre for adventurous programming ;).

Me, I’m just happy to get a chance to hear different orchestras. Besides which, having only started listening to classical music more seriously in the past year or so (hey, check out my user name), a lot of this repertoire I’m only hearing live for the first time, and sometimes for the first time ever. Having said that, I can certainly understand how this might be frustrating for seasoned listeners. In any case, once I leave Edinburgh, I'll be hard pressed to hear this variety of ensemble in the entire year, let alone in a 3 week period. Groups rarely tour that far south, greatest hits or otherwise :'(.

Anyway, I really enjoyed both evenings 8). The highlight for me was the Sibelius. I loved the warm, rich strings, and the build up in the final movement was pretty phenomenal. It was also interesting watching Jansons conduct. He is quite animated on the podium, with big arm gestures. But a few times, he appeared almost to stop completely – although I couldn’t see whether he was still indicating the beat with his arms lowered – as though taking in the waves of sound just for a second or two. This was most noticeable in the final movement with the momentum that builds in the recurring sweeping string melody. Ironically, the programme notes made a point of the incipient modernism in this 2nd symphony, but I felt it was the romantic elements that Jansons brought out. That’s not to say it was ‘soupy’; it was clearly articulated but lush. The Strauss didn’t work quite so well for me; it sagged a bit in the middle. Or perhaps I should say that I lost concentration a little :-[.

In the Shostakovich the following night, it was again the strings that made the greatest impression: the rich tones again, particularly in the gorgeous 3rd movement. I don’t know this piece very well, only the version in the Mravinsky Anniversary box. In comparison, Jansons’s is not as raw, but still robust. The brass were powerful, but in a warmer, less ‘blary’ way. Certainly the full contingent in the final movement was impressive, although the wind solos, especially the oboe, in the 3rd also stick in mind. A pity that someone brought her toddler along and I could hear it gurgling intermittently throughout the concert even half a hall away and about 15 rows in front of them >:(. I’m surprised no one asked them to leave. Still, I enjoyed it, even if I preferred the Sibelius marginally. It has certainly spurred me to explore Shostakovich a bit more, so it's all good :D.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on August 29, 2007, 03:06:54 PM
I have this next Monday. I've been offered free tickets to this annual event for the past three years [being an NZSO subscriber] but declined each time for various reasons. This year I attended an NZSO Foundation luncheon and they had a cellist from the NYO perform a few pieces and he was very good. So this year I decided to accept the invitation and I am now quite looking forward to the occasion. The Bartok should be excellent and the Belt Sander world premier interesting!

NYO [NZSO National Youth Orchestra]


PROGRAMME

RAVEL La Valse
BARTOK Concerto for Orchestra
MARGETIC Belt Sander (Composer-in-Residence - World Premiere)
DEBUSSY La Mer

FEATURED ARTISTS
Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

PERFORMANCE INFO
Since its inception in 1959, the National Youth Orchestra has played a vital role in the musical life of New Zealand. It has served as a specialised training ground for New Zealand’s most gifted young musicians, many of whom have forged careers here and abroad as orchestral players, soloists, chamber musicians and teachers.

The NZSO National Youth Orchestra continues to strive for the highest level of artistic excellence and it owes a considerable debt of gratitude to its conductors, who succeed year after year in bringing together young players from diverse backgrounds and experience and, in the space of just ten days, shape them into the fine ensemble you will hear.

National Youth Orchestra

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
YANNICK NÉZET-SÉGUIN

Yannick Nezet-Seguin is the Artistic Director of the Orchestre Métropolitain in Montreal and Principal Guest Conductor of the Victoria Symphony. In 2005, he made his Australian debut with the Sydney Symphony.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on August 29, 2007, 03:09:44 PM
Should be a fun time. Judging by what I've heard of him, Nézet-Séguin is a young conductor going places.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Choo Choo on August 29, 2007, 03:49:06 PM
Judging by what I've heard of him, Nézet-Séguin is a young conductor going places.

Agreed.  Just today I was listening again to his recent Montreal recording of Bruckner's 7th Symphony - an individual interpretation requiring great control to carry off successfully - which he does, in spades.  Great stuff.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: mahlertitan on August 29, 2007, 03:56:32 PM
Agreed.  Just today I was listening again to his recent Montreal recording of Bruckner's 7th Symphony - an individual interpretation requiring great control to carry off successfully - which he does, in spades.  Great stuff.

I too, believe that He, is a conductor of immense potential, judging from that Bruckner's 7th alone.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on August 29, 2007, 04:02:12 PM
Should be a fun time. Judging by what I've heard of him, Nézet-Séguin is a young conductor going places.

Agreed.  Just today I was listening again to his recent Montreal recording of Bruckner's 7th Symphony - an individual interpretation requiring great control to carry off successfully - which he does, in spades.  Great stuff.

I too, believe that He, is a conductor of immense potential, judging from that Bruckner's 7th alone.

Thanks for the feedback.

Its sounding very promising.

I'll be sure to post a review :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 30, 2007, 06:54:59 PM
I've just come back from a rather disappointing concert tonight.

The two fantastic BRSO concerts earlier this week were followed by a couple of MTT/SFSO gigs. Again, Festival-friendly repertoire ... Fanfare for the Common Man, anyone? ;D

Tonight's programme:

Strauss, final scene from Salome with Deborah Voight
Mahler 7

I've never heard any of MTT's recordings nor the SFSO so I had no idea what to expect. I thought the Strauss was very well played; the orchestra produced a beautiful full sound, although there were some problems with balance: you could barely hear Voight at some of the climactic moments.

The Mahler was disappointing. At the outset, I have to say that besides the 1st, the 7th is the one I've listened to the least, so I'm probably not the best judge of this piece.

But here goes. I felt that the brass let the side down. For instance, the horns didn't seem very steady at the opening of the first Nachtmusik. The Scherzo felt a bit stolid; I thought it lacked bite. Even the friend who went with me - not a classical fan by any means - commented that the humour promised in the programme notes was missing ;). While the various soloists played well, they didn't really come together coherently in the more chamber-like bits. The orchestra certainly generated a huge sound in the first and final movements, but this just seemed to muddy things up.

I had the same problem with the Mahler as the Prokofieff PC3 the previous night: it was hard to get a sense of either piece as a coherent whole. Yefim Bronfman was impressive but the piece didn't come alive for me. I didn't feel the electricity I sense in the Browning/Leinsdorf recording, for example. In that sense, the Tchaik 1 fared a lot better, although it's hard for me to gauge, being the first time I've heard it. That first concert opened with Fanfare, Ruth Crawford Seeger's Andante for Strings, and Adams's Short Ride in a Fast Machine (lol, I'm going ass-backwards). I liked this: the in-your-face brass of Fanfare, then the smooth layers of sounds of the strings, and then the Adams, which was rollicking good fun :D.

So overall, a mixed couple of nights, and not as good as I'd expected. I'm still happy to have gone, but would've liked to end the year's Festival on a better note :).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on September 01, 2007, 12:32:10 PM
Today I got the programme for the "Sibelius & Beyond" festival of Finnish music in London this autumn.  Headline is probably the complete cycle of Sibelius symphonies from Salonen and the LAPO, but plenty other events in various venues around town featuring a whole range of modern Finnish composers.

The one which I would definitely attend if I were around at the time (which I won't be) is a free lunchtime concert in the Royal Academy of Music on Marylebone Road on the 2nd November, at which Segerstam will be conducting his own 173rd Symphony.  Not too many other opportunites to hear that particular piece, I'm guessing.

London has a strong Finnish community.  Another not-to-be-missed event is always the annual Christmas Fair in the Finnish Church in Rotherhithe, where you can buy a whole range of produce including some amazing liqueurs that I've never been able to find anywhere else (and believe me, I've tried.)

What I wouldn't give to be in London this fall! I would love to see that cycle. And performances of contemporary Finnish music and little heard Sibelius chamber music...a smorgasbord. But, I was looking at the festival's website (http://www.sibeliusandbeyond.com/index.php), where is the Kullervo? A glaring ommission, I mean Jorma Hynninen will already be in town...that would really have capped things off.

Quote from: M forever
They also have a complete Sibelius cycle going on in LA in October, with - can it be a coincidence? - the LAP/Salonen, too.

If DG is smart, they would record that cycle and release it on iTunes...as he intended to do one with them yet they never got around to it...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on September 01, 2007, 12:40:38 PM
I've just come back from a rather disappointing concert tonight.

The two fantastic BRSO concerts earlier this week were followed by a couple of MTT/SFSO gigs. Again, Festival-friendly repertoire ... Fanfare for the Common Man, anyone? ;D

Tonight's programme:

Strauss, final scene from Salome with Deborah Voight
Mahler 7

I've never heard any of MTT's recordings nor the SFSO so I had no idea what to expect. I thought the Strauss was very well played; the orchestra produced a beautiful full sound, although there were some problems with balance: you could barely hear Voight at some of the climactic moments.

The Mahler was disappointing. At the outset, I have to say that besides the 1st, the 7th is the one I've listened to the least, so I'm probably not the best judge of this piece.

But here goes. I felt that the brass let the side down. For instance, the horns didn't seem very steady at the opening of the first Nachtmusik. The Scherzo felt a bit stolid; I thought it lacked bite. Even the friend who went with me - not a classical fan by any means - commented that the humour promised in the programme notes was missing ;). While the various soloists played well, they didn't really come together coherently in the more chamber-like bits. The orchestra certainly generated a huge sound in the first and final movements, but this just seemed to muddy things up.

I had the same problem with the Mahler as the Prokofieff PC3 the previous night: it was hard to get a sense of either piece as a coherent whole. Yefim Bronfman was impressive but the piece didn't come alive for me. I didn't feel the electricity I sense in the Browning/Leinsdorf recording, for example. In that sense, the Tchaik 1 fared a lot better, although it's hard for me to gauge, being the first time I've heard it. That first concert opened with Fanfare, Ruth Crawford Seeger's Andante for Strings, and Adams's Short Ride in a Fast Machine (lol, I'm going ass-backwards). I liked this: the in-your-face brass of Fanfare, then the smooth layers of sounds of the strings, and then the Adams, which was rollicking good fun :D.

So overall, a mixed couple of nights, and not as good as I'd expected. I'm still happy to have gone, but would've liked to end the year's Festival on a better note :).

Thanks for these excellent reports!

I understand your disappointment with the 7th. Among Mahler's symphonies, this is the one that benefits the most from extra-lucid conducting, extra-transparent textures and extra-colourful intrumental solos. A very difficult balance to achieve: chamber music clarity with large orchestra refulgence, yet it has to have lyrical flow and almost heart-on-sleeve emotionality.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on September 04, 2007, 06:12:08 PM
Off to Wellington for two nights tomorrow morning with two concerts to enjoy.

Tomorrow night:

 Cinderella (http://www.nzballet.org.nz/cinderella.html)

and Friday night NZSO

PROGRAMME
Die Meistersinger Prelude
Lohengrin Prelude (Act 1)
Tristan und Isolde: Prelude and Liebestod
The Flying Dutchman Overture
Tannhaüser Overture
Gotterdammerung: Immolation Scene


FEATURED ARTISTS
Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor
Margaret Medlyn
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on September 05, 2007, 05:05:42 PM
Please report!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on September 11, 2007, 08:52:28 AM
At the CSO next week:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Riccardo Muti, conductor


Tchaikovsky -   Symphony No. 6 (Pathétique)
Hindemith -   Nobilissima visione
Scriabin -   The Poem of Ecstasy


Looking forward to the Hindemith and Scriabin, in particular. I heard the Scriabin ten years ago with Boulez when Bud Herseth was still principal trumpet. Will be interesting to hear what Chris Martin makes of it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 11, 2007, 10:32:46 AM
At Symphony Hall this season:

13 October (Sat)
Gandolfi, The Garden of Cosmic Speculation
Poulenc, Concerto for Organ, Timpani & Strings (Simon Preston)
Tchaikovsky, Symphony No. 6, Pathétique
(Robt Spano conducting)

10 November (Sat)
Berg, Violin Concerto (Christian Tetzlaff)
Mahler, Symphony No. 9

17 November (Sat)
Haydn, Symphony No. 104, London
Carter, Horn Concerto (Jas Sommerville)
Mahler, Symphony No. 1

26 January (Sat)
Elgar, The Dream of Gerontius
Davis conducting

9 February (Sat)
Martin, Petite symphonie concertante (Ann Hobson Pilot, hp; Randall Hodgkinson, pf; Mark Kroll, hpschd)
Prokofiev, Violin Concerto No. 1 (Vivian Hagner)
Saint-Saëns, Symphony No. 3, Organ (David Christie)
Dutoit conducting

16 February (Sat)
Sibelius, Violin Concerto in D (Vadim Repin)
Shostakovich, Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Opus 43
Elder conducting

23 February (Sat)
Mozart, Symphony No. 29 in A
Berg, Chamber Concerto for piano & violin w/ 13 winds (Isabelle Faust, Peter Serkin)
Brahms, Serenade No. 2

15 March (Sat)
Schumann, Piano Concerto (Garrick Ohlsson)
Shostakovich, Symphony No. 5 in D Minor, Opus 47
Gatti conducting

27 March (Thur)
Bartók, Piano Concerto No. 3 (András Schiff)
Schubert, Symphony No. 9 in C, Great
Haitink conducting

12 April (Sat)
Brahms, Symphony No. 3 in F Minor
Brahms, Piano Concerto No. 1 in D Minor (Yevgeny Kissin)

2 May (Fri, 7:30)
Berlioz, Les Troyens Seconde Partie, Les Troyens ŕ Carthage
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 11, 2007, 10:37:54 AM
10 November (Sat)
Berg, Violin Concerto (Christian Tetzlaff)
Mahler, Symphony No. 9

Levine did this same program here in 2004, with the Met Orchestra.  The Mahler was a tad slow, but the Berg was quite amazing.  Tetzlaff must be one of the work's great interpreters at the moment. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 11, 2007, 10:43:11 AM
Well, if the Mahler runs slow again, I can always catnap  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 11, 2007, 10:45:11 AM
Heard the Mahler First last maybe two seasons ago? -- also at Symphony. I seem to be curving to diminishing returns . . . I have found a little less patience with the last movement with each successive listening.

But maybe this one will reverse the curve curse . . . .
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on September 11, 2007, 11:03:56 AM
Heard the Mahler First last maybe two seasons ago? -- also at Symphony. I seem to be curving to diminishing returns . . . I have found a little less patience with the last movement with each successive listening.

But maybe this one will reverse the curve curse . . . .

If you're a member of operashare, try to find Dudamel's debut with the CSO. There was a broadcast that someone uploaded. If that doesn't cure your impatience with the last movement of Mahler 1, nothing will. (NB: there are (or were) two Dudamel Mahler 1s on operashare: CSO and IPO - the CSO performance is on a different level entirely)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on September 13, 2007, 07:07:49 PM
I have this next Monday. I've been offered free tickets to this annual event for the past three years [being an NZSO subscriber] but declined each time for various reasons. This year I attended an NZSO Foundation luncheon and they had a cellist from the NYO perform a few pieces and he was very good. So this year I decided to accept the invitation and I am now quite looking forward to the occasion. The Bartok should be excellent and the Belt Sander world premier interesting!

NYO [NZSO National Youth Orchestra]


PROGRAMME

RAVEL La Valse
BARTOK Concerto for Orchestra
MARGETIC Belt Sander (Composer-in-Residence - World Premiere)
DEBUSSY La Mer

FEATURED ARTISTS
Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

PERFORMANCE INFO
Since its inception in 1959, the National Youth Orchestra has played a vital role in the musical life of New Zealand. It has served as a specialised training ground for New Zealand’s most gifted young musicians, many of whom have forged careers here and abroad as orchestral players, soloists, chamber musicians and teachers.

The NZSO National Youth Orchestra continues to strive for the highest level of artistic excellence and it owes a considerable debt of gratitude to its conductors, who succeed year after year in bringing together young players from diverse backgrounds and experience and, in the space of just ten days, shape them into the fine ensemble you will hear.

National Youth Orchestra

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
YANNICK NÉZET-SÉGUIN

Yannick Nezet-Seguin is the Artistic Director of the Orchestre Métropolitain in Montreal and Principal Guest Conductor of the Victoria Symphony. In 2005, he made his Australian debut with the Sydney Symphony.



This was a great concert experience last Monday night.

They brought the orchestra out as one to enthusiastic applause; so many fresh faces!

Ravel's La Valse was a joy to hear performed live with its various twists and turns. The young orchestra held it together superby and the thunderous climax was spine tingleling.

Bartoks Concerto for Orchestra was a challenging piece as I'd found it took me longer to get a handle on it in my pre-concert preperation. They performed it very well but it seemed to drag abit to my ears ???

After the break it was MARGETIC Belt Sander (Composer-in-Residence - World Premiere) and while this wasn't a classic piece of writing it was very engaging to hear/see. The composer was 'inspired' to write this after hearing an electric sanders rhythm/sounds so you can imagine the textures that were conjured up with the orchestra. The percussion especially provided a number of unique instrumemtation and sounds. It was all quite bizarre really!

The final piece was Debussy's La Mer which gets a bit overdone really, but on the night it was a highlight. In fact I prefered it to the NZSO's version last year. Great definition to the strings and the trcky six cello part in the first movement was handled perfectly.

They received a great response from the audience [which was surprisingly small]. It was a joy to see young people dedicating themselves to serious art music; a great night :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on September 13, 2007, 07:23:13 PM
- Schubert 8 and Bruckner 9,  Orchestre métropolitain du grand Montréal, Yannick Nézet-Séguin. There's no doubt I'm buying a ticket for that one.  I'll go on the 17th, they will be playing in one of Montreal's churches. On the 21 they play the same program again, this time in another church - the same venue they recorded the 7th in - and I think ATMA's engineeers will be making a recording.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PaulR on September 14, 2007, 07:11:40 AM
on the 29th, I'm going to a recital by Richard Goode at my school :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bonehelm on September 14, 2007, 07:42:09 AM
Yundi Li/Edo de Waart/Hong Kong Philharmonic - Prokofiev PC #2, Rachmaninov symphony no.3
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: jochanaan on September 14, 2007, 08:02:22 AM
This one. (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,3289.0.html) ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 14, 2007, 08:06:50 AM
Oh, just caught this!  Congrats and good luck tomorrow!  :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on September 15, 2007, 09:09:05 AM


9 February (Sat)
Martin, Petite symphonie concertante (Ann Hobson Pilot, hp; Randall Hodgkinson, pf; Mark Kroll, hpschd)
Prokofiev, Violin Concerto No. 1 (Vivian Hagner)
Saint-Saëns, Symphony No. 3, Organ (David Christie)
Dutoit conducting



This I would love to see!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on September 15, 2007, 09:11:30 AM


13 October (Sat)

Poulenc, Concerto for Organ, Timpani & Strings (Simon Preston)

(Robt Spano conducting)


I have never heard any of Poulenc's works played live....I will have to rectify this in about 8 hours time.  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 15, 2007, 09:12:26 AM
This one. (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,3289.0.html) ;D

You and me, both!  :)

Knock 'em flat daid, John!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 15, 2007, 09:12:47 AM
I have never heard any of Poulenc's works played live....I will have to rectify this in about 8 hours time.  8)

 :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 15, 2007, 09:16:09 AM
Quote from: karlhenning
9 February (Sat)
Martin, Petite symphonie concertante (Ann Hobson Pilot, hp; Randall Hodgkinson, pf; Mark Kroll, hpschd)
Prokofiev, Violin Concerto No. 1 (Vivian Hagner)
Saint-Saëns, Symphony No. 3, Organ (David Christie)
Dutoit conducting

This I would love to see!

The Saint-Saëns was the grand finale on the season opener immediately after the organ's thorough restoration at Symphony Hall.  It was such a delight, I'm queuing right up for another performance!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on September 15, 2007, 09:20:19 AM
This I would love to see!


The Saint-Saëns was the grand finale on the season opener immediately after the organ's thorough restoration at Symphony Hall.  It was such a delight, I'm queuing right up for another performance!

And Dutoit conducting....heck, I would go if he was on the podium for a musical salute to Chitty Chitty Bang Bang!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 15, 2007, 09:21:58 AM
I am assured that there is no truth whatever to the rumor that jochanaan does Dick van Dyke imitations . . . .
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: jochanaan on September 16, 2007, 03:16:38 PM
I am assured that there is no truth whatever to the rumor that jochanaan does Dick van Dyke imitations . . . .
A foul calumny!  I'd much rather imitate Julie Andrews! ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on September 16, 2007, 06:33:16 PM
Attended  Cinderella (http://www.nzballet.org.nz/) while on holiday in Wellington a week ago.

Its the first ballet I've attended in 16 years and it turned out to be the highlight of our time away.

The sets, costumes, music and dancing were magical and captivating. They did an interesting thing too by having a small performance happening on stage inbetween the acts which actually worked and was a novel approach which I haven't seen before. It was related to the Cinderella story so fitted perfectly.

The theatre was lovely too. I hadn't been in the St.James before and it was a grand old lady with a Victorian feel with its giant arches and Gothic feel.

I'll definately be attending more ballets.

A memorable eveing out :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on September 20, 2007, 02:54:31 AM
Tonight Mrs. Rock and I will be attending a concert by the Staatskapelle Dresden. Fabio Luisi conducting, Hélčne Grimaud piano.

Beethoven Piano Concerto #5
Strauss Eine Alpensinfonie

Sarge

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 20, 2007, 04:00:41 AM
A foul calumny!  I'd much rather imitate Julie Andrews! ;D

Well, of course, if the Poulenc was practically perfect in every way . . . .

 ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on September 21, 2007, 02:52:37 AM
:o :o :o

Bring your camera (and post the pictures).  ;D

Believe it or not, I forgot my camera...and we had front row seats! ARRRGGGHHH!!!  What really makes it painful to contemplate the pictures I missed is the fact she didn't wear her usual long-sleeved, loose fitting shirt/blouse with her black slacks but a halter top that bared her arms, shoulders, back, and large swaths of chest. It was the sexiest outfit I've ever seen her wear. I didn't get a chance to talk to her this time either. By the time I'd purchased her new CD the crowd waiting for her autograph was huge. I doubt more than a fourth got to her before the intermission ended. The highlight of the concerto was the slow movement: intensely inward and poetic.

Luisi is a fun conductor to watch. He's short and very thin and very animated on the podium. He resembles Mahler somewhat. From the caricatures I've seen of Mahler conducting, they seem to have a similar style.  I imagined Luisi channeling Mahler last night.  :D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on September 21, 2007, 02:03:33 PM
Attended Turandot on Thursday night; needless to say it was fantastic!

It was great to see a contemporary production after having watched the Mets DVD version the previous night as it made the Mets version look positvely old-fashioned!

Actually its a great way to approach these operas; see the traditinal approach, then a modern updating. Its amazing how the same story and music can be presented in a completely different way; both excellent!

 Heres (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/topic/story.cfm?c_id=264&objectid=10465168) todays review in our local newspaper  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on September 22, 2007, 03:09:10 AM


You are a true collector...going for the music before the flesh.  ;D

In truth, I thought I could have both  ;)

Quote
Yeah, sure Sarge, I bet you were watching the conductor.  ::) 

Actually, I couldn't see him during the concerto...not that I would have noticed him much during the Beethoven in any case ;D  Because he's so short, and because the piano necessitated the placement of the podium deep in the orchestra, the viola section totally obscured him from our viewing angle. He was much closer to the edge of the stage during the Strauss, and visible.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on September 23, 2007, 11:35:37 PM
Friday night I attended this:

Evgeny Kissin
London Symphony Orchestra
Sir Colin Davis

Beethoven
"Emperor" Concerto
"Eroica" Symphony


Kissin's rendition of PCs arch-warhorse almost made me forget I've heard it a zillion times before. Especially the transition between the second and the third movement was so gentle, so flowing, so lyrical that I was really startled by the beginning of the Rondo. His superb pianism allowed him to deliver everything required: passion, drama, nostalgia and exuberance. The excellent dialogue between him and LSO, with a full and warm sound, especially in the winds, was a feast for the ears --- and also for the eyes, since the concertmaster was so raptured by the music that he literally swinged, rolled and bounced in his chair, while his feet stepped a la Fred Astaire.
The audience responded enthusiastically with ovations and Kissin obliged with two encores: Rage Over a Lost Penny and a Marche Militaire by Schubert.

Second part, another warhorse: Eroica. No surprise here. Davis conducted with very elegant and discrete gestures, the winds and brass were absolutely stunning while the strings sounded... well, lush, if you excuse my cliche. But despite the fine conducting and the excellent performance of the orchestra, I once again felt that the 4th movement is strikingly at odds with the other three and it's anything but heroic. With all due respect to Beethoven I believe it's a weak finale for an otherwise extraordinary work.

The five salvos of applauses and ovations made a perfect conclusion for a highly enjoyable evening.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on September 24, 2007, 02:22:25 AM
Glad you had a good time. His Rage over a lost penny is excellent.  :)

Indeed. And I could have sworn he'd play it as encore. :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on September 24, 2007, 04:51:09 PM
Ticket sale for next month Bemus (Belgrade autumn festival) started, rather poor selection this year but I'm considering these five (probably all)

QUATUOR EBČNE   
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Divertimento D major K 136
Bela Bartók - Quartet No. 1, op. 7
Franz Schubert - Quartet No. 14 Death and the maiden, D minor D810

GIDON KREMER & KREMERATA BALTICA    
Felix Mendelssohn - Violin concerto D minor, op. posth.
Bela Bartók - Divertimento
Cinema – compilation of film music
Charles Chaplin: "Smile" from the "Modern Times" (Arr. for Violin and Strings: Andrei Pushkarev)
Toru Takemitsu: Fragment from "Three Movie Scores"
Isaak Dunaevsky: "Overture" from "The Children of Captain Grant" (Arr. for Strings: A. Pushkarev)
Giya Kancheli: "Rag-Gidon-Time"
Glenn Miller: "Moonlight Serenade" (Arr. for Violin and Strings: Andrei Pushkarev)
Astor Piazzolla: "Tres Minutos con la Realidad ", "Libertango" (Arr. for Violine, Vibraphone and Strings: Andrei Pushkarev)
Ennio Morricone: Thema aus "For a fistful of Dollars" (Arr. for Strings: Aleksey Igudesman)
Soloists: Gidon Kremer, violin; Andrei Pushkarev, vibraphone

ALEXANDER RUDIN, violoncello & MUSICA VIVA    
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Serenade No. 6 D major K239 (Serenata Notturna) for two small orchestras
Aulis Sallinen - Chamber music III (The Nocturnal Dances of Don Juanquixote), for violoncello and strings, Op. 58
Valentin Silvestrov - Serenade for strings
Joseph Haydn - Symphony No. 8 Le Soir, G major Hob. I/8

BELGRADE PHILHARMONIC    
Conductor: Nikolay Alekseev
Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano
Pyotr Tchaikovsky - Romeo and Juliet
Franz Liszt - Piano concerto No. 2 A major
Sergey Prokofiev - Symphony No. 5 B flat major, Op. 100

BELGRADE STRINGS    
Conductor RONALD ZOLLMAN
Letizia Belmondo, harp; Pyotr Fedkov, oboe; Elena Popovskaya, soprano and Alexander Kisselev, bass
Witold Lutoslawski - Trauermusik, for strings
Witold Lutoslawski - Concerto for oboe, harp and chamber orchestra
Dmitry Shostakovich - Symphony No. 14, for soprano, bass, strings and percussion, Op. 135
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: hornteacher on September 24, 2007, 05:02:04 PM
Charlotte Symphony Orchestra concert next month:

Eric Ruske - Soloist

Mozart Horn Concerto #4
Strauss Horn Concerto #1
Beethoven Symphony #7


Should be fun, especially for a hornist like me!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on September 24, 2007, 05:28:43 PM
At the CSO next week:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Riccardo Muti, conductor


Tchaikovsky -   Symphony No. 6 (Pathétique)
Hindemith -   Nobilissima visione
Scriabin -   The Poem of Ecstasy


Looking forward to the Hindemith and Scriabin, in particular. I heard the Scriabin ten years ago with Boulez when Bud Herseth was still principal trumpet. Will be interesting to hear what Chris Martin makes of it.

Full review on my blog: http://tonicblotter.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on September 24, 2007, 06:41:23 PM
American record Guide's latest issue has assessment of recent concerts by both Montreal orchestras, Nagano's OSM and Nézet-Séguin's OMGM.

I attended the NZ Mahler 6th concert from last summer, described with gushing enthusiasm by ARG' reviewer as 'made in heaven'. The cooler respons of another reviewer for Nagano's own Mahler offering (the Resurrection) concords with my own observations. NZ is the more interesting conductor, and each concert or disc of his is an event (as was this weekend's Bruckner 9, a real knockout). Nagano's elicit prudent praise, but he (and the orchestra) fail to excite or generate even moderate interest. No contest IMO.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 25, 2007, 07:16:32 AM
GIDON KREMER & KREMERATA BALTICA    
Felix Mendelssohn - Violin concerto D minor, op. posth.
Bela Bartók - Divertimento
Cinema – compilation of film music
Charles Chaplin: "Smile" from the "Modern Times" (Arr. for Violin and Strings: Andrei Pushkarev)
Toru Takemitsu: Fragment from "Three Movie Scores"
Isaak Dunaevsky: "Overture" from "The Children of Captain Grant" (Arr. for Strings: A. Pushkarev)
Giya Kancheli: "Rag-Gidon-Time"
Glenn Miller: "Moonlight Serenade" (Arr. for Violin and Strings: Andrei Pushkarev)
Astor Piazzolla: "Tres Minutos con la Realidad ", "Libertango" (Arr. for Violine, Vibraphone and Strings: Andrei Pushkarev)
Ennio Morricone: Thema aus "For a fistful of Dollars" (Arr. for Strings: Aleksey Igudesman)
Soloists: Gidon Kremer, violin; Andrei Pushkarev, vibraphone

These all look great, especially that Lutoslawski/Shostakovich concert, but I hope you will highly consider the one above.  I heard Kremer and his group last summer, one of the finest ensembles I've ever heard.  But the big surprise was Andrei Pushkarev, who must be one of the world's greatest vibraphone players.  I have never heard anything like it.  The Glenn Miller arrangement was almost worth the entire evening alone.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 25, 2007, 07:22:42 AM
Full review on my blog: http://tonicblotter.blogspot.com/

Fascinating write-up, thank you!  Loved this: (Note to self: next time don't sit in the Terrace when nine horns and the pipe organ are in use. )   ;D

I'm still marveling that Muti opened the concert with the Tchaikovsky--a novel idea, even if for some it turned out to be not entirely successful.  I find the whole subject of "program order" an interesting one, and generally think that some of those traditions are worth revisiting and shaking up.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on September 25, 2007, 08:02:29 AM
These all look great, especially that Lutoslawski/Shostakovich concert, but I hope you will highly consider the one above.  I heard Kremer and his group last summer, one of the finest ensembles I've ever heard.  But the big surprise was Andrei Pushkarev, who must be one of the world's greatest vibraphone players.  I have never heard anything like it.  The Glenn Miller arrangement was almost worth the entire evening alone.

--Bruce

I've seen Kremer with his band once before and it was splendid evening: Part's Fratres, Shostakovich Violin Sonata (string orch. arr.) and Enescu Octet with few encores of which Piazzolla's Oblivion brought the house down. Really memorable night, so I'll definitely try not to miss that one.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on September 25, 2007, 04:19:15 PM
Fascinating write-up, thank you!  Loved this: (Note to self: next time don't sit in the Terrace when nine horns and the pipe organ are in use. )   ;D

I'm still marveling that Muti opened the concert with the Tchaikovsky--a novel idea, even if for some it turned out to be not entirely successful.  I find the whole subject of "program order" an interesting one, and generally think that some of those traditions are worth revisiting and shaking up.

--Bruce

Thanks. I didn't think the Pathetique as opener was unsuccessful as much as I thought some of what followed wasn't quite of the same caliber. Conceptually it's fine. JUst make sure that it doesn't go programatically downhill from there. NB: the Terrace in Chicago is behind the orchestra, i.e. all of those nine horns had their bells pointed at me and the organ was just above me.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: sound67 on October 03, 2007, 03:27:02 PM
Listened to the "Pathétique" this evening as part of a gala concert at the Alte Oper, Frankfurt, in memory of Mstislav Rostropovich. Three of his master pupils, Mischa Maisky, David Geringas and Natalia Gutman, played pieces with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi conducting. Since I'm friends with a musician from that orchestra I was able to attend the after-concert gala dinner. Towards the end, we noticed a presence standing next to our table. Looking up, we saw that it was Järvi, making his rounds to say farewell to the party crowd. Naturally, the orchestra musicians all rose up to shake his hands, and also naturally, I didn't do that because I would have felt ashamed. But since I did not move, he nodded in my direction, and I nodded back. A fine concert it was.

Thomas
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bonehelm on October 03, 2007, 05:34:37 PM
Vancouver symphony orchestra
Bramwell Tovey (conductor)
Lang Lang (pianist)

BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto no.1 in C major, op.15
                  Symphony no.6 in F major, "pastoral"
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: rockerreds on October 05, 2007, 09:33:48 AM
Wednesday,October 10
First Unitarian Church,22nd and Chestnut Streets.Philadelphia,PA
Concert 730pm,Talk 6pm
Mimi Stillman,flute
Yumi Kendall,cello
Charles Abramovic,piano

Works of Rorem,Crumb,Abramovic,Cacioppo

FREE!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on October 05, 2007, 09:47:25 AM
I am hearing Murray Perahia play some Beethoven and Chopin on Oct.21 and on Nov.4 Dohnanyi is conducting Bruckner's 4th with the CSO, Arabella Steinbacher will play the Sibelius VC in the first half.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 05, 2007, 10:17:41 AM
Eagerly looking forward to this coming Monday night, at Carnegie Hall:

Boston Symphony Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Piano
Tanglewood Festival Chorus
John Oliver, Conductor

Ravel: Alborada del gracioso 
Ravel: Pavane pour une infante défunte 
Ravel: Piano Concerto in G Major 
Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé (complete)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on October 06, 2007, 03:13:25 AM
Eagerly looking forward to this coming Monday night, at Carnegie Hall:

Boston Symphony Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Piano
Tanglewood Festival Chorus
John Oliver, Conductor

Ravel: Alborada del gracioso 
Ravel: Pavane pour une infante défunte 
Ravel: Piano Concerto in G Major 
Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé (complete)

--Bruce

Nice. Indeed very nice.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on October 06, 2007, 07:06:57 AM
Eagerly looking forward to this coming Monday night, at Carnegie Hall:

Boston Symphony Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Piano
Tanglewood Festival Chorus
John Oliver, Conductor

Ravel: Alborada del gracioso 
Ravel: Pavane pour une infante défunte 
Ravel: Piano Concerto in G Major 
Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé (complete)

--Bruce

Ooh, that does sound fun. I still never had the chance of hearing the Ravel concerto live. Haitink is doing the complete Daphnis along with Poulenc's Gloria with the CSO + Chorus in November.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on October 06, 2007, 10:22:07 AM
At the Montreal Symphony on the 23rd:

Herbert Blomstedt and the Bruckner 2nd  :D

Peter Serkin in Bach's first piano concerto.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 06, 2007, 10:41:54 AM
At the Montreal Symphony on the 23rd:

Herbert Blomstedt and the Bruckner 2nd  :D

Peter Serkin in Bach's first piano concerto.

Great-sounding program!  I don't think I've ever heard that Bruckner live, and it has one of my favorite Bruckner slow movements, really haunting.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: suomesta on October 10, 2007, 12:34:50 AM
Martin Fröst plays Aho's Clarinet Concerto tomorrow with the Lahti Symphony, can't wait! LS also shows their concerts as webcasts at www.classiclive.com. I'm the one waiving at you in the front row...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on October 10, 2007, 04:37:15 AM
Well,  the Cleveland O is playing Mahler 2 this weekend.  I think I might try and catch the friday morning show.

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on October 11, 2007, 06:26:05 AM
In less than 2 hours I'll be attending this:

Claude Debussy - Violin Sonata
Maurice Ravel - Violin Sonata
Cesar Franck - Violin Sonata


Cristina Anghelescu - violin, Viniciu Moroianu - piano.

(I guess these names ring no bell for you. :) )
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: suomesta on October 12, 2007, 01:07:13 AM
Remember I mentioned going to listen to Martin Fröst the other day? Well the performance was simply outstanding. I am sorry, I know this is not a review place, but I still wanted to share this experience with you. He played 2 impros as an encore, here is a link to one of them http://www.classiclive.com/Concerts/2007/October/370
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: matti on October 12, 2007, 01:15:54 AM


Cristina Anghelescu 

Her name does ring a bell, in fact. She did well in the Sibelius Competition some fifteen years ago.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on October 12, 2007, 01:45:59 AM
In less than 2 hours I'll be attending this:

Claude Debussy - Violin Sonata
Maurice Ravel - Violin Sonata
Cesar Franck - Violin Sonata


Cristina Anghelescu - violin, Viniciu Moroianu - piano.

(I guess these names ring no bell for you. :) )

Her name does ring a bell, in fact. She did well in the Sibelius Competition some fifteen years ago.

Well, it's been a marvelous evening. The highlight was the Blues from Ravel's Sonata which the 2 performers made sound rather like a Tango: intensely passionate and sensual..

The only awful thing was that right after the 1st part of Debussy's Sonata a mobile phone started to ring somewhere in the hall and the f&*%$#g bastard did not turn it off, probably from fear of not being reprehended publicly and loudly --- which some of us did anyway.

Tonight:

Liszt - PC 1
Tchaikovsky - String Serenade
Tchaikovsky - Capriccio Italien


Romanian National Radio Orchestra, conductor Ilarion Ionescu-Galati
Ioana Maria Lupascu - piano

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on October 12, 2007, 03:50:11 AM
Great program, Andrei!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on October 12, 2007, 12:17:11 PM
Looking forward to this next Thursday.

Music of the Spheres

 
Mischa Santora  Conductor
Michael Houstoun  Piano
   
Britten   Sinfonia da Requiem
Prokofiev  Piano Concerto No.1
Interval 
Holst   The Planets

To finish the APN News & Media Premier Series for the year, a long awaited event – the APO presents Holst’s Planets suite in its entirety for the first time in 15 years. Under the baton of Mischa Santora, whose appearances with the orchestra in 2005 were roundly applauded, Holst’s masterpiece, admired especially for the astounding “Mars Bringer of War” and for the moving “Jupiter” theme, will receive a rendition worth the wait. The first half of the programme has two more treats in store: Michael Houstoun in Prokofiev’s cheeky and virtuosic first piano concerto, and Benjamin Britten’s devastatingly raw Sinfonia da Requiem, written upon the death of his parents.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 15, 2007, 02:34:30 PM
This week, three concerts by the Cleveland Orchestra, with Franz Welser-Möst.  I love them, so I'm excited...

Tomorrow:
Mozart: Symphony No. 28 in C Major, K. 200 
John Adams: Guide to Strange Places 
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6, "Pathétique"  

Wednesday:
DebussyIbéria, from Images, No. 2 
Matthias Pintscher: Five Orchestral Pieces (NY Premiere)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 

Thursday:
Malin Hartelius, Soprano
Bernarda Fink, Mezzo-Soprano
Westminster Symphonic Choir
Joe Miller, Conductor
Mahler: Symphony No. 2, "Resurrection" 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: suomesta on October 18, 2007, 01:41:44 AM
Who said something about Bruckner - we have a black lab named after him! He likes his 8th Symphony especially...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on October 18, 2007, 02:31:41 AM
Tomorrow:

Enescu - Concert Overture on Romanian Folk Themes
Grieg - Piano Concerto in A minor
(interval)
Sibelius - Valse triste
Respighi - Pini di Roma

Romanian National Radio Orchestra, conducted by Horia Andreescu
Geir Botnen, piano


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: quintett op.57 on October 18, 2007, 08:06:42 AM
Tonight :

Dvorak : Cello Concerto               Eschenbach/Orchestre de Paris/Yo-Yo Ma
Hindemith : Symphony in E-flat
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on October 19, 2007, 05:15:22 PM
Looking forward to this next Thursday.

Music of the Spheres

 
Mischa Santeria Conductor
Michael Houston Piano
   
Britten sniffing DA Requiem
Prokofiev Piano Concerto No.1
Interval
Holst the Planets

To finish the APN News & Media Premier Series for the year, a long awaited event – the APO presents Holst's Planets suite in its entirety for the first time in 15 years. Under the baton of Mischa Santeria, whose appearances with the orchestra in 2005 were roundly applauded, Holst's masterpiece, admired especially for the astounding Mars Bringer of War and for the moving Jupiter theme, will receive a rendition worth the wait. The first half of the programme has two more treats in store: Michael Houston in Prokofiev's cheeky and virtuosic first piano concerto, and Benjamin Britten's devastatingly raw Sniffing DA Requiem, written upon the death of his parents.


Great concert!

The Britten piece was the first work I've heard live by him and it was a treat. Loved the growling sax parts in the second movement and the finale reminded me of Stravinsky's Firebird conclusion. The only negative was the ragged horn section at one point.

Prokofiev's  Piano Concerto No.1 was great with Michael Houston performing the tricky work with alot of fire and passion. In an evening of 20th century composers this was the most modern sounding of the three.

Holst's The Planets was the highlight. I'm very familiar with this work as it was a gateway piece for me as a teenager so to hear/see it performed live was wonderful. They took the tempo noticeably faster than the Elder/Halle Orchestra Hyperion SACD version that I've been listening to recently. The power of Mars, especially when the main theme returns at the half way point only STRONGER, was goosebump territory. The only negative was for the Neptune finale they replaced the unseen choir with a very visible synth  ??? Apparently this was a musical decision not a financial one, but the ending was very thin and digital sounding after the grandeur of the preceding hour. Some guy did a LOUD sneeze right as the final notes were fading around the hall  ::)

A great finish to the APO's premium season  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on October 20, 2007, 04:36:02 AM
Great concert!
...

Hey, good to see you made it to the concert and moreover, that it was worth your while :D. The Bartok PC1 is one of my favourites.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on October 21, 2007, 03:01:42 PM
Hey, good to see you made it to the concert and moreover, that it was worth your while :D. The Bartok PC1 is one of my favourites.

Yep, thanks for that mate; glad I made the effort  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: rubio on October 22, 2007, 08:23:49 AM
I wonder about going to this concert:

Oslo PO - Gennadij Rozhdestventski
06.12.07 

Program: 
HJALMAR BORGSTRŘM
The Thought, symphonic poem

PETER I. TCHAIKOVSKY
Manfred Symphony 


This sounds very promising, so basically I wonder if Rozhdestventski is giving great shows at the moment? Or is he over the top?


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 22, 2007, 09:52:37 AM
I wonder about going to this concert:

Oslo PO - Gennadij Rozhdestventski
06.12.07 

Program: 
HJALMAR BORGSTRŘM
The Thought, symphonic poem

PETER I. TCHAIKOVSKY
Manfred Symphony 


This sounds very promising, so basically I wonder if Rozhdestventski is giving great shows at the moment? Or is he over the top?

Can't answer your query about the conductor (whom I don't think I've ever heard live) but I'd go just for the combination of him, the orchestra, and that program.  Manfred isn't done all that often and is well worth hearing, and I've not heard any music by the other composer. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on October 22, 2007, 10:23:05 AM
Looking forward to doing this double bill on November 11:

Jones Hall, Houston, TX

2:30pm
Houston Symphony
Hans Graf, conductor


Mozart: Serenade for Winds
Berg: Lyric Suite
Zemlinsky: Lyric Symphony

8:00pm
UBS Verbier Festival Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, conductor
Martha Argerich, piano


Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3

And the next weekend, with our local symphony, Sibelius 2nd and Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto with Caitlin Tully, on Saturday, Nov. 17, and the 18th, Houston Symphony with Hans Graf and Emmanual Ax:

Sibelius:
Finlandia
Sibelius: Symphony No. 7
Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1

That's like a smorgasbord for Sibelians down here.  ;)

Speaking of Sibelius, M forever has been attending the L.A. Sibelius cycle and reporting back, sounds like it's been quite interesting so far, the 1st was apparently awesome (especially for M to say so!) The 5th and 6th is this weekend.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 22, 2007, 10:56:26 AM
Houston Symphony
Hans Graf, conductor


Mozart: Serenade for Winds
Berg: Lyric Suite
Zemlinsky: Lyric Symphony

8:00pm
UBS Verbier Festival Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, conductor
Martha Argerich, piano


Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3

All sounds great, but Nov. 11 sounds like a really action-packed day!  That first program is really canny: winds in the first piece, strings in the next, then all together for the Zemlinsky.  And I was watching the UBS Verbier group online last August--another excellent group that appears to be made up of relatively young players.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on October 22, 2007, 03:03:42 PM
8:00pm
UBS Verbier Festival Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, conductor
Martha Argerich, piano


Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3

I'll be hearing the same combo in Chicago on the 13th!  :D  Looking forward to comparing notes.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: vandermolen on October 24, 2007, 06:52:06 AM
John Foulds "A World Requiem" (Royal Albert Hall, London 11th November 2007). Last performed there in 1926.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 24, 2007, 06:58:37 AM
John Foulds "A World Requiem" (Royal Albert Hall, London 11th November 2007). Last performed there in 1926.

Now that sounds really fascinating.  (And I bet that in the United States, that piece has never been performed.)  Do report back.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 24, 2007, 07:40:26 AM
Tomorrow night, Paul Hillier and the Theatre of Voices, in this interesting program at Zankel Hall:

Sheldon Frank: "As I Was Saying" 
Berio: A-ronne
David Lang: The Little Match Girl Passion (World Premiere)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on October 24, 2007, 12:07:24 PM
Final NZSO concert for the season tomorrow night:

Edo de Waart
Subscription Tour 6 - Series 1

PSATHAS Planet Damnation
MOZART Piano Concerto No 23 K488
RACHMANINOV Symphony No 2

EDO DE WAART Conductor
SA CHEN Piano
LAURENCE REESE Timpani

The tiny repertoire of concertos for timpani is boosted by what will undoubtedly prove a demanding and illustrious addition from award-winning New Zealand composer John Psathas.  Mozart's popular Piano Concerto in A major, K 488, from the mid-1780s Marriage of Figaro era, communicates joy tinged with sadness, that perennial human condition.  After an aborted 1905 revolution in Russia, Rachmaninov escaped to the stability offered by Dresden.  The Second Symphony, the most expansive and, due to its lyrical emotion, best loved of the three was the first work composed there in 1906.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 24, 2007, 12:26:38 PM
Final NZSO concert for the season tomorrow night:

Edo de Waart
Subscription Tour 6 - Series 1

PSATHAS Planet Damnation
MOZART Piano Concerto No 23 K488
RACHMANINOV Symphony No 2

EDO DE WAART Conductor
SA CHEN Piano
LAURENCE REESE Timpani

Sounds like another good evening in the concert hall.  I've heard of Psathas but don't know his music.  Love the title...  ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: vandermolen on October 24, 2007, 12:28:20 PM
Now that sounds really fascinating.  (And I bet that in the United States, that piece has never been performed.)  Do report back.

--Bruce

Will do Bruce; am looking forward to it. Apparently it is a massive work (90 mins) and was regularly performed at the Albert Hall in London every Armistice Day in the years after World war One.

Jeffrey
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on October 24, 2007, 12:29:27 PM
Wow, quite a monument Back in the Day, eh, vandermolen?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on October 24, 2007, 12:30:16 PM
Sounds like another good evening in the concert hall.  I've heard of Psathas but don't know his music.  Love the title...  ;D

--Bruce

Yeah Bruce he is a local composer who is doing quite well; a number of his works have been played by both the NZSO and the APO. Could be a name to keep an eye on  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on October 24, 2007, 08:06:53 PM
Today's Montreal SO concert: my view in the Bruckner Abbey (guess which composer was featured? ;D).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on October 25, 2007, 06:07:19 PM
October 26-27, 2007
Verizon Hall
Schubert, Mozart, and Haydn    
   
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Stephen Hough, piano

SCHUBERT  Overture in C major "in the Italian Style"
MOZART  Piano Concerto No. 21, K. 467
MOZART  Excerpts from Ballet Music from Idomeneo
HAYDN  Symphony No. 100 ("Military")

My first subscription concert of the season. Looks to be a good one.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on October 25, 2007, 11:13:10 PM
October 26-27, 2007
Verizon Hall
Schubert, Mozart, and Haydn    
   
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Stephen Hough, piano

SCHUBERT  Overture in C major "in the Italian Style"
MOZART  Piano Concerto No. 21, K. 467
MOZART  Excerpts from Ballet Music from Idomeneo
HAYDN  Symphony No. 100 ("Military")

My first subscription concert of the season. Looks to be a good one.

No doubt it is. Please report back!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on October 26, 2007, 06:50:28 AM
We're hearing this concert tonight in Frankfurt:

HR-Sinfonieorchester (formerly the Frankfurt RSO) conducted by Paavo Järvi, Lars Vogt piano         

Mahler      Adagio Symphony #10
Mozart      Piano Concert B major KV 595
Sibelius   Symphony #5


Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on October 26, 2007, 12:08:42 PM
Final NZSO concert for the season tomorrow night:

Edo de Waart
Subscription Tour 6 - Series 1

PSATHAS Planet Damnation
MOZART Piano Concerto No 23 K488
RACHMANINOV Symphony No 2

EDO DE WAART Conductor
SA CHEN Piano
LAURENCE REESE Timpani

The tiny repertoire of concertos for timpani is boosted by what will undoubtedly prove a demanding and illustrious addition from award-winning New Zealand composer John Psathas.  Mozart's popular Piano Concerto in A major, K 488, from the mid-1780s Marriage of Figaro era, communicates joy tinged with sadness, that perennial human condition.  After an aborted 1905 revolution in Russia, Rachmaninov escaped to the stability offered by Dresden.  The Second Symphony, the most expansive and, due to its lyrical emotion, best loved of the three was the first work composed there in 1906.



Wonderful concert last night!

The world premier of PSATHAS' Planet Damnation was sensational. The percussion was heavily featured with the timpani stationed at the front of the stage. This was a highly rhythmic, driving and powerful tour de force replete with tubular bells, staccato violins and thrilling woodwind playing. The conclusion was met with thunderous applause. This is a composer to keep a look out for.

MOZART' Piano Concerto No 23 K488 was played by a delightful SA CHEN who looked very lovely and performed with an appropriate light touch. Charming.

RACHMANINOV' Symphony No 2 was a one hour journey of waves of surging strings and triumphant heralding of horns and percussion. The Adagio is especially beautiful.

Another fantastic night at the concert hall.  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 26, 2007, 02:26:52 PM
On Sunday afternoon, James Levine and the MET Chamber Ensemble are doing a very interesting version of Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat.  Note the participants.  ;D

The MET Chamber Ensemble
James Levine, Artistic Director and Conductor
Judith Bettina, Soprano
Susan Narucki, Soprano
Sasha Cooke, Mezzo-Soprano
Elliott Carter, Soldier
Milton Babbitt, Devil
John Harbison, Narrator

Elliott Carter: Tempo e tempi 
John Harbison: North and South 
Milton Babbitt: The Head of the Bed 
Stravinsky: Histoire du soldat 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on October 26, 2007, 02:34:52 PM
Just further proof that Milton Babbitt is the Devil incarnate.

A seriously enticing concert: please report back!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 29, 2007, 07:23:21 AM
On Sunday afternoon, James Levine and the MET Chamber Ensemble are doing a very interesting version of Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat.  Note the participants.  ;D

The MET Chamber Ensemble
James Levine, Artistic Director and Conductor
Judith Bettina, Soprano
Susan Narucki, Soprano
Sasha Cooke, Mezzo-Soprano
Elliott Carter, Soldier
Milton Babbitt, Devil
John Harbison, Narrator

Elliott Carter: Tempo e tempi 
John Harbison: North and South 
Milton Babbitt: The Head of the Bed 
Stravinsky: Histoire du soldat 

--Bruce

IMHO this was one of the best concerts of the year.  Susan Narucki was fantastic in the Carter song set, which I've now heard three or four times, live.  It must be one of his best works.  The Harbison set was new to me, and is also very strong, with some jazzy, bluesy elements, and Sasha Cooke has an absolutely huge voice. 

The Babbitt, sung by Judith Bettina, has never done it for me--until this performance.  It is like a steely object that stubbornly resists all efforts to penetrate it.  Its 15 stanzas (basically all stitched together without pauses for 22 minutes) seem like 15 monochrome canvases at first, until you start noticing tiny details that leap out. 

But of course, what everyone was waiting for was the Stravinsky.  John Harbison adapted the text, changing the names of the Soldier and the Devil to "Elliott" and "Milton."  It was worth the entire afternoon to see Carter turn and say to Babbitt, "You filthy, rotten scum!"  And at one point Babbitt replies, "My dodecaphonic hexachords will bring about your fall!"

The playing of the MET Chamber Ensemble was inspired: it was like hearing another 25 soloists.  David Chan, the MET Orchestra's concertmaster, was just fantastic in the Stravinsky. 

More potential good news: the concert was videotaped.  I'm trying to find out if it's going to be shown on PBS or turned into a DVD. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on October 29, 2007, 02:09:34 PM
October 26-27, 2007
Verizon Hall
Schubert, Mozart, and Haydn    
   
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Nicholas McGegan, conductor
Stephen Hough, piano

SCHUBERT  Overture in C major "in the Italian Style"
MOZART  Piano Concerto No. 21, K. 467
MOZART  Excerpts from Ballet Music from Idomeneo
HAYDN  Symphony No. 100 ("Military")

My first subscription concert of the season. Looks to be a good one.

...and it was... a very enjoyable night out at the symphony. McGegan was very energetic, and I think that translated well to the orchestra. The Schubert which opened the program was agreeable, though it seemed very short lived. Mr. Hough gave a very good account of the Mozart concerto, with very fluid playing backed up by responsive accompaniment. I really enjoyed his solos though - I'm not sure if he played the ones usually played with the piece, but in his hands they sounded great and were interesting as well. A bonus was that they had a signing during the intermission, where Mr. Hough came out to autograph CDs. I already had his excellent Saint-Saens concerto collection, so I opted for the Hyperion Rachmaninov concerto set.

The second half was better than the first - it almost seemed like, now that the soloist had played and gone the orchestra was free to really let loose. And they did - I found the ballet excerpts from Idomeneo the most exciting and exuberantly played pieces in the program. There were hints of this in the last movement of the piano concerto, but it came out full flower in the ballet music and the Haydn symphony that followed. The Haydn of course was great - the extra percussion really made for some great listening. And of course, throughout, McGegan was hopping around on the podium like a frantic gnome making adjustments to ensure nothing went awry. The audience was enthusiastic as they offered a few callbacks to McGegan at the close of the show. I did notice that while some stood, it seemed the vast majority were still seated, but were applauding con brio, as was I.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on October 29, 2007, 02:14:50 PM
The Philadelphia Orchestra 
Stéphane Denčve,  conductor 
Vincent Dubois,  organ 
 
Verizon Hall
 
Ravel and Roussel 
 
HIGDON  blue cathedral 
POULENC  Concerto for Organ, Strings, and Timpani 
RAVEL  Suite from Mother Goose 
ROUSSEL  Suite No. 2 from Bacchus and Ariadne

This is my next subscription concert - Nov 10th. I know I've heard the Poulenc before (by the Philadelphia Orchestra) as it was recorded and put on an Ondine CD (along with Barber's Toccata and something else). It will be great to hear it live. I'll have to dig out my Dutoit/Montreal SO recordings of the Ravel to remember what the Mother Goose was like. The Higdon I'll refresh my memory on as well from a Telarc CD (Spano/Atlanta). And I don't believe I've heard the Roussel yet, so a nice mix of old and new.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on October 29, 2007, 02:21:45 PM
I know I've heard the Poulenc before (by the Philadelphia Orchestra) as it was recorded and put on an Ondine CD (along with Barber's Toccata and something else).

The something else would be the Saint-Saens Symphony No.3 "Organ". A fine disc, though I would have preferred the latter piece with a bit more edge and drive. Good to see Denčve making some headway into the big leagues. He is one of a few young conductors I have been extremely impressed with. I first heard him several years ago conducting a performance at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein in Duisburg. His talent was quite evident then already. He apprenticed with Solti, IIRC.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: 12tone. on October 29, 2007, 06:22:31 PM
Our (CAN) Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has 0 programs this year that look remotely interesting.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on October 30, 2007, 03:37:48 AM
Our (CAN) Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has 0 programs this year that look remotely interesting.

Don't leave us hanging!  So what are they playing?  Any All-Dittersdorf programs?  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on October 30, 2007, 03:44:35 AM
Really looking forward to James Sommerville playing the premiere of the Carter Horn Concerto next month.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on October 31, 2007, 12:16:30 AM
This Friday:

Sibelius

Finlandia
Violin Concerto
Symphony no. 2


Romanian National Radio Orchestra, Jin Wang - conductor
Alexandru Tomescu - violin
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bonehelm on November 03, 2007, 06:43:00 PM
Next tuesday:

THE CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
 
Schedule
Tuesday,6 November 2007
8 pm
English Musical Renaissance

John Ireland
The Land of the Lost Continent

William Walton
Quartet for Piano and Strings

Composer T.B.A
Songs

Edward Elgar
Quintet in A minor for Piano
and Strings, Opus 84

Someone want to tell me what to expect?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on November 08, 2007, 06:04:14 AM
Yesterday night a terrific night with Mr. Anthony di Bonaventura

Beethoven - Sonata in D Major (1781) (a very pleasant surprise)

Rachmaninov - Variations on a Theme of Corelli, op. 42

Ravel - Mirroirs

The beauty and poetry of his performance amazed me. I was also particularly impressed by his modesty.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on November 08, 2007, 12:59:16 PM
This next Friday:

Brentano String Quartet

Auckland performance
WHEN: Friday 16 November 2007, 7pm
WHERE: Auckland Town Hall


Programme 1

Selected & transcribed by Mark Steinberg: Renaissance works

Haydn: String Quartet in G Opus 64 No 4

Gabriela Lena Frank: world premičre of new work composed for the quartet

Bartók: String Quartet No 6 (1939)

Should be a good one  :)

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 08, 2007, 01:05:52 PM
Wow, great program, and I haven't heard anyone mention Gabriela Lena Frank.  A group here in NYC called ModernWorks, run by cellist Madeleine Shapiro, has done some of her pieces and I enjoyed them a lot.  I'll be most interested in your comments!  And that Bartók... 0:)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on November 08, 2007, 01:15:20 PM
Just came in from Blandine Rannou recital at Belgrade City Hall
program was:
Jean Philippe Rameau - excerpts from Nouvelles Suites (first half of Suite in A and second part of Suite in G)
Antoine Forqueray - Suite No.5
encore: Forqueray's La Portugaise (sp?)

Very nice playing, not the most rhythmically incisive but very tender and gentle (though she was all guns blazing in L'Egiptienne and Le Jupiter) with lovely singing line, Allemande fron Rameau's suite in A was simply drop dead gorgeous.
Haven't heard her Rameau recordings for Zig-Zag, definitely will consider.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on November 08, 2007, 05:07:59 PM
Wow, great program, and I haven't heard anyone mention Gabriela Lena Frank.  A group here in NYC called ModernWorks, run by cellist Madeleine Shapiro, has done some of her pieces and I enjoyed them a lot.  I'll be most interested in your comments!  And that Bartók... 0:)

--Bruce

Interesting. Thanks for that background Bruce.

I'll be sure to report back  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 09, 2007, 01:00:52 PM
Just found out I'm hearing Gustavo Dudamel and the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela at Carnegie on Sunday afternoon.  Since tickets are about as scarce as they come, I'm very excited.  Program:

BERLIOZ: Le Carnaval romain Overture 
CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor, Op. 21 (with Emanuel Ax)
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 5 
Latin American compositions and other works 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on November 09, 2007, 08:35:47 PM
Bruce, I'm quite excited too! Please report.

Is there a trill on the trumpets at the end of Carnaval Romain (a fantastic touch only a few conductors achieve properly) ?

Ole!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: rubio on November 10, 2007, 06:53:25 AM
I wonder about these two concerts in Oslo.

First 29th of March 2008:

NDR Sinfonieorchester Hamburg
Christoph von Dohnanyi
Yefin Bronfman
 
Program:
BEETHOVEN pinao concerto no. 4
STRAVINSKY Firebird, complete

Then 16th of April 2008:

London Symphony Orchestra
Daniel Harding
Viktoria Mullova

Program:
BRITTEN Sinfonia da Requiem
PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto no. 2
BRAHMS Symphony no. 2
BEETHOVEN Sonata no. 1 i F Op.5
CHOPIN Sonata
CHOPIN Pieces (Nocturne, Etude, Valse)
BRAHMS Sonata F Op.99


Should I go for these concertos? They are not very cheap, but these orchestras don't come to Oslo often.
 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on November 11, 2007, 07:57:57 AM
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Stéphane Denčve, conductor
Vincent Dubois, organ

HIGDON blue cathedral
POULENC Concerto for Organ, Strings, and Timpani
RAVEL Suite from Mother Goose
ROUSSEL Suite No. 2 from Bacchus and Ariadne

Jennifer Higdon's blue cathedral is a lushly scored work (as are the other works in the program) and modernist (but tonal) sensibility. I really enjoyed the mood and setting of the piece - and the orchestra did well by it. Which is a good thing because Higdon was sitting in the audience. It's not often I get to see the composer at a concert of their own music, but I understand Higdon teaches at Curtis in Philly.

The Poulenc was exceptionally well done - Deneve's interpretation made so much sense intellectually, sensually and emotionally that I think it is the finest version of this work that I've heard. And the soloist, Vincent Dubois returned for an encore.

After intermission came two suites of ballet music from Ravel and Roussel. I think the Ravel made more of an impact in terms of the emotions it displays - sadness, longing, humor... but the Roussel was much more visceral especially in the closing.

Post concert, Jennifer Higdon was autographing CD so I bought one of her chamber music, and said that hearing blue cathedral live was great. She said it does sound different from the recording, and I said, yes, the live experience is much more exciting.

I'd not mind seeing this conductor in Philadelphia more often - it was a great concert.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: pjme on November 11, 2007, 02:35:04 PM
Last Friday I went to Amsterdam, for :

the Concertgebouw orchestra, conducted by George Benjamin

Claude Debussy : Prélude ŕ l'aprčs-midi d'un faune
Paul Dukas ( orch. Geert Van Keulen) : La plainte, au loin, du faune...
Olivier Messiaen: for organ solo : two fragm. from "La nativité du seigneur"
Les enfants de dieu
dieu parmi nous
Marc - André Dalbavie : La source d'un regard ( for Messiaen) ( 2007 - premiere,with Bamberg and Philadelphia)
Olivier Messiaen: Les offrandes oubliées
Chronochromie

Benjamin -a small,stylish figure in front of the huge orchestra, conducted music he definitely loves.
Dalbavie's work (The origin of a look, or The origin of a gaze..???)is a long "threnos" , a lament or  a dirge. It sounded almost "romantic" compared to Messiaen's extravagant and extraordinary Chronochromie. The Concertgebouw shook and shimmered under the gigantic brass chords and percussion (xylophone, xylorimba,tubular bells,cymbals,large tam tam ,bass drum, glockenspiel) explosions.
The Epode - a 5 minute piece for 18 solo strings - depicting a bird concert at dawn, still manages to amaze and shock.

Organist Leo Van Doeselaar, who played the Messiaen fragments, turned the Concertgebouw organ now into a huge roaring monster - then into a whispering & crooning Harmonium....

An interesting concert, of course. It was played twice ( Thursday/Friday) for almost sold out audiences. Benjamin briefly introduced the orchestral works by Messiaen .

Peter
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on November 11, 2007, 02:40:23 PM
Wow, Peter, this must have been a fantastic night at the symphony!  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: pjme on November 11, 2007, 02:49:35 PM
Yes Lilas, an impressive experience.

The Concertgebouw will do more Messiaen in 2008 :

Počmes pour Mi ( one of my favorite Messiaen works) with Measha Bruggergosman / David Robertson
l'Ascension (Myung Whun Chung conducting)
Eclairs sur l'au-delŕ (Ingo Metzmacher)
Turangalila Symph. (Mariss Jansons / Jean Yves Thibaudet )

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on November 12, 2007, 04:55:46 AM
I've only been to a handful of concerts since the summer, so I'm happy to get back into the live music groove with a couple this weekend:

COPLAND   Music for the Theatre (2')
MILHAUD   Le Bouf sur le Toit (15')
TURNAGE   A Prayer out of Stillness (15-18’) UK premiere
TÜÜR   Oxymoron (Music for Tirol) (19') Scottish premiere

Scottish Chamber Orchestra
Olari Elts  - Conductor
John Patitucci  - double bass/ six string bass guitar

No idea about how any of this sounds ???, but I'm always ready to hear something new. Apparently the concert is a fusion of classical and jazz styles which 'can make for a memorable, edge of the seat music-making.' Seems like a very short programme though.


The Dunedin Consort - Buxtehude Anniversary Concert
Director John Butt

Buxtehude ‘Der Herr ist mit Mir’
Bach 'Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit', Cantata 106
Beamish New commission

More familiar territory here :D. I really like the Dunedin's Bach and can't wait to hear the Actus Tragicus.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 12, 2007, 06:35:33 AM
I've only been to a handful of concerts since the summer, so I'm happy to get back into the live music groove with a couple this weekend:

COPLAND   Music for the Theatre (2')
MILHAUD   Le Bouf sur le Toit (15')
TURNAGE   A Prayer out of Stillness (15-18’) UK premiere
TÜÜR   Oxymoron (Music for Tirol) (19') Scottish premiere

Scottish Chamber Orchestra
Olari Elts  - Conductor
John Patitucci  - double bass/ six string bass guitar

No idea about how any of this sounds ???, but I'm always ready to hear something new. Apparently the concert is a fusion of classical and jazz styles which 'can make for a memorable, edge of the seat music-making.' Seems like a very short programme though.

Wow, what a great program.  The Copland and Milhaud aren't done often enough, and the other two sound intriguing.  Please report back... :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 12, 2007, 07:28:27 AM
After yesterday's concert with Gustavo Dudamel and the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela, they're back for round two tonight, and this time I'm much more excited by the repertoire.  Dudamel is conducting the Bartók, and Simon Rattle is doing the Shostakovich.

Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on November 12, 2007, 07:05:23 PM
Looking forward to doing this double bill on November 11:

Jones Hall, Houston, TX

2:30pm
Houston Symphony
Hans Graf, conductor


Mozart: Serenade for Winds in c minor, K. 388
Berg: Lyric Suite
Zemlinsky: Lyric Symphony

8:00pm
UBS Verbier Festival Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, conductor
Martha Argerich, piano


Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3

Both of these concerts were just fantastic...and the Verbier Festival Orchestra was insanely great, they fairly took the roof off Jones Hall last night.

First, the Houston SO concert:

To my delight, it was announced at the beginning this was being recorded for a release in early 2008 on Naxos. And there were certainly a lotta microphones! The audience (mostly geriatric) was admonished to stay quiet, and then we had a gorgeous Mozart Serenade, extremely well-prepared with 8 of the wind players and finely conducted by Hans Graf, somewhat a Mozart specialist. The Berg Lyric Suite was a real treat to hear, couched with an explanation to the audience that Berg is difficult, beware, though it was very enjoyable and beautiful music.

The Zemlinsky Lyric Symphony was the highlight by far, it's ravishing stuff. The soloists were Roman Trekel and Twyla Robinson, both excellent. The orchestra played with fine control and balance, it should be a nice new recording of this gem of a piece. I was very proud of the audience for staying quiet, rare down here. I felt the concentration of the audience was radically better too as a consequence!

The Verbier Festival Orchestra:

I described this incredible experience in great detail here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,4316.msg106587.html#msg106587). Man, if you get the chance, go see this group. The current youth orchestra phenomenon is truly something to behold - this international group of young musicians played their hearts out and produced a searing performance, the most exciting orchestral concert I've perhaps ever been to. I almost couldn't believe how fantastic their Symphonie Fantastique was (pun!), and Dutoit conducted it marvelously.

The vibe in the room was palpable, the chemistry, the occasion...I won't forget the experience for a long, long time. Argerich was awesome too in Prokofiev 3rd, dynamic and graceful. We called her back for an encore finally, Chopin and some other piece we couldn't identify...and the orchestra also encored, with a cracking, vivacious rendition of Chabrier's Espańa.

All in all, a truly exhilarating concert, and a treasure of an experience. (And a pleasure to meet GMG member brian_rein, who ended up going with us at the last minute!)

They play 3 more times in the US this week, in Chicago and New York, and next week in Europe.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on November 12, 2007, 07:31:28 PM
Our (CAN) Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has 0 programs this year that look remotely interesting.

What are you looking for?  I wouldn't mind seeing every one of those Masterwork Diamond programs.

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on November 12, 2007, 07:34:33 PM
I wonder about these two concerts in Oslo.

First 29th of March 2008:

NDR Sinfonieorchester Hamburg
Christoph von Dohnanyi
Yefin Bronfman
 
Program:
BEETHOVEN pinao concerto no. 4
STRAVINSKY Firebird, complete

 

I vote yes.  It seems like a no-brainer to me. (I don't comment on the other offering since I don't know his work.)

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on November 14, 2007, 08:32:17 PM
Houston, Texas at Rice University on Saturday November, 17: The Best Place to Be on Earth!!

Take a look at the program:

From morning to evening for an entire day, music of Eastern Europe performed by students of the Shepherd School

Concert I - 10:00 a.m.
Bartók - Piano Quintet, DD.77 (1903-4)
Proto - Quartet for Basses (1964)
Bartok - String Quartet No. 3 (1927)
Shostakovich - String Quartet No. 8 (1960)

Concert II - 12:00 noon
Saint-Saëns - Fantasie, Op. 124 (1907)
Gličre - Duets for Two Cellos, Op. 53 (1911)
Schubert - Rondo in A Major, D. 951, for piano four-hands (1828)
Tchaikovsky - String Quartet in D Major, Op. 11 (1871)
Dvorák - String Quintet in G Major, Op. 77 (1875)

Concert III - 2:00 p.m.
Stravinsky - Octet for Wind Instruments (1923, rev. 1952)
Arensky - String Quartet, Op. 35 (1894)
Martinu - Promenades, for flute, violin, and piano (1940)
Dvorák - Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (1887)

Concert IV - 4:00 p.m.
Lutoslawski - Variations on a Theme of Paganini for Two Pianos (1941)
Janácek - String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters” (1928)
Messiaen - Quartour pour la Fin de Temps (1941)

Concert V - 6:00 p.m.
Smetana - Piano Trio in G Minor, Op. 15 (1855)
Shostakovich - Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano, Op. 67 (1944)
Dvorák - String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 51(1879)
Prokofiev - Quintet in G Minor, Op. 39 (1924)

Concert VI - 8:00 p.m.
Martinu - Piano Quartet No.1 (1942)
Rózsa - String Quartet No. 1, Op. 22 (1949, 50)
Husa - Deux Preludes (1966)
Brahms - String Quintet No. 2 in G Major, Op. 111 (1891)


.................when am I going to eat??!??!  :o ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on November 14, 2007, 11:32:34 PM
Houston, Texas at Rice University on Saturday November, 17: The Best Place to Be on Earth!!

Take a look at the program:

From morning to evening for an entire day, music of Eastern Europe performed by students of the Shepherd School

Concert I - 10:00 a.m.
Bartók - Piano Quintet, DD.77 (1903-4)
Proto - Quartet for Basses (1964)
Bartok - String Quartet No. 3 (1927)
Shostakovich - String Quartet No. 8 (1960)

Concert II - 12:00 noon
Saint-Saëns - Fantasie, Op. 124 (1907)
Gličre - Duets for Two Cellos, Op. 53 (1911)
Schubert - Rondo in A Major, D. 951, for piano four-hands (1828)
Tchaikovsky - String Quartet in D Major, Op. 11 (1871)
Dvorák - String Quintet in G Major, Op. 77 (1875)

Concert III - 2:00 p.m.
Stravinsky - Octet for Wind Instruments (1923, rev. 1952)
Arensky - String Quartet, Op. 35 (1894)
Martinu - Promenades, for flute, violin, and piano (1940)
Dvorák - Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (1887)

Concert IV - 4:00 p.m.
Lutoslawski - Variations on a Theme of Paganini for Two Pianos (1941)
Janácek - String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters” (1928)
Messiaen - Quartour pour la Fin de Temps (1941)

Concert V - 6:00 p.m.
Smetana - Piano Trio in G Minor, Op. 15 (1855)
Shostakovich - Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano, Op. 67 (1944)
Dvorák - String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 51(1879)
Prokofiev - Quintet in G Minor, Op. 39 (1924)

Concert VI - 8:00 p.m.
Martinu - Piano Quartet No.1 (1942)
Rózsa - String Quartet No. 1, Op. 22 (1949, 50)
Husa - Deux Preludes (1966)
Brahms - String Quintet No. 2 in G Major, Op. 111 (1891)


.................when am I going to eat??!??!  :o ;D

Are you going to attend them ALL???  :o
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on November 15, 2007, 06:24:28 AM
Are you going to attend them ALL???  :o
Well, I might skip the first halves of I and VI. Have to have a meal sometime  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on November 15, 2007, 06:32:41 AM
Well, I might skip the first halves of I and VI. Have to have a meal sometime  8)

Even so, it's way too much for one day...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 15, 2007, 08:38:17 AM
Houston, Texas at Rice University on Saturday November, 17: The Best Place to Be on Earth!!

Take a look at the program:

From morning to evening for an entire day, music of Eastern Europe performed by students of the Shepherd School

Concert I - 10:00 a.m.
Bartók - Piano Quintet, DD.77 (1903-4)
Proto - Quartet for Basses (1964)
Bartok - String Quartet No. 3 (1927)
Shostakovich - String Quartet No. 8 (1960)

Concert II - 12:00 noon
Saint-Saëns - Fantasie, Op. 124 (1907)
Gličre - Duets for Two Cellos, Op. 53 (1911)
Schubert - Rondo in A Major, D. 951, for piano four-hands (1828)
Tchaikovsky - String Quartet in D Major, Op. 11 (1871)
Dvorák - String Quintet in G Major, Op. 77 (1875)

Concert III - 2:00 p.m.
Stravinsky - Octet for Wind Instruments (1923, rev. 1952)
Arensky - String Quartet, Op. 35 (1894)
Martinu - Promenades, for flute, violin, and piano (1940)
Dvorák - Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (1887)

Concert IV - 4:00 p.m.
Lutoslawski - Variations on a Theme of Paganini for Two Pianos (1941)
Janácek - String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters” (1928)
Messiaen - Quartour pour la Fin de Temps (1941)

Concert V - 6:00 p.m.
Smetana - Piano Trio in G Minor, Op. 15 (1855)
Shostakovich - Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano, Op. 67 (1944)
Dvorák - String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 51(1879)
Prokofiev - Quintet in G Minor, Op. 39 (1924)

Concert VI - 8:00 p.m.
Martinu - Piano Quartet No.1 (1942)
Rózsa - String Quartet No. 1, Op. 22 (1949, 50)
Husa - Deux Preludes (1966)
Brahms - String Quintet No. 2 in G Major, Op. 111 (1891)


.................when am I going to eat??!??!  :o ;D

Wow!  That is quite a fantastic line-up.  I wouldn't even worry about food: just stuff a few PowerBars in your pocket and settle in for the day.  ;D

Do report back on all that.  Hard to choose, but I'd definitely want to catch concerts III and IV, the latter with the Messiaen. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on November 15, 2007, 07:37:09 PM
Houston, Texas at Rice University on Saturday November, 17: The Best Place to Be on Earth!!

Take a look at the program:


All chamber music? Looks pretty boring. But it's free right?

Anyway I am looking forward to the Feb. 2 performance of Die Walkuere at the MET conducted by Maazel. That should be interesting. There is James Morris as Wotan (a role he pretty much owns nowadays), Lisa Gasteen (I guess she is singing Brunnhilde) and Michele DeYoung (what is she singing? Fricka?).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on November 16, 2007, 02:28:53 PM
I just found out that I will be going to go hear the Magic Flute at the Met next Saturday with my in-laws. Diana Damrau is the Queen of the Night, Kirill Peternko conducting. I am stoked!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 16, 2007, 02:32:30 PM
I just found out that I will be going to go hear the Magic Flute at the Met next Saturday with my in-laws. Diana Damrau is the Queen of the Night, Kirill Peternko conducting. I am stoked!

You are going to have a fantastic time.  Damrau is terrific (although I've not heard her in this).  Do report back!

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on November 16, 2007, 04:42:52 PM
There's a youtube vid of Damrau as the Queen of the Night. She is quite fantastic (check also her sizzling and funny Martern aller arten).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on November 16, 2007, 05:02:51 PM
All chamber music? Looks pretty boring. But it's free right?
Yep, it's free.

Not sure about boring though!  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on November 17, 2007, 08:09:44 PM
These are the concerts I attended during the chamber music festival:
Houston, Texas at Rice University on Saturday November, 17: The Best Place to Be on Earth!!
Concert II - 12:00 noon
Saint-Saëns - Fantasie, Op. 124 (1907)
Gličre - Duets for Two Cellos, Op. 53 (1911)
Schubert - Rondo in A Major, D. 951, for piano four-hands (1828)
Tchaikovsky - String Quartet in D Major, Op. 11 (1871)
Dvorák - String Quintet in G Major, Op. 77 (1875)

Concert III - 2:00 p.m.
Stravinsky - Octet for Wind Instruments (1923, rev. 1952)
Arensky - String Quartet, Op. 35 (1894)
Martinu - Promenades, for flute, violin, and piano (1940)
Dvorák - Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (1887)

Concert V - 6:00 p.m.
Smetana - Piano Trio in G Minor, Op. 15 (1855)
Shostakovich - Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano, Op. 67 (1944)
Dvorák - String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 51(1879)
I wanted to see the Shostakovich SQ 8, but arrived too late; the doors were shut. :( I also wanted to see the Shostakovich piano trio, but the violinist had broken her arm and the performance was called off.

The Saint-Saens Fantasie for Harp and Violin was a surprisingly interesting piece, though the harp held my attention far more than the violin did and in general it seemed to go on for quite a while. The Gliere duets were rather roughly performed, but I loved the No. VIII from this set - it sounds like baroque music from Brazil! The Schubert Rondo sounds like an inferior imitation of his own piano sonata in the same key (A major); the two works even open in the same way. The Tchaikovsky quartet was, of course, one of the highlights of the afternoon, though I noticed that the piece relies on the first violin for nearly all its good melodies. It doesn't matter: I love the work, one of the greatest chamber pieces of all time, and the first two movements are truly moving. In the ensuing Dvorak quintet only the third movement really caught my attention - truly beautiful! - although I thought to myself, "this came from his American period," and then looked at the program and saw it said 1875!

During the Stravinsky Octet I moved to a seat next to the exit so I could boot my computer and send a piece in to the school paper before the deadline hit. I listened, though, but the music didn't catch my interest, except a variation in the second movement based on a rather silly oompah-waltz. By contrast, the first seconds of the Arensky quartet for violin, viola and two cellos snared my attention so that I left my computer (bad idea!) and returned to my seat. The work owes a lot to the Tchaikovsky quartet, with its slow, beautiful beginning and gradual rise in action, but the second cello and minor key mean that this piece is the perfect foil. If the Tchaikovsky quartet is a rich treat, the Arensky is dark chocolate. Sunny moments appeared and then were replaced by the resumption of the powerfully somber opening passage. This performance had the feel of a real "discovery", and the players were correspondingly enthusiastic (unfortunately the violinist's enthusiasm got in the way of his technique on occasion). The second movement was a set of variations on a theme by Tchaikovsky; I have, just now, learned there is a third movement. It wasn't played! Why? Sadly, the same must be asked of the Dvorak piano quintet, in which the first three movements were played and the last again omitted! (In the interim, Martinu's Promenades was a very satisfying diversion, though marred by some unfortunate violin playing.)

Smetana's piano trio was a moving experience, aided by some truly exceptional playing, especially from the pianist, who has an incredibly tough role. The piano part seems in some places to be much like Rachmaninov! This was far more emotionally engaging than anything I had heard since the Arensky. It was, however, no match for what followed (since the Shostakovich had been canceled): Dvorak's string quartet in E-flat. I had heard this piece in a recording by the New Zealand String Quartet and disliked it. These students proved me wrong. The violist and cellist were especially captivating, both to watch and to hear. They were two of just three performers all afternoon to really let the music's power come through in their body language and, especially, facial expressions. This is an absolutely beautiful quartet from first second to last, and I was so overjoyed by the performance that I left immediately in case anything that followed proved disappointing. The afternoon therefore ended on probably the highest note I heard all day.

All told, I listened to 6 of the 12 hours of music on offer. I was able to fit in two meals and some bathroom breaks  ;D  . What a glorious Saturday at Rice University!

My main regrets are missing the Shosty Eighth Quartet - this was one of the things I was most looking forward to - as well as having to miss Janacek's "Intimate Letters" during my dinner break, and Brahms' String Quintet, the last piece of the day.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 20, 2007, 02:28:27 PM
On Thursday, Nov. 29, Gustavo Dudamel will make his debut with the New York Philharmonic, and since the program is very interesting, I can't wait.  I can't recall ever hearing the Chávez in concert.

Chávez: Symphony No. 2, Sinfonía India
Dvorák: Violin Concerto (with Gil Shaham)
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on November 25, 2007, 12:32:19 PM
My wife is buying me a concert ticket for Christmas. It's in March, but I'm patient 8).

Concerts at the symphony here are strangely put together. They are konzept things. This one is entitled "Bach and the art of counterpoint". The French version of the concert title is "Bach et l'art de la fugue", which is not the same thing at all. Anyhow, the orchestra's brass will play Tre Canzoni from Gabrieli's symphoniae sacrae of 1597 in alternance with piano performances of some Preludes and Fugues from the WTC played by Angela Hewitt. Weird...

After intermission I'll be on familiar turf with Bruckner's 'counterpoint' symphony, the 5th. Nagano will conduct. I have mixed feelings about that. I heard him do a decent 8th in Berlin, but he was so dull and clueless in the 9th I felt embarrassed for him. Hopefully he'll take some Viagra instead of his usual Prozac.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on November 27, 2007, 09:04:59 AM
This weekend at Carnegie, three all-Russian programs by Valery Gergiev and the Kirov.  I've heard Gergiev do Le sacre, but none of the rest.

Saturday:
Glinka: Act I of Ruslan and Ludmilla
Stravinsky: Le sacre du printemps

Sunday:
Rimsky-Korsakov: The Snow Maiden (concert performance)

Tuesday:
Stravinsky: Les noces
Borodin: Act II of Prince Igor

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on November 28, 2007, 07:28:57 PM
This coming Saturday:

Tapestry - In the Company of Angels

(http://www.tapestryboston05.com/groupphoto.jpg)

From the web:
The trademark of the Boston an a cappella ensemble of four women (plus instrumental guests) is combining medieval repertory and contemporary compositions in bold conceptual programming. The ensemble made its debut in 1995, with a performance which The Boston Globe deemed "a knockout," and critics have since hailed the ensemble's rich distinctive voices, technically spot-on singing and emotionally charged performances.

Tapestry's holiday offering explores the lush Renaissance harmonies of Boston composer Patricia Van Ness and 16th century Spanish composers, spiced with lively folk songs and dances. The program includes selections from Tapestry's award winning CD Sapphire Night

"This is an outstanding performance such as I have rarely heard, beginning with a smooth legato of utter perfection in a low restricted range, then gradually expanding upwards with ecstacy to reach a top D with amazing control." - Gramophone


As noted back at H.H.Q., Tapestry will perform Castelo dos Anjos which was composed by our very own Karl Henning.  Hopefully by Sunday I will be able to provide a full report of the concert.




Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on November 29, 2007, 06:32:42 AM
Splendid, Bill. Be sure to go back and meet the ladies after the concert!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 04, 2007, 10:05:48 AM
This Saturday at Carnegie Hall:

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Christian Zacharias, Piano

Bach: "Brandenburg" Concerto No. 3 
Schumann: Overture, Scherzo and Finale
Christopher Theofanidis: New work
Schumann: Piano Concerto 

I haven't heard Orpheus live in years, nor anything by Theofanidis, so this will be interesting. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on December 04, 2007, 10:07:40 AM
Too much Schumann  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 04, 2007, 10:29:15 AM
Too much Schumann  8)

Aw... :'(...really?

Over the summer I heard a 1977 live recording of the Piano Concerto with Arrau, Jochum and the Concertgebouw...really liked it a lot. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on December 04, 2007, 10:55:29 AM
Aw... :'(...really?

No, not seriously, Bruce. Though at CMG there's someone doing for Schumann what a certain someone does here for a certain English composer.

I do like the Piano Concerto, though (rather like the Beethoven symphonies) it is not of the class of piece which compels my presence in the hall.  I enjoyed playing in the orchestra when we did this at Wooster.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: BachQ on December 04, 2007, 10:58:40 AM
Though at CMG there's someone doing for Schumann what a certain someone does here for a certain English composer.

In that case, Schumann is doomed @ CMG .......
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 04, 2007, 11:05:25 AM
No, not seriously, Bruce. Though at CMG there's someone doing for Schumann what a certain someone does here for a certain English composer.

I do like the Piano Concerto, though (rather like the Beethoven symphonies) it is not of the class of piece which compels my presence in the hall.  I enjoyed playing in the orchestra when we did this at Wooster.

Ah...I see, thanks.  8)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on December 04, 2007, 11:16:54 AM
OTOH, Bruce, the concert on which the BSO are playing (D Minor take note) the Shostakovich Fifth, the other half of the concert is Garrick Ohlsson playing the Schumann Concerto.

And yes, I look forward to the concert  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 12, 2007, 01:56:10 PM
This weekend, the New York Philharmonic is playing Shostakovich's Symphony No. 4, conducted by Andrey Boreyko.  The conductor is new to me, but the piece... 0:)...is not.  Will very much enjoy hearing it live...

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on December 12, 2007, 02:01:07 PM
This weekend, the New York Philharmonic is playing Shostakovich's Symphony No. 4, conducted by Andrey Boreyko.  The conductor is new to me, but the piece... 0:)...is not.  Will very much enjoy hearing it live...

Splendid, Bruce! In the spring, the BSO will play the Fourth, which will be my first live experience of it . . . .
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on December 12, 2007, 02:04:53 PM
Trevor Pinnock will be conducting Bach's Christmas Oratorio in Ottawa, Canada, tomorrow night. I have my tickets ready!!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 12, 2007, 02:10:19 PM
Karl, yup, it's fantastic live--you'll surely have a great evening.  I still recall this concert with great pleasure...seems like yesterday:

Carnegie Hall
December 3, 2000
The MET Orchestra
Valery Gergiev, Conductor
Scriabin: Prometheus, The Poem of Fire (Alexander Toradze, Piano)
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 4 in C minor

I And Morigan, love Pinnock!  Never heard him live, though.  This CD, one of the first I ever bought, is still a favorite:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51FR3WND7FL._AA240_.jpg)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on December 12, 2007, 02:14:57 PM
Yes, Pinnock has always been among my favourites for period music, and I'm absolutely thrilled to hear him live!! He's also going to conduct Handel's Messiah next week, but I won't be able to attend. What a shame! (If not for Messiah, for Pinnock, at least :))
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on December 12, 2007, 02:18:17 PM
This weekend, the New York Philharmonic is playing Shostakovich's Symphony No. 4, conducted by Andrey Boreyko.  The conductor is new to me, but the piece... 0:)...is not.  Will very much enjoy hearing it live...

--Bruce

Bruce,

He was our former conductor at the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra!  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 12, 2007, 02:20:50 PM
Yes, Pinnock has always been among my favourites for period music, and I'm absolutely thrilled to hear him live!! He's also going to conduct Handel's Messiah next week, but I won't be able to attend. What a shame! (If not for Messiah, for Pinnock, at least :))

Well, if you had to choose (and it sounds like you did) the Bach, no?  Maybe not performed quite as often...  Just looked at the website and it says it hasn't been performed there since 1975! 

ChamberNut, very interesting!  I've actually been to Winnipeg--my dad lived there for awhile back in the 1980s.  Great city.  (PS, did you get P.M.?)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 12, 2007, 07:35:12 PM
Trevor Pinnock will be conducting Bach's Christmas Oratorio in Ottawa, Canada, tomorrow night. I have my tickets ready!!

Kent Nagano is conducting it tonight in Montreal, and I, too, have tickets. But I gave them to my neighbour. Our daughter gave birth yesterday, and a tiny baby was quite enough to sway my priorities for tonight. I just hope another occasion comes along soon! :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MN Dave on December 12, 2007, 07:46:53 PM
Kent Nagano is conducting it tonight in Montreal, and I, too, have tickets. But I gave them to my neighbour. Our daughter gave birth yesterday, and a tiny baby was quite enough to sway my priorities for tonight. I just hope another occasion comes along soon! :D

Congratulations!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 13, 2007, 05:49:20 AM
Thank you!

Morigan, please give us your impressions on Pinnock's Christmas Oratorio.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on December 13, 2007, 05:50:11 AM
ChamberNut, very interesting!  I've actually been to Winnipeg--my dad lived there for awhile back in the 1980s.  Great city.  (PS, did you get P.M.?)

--Bruce

Small world, eh Bruce?  :)  Yes, I did get your PM, thank you.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on December 13, 2007, 06:31:52 AM
Thank you!

Morigan, please give us your impressions on Pinnock's Christmas Oratorio.

Sure thing. BTW, are you from Montreal? The OSM and Nagano gave a great concert here last season for their Canadian tour. This guy's conducting is electrifying (and he conducted Beethoven's 7th, so you can imagine).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 13, 2007, 06:34:53 AM
Yes I am from Montreal! Honestly I'm not crazy about Nagano. I'm surprised to hear he can be electrifying. This gives me hope! So far I've found him quite dull. I have tickets for the Bruckner 5 he'll conduct next Spring :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on December 13, 2007, 06:43:03 AM
Yes I am from Montreal! Honestly I'm not crazy about Nagano. I'm surprised to hear he can be electrifying. This gives me hope! So far I've found him quite dull. I have tickets for the Bruckner 5 he'll conduct next Spring :D

Argh! Lilas Pastia, I am so jealous! :)  I've been wanting to hear a live performance of a Bruckner symphony, and the 5th is one of my favorites.  I actually ran into the WSO conductor a month ago at the grocery store, and we chatted a bit.  I asked him "So...any chance we'll have some Bruckner in the next season 2008/2009?"  He then asked me my favorite Bruckner symphony was and I listed 3 or 4 different ones, of course. :)  He said he would keep it in mind.   ;D  We'll see!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on December 13, 2007, 06:49:00 AM
Maybe he was just showing off on tour!!  ;D I remember he was as energic as those young latino conductors.
I also heard his 9th last year, it was broadcast by Radio-Canada. I think it was his first official concert as conductor or the OSM.

Chambernut : We had Bruckner's 8th in Ottawa last season. :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on December 13, 2007, 07:47:25 AM
I will be seeing John Adams's Dr. Atomic at the Lyric Opera tomorrow.  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 13, 2007, 07:56:38 AM
I will be seeing John Adams's Dr. Atomic at the Lyric Opera tomorrow.  :D

Oh you lucky dog...do post impressions.   :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on December 13, 2007, 02:03:08 PM
Chambernut : We had Bruckner's 8th in Ottawa last season. :D

Morigan, there is no need to be cruel!  :'(

 :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 13, 2007, 06:43:01 PM
I will be seeing John Adams's Dr. Atomic at the Lyric Opera tomorrow.  :D

I have  a dowload of an August 2007 concert (not heard yet) and I thought it was an orchestral piece  ??? The notes only mention an orchestra and conductor (Adams himself). No mention of any singers. What am I to expect??
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 13, 2007, 06:48:43 PM
Maybe he was just showing off on tour!!  ;D I remember he was as energic as those young latino conductors.
I also heard his 9th last year, it was broadcast by Radio-Canada. I think it was his first official concert as conductor or the OSM.

Chambernut : We had Bruckner's 8th in Ottawa last season. :D

If you're referring to Bruckner's 9th, I was at that concert and it was a turgid and unexciting affair. As far removed as could be from Nézet-Séguin's impassioned interpretation (from last September - a cd is coming out soon on ATMA).

Hear ye, Londoners: Nézet-Séguin has been appointed principal guest conductor of the LPO as of September 2008. I fully expect you bunch to give us reports :D. NZ will also make his début at the Salzburg Festival next Summer. This young man is going places!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on December 13, 2007, 07:00:23 PM
I have  a dowload of an August 2007 concert (not heard yet) and I thought it was an orchestral piece  ??? The notes only mention an orchestra and conductor (Adams himself). No mention of any singers. What am I to expect??
That was the Doctor Atomic Symphony, four movements assembled from parts of the opera with the vocal lines replaced by instrumental ones. I wasn't terribly impressed, to be honest, but it sounded to me as if it would work better in operatic form.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 13, 2007, 07:32:55 PM
Thanks, Edward!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Millfields on December 15, 2007, 06:36:41 AM
Looking forward to the following in Amsterdam:

Jan 16th Mahler 5/ Strauss Don Juan - Concertgebouw/ Maris Jansons
Feb 24th Wagner Walkure 1st Act / Schubert 8th  - Haitink/Concertgebouw
Feb 25th Mozart Cosi fan tutte - Vienna state opera/Schneider
3rd May  Mahler 4/ Strauss Till Eulenspiegel / Strauss misc songs - Ivan Fischer Budapest fest Orch
10th May Tristan und Isolde  - Dutch national opera
? June (if I can get a ticket) - Alfred Brendel

Anyone going to these concerts?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 15, 2007, 08:34:33 AM
Going to Belgium from late May to June 12. I'll be looking for concerts in Amsterdam, Ličge, Antwerp or Cologne.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Millfields on December 16, 2007, 02:57:28 AM
Going to Belgium from late May to June 12. I'll be looking for concerts in Amsterdam, Ličge, Antwerp or Cologne.

You may also want to include Rotterdam in your search  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 16, 2007, 07:37:32 AM
You're righ, I didn't think of it! So far I've been to the Amsterdam Concertgebouw twice, and the Cologne Philharmonie once.

I try to settle for places that can be reached within a couple of hours by train. :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on December 16, 2007, 11:29:16 PM
I try to settle for places that can be reached within a couple of hours by train. :D

Then you have all Belgium, Netherlands and Luxemburg at your disposal...  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 17, 2007, 05:41:02 PM
I know. Here's what I have found:

- Amsterdam Concertgebouw: June 6, Myung-Whun Chung - Messiaen and Bruckner (sy no. 6)

- Rotterdam Philharmonic: Also on June 6, Andrew Davis: Bach Passacaglia en fuga in c -Mozart Tweede fluitconcert (Emmanul Pahud, flute) - Takemitsu I Hear the Water Dreaming - Tippett Vierde symfonie (4th symphony)

- Ličge Philharmonic: on tour in China  :P

- SWR Cologne : the Concertgebouw on tour, with Messiaen and Schubert songs orchestrated by Webern.

- Luxembourg: nothing during my dates.

Methink another visit to Amsterdam will figure on the agenda :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on December 18, 2007, 04:05:32 AM
I know. Here's what I have found:

Have you tried going westwards? Lille has a decent orchestra and their fancy website lists Das Lied von der Erde with Urmana on June 3, but it looks it's a guest concert in Paris (my french isn't good enough, so you might check yourself).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 18, 2007, 09:10:20 PM
Thank, I'll have a look. Lille is not that far. Nor are Nancy and Strasbourg for that matter. Same distance, different directions. But I'm busy concocting a London-Amsterdam combo that will probably leave me with no time - and cash :D - for anything else!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 19, 2007, 07:49:22 AM
This Friday, a fascinating selection of 20th and 21st-century holiday music by The Crossing, the choir in Philadelphia.

The Crossing
Donald Nally, conductor
Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill
Friday 21 December 2007  8pm

Andrew Gant: What child is this (1995)         
James MacMillan: Tremunt videntes angeli (2002)      
Judith Bingham: The clouded heaven (1998)         
Don Michael Dicie: Star unto glory (2006)          
John Paynter: The Rose (1969)            
Colin Mawby: How far is it to Bethlehem (1996)      
Jake Thackray/arr. Howard Goodall: Remember Bethlehem (2000)         
Kerry Andrew: Hevene Quene (2006)            
Kenneth Leighton: A Christmas Caroll (1954)          
Kenneth Leighton: O leave your sheep (1963)         
Thomas Adčs: The Fayrfax Carol (1997)         
John Tavener: A nativity (1985)            
David Shapiro: Et incarnatus est (2007, world premiere)            
Jonathan Varcoe: Lullay lullay little child (1990)      
Jonathan Dove: Welcome, all wonders in one sight! (1999)   
Arr. Carl Ruggles: What child is this (1971)

--Bruce   
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: pjme on December 20, 2007, 02:08:17 PM
It is an ETcetera/Klara CD, but next Saturday Zefiro Torna and all the singers are in a small village near Antwerp - Bornem, on the banks of the Schelde....this is what Musicweb had to say:

We live at a time when we should be very thankful for the vast wealth of ‘early’ music now available to us. Barely a generation ago – certainly two – it would have been unlikely that a recording of a substantial portion of the corpus of mediaeval sacred music from Finland would have been thought likely to succeed. It is equally unlikely that anyone would then have assembled the resources and channelled the energy into producing and disseminating such.


Here, though, is a sumptuous and inspiring collection – representative and selective, rather than aggressively comprehensive – of some nearly two dozen pieces ranging in length from one and a half to four and three quarter minutes. The Piae Cantiones ecclesiasticae et scholasticae veterum episcoporum (‘pious songs for church and school by the old bishops’) was published in Turku, Finland, in 1582. It actually comprises music from a variety of places and times, though it’s safe to make two assumptions: that about half the 75 or so songs which it contains are Finnish… they are not to be found elsewhere, and are stylistically consistent. Secondly, we can determine very quickly not only that the songs are nearly all considerably older than the late sixteenth century, but also that some surely date back as much as 500 years. That many of the titles should be in Latin in Protestant Finland may be explained by the fact that the publication was sponsored by the Catholic sympathiser, King Johan III of Sweden, at that time ruler of Finland.


Evidence that the Piae Cantiones were an attempt to preserve a perhaps threatened local tradition of music hitherto transmitted only (or largely) orally is in the two republications within a few years - one in Finnish in 1616, a second again in Latin nine years after that; and many more before long. Significantly the Piae Cantiones have had a strong influence on contemporary Finnish music… Sibelius’ Carminalia as well as modern ‘folk’ song and other modern arrangements of them, for example.


The majority of these songs are related to Christmas – hence, presumably – the preponderance (almost a third) in the first batch (De Nativitate tr.s1-8) here. Others concern high points of the liturgical year (e.g. Easter – De Passione tr.s9-11), school life (tr.s15-18) and the woes of the human condition (tr.s12-14) as well as the rebirth of nature in spring (tr.s19-22). It would not be an exaggeration to suggest that anyone unfamiliar with Finnish music before the Early Modern period (or for that matter any era of that nation’s music) would do best to buy this CD, which is admittedly a little under-generous at less than an hour in length.


The performances are first class: Zefiro Torna performs on period instruments (from the 15th and 16th centuries), including the kannel (Estonian) or kantele (Finnish), a zither, or dulcimer. The particular combinations which we hear throughout the CD lend the music a definite ‘antique’, decidedly ‘folk’, aura. This does not detract from the clarity of the singing, though, by the four specialists in the group and by the half dozen young singers from the Antwerp Cathedral Choir. The Flemish Zefiro Torna (which was founded in 1996) draws players who first established themselves in such venerable ensembles as the Huelgas Ensemble, Collegium Vocale Ghent and Capilla Flamenca. The production and implied advocacy of Finnish music with such strong nationalist flavours by Flemish musicians is perhaps unexpected – but nevertheless to be applauded.


One’s overall impression is of quiet, self-confident, highly focused music with the harmonics, temporal variation and melodic richness of mediaeval song from other northern European traditions. The original Carmina Burana may come to mind. There is a certain sparseness, tempered by a springy jollity, particularly in the festive pieces. It’s the kantele that confers the greatest distinction on the music. It’s not an overly ‘twangy’ instrument, and serves as an effective accompanying instrument for the singers.


Other percussive instruments are not usually overdone. They too compliment and support the rather delicate tracing of what is a very tuneful collection of pieces. Although their use (and the fade out) in O Scholares discite does jar just a little and there is some modern-sounding syncopation in Sum in aliena provincia. You may not like the bells in In vernali tempore; they sound just a little false, almost intrusive. The slight breathiness of the recorder and its ever so marginal over-closeness in recording contribute in a way to a sense that this is spontaneous and very genuine music making; most definitely not purely demonstrative or reluctantly catalogued so as to be merely a set of examples. It’s worth listening to and getting to know in its own right.


Some of the songs (Personent hodie and Tempus adest floridum, for instance) will be recognized immediately. These incarnations delight for their tinges of freshness. Although Piae Cantiones is Finland’s only collection of its type, it does reflect wider European traditions; yet Zefiro Torna and the others have successfully emphasised the uniquely Finnish properties of the music… crystalline transparency and thin tonalities; a clarity of timbre that is still evident in modern Baltic unaccompanied choral works; a momentum which rarely stops for effect, but rather is created without fuss in the bracingly brittle blend of melody and words. Although one senses the scholastic origins of this combination, the music is never perfunctory or dry. Rather, its liveliness is internal and does not rely on excessive arranging. It really is Sibelius’ pure spring water again.


The recording is a good one and the booklet nicely illustrated with the text to all the songs in Latin/Finnish and English. Piae Cantiones would make a slightly different Christmas present as well as meet nicely the needs of anyone curious to experience Finnish music from the 500 year period in question.


Mark Sealey




 
 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: pjme on December 20, 2007, 02:15:25 PM
I know. Here's what I have found:

- Amsterdam Concertgebouw: June 6, Myung-Whun Chung - Messiaen and Bruckner (sy no. 6)

- Rotterdam Philharmonic: Also on June 6, Andrew Davis: Bach Passacaglia en fuga in c -Mozart Tweede fluitconcert (Emmanul Pahud, flute) - Takemitsu I Hear the Water Dreaming - Tippett Vierde symfonie (4th symphony)

- Ličge Philharmonic: on tour in China  :P

- SWR Cologne : the Concertgebouw on tour, with Messiaen and Schubert songs orchestrated by Webern.

- Luxembourg: nothing during my dates.

Methink another visit to Amsterdam will figure on the agenda :D


Hi Lilas, I live in Antwerp - so don't forget our orchestra.
Brussels: the renamed Brussels' Philharmonic ( former VRO/Flemish Radio Orchestra),Orchestra of La Monnaie, Antwerp Opera Orchestra and the Flemish Symphony Orchestra - check the Bruges Concertgebouw and "Flagey" in Brussels ( a huge Art Deco building - the former seat of National Radio. It still houses the famous studio 4 ,loved by  many musicians....very good programming.

Peter
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 20, 2007, 03:06:49 PM
Speaking of the Concertgebouw, they're returning to New York in February for three concerts with Mariss Jansons, and I'm planning to be at all of them:

Monday, February 4 at 8:00 p.m.
CLAUDE DEBUSSY La mer
HECTOR BERLIOZ Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14

Tuesday, February 5 at 8:00 p.m.
Yefim Bronfman, Piano
OTTO KETTING De aankomst ("The Arrival")
SERGEI PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major, Op. 26
JOHANNES BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 73

Wednesday, February 6 at 8:00 p.m.
RICHARD STRAUSS Don Juan, Op. 20
GUSTAV MAHLER Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp Minor

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 20, 2007, 06:54:36 PM
Hi Lilas, I live in Antwerp - so don't forget our orchestra.
Brussels: the renamed Brussels' Philharmonic ( former VRO/Flemish Radio Orchestra),Orchestra of La Monnaie, Antwerp Opera Orchestra and the Flemish Symphony Orchestra - check the Bruges Concertgebouw and "Flagey" in Brussels ( a huge Art Deco building - the former seat of National Radio. It still houses the famous studio 4 ,loved by  many musicians....very good programming.

Peter

Hello, Peter! I love Antwerpen :D. I visited the city almost 25 years ago (my mother-in-law was born there). I found it extremely interesting. Unfortunately the cathedral was under repair and I couldn't visit. I missed all these Rubens paintings  :P. (http://www.topa.be/site/images/olv5-30_grand.jpg)

I was impressed by the Schelde and the city's docks, with its amazing forest of cranes and endless rows of cargo containers.

I checked the Royal Flanders Philharmonic, but I couldn't find concerts, and couldn't even figure out where their home base is? I had thought it would be in Antwerpen, but I can't be certain. In any case, I'm open to suggestions, so if you find something worth attending between May 29 and June 12, let me know! ;)

André

Bruce
: please report, I want to know what this orchestra sounds like out of the Concertgebouw!  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: pjme on December 21, 2007, 06:10:50 AM
Hi André, welcome in Antwerp!

You'll be surprised : after 25 years the city will look different to you. The cathedral has had indeed a major ( and ever continuing..) restauration. The architects did a great job, especially inside: all clutter has been removed ,discreet and effective lighting gives the building an airy feel.
Only recently the Opera had a complete make-over ( it was closed for almost 2 years). Now we're waiting for the new ( car free zone) square that will be built in front of it.

I will check "De Philharmonie" in Antwerp ,Bruges' Concertgebouw, Flagey and Bozar in Brussels.

Best wishes, Peter
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on December 21, 2007, 07:39:31 AM
André

Bruce
: please report, I want to know what this orchestra sounds like out of the Concertgebouw!  ;)

Hi André!  I'll probably be writing up all three concerts, so happy to send you the links.  They actually come to New York about every other year, and I usually go hear them no matter what they're playing.  They came with Blomstedt a few years ago (whom I admire as a conductor) but the programming was on the dull side, especially given the orchestra's history with contemporary music (and lots of Dutch composers) and also compared to what other orchestras are doing, such as Rattle and Berlin's three recent concerts with Lindberg, Adčs and Kurtág.

I've heard the Concertgebouw Orchestra in both Avery Fisher Hall (surprisingly, not so bad) and Carnegie, where they really sound great.  The Fisher concerts were with Chailly, when he was doing his concerts of Brahms paired with Schoenberg, very stimulating.  A favorite memory from Carnegie was with Haitink in the Mahler Fifth.  After probably six or seven curtain calls, Haitink finally grabbed the score and waved it in the air, as if to say, "Here is the real star of the evening," and of course who could not agree...the crowd loved it.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: pjme on December 21, 2007, 08:31:31 AM
André, The Royal Flanders Philharmonic (De Filharmonie) has its home base in Antwerp : at the "Singel" ( Conservatory + 2 concerthalls)and at the Queen Elisabeth Hall. The latter is in bad shape ,but has an excellent location : next to central station ( another great renovation! a huge 19th century dome on top of a futuristic base....5 or 6 storeys deep.It is on the Amsterdam - Paris line)

http://www.defilharmonie.be/orkest ( Jaap van Zweden and Phillippe Herreweghe chief conductors)

Since Belgium is so small, most orchestras tour extensively and play in many cities. Bruges boasts a new Concertgebouw , the Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels has been re -named Bozar , Ghent has worked hard to improve the acoustics of "De Bijloke".
The Flagey - building in Brussels was almost torn down...private investors saved it and now it is again an Art Deco gem of the highest order. Even the large concertorgan in Studio 4 is supposed to work again .....???

http://www.debijloke.be/

http://www.concertgebouw.be/

http://www.flagey.be/flagey.htm

http://www.bozar.be/

http://www.desingel.be/

Bozar in Brussels remains ( Salle Henri Leboeuf )the largest & most famous concerthall in the country. It is the main seat of the Belgian National Orchestra ( Walter Weller ).

http://www.lamonnaie.be/demunt-1.0/index.jsp ( Kazushi Ono / Marc Wigglesworth cond.)

http://www.symfonieorkest.be/ The "Symfonie orkest van Vlaanderen" ( the Flemish SO), has its seat in Bruges. Etienne Siebens is conductor. They had to struggle to survive,but seem to do well....

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on December 21, 2007, 09:34:06 AM
Speaking of the Concertgebouw, they're returning to New York in February for three concerts with Mariss Jansons, and I'm planning to be at all of them:

Monday, February 4 at 8:00 p.m.
CLAUDE DEBUSSY La mer
HECTOR BERLIOZ Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14

Tuesday, February 5 at 8:00 p.m.
Yefim Bronfman, Piano
OTTO KETTING De aankomst ("The Arrival")
SERGEI PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major, Op. 26
JOHANNES BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 73

Wednesday, February 6 at 8:00 p.m.
RICHARD STRAUSS Don Juan, Op. 20
GUSTAV MAHLER Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp Minor

--Bruce

Oh, my! Jansons doing the fantastique should be amazing. Same with the Brahms. Not sure why they need to do Mahler 5 again, though.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on December 21, 2007, 10:09:45 PM
André, The Royal Flanders Philharmonic (De Filharmonie) has its home base in Antwerp : at the "Singel" ( Conservatory + 2 concerthalls)and at the Queen Elisabeth Hall. The latter is in bad shape ,but has an excellent location : next to central station ( another great renovation! a huge 19th century dome on top of a futuristic base....5 or 6 storeys deep.It is on the Amsterdam - Paris line)

http://www.defilharmonie.be/orkest ( Jaap van Zweden and Phillippe Herreweghe chief conductors)

Since Belgium is so small, most orchestras tour extensively and play in many cities. Bruges boasts a new Concertgebouw , the Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels has been re -named Bozar , Ghent has worked hard to improve the acoustics of "De Bijloke".
The Flagey - building in Brussels was almost torn down...private investors saved it and now it is again an Art Deco gem of the highest order. Even the large concertorgan in Studio 4 is supposed to work again .....???

http://www.debijloke.be/

http://www.concertgebouw.be/

http://www.flagey.be/flagey.htm

http://www.bozar.be/

http://www.desingel.be/

Bozar in Brussels remains ( Salle Henri Leboeuf )the largest & most famous concerthall in the country. It is the main seat of the Belgian National Orchestra ( Walter Weller ).

http://www.lamonnaie.be/demunt-1.0/index.jsp ( Kazushi Ono / Marc Wigglesworth cond.)

http://www.symfonieorkest.be/ The "Symfonie orkest van Vlaanderen" ( the Flemish SO), has its seat in Bruges. Etienne Siebens is conductor. They had to struggle to survive,but seem to do well....



Peter, I'll be checking all these liks this weekend!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Siedler on December 26, 2007, 02:05:42 PM
BPO is coming to Finland but the tickets seems to be sold-out already.  :'(
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on January 08, 2008, 10:11:16 AM
Saturday Jan. 19th
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

Borodin - Prince Igor Overture
Chin Ya Kin - Ecstasy
Richard Strauss - Horn Concerto # 2
P.I. Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 2 "Little Russian"

Sunday Jan. 20th
Winnipeg Chamber Music Society

Prokofiev - Violin Sonata in C major, Op. 56
Mendelssohn - String Quartet in A minor, Op. 13
Beethoven - Piano Trio No. 5 in D major, Op. 70/1 "Ghost"

Thursday Jan. 24th
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

Mozart - Overture to The Marriage of Figaro
Rossini - Overture to The Italian Girl in Algiers
Beethoven - Symphony No. 4

 :)





Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on January 09, 2008, 11:00:13 AM
Tonight at the NAC:

Ludovic Morlot, chef d’orchestre
Midori, violon

RAVEL Ma Mčre l’Oye : Suite
TCHAĎKOVSKI Concerto pour violon
RAVEL Pavane pour une infante defunte
CHOSTAKOVITCH Symphonie no 9

I can't wait!!!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on January 09, 2008, 11:03:22 AM
Tonight at the NAC:

Ludovic Morlot, chef d’orchestre
Midori, violon

RAVEL Ma Mčre l’Oye : Suite
TCHAĎKOVSKI Concerto pour violon
RAVEL Pavane pour une infante defunte
CHOSTAKOVITCH Symphonie no 9

I can't wait!!!

What's the "NAC"? I heard Morlot a few weeks ago in Chicago and was quite impressed. He did an outstanding Rosenkavalier Suite with the CSO.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on January 09, 2008, 11:07:59 AM
Canada's National Arts Centre... it's nothing spectacular but we have big names quite often and a very good orchestra led by Pinchas Zukerman.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on January 09, 2008, 11:09:20 AM
Canada's National Arts Centre... it's nothing spectacular but we have big names quite often and a very good orchestra led by Pinchas Zukerman.

What is the orchestra on the program?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on January 09, 2008, 11:09:47 AM
What's the "NAC"? I heard Morlot a few weeks ago in Chicago and was quite impressed. He did an outstanding Rosenkavalier Suite with the CSO.

I heard him in 2006 with the New York Philharmonic, in a program of Carter, Schumann and Brahms that he conducted at the last minute, replacing Christoph von Dohnányi who was ill.  Considering that Morlot stepped in at the eleventh hour, and kept the program the same, he was very impressive.  

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on January 09, 2008, 11:18:48 AM
Thank you for your replies :)

Well, I have never heard of this conductor before, but I'm enthralled, mainly because it will be my first ever live performance of the Tchaikovsky VC!

O Mensch: the orchestra on this programme is the Centre's own orchestra, simply called the "NAC Orchestra" or "NACO"

It's going to make up for the fact that I missed Frederica von Stade's recital yesterday... and how much does this cost me? 10 bucks :) Being a student has never been more fun.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: bassio on January 09, 2008, 02:03:48 PM
I did not know that you had a concert thread around here. Nice.  :)

I am looking forward to a concert next friday. A Piano Recital by a pianist called Tamas Vesmas.  :D Romanian. Anyone heard of him? He has some recordings on Amazon.

By the way, can I ask you guys to submit any upcoming concerts to http://www.allaboutclassical.com/concertcalendar
[Disclaimer: It is my website by the way.]
I apologize. I am embarrassed and I hate to be naggy. But the calendar is almost empty and I will be hurt to see it wasted. It seemed to me (at one moment in time and space) that a centralized classical music concert calendar to check out will be a great idea.  :-\
So if you are not busy for a few secs and you want to give the idea a push then it will be great. :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on January 11, 2008, 09:55:53 AM
Tonight at the NAC:

Ludovic Morlot, chef d’orchestre
Midori, violon

RAVEL Ma Mčre l’Oye : Suite
TCHAĎKOVSKI Concerto pour violon
RAVEL Pavane pour une infante defunte
CHOSTAKOVITCH Symphonie no 9

I can't wait!!!

Morigan, how was the concert?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on January 11, 2008, 11:56:28 AM
Hi ChamberNut,

It was great! The Ravel wasn't really what I was after, but it was still nice... I loved many parts of his Mother Goose suite.

The Tchaikovsky VC and Midori were my main motivations for buying the tickets, of course. I have to tell you something funny: just before the beginning of the concert, there was the usual recorded message telling the audience to turn off their cell phones, and then another voice announced: "Ladies and gentlemen, tonight's soloist, Midori, is sorry to inform you that, due to loss of luggage during her travel from Japan, she will be appearing on stage wearing street clothes". LOL!! So anyway she played while wearing something that looked like a school girl's uniform from the 40's.

Her interpretation of the concerto was awesome; she used a little more rubato than what I'm used to, but it was interesting. I also thought her sound was very small. Sometimes a solo instrumentist from the orchestra would totally overpower the main melodic line of her violin. I thought her sound was somewhat like her: a small, shy and cute asian lady.

She came down to the Atrium to sign autographs and meet with people after the concert; it was nice.

Oh and I almost forgot: I loved the Shosty. I was anxious to hear the 9th after reading about its story and the controversy that it caused, etc. It confirmed to me that Morlot was a very competent conductor.

One could almost see Shostakovich's ghost running around the performers and yelling: "This is a circus! The world is a circus!".

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on January 11, 2008, 01:47:39 PM
We'll be attending a fascinating concert next Monday in Mannheim. The Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz performing three works I've never heard live:

César Franck - Psalm 150 for Choir and Orchestra

Camille Saint-Saens - Symphony #3 (Organ)

Arthur Honegger - Le Roi David


Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on January 11, 2008, 01:49:57 PM
We'll be attending a fascinating concert next Monday in Mannheim. The Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz performing three works I've never heard live:

César Franck - Psalm 150 for Choir and Orchestra

Camille Saint-Saens - Symphony #3 (Organ)

Arthur Honegger - Le Roi David


Sarge

Very interesting program, and I don't know the Honegger at all.  Does the hall have a great pipe organ, by any chance?  If so, you are possibly in for a sonic spectacular with that Saint-Saens.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on January 11, 2008, 04:09:11 PM
My wife and I are heading to this tonight:

Baroque Chamber Orchestra of Colorado

Virtuoso Violins: Chamber Music by Candlelight

Lopez Nogueira, Suite for Solo Violin

Castello, Sonatas for One and Two Violins and Continuo

Stradella, Motet: Exultate in Deo fideles

Purcell, Fantasia: Three Parts Upon a Ground

Telemann, Concerto for Four Violins (unaccompanied) in G major

Handel, Cantata: Spande ancor

Telemann, Concerto for Violin, Strings and Continuo in E major

http://dcc1079.googlepages.com/
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on January 12, 2008, 06:28:38 AM
Thank you for your replies :)

It's going to make up for the fact that I missed Frederica von Stade's recital yesterday...


 :'( :'( :'(

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: pjme on January 13, 2008, 02:49:30 PM
I'll be in London on February 10th for a Philharmonia concert /Royal Albert Hall.

Esa Pekka Salonen will conduct

André Jolivet's 5 Dances rituelles
Olivier Messiaen's Oiseaux exotiques ( piano & orch.)
Stravinsky : Le sacre du printemps

The concert will be repeated in Luxemburg's new Philharmonie ( on February 12th)

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on January 13, 2008, 06:24:32 PM
We'll be attending a fascinating concert next Monday in Mannheim. The Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz performing three works I've never heard live:

César Franck - Psalm 150 for Choir and Orchestra

Camille Saint-Saens - Symphony #3 (Organ)

Arthur Honegger - Le Roi David


Sarge


With that line up Sarge, let us know of any last minute changes. ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on January 14, 2008, 06:31:54 AM
With that line up Sarge, let us know of any last minute changes. ;D

 ;D :D ;D

Yeah, with my luck they'll substitute Eine Kleine Nachtmusik for the Saint-Saens. But actually it doesn't matter. We aren't going. I've got the flu. :(

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Siedler on January 14, 2008, 06:51:45 AM
Thu 31.1.2008 / Carlos Kalmar, conductor / Lilli Paasikivi, mezzo-soprano / Jussi Myllys, baritone / Ain Anger, bass / Dominante Choir
Berlioz: Romeo and Juliet
I bought tickets a while ago to this one, I'm excited as I haven't heard Berlioz R&J yet.

Another concert which I'm really looked forward to (and I bought the tickets today):
21 May 2008 Helsinki, Finlandia Hall / Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Sakari Oramo; Annika Mylläri-McLoud, soprano; Hilary Summers, alto; Akateeminen Laulu; EMO Ensemble

Arnold Schönberg: Chamber Symphony No. 1; Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 2
--
It will be wonderful to hear Resurrection symphony live even with the dreary acoustics of the venue.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on January 14, 2008, 08:52:28 PM
;D :D ;D

Yeah, with my luck they'll substitute Eine Kleine Nachtmusik for the Saint-Saens. But actually it doesn't matter. We aren't going. I've got the flu. :(

Sarge

Sorry to hear that.  Get well soon.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: B_cereus on January 15, 2008, 01:42:11 PM
I am seriously considering going to see a concert by the young French cellist Gautier Capucon early next month. He begins touring Europe and North America from this month.

I have never heard of him before, but I've read very positive reviews of his CD recordings. Anyone familiar and has opinions on him? Should I go for it, or should I spend my money somewhere else? Thanks  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on January 15, 2008, 08:34:53 PM
Gautier Capuçon is one of those amazing young French upstarts who are taking the musical world by storm. For some reason they are all very personable too, with many cd covers looking like so much soft beefcake porn. That definitely helps sell concert tickets and records ::). But they are good. I mean, really good!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on January 21, 2008, 05:22:05 AM
Saturday Jan. 19th
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

Borodin - Prince Igor Overture
Chin Ya Kin - Ecstasy
Richard Strauss - Horn Concerto # 2
P.I. Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 2 "Little Russian"

Wow!  Being hardly familiar with Tchaikovsky symphonies in general, I was blown away by the Symphony No. 2 "Little Russian".  I love the energy of this symphony, and all the Ukrainian folk themes within it.  I now must get this symphony into my collection!  This was a great concert.  The Strauss Horn concerto was also new to me, but I enjoyed it very much.  You could tell the reverence and influence of Mozart's Horn Concerti in this work! Lovely.  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on January 21, 2008, 07:42:27 AM
Who was the horn soloist?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on January 21, 2008, 08:12:09 AM
Who was the horn soloist?

Horn soloist was the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra's Principal Horn, Patricia Evans.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on January 22, 2008, 10:33:54 AM
Next week:

New York Philharmonic
Lorin Maazel, conductor
Synergy Vocals

Berio: Sinfonia
Brahms: Symphony No. 4

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on January 25, 2008, 07:38:20 AM
But before next week, this one tonight.  I am very excited, and perhaps most amazingly, it's free.

Musicians from the Lucerne Festival Academy Ensemble and the New Juilliard Ensemble
Pierre Boulez, conductor

Varčse: Intégrales (1924-25)
Carter: Triple Duo (1982)
Stravinsky: Concertino (for twelve instruments) (1952)
Carter: Penthode (1984-85)
Boulez: Dérive I (1984, rev. 1986)
Carter: Clarinet Concerto (1996)
Ismail Lumanovski, clarinet

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on January 29, 2008, 06:04:22 AM
tonight:

Piotr Anderszewski recital

J S Bach: Partita No 2 in C minor, BWV 826
Schumann: Humoreske in B flat major, op 20
Szymanowski: Masques, op 34
J S Bach: Partita No 1 in B flat major, BWV 825
(or English Suite No 4 instead of 2nd Partita)
 
and then on Friday regular Belgrade Philharmonic subscription concert:

Jadwiga Rappe, alto [yup, of the thread (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2087.0.html) fame ;D]
Mariusz Smolij, conductor

S. Moniuszko: Overture to the opera Paria
K. Szymanowski: Three Songs to the poems of Jan Kasprowicz
S. Prokofiev: Symphony no. 5

That will be more live Szymanovski in four days than for last four years
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on January 29, 2008, 08:54:56 AM
Tell us what you think of Anderszewski. I was unimpressed with him in Chicago a few weeks ago in LvB PC 1.

I heard this last Saturday:

eight blackbird
Strange Imaginary Remix
 
Dennis DeSantis - strange imaginary remix
DeSantis - Powerless
David M. Gordon - Friction Systems
Gordon Fitzell- evanescence
Steve Mackey - Indigenous Instruments
Radiohead - Dollar and Cents (arr. Cliff Colnot)

Fun and games. The group is amazing. DeSantis was doing some electronic effects throughout all the works, which worked well for his own stuff and the Fitzell, but less so with the Mackey and Gordon, which lost a lot of edge and detail.

...I heard this yersterday:

MusicNOW

Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor
Mark-Anthony Turnage, host
Sidsel Endresen, soprano

Wallin and Endresen -   LautLeben
Knussen -   Songs without Voices, Op. 26
Salonen -   Catch and Release

Wasn't so impressed with the Wallin/Endresen. Too much video performance art of a kind that has been done a million times. Loved the Knussen, though it was a tad austere for him. The Salonen was good fun. Star-studded audience with Boulez, Turnage, Knussen present. Boulez walked in right in front of me and Knussen sat a few seats over.


...and I am going to hear this on Saturday:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Pierre Boulez, conductor
Susan Graham, mezzo-soprano


Berio -   Quatre dédicaces
Berlioz -   Les nuits d'été
Stravinsky -   Petrushka
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on January 29, 2008, 09:13:29 AM
I heard this last Saturday:

eight blackbird
Strange Imaginary Remix
 
Dennis DeSantis - strange imaginary remix
DeSantis - Powerless
David M. Gordon - Friction Systems
Gordon Fitzell- evanescence
Steve Mackey - Indigenous Instruments
Radiohead - Dollar and Cents (arr. Cliff Colnot)

Fun and games. The group is amazing. DeSantis was doing some electronic effects throughout all the works, which worked well for his own stuff and the Fitzell, but less so with the Mackey and Gordon, which lost a lot of edge and detail.

I am a huge fan of eighth blackbird.  It is somewhat amazing to me that they have made a career, as a sextet doing nothing but contemporary music, but hearing is believing.  Their CD, strange imaginary animals, is terrific if you want to revisit some of the works on that program. 

That Boulez concert looks mighty tasty, too.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on January 29, 2008, 09:20:09 AM
Their CD, strange imaginary animals, is terrific if you want to revisit some of the works on that program. 

I have that already, of course.  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on January 29, 2008, 11:32:39 AM
Tonight, hearing this concert of Elliott Carter, the third concert in the Focus! festival.  The great thing is, they're repeating a piece, doing the Asko Concerto twice.  I wish people would consider doing this more often, especially with unfamiliar works.

--Bruce

* * * * *

Three Poems of Robert Frost (1980)
David McFerrin, baritone

Quintet for Piano and winds (1991)
Alexandra Lambertson, oboe; Bryan Conger, clarinet; Brigette Bencoe, French horn; Joshua Firer, bassoon; Jacek Mysinski, piano

Asko Concerto (2000)

Tempo e tempi (1999)
Jennifer Zetlan, soprano; Jessica Pearlman, oboe and English horn; David Fulmer, violin; Hannah Sloane, Cello

Asko Concerto (repeat performance)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on January 30, 2008, 09:46:19 AM
Tell us what you think of Anderszewski. I was unimpressed with him in Chicago a few weeks ago in LvB PC 1.

Mixed impressions really. Enjoyed the Szymanowski very much but that is new piece to me so couldn't tell to what extent it is due to the music itself an to what extent to his playing. Was mostly ambivalent to Bach except for both Sarabandes which sounded slow, portentous and very much non-vocal to me.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on February 01, 2008, 09:02:20 AM
Piano recitals are a bit thin on the ground here, but next Wednesday, I'm heading over to Glasgow to hear Brendel, probably for the last time, given his retirement.

   Haydn - Variations in F minor, Hob.XVII/6
   Mozart - Piano Sonata in F major, K.533/K.494
   Beethoven - Piano Sonata in E flat major "quasi una fantasia", Op.27 No.1
   Schubert - Piano Sonata in B flat major, D960

I get the impression that some people find him a boring pianist, but after hearing him live last year (similar repertoire as the above), I disagree. I liked his poise and I remember a beautiful op. 110 from the last concert, although I personally prefer the Schubert Impromptus to be a little more extroverted.

Looking forward to this one :).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Haffner on February 01, 2008, 10:17:48 AM
We don't get much for great Symphonic or Chamber music out here so:


Heaven and Hell
Van Halen
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 01, 2008, 11:00:08 AM
Here's one that I've got on my calendar and for once, and thankfully, I have the night off!!!!!


Friday, February 15, 2008 at 8:00 PM 
Severance Hall

JANACEK & SCHOENBERG

The Cleveland Orchestra
Pierre Boulez, conductor
Janácek: Sinfonietta
Schoenberg: Pelleas und Melisande, Symphonic Poem

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 01, 2008, 11:07:48 AM
Here's one that I've got on my calendar and for once, and thankfully, I have the night off!!!!!


Friday, February 15, 2008 at 8:00 PM 
Severance Hall

JANACEK & SCHOENBERG

The Cleveland Orchestra
Pierre Boulez, conductor
Janácek: Sinfonietta
Schoenberg: Pelleas und Melisande, Symphonic Poem

Allan

 :o  :o  :o  Wow, that looks incredible.  Please gush voluminously, if appropriate, afterward.  ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 01, 2008, 11:09:50 AM
Come on up Bruce, bring a warm jacket though.  I'll supply the cigars and booze afterwards.

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 01, 2008, 11:18:00 AM
Come on up Bruce, bring a warm jacket though.  I'll supply the cigars and booze afterwards.

Allan

You make a highly tempting offer, Mr. T. Bass.  ;D  Alas, that night I'm supposed to hear Messiaen's Turangalîla at Carnegie, with David Robertson, St. Louis and pianist Nicolas Hodges.

Don't you wish sometimes that you could be like, ten different people?

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 01, 2008, 11:24:44 AM
You make a highly tempting offer, Mr. T. Bass.  ;D  Alas, that night I'm supposed to hear Messiaen's Turangalîla at Carnegie, with David Robertson, St. Louis and pianist Nicolas Hodges.

Don't you wish sometimes that you could be like, ten different people?

--Bruce

Sheeeeit meng,  that's not a shabby line up either.  Have a great time.  Have you heard the Messaien live before?  I missed Cleve doing it due to work and I really hate that I didn't get to see it.

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Haffner on February 01, 2008, 11:27:22 AM
Sheeeeit meng,  that's not a shabby line up either. 
Allan



Choo got eet, maing! I'm wi'cha! ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 01, 2008, 11:31:25 AM
Sheeeeit meng,  that's not a shabby line up either.  Have a great time.  Have you heard the Messaien live before?  I missed Cleve doing it due to work and I really hate that I didn't get to see it.

Allan

Have heard it once, just a couple of years ago, at Carnegie in a great performance with Eschenbach and Philadelphia.  His inspired programming idea: on the first half, he placed traditional Balinese gamelan music, by an ensemble from Swarthmore College.  It sort of "retuned your ears" for the Messiaen after intermission.  I still think it's one of the most creative concerts I've been to.

[Just saw Haffner's reply...and chuckling...]

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Haffner on February 01, 2008, 11:38:52 AM


[Just saw Haffner's reply...and chuckling...]

--Bruce


 :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: bassio on February 02, 2008, 05:52:53 AM
Piano recitals are a bit thin on the ground here, but next Wednesday, I'm heading over to Glasgow to hear Brendel, probably for the last time, given his retirement.

   Haydn - Variations in F minor, Hob.XVII/6
   Mozart - Piano Sonata in F major, K.533/K.494
   Beethoven - Piano Sonata in E flat major "quasi una fantasia", Op.27 No.1
   Schubert - Piano Sonata in B flat major, D960

I get the impression that some people find him a boring pianist, but after hearing him live last year (similar repertoire as the above), I disagree. I liked his poise and I remember a beautiful op. 110 from the last concert, although I personally prefer the Schubert Impromptus to be a little more extroverted.

Looking forward to this one :).

Hey Novitiate, Brendel is one of my favorite artists - can you update us on the info please? Where, when?
Looking forward to your impressions.

I hope you don't miss it.  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 05, 2008, 09:30:32 AM
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam
Mariss Jansons, Conductor

Monday, February 4 at 8:00 p.m.
CLAUDE DEBUSSY La mer
HECTOR BERLIOZ Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14

Well this was quite marvelous.  I've heard the Debussy two or three times in the last year or so (including Levine and Boston a few weeks ago) but when it's played like this, I could listen to it over and over.  Ditto for the Berlioz, which had some real fire in the coloring, helped by the group's famous woodwind section, and Jansons's beautiful shading of dynamic levels.  (NB: I confess I'm not a huge fan of the piece.)

We also got two encores, both played with as much energy and finesse as you could want:

GRIEG  "Solveig’s Song" from Peer Gynt 
BERLIOZ  "Marche Hongroise" from La damnation de Faust

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 05, 2008, 10:27:50 AM
Ditto for the Berlioz, which had some real fire in the coloring, helped by the group's famous woodwind section, and Jansons's beautiful shading of dynamic levels.  (NB: I confess I'm not a huge fan of the piece.)

Damn. Wish I could have heard this. Two friends of mine reported from the Boston concert that it was amazing. Jansons/RCO is my top recommendation in modern sound for the fantastique. Jansons loves that piece and it shows.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 05, 2008, 10:35:57 AM
Damn. Wish I could have heard this. Two friends of mine reported from the Boston concert that it was amazing. Jansons/RCO is my top recommendation in modern sound for the fantastique. Jansons loves that piece and it shows.

His might have been the most persuasive version I've heard.  Oh, and I forgot to mention the orchestra's fantastic percussion section which also helped create the otherworldly atmosphere.  The tuned tympani in the third movement...just outstanding, drenched with menace, and the offstage gongs, with a great timbre and also just so deftly played: a true mezzo-forte the first time they appear, piano the second--expert.

Very much looking forward to the Ketting De aankomst tonight...

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Domenico on February 08, 2008, 11:11:38 AM
Tonight, as part of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society series, a recital by Christian Zacharias.

Can't wait!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 08, 2008, 11:53:06 AM
I just heard Zacharias a few weeks ago with Orpheus, in the Schumann Piano Concerto--excellent.  He was clearly having a great time playing with them.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on February 08, 2008, 12:04:55 PM
Schumann Piano Concerto

I get to hear it next week.  On Valentine's Day.  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 08, 2008, 12:08:41 PM
I get to hear it next week.  On Valentine's Day.  :)

Oh great, with whom?  (Sorry if you posted it already.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on February 08, 2008, 12:13:38 PM
Oh great, with whom?  (Sorry if you posted it already.)

--Bruce

Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra - Alexander Mickelthwate conducting

Darryl Friesen - piano
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 08, 2008, 12:15:04 PM
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra - Alexander Mickelthwate conducting

Darryl Friesen - piano

Ah, excellent.  Haven't heard Friesen, so do give a report if you like. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 08, 2008, 02:04:24 PM
It's official.  I got my ticket to see Boulez and Cleveland!!! I haven't had a chance to see a live concert in a while and I need a break from playing so much lately.  I can't wait!!!!


Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: bassio on February 08, 2008, 02:30:18 PM
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra - Alexander Mickelthwate conducting

Darryl Friesen - piano

I guess bhodges meant: with whom? (= who will you be going with?)  ;D
.. didn't you say it will be valentine's day?  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: bassio on February 08, 2008, 02:42:22 PM
It's official.  I got my ticket to see Boulez and Cleveland!!! I haven't had a chance to see a live concert in a while and I need a break from playing so much lately.  I can't wait!!!!


Allan

playing Maessian?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 08, 2008, 02:43:35 PM
playing Maessian?
Janacek Sinfonietta and Schoenberg Pelleas


Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 08, 2008, 02:43:56 PM
It's official.  I got my ticket to see Boulez and Cleveland!!! I haven't had a chance to see a live concert in a while and I need a break from playing so much lately.  I can't wait!!!!


Allan

You lucky dog.  So which of these are you going to?  (Ah, you just answered...)

THIS WEEKEND AND NEXT:
Pierre Boulez conducts The Cleveland Orchestra
Pierre Boulez returns to Severance Hall to conduct The Cleveland Orchestra: on Saturday, Feb. 9 at 8:00 p.m., hear the lyrical Berg Violin Concerto with soloist Leonidas Kavakos, the Bach/Webern Ricercare from Musical Offering and Schoenberg's passionate Pelleas and Melisande. The Friday, Feb. 8 11:00 a.m. performance features Schoenberg and Bach/Webern. Next week, Maestro Boulez conducts Bartók's Bluebeard's Castle on Feb. 14 and Feb. 16.

PS, I'm getting a kick out of the fact that the Bartók Bluebeard is on Valentine's Day... ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: SonicMan46 on February 10, 2008, 04:36:01 PM
I assume this thread can include 'concerts just seen' -  :D (or do we have another thread for that category?) -  ;D

But, just getting back for the evening from a Winston-Salem Symphony concert (Robert Moody is our local conductor); program:

Richard Strauss - Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche
Arnold Schoenberg - Verklarte Nacht

Joseph Schwantner - Concerto for Percussion & Orchestra w/ Evelyn Glennie on percussion!

The last composer despite being an American from Chicago (and a few years older than me) is unknown to me!  Evelyn Glennie (http://www.evelyn.co.uk/homepage.htm) (my first experience w/ her skills, either live or on CD!) was just an amazing percussionist - moving from the back to the front of the stage, and playing just a wide assortment of drums, gongs, xylophones, etc. - and of course the piece de resistance is that she is DEAF!  I was impressed - she has performed in a variety of genres & has won a few Grammy awards - would be very interested in impressions from others concerning her recordings - thanks as usual!   :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 10, 2008, 04:54:56 PM
That sounds like a fantastic concert, and Glennie is quite a phenom.  I don't have many of her recordings, but I can recommend this one most enthusiastically: James MacMillan's Veni, Veni, Emanuel, written for her.  It originally came out in 1993 but has been re-released; apparently Amazon still has copies of the original, which has Glennie's picture on the cover.

Reissue:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41xuzLD2SkL._AA240_.jpg)

Original:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/414SW3Z83PL._AA240_.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Evelyn-Glennie-Veni-veni-emmanuel/dp/B000003EL4

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: SonicMan46 on February 10, 2008, 05:09:14 PM
That sounds like a fantastic concert, and Glennie is quite a phenom.  I don't have many of her recordings, but I can recommend this one most enthusiastically: James MacMillan's Veni, Veni, Emanuel, written for her.  It originally came out in 1993 but has been re-released; apparently Amazon still has copies of the original, which has Glennie's picture on the cover.

Bruce - thought that you might be one of the first to come through w/ recommendations!  :D

She was just amazing - running 'back & forth' from front and back stage w/ her groupings of percussion instruments - of course, I can't even imagine her inner experience in producing the percussion sounds along w/ the orchestra and not being able to HEAR any of this music! Indeed, phenomenal - she is on my 'wish list' to purchase a few CDs - not sure yet which 'genre' I may want?  (she won Grammy w/ a Bela Fleck collaboration - great banjo guy - have a number of his CDs) - she certainly is different - thanks - Dave  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on February 10, 2008, 05:18:12 PM
I'm playing so much lately I don't get time to go any concerts and won't for a while. :(

So, the next two concerts I'm looking forward to are two I'm playing in!  :D

With our college wind ensemble, of Lamar University (a college in southeast Texas), the following program on the 12th, 14th, and 15th:

Giovanni Gabrieli - Sonata pian e forte
(arranged for 8 brass)

George Gershwin, trans. Thomas Verrier - Rhapsody in Blue
(transcription of orchestral version)

Charles Ives - March Intercollegiate

Morten Lauridsen, trans. H Robert Reynolds -
Ave Maria (world premiere of arrangement)

Michael Daugherty - Raise the Roof
(a 2003 commission for Detroit Symphony)


Our big concert is on the Friday, the 15th at 5pm at the Lila Cockrell Theater in San Antonio if anybody is in the area! And we are also putting the program to CD in recording sessions the following week. It's been really a fun program to work up.

There are also many great concerts this week at the same location featuring Texas' best school orchestras, choirs and other wind groups as part of the TMEA Convention taking place this week. More information is here: http://www.tmea.org (http://www.tmea.org)

Another concert I'm looking forward to is March 4th, I play with our college jazz ensemble and we are doing a tribute to Harry James (a native of our area), with some other fun things thrown in.  ;D


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Steve on February 10, 2008, 06:24:15 PM
This Saturday: Verdi's Falstaff at the Lyric Opera of Chicago..

"Andrew Shore plays the Fat Knight as a genial, whiskery old buffer…. to his histrionic and vocal gifts, he adds the feat of downing pints of beer without coming up for breath! Shore was born to sing this role!" The Times, London

With her rich, honeyed soprano and unstoppable stage presence, Veronica Villarroel "is nothing short of breathtaking."
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 11, 2008, 11:00:30 AM
Bruce - thought that you might be one of the first to come through w/ recommendations!  :D

She was just amazing - running 'back & forth' from front and back stage w/ her groupings of percussion instruments - of course, I can't even imagine her inner experience in producing the percussion sounds along w/ the orchestra and not being able to HEAR any of this music! Indeed, phenomenal - she is on my 'wish list' to purchase a few CDs - not sure yet which 'genre' I may want?  (she won Grammy w/ a Bela Fleck collaboration - great banjo guy - have a number of his CDs) - she certainly is different - thanks - Dave  :)


More...I had no idea until just now that she is now Dame Evelyn Glennie.  Here (http://www.evelyn.co.uk/homepage.htm) is her huge website, with a discography.  I realize I have another one of her recordings--Tüür's Magma--but I've been so busy I haven't listened to it yet.  :-[  Maybe will rectify that later today.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 11, 2008, 01:11:16 PM
Just decided to go hear this tomorrow night, since Gilbert is conducting, and I don't know the Nielsen well (although I've heard the Blomstedt recording). 

Carnegie Hall
February 12, 2008
The Curtis Symphony Orchestra
Alan Gilbert, Conductor

BARBER  Overture for The School for Scandal, Op. 5 
BEETHOVEN  String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 95, "Serioso"  
NIELSEN  Symphony No. 3, Op. 27, "Sinfonia espansiva"

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: SonicMan46 on February 11, 2008, 03:49:46 PM
More...I had no idea until just now that she is now Dame Evelyn Glennie.  Here (http://www.evelyn.co.uk/homepage.htm) is her huge website, with a discography.  I realize I have another one of her recordings--Tüür's Magma--but I've been so busy I haven't listened to it yet.  :-[  Maybe will rectify that later today.

Bruce - yes, listed as a Dame in the program notes & introduced as such, also - been to her homepage, and quite impressive; a lot of CD choices on Amazon, and such a variety - hard to decide 'where' to start?

Enjoy your concert tomorrow night - looks good to me!  Dave  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on February 14, 2008, 03:02:27 PM
First concert of the year coming up next Thursday:

Playing with Fire

APO
 
Christian Knapp Conductor 

Műza Rubackyté  Piano 
 
Chopin Piano Concerto No. 1
Ravel Valses nobles et sentimentales
Stravinsky Firebird Suite

Pianist Műza Rubackyté has been hailed by the Chicago Tribune as “one of today’s most important pianists”. She begins our season with Chopin’s fiery Piano Concerto No. 1. It launches a programme blazing with colour and energy, with Ravel’s multi-hued waltzes leading into Stravinsky’s electrifying and unforgettable Firebird Suite.

Looking forward to it. Seems like a long wait [late November] between concerts  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 14, 2008, 04:04:41 PM
Pianist Műza Rubackyté has been hailed by the Chicago Tribune as “one of today’s most important pianists”. She begins our season with Chopin’s fiery Piano Concerto No. 1. It launches a programme blazing with colour and energy, with Ravel’s multi-hued waltzes leading into Stravinsky’s electrifying and unforgettable Firebird Suite.

Looking forward to it. Seems like a long wait [late November] between concerts  :)

Enjoy the concert, but don't put too much currency in Chicago Trib reviews. The guy who writes there is rather random.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 20, 2008, 09:42:21 AM
Tonight, the excellent new music group Either/Or, in this program:

Georg Friedrich Haas: Ein Schattenspiel, for piano and live electronics, New York premiere
Alexander Stankovski: Duet for saxophone and piano, US premiere
Richard Carrick: Moroccan Flow (unfolding from unity) for cello, World premiere
Beat Furrer: Lied for violin and piano
Karlheinz Essl : more or less, real-time composition for 5 computer-controlled soloists, US premiere
Peter Ablinger: Weiss/Weisslich 4 for piano and ensemble

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 20, 2008, 09:43:34 AM
Might go to hear Thibaudet play Debussy Preludes Book II and Brahms Piano Sonata No.3 this Sunday.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 20, 2008, 09:45:32 AM
Delete that word "might" immediately!  ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 20, 2008, 10:16:39 AM
Delete that word "might" immediately!  ;D

That would make an ungrammatical sentence that already omits the subject even worse.  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 20, 2008, 10:20:42 AM
All right, then change "might" to "I pledge to"...

 ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 20, 2008, 10:25:27 AM
Holy F--K! The CSO just announced the new season (http://www.cso.org/main.taf?p=3,11,6&SeasonID=0809). I get to hear Chailly do Mahler 10 for my birthday and then he does Bruckner 5 the following week! Dudamel returns for Brahms 2, Luisi conducts Symphonie fantastique, Haitink does Shosty 15, Schubert 9, Mahler 2, Bruckner 8, Lutoslawski, Trpceski plays Tchaik PC1, Boulez does Janacek Sinfonietta and Ives. Sensory overload! I'm gonna go broke.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 20, 2008, 10:45:11 AM
It's definitely chock full of great stuff.  I'd also love to hear that Muti in that Verdi Requiem, with Barbara Frittoli and Olga Borodina.

I'm amazed Boulez is doing Ives.  From his comments (e.g., he'd have to "recompose" his work) I didn't think he liked him much.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on February 20, 2008, 10:47:37 AM
Holy F--K! The CSO just announced the new season (http://www.cso.org/main.taf?p=3,11,6&SeasonID=0809). I get to hear Chailly do Mahler 10 for my birthday and then he does Bruckner 5 the following week! Dudamel returns for Brahms 2, Luisi conducts Symphonie fantastique, Haitink does Shosty 15, Schubert 9, Mahler 2, Bruckner 8, Lutoslawski, Trpceski plays Tchaik PC1, Boulez does Janacek Sinfonietta and Ives. Sensory overload! I'm gonna go broke.

Argh!  I am so envious! :(  I can't wait to see the WSO line-up.  I'm hoping they put Bruckner into the program.   :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 20, 2008, 10:55:13 AM
I just saw Boulez do tje Janacek here in Cleveland and it was amazing.  A whole different experience from the more driven versions I have heard. It sort of reminded me of when someone does Brahms very well, how layered and dense the music really is and how much of that part of the construction of the music so many people fail to pay proper attention to. 

Very enjoyable listening,
Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 20, 2008, 10:59:01 AM
If I  actually make it through this week alive,  I fly out to Sacremento next week to catch the Mrs. in the Sacremento Opera production of Turn of the Screw.  She's Mrs. Grose.

(Also get to see my niece who was born in late Jan!!!!!)
Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 20, 2008, 11:07:07 AM
Allan,

You should try to get this CD (http://www.cso.org/main.taf?p=4,1,3,7,2&productid=15422) (only available through that link). It has the most amazing Janacek Glagolitic Mass with Boulez conducting, among many other goodies.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on February 20, 2008, 11:08:50 AM
If I  actually make it through this week alive,  I fly out to Sacremento next week to catch the Mrs. in the Sacremento Opera production of Turn of the Screw.  She's Mrs. Grose.

(Also get to see my niece who was born in late Jan!!!!!)
Allan

!!!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Tempora on February 20, 2008, 11:12:09 AM
April 11-12
Maggio Musicale Fiorentino Orchestra- Zubin Mehta
F.Mendelssohn-Opus 20
J.Brahms Symphony Op 68. No 1
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 20, 2008, 11:12:15 AM
Allan,

You should try to get this CD (http://www.cso.org/main.taf?p=4,1,3,7,2&productid=15422) (only available through that link). It has the most amazing Janacek Glagolitic Mass with Boulez conducting, among many other goodies.

Wow thanks so much for that.  I'm ordering it today.

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on February 20, 2008, 03:03:06 PM
This one. (http://www.cadoganhall.com/showpage.php?pid=438)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on February 21, 2008, 06:30:37 AM
Mark! Are you back, lad?

(Don't make me read your signature!  ;D )
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 21, 2008, 09:39:06 AM
Tonight, this fascinating concert by Marilyn Nonken, Director of Piano Performance Studies at New York University.  I've heard her do the Harvey piece before, and liked it quite a bit.

Tom Beyer: New Work (world premiere, w/ Kathy Supove, piano)
Chris Bailey: Out Of
Beth Wiemann: A Change in the Weather
Alvin Lucier: Music for Piano with Pure-Wave Slow-Sweep Oscillators
Jonathan Harvey: Tombeau de Messiaen

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on February 21, 2008, 09:51:29 AM
Saturday night at Symphony: (http://www.bso.org/bso/mods/perf_detail.jsp?pid=25700069)

MOZART :: Symphony No. 29
BERG :: Chamber Concerto for piano and violin with thirteen wind instruments
BRAHMS :: Serenade No. 2

Isabelle Faust, violin
Peter Serkin, piano

 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 21, 2008, 09:53:03 AM
And who conducteth? Jimbo?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on February 21, 2008, 09:54:24 AM
Oui.

(I won't make you mash the link.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 21, 2008, 09:58:53 AM
Saturday night at Symphony: (http://www.bso.org/bso/mods/perf_detail.jsp?pid=25700069)

MOZART :: Symphony No. 29
BERG :: Chamber Concerto for piano and violin with thirteen wind instruments
BRAHMS :: Serenade No. 2

Isabelle Faust, violin
Peter Serkin, piano

Wow, nice program.  I just heard Levine conduct that Berg a few weeks ago, and it was marvelous, and I haven't heard the Brahms live in a very long time.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on February 21, 2008, 10:40:49 AM
That concerto was the first Berg piece I learnt to love, Bruce.

About three-quarters down that BSO page, there's a podcast with Robt Kirzinger giving a semi-casual introduction to the program (he uses the technical term "neat-o" at one point).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 21, 2008, 10:45:58 AM
That concerto was the first Berg piece I learnt to love, Bruce.

About three-quarters down that BSO page, there's a podcast with Robt Kirzinger giving a semi-casual introduction to the program (he uses the technical term "neat-o" at one point).

Oh great, thanks--I'll try to check it out later.  Sounds neat-o.  ;D

I hadn't heard that Berg live in years.  Just did a quick search of Carnegie's site, which goes back to 2005, and Levine's was the sole complete performance during that time.  (Another group did an excerpt, but not the complete piece.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on February 21, 2008, 11:43:29 AM
First concert of the year coming up next Thursday:

Playing with Fire

APO
 
Christian Knapp Conductor 

Műza Rubackyté  Piano 
 
Chopin Piano Concerto No. 1
Ravel Valses nobles et sentimentales
Stravinsky Firebird Suite

Pianist Műza Rubackyté has been hailed by the Chicago Tribune as “one of today’s most important pianists”. She begins our season with Chopin’s fiery Piano Concerto No. 1. It launches a programme blazing with colour and energy, with Ravel’s multi-hued waltzes leading into Stravinsky’s electrifying and unforgettable Firebird Suite.

Looking forward to it. Seems like a long wait [late November] between concerts  :)


Wonderful concert last night;a sensational way to start the new season.

The Chopin was glorious! Műza Rubackyté was a wonderfully engaging soloist and the way she related to the members of the orchestra was a delight. She was very expressive with her body movements; a real treat.

I wasn't familiar with the brief Ravel piece. A 15min piece made up of four or five short pieces. A waltz, an omm-pah-pah, lots of percussion with tamborine rattling being prominent.

The Firebird was exciting. When the bass drum strikes came in they were like canon fire! Very interesting orchestration like the bit near the begining where the first violinists rub their fingers up and down the strings to get that spooky sound. The trumpet fanfare at the conclusion was rousing.

It was great to be back at a live performance  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 21, 2008, 03:09:52 PM
All right, then change "might" to "I pledge to"...

 ;D

--Bruce

OK, I've rectified the problem and bought a ticket to hear Thibaudet.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 21, 2008, 03:17:01 PM
OK, I've rectified the problem and bought a ticket to hear Thibaudet.

 :D

Just this week I was recalling his performance in the Messiaen Turangalîla with Eschenbach and Philadelphia a few years ago--one of my favorites of his appearances here.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 21, 2008, 03:56:15 PM
Just this week I was recalling his performance in the Messiaen Turangalîla with Eschenbach and Philadelphia a few years ago--one of my favorites of his appearances here.

He's on the Chailly/RCO/Decca recording of the Turangalila, IIRC. BTW, intersting post the other day. I didn't realize Matt Groening was a Messiaen fan and that Leela is actually Turanga Leela. I have that whole show on DVD somewhere. I should really dig it out.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on February 22, 2008, 07:21:32 AM
Tonight's WSO concert:

Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor
Rachmaninoff - Symphony No. 2 in E minor

Alexander Mickelthwate, conducting
Vladimir Sverdlov, piano

A little less familiar with Rachmaninoff, even though these are two well known and loved works.  Very much looking forward to it!  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 22, 2008, 08:31:39 AM
:D

Just this week I was recalling his performance in the Messiaen Turangalîla with Eschenbach and Philadelphia a few years ago--one of my favorites of his appearances here.

--Bruce

You've seen that piece more than once? That's awesome.  I missed Cleveland doing it because of work and with all these other performances happening now and in the recent past I feel like I'm not gonna be able to see it live for a while.

Missing the boat,
Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on February 23, 2008, 12:37:41 PM
Tonight I am going to the BSO the third week in a row. It certainly is good to live in a place again with a really good orchestra and a nice concert hall. For years, the best I could catch was the LA Philharmonic which isn't really that great an orchestra anymore. Their ensemble quality really has suffered a lot under that overhyped mediocre poser Salonen. Thinking back, I haven't heard any really good concerts with him over the 5 years in lived in SoCal, some were pretty good but nothing special, some were really quite bad. At best, they got through the music without major booboos but rarely with special musical moments, at worst, they poked their way through the pieces with lots of ensemble insecurities and some pretty major messups while Salonen headbanged to the music like he was on drugs. The best memory I have of the LAP live is a Pictures at an Exhibition under Gergiev. But even that wasn't what one could call "world class". No comparison at all to how good the orchestra was before Salonen, when I heard them under Sanderling and (even!) Previn. And the acoustics in Disney Hall aren't all that good either, as nice as the hall is as a builing.

Last week I heard Shostakovich 4 conducted by Mark Elder which saw the BSO in excellent shape in a very well played, if not necessarily very intense performance - which I attributed mostly to Elder whose direction was competent, but he did not connect with the orchestra too well. They also played Sibelius' violin concerto with Vadim Repin, but I only arrived after the intermisssion because I made up my mind to go rather late that day.

The week before that, I heard Martin's Sinfonia Concertante for harpsichord, harp and chamber orchestra, Prokofieff's 1st violin concerto and Saint-Saëns' Organ Symphony (I actually went to that program on two consecutive evenings). The conductor was Charles Dutoit and the soloist Viviane Hagner, and that was a very good concert in every respect. The soloist was outstanding, and Dutoit conducted a very stylish performance of the Organ Symphony.

Tonight, I am going to see the current MD, James Levine in a program with Mozart's 29th symphony, Berg's chamber concerto for violin, piano and wind instruments, and Brahms' 2nd serenade. So I am looking forward to that right now!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on February 23, 2008, 02:06:52 PM
The week before that, I heard Martin's Sinfonia Concertante for harpsichord, harp and chamber orchestra, Prokofieff's 1st violin concerto and Saint-Saëns' Organ Symphony (I actually went to that program on two consecutive evenings). The conductor was Charles Dutoit and the soloist Viviane Hagner, and that was a very good concert in every respect. The soloist was outstanding, and Dutoit conducted a very stylish performance of the Organ Symphony.

Wow!  Is Dutoit only guest conducting these days?  Karl did you mention this one also, or maybe I am thinking of a recording we discussed on Allan's thread?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on February 23, 2008, 02:16:44 PM
Yes, Karl was in the concert with his wife, too (I took a pic there of us all in the lobby and posted it here). Actually, they are coming tonight, too, we will all have dinner before the concert, and yes, Dutoit is doing a ton of guest conducting instead of holding a permanent position right now. He seems to be everywhere. I saw him in SF a while ago, too, a friend saw him even in Australia a few months back. And why not, no administrative burdens, nice fees, travelling all over the world...I think there are worse ways to make a living...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Mark on February 23, 2008, 02:18:18 PM
Mark! Are you back, lad?

(Don't make me read your signature!  ;D )

Now and then, Karl, now and then ... ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on February 23, 2008, 02:57:35 PM
Yes, Karl was in the concert with his wife, too (I took a pic there of us all in the lobby and posted it here). Actually, they are coming tonight, too, we will all have dinner before the concert, and yes, Dutoit is doing a ton of guest conducting instead of holding a permanent position right now. He seems to be everywhere. I saw him in SF a while ago, too, a friend saw him even in Australia a few months back. And why not, no administrative burdens, nice fees, travelling all over the world...I think there are worse ways to make a living...

I would love to see him stop in Denver.  Probably not a big enough venue for him, but I will see if he has a schedule on the web.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on February 23, 2008, 04:40:19 PM
The January-February edition of american Record Guide reports a recent concert with Dutoit conducting the UBS Verbier Festival Orchestra in Disney Hall, LA. This is a crack youth orchestra bankrolled by fellow Swiss bank UBS. The reviewer gushed no end on the brilliance, elegance and level of emotion Dutoit elicited from this band. The Fantastique was deemed "as close to a perfect Fantastique as I've heard", and "the ease, luminosity and confidence of Chabrier's  Espana afterwards was almost frightening".

What? Espana after the Fantastique? Well, if you happen to have Martha on hand to play Prokofiev's 3rd concerto as a final piece you rightly give her the spotlight !  Methink that Dutoit's still excellent connection with his former wife must play a role in all these engagements. I suspect they hire him on promises or mere expectations of a possible Martha appearance ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on February 25, 2008, 07:23:24 AM
Dutoit is doing a ton of guest conducting instead of holding a permanent position right now.

He actually does have a semi-permanent position right now. He's the Artistic Adviser of the Philadelphia Orchestra, filling in until they find a permament replacement for Eschenbach (sort of what Haitink is doing with the CSO right now and what he did with Dresden after Sinopoli keeled over). Starting in 2009, Dutoit will be the principal conductor and artistic director of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

Dutoit is doing Holst's the Planets with the CSO at the end of March, which I am looking forward to.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on February 25, 2008, 08:36:33 PM
Quote
The January-February edition of american Record Guide reports a recent concert with Dutoit conducting the UBS Verbier Festival Orchestra in Disney Hall, LA. This is a crack youth orchestra bankrolled by fellow Swiss bank UBS. The reviewer gushed no end on the brilliance, elegance and level of emotion Dutoit elicited from this band. The Fantastique was deemed "as close to a perfect Fantastique as I've heard", and "the ease, luminosity and confidence of Chabrier's  Espana afterwards was almost frightening".

What? Espana after the Fantastique? Well, if you happen to have Martha on hand to play Prokofiev's 3rd concerto as a final piece you rightly give her the spotlight !  Methink that Dutoit's still excellent connection with his former wife must play a role in all these engagements. I suspect they hire him on promises or mere expectations of a possible Martha appearance.

Well, that review was right on then! :) I saw the same concert in Houston and had the exact same reaction. He and the Verbier group had incredible chemistry. In my far flung corner of the world, we rarely ever get to witness something like that live, and honestly they totally blew us away. I wrote about the concert at length here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,4316.msg106587.html#msg106587).

And yeah, Verbier may be a "youth" orchestra, but the ages range from 17 up to 29, with very rigorous and competitive auditions held all over the world, so the players are at the level of near or newly professional already. I know someone who is trying out this year for timpani, he has made the final rounds, and just missed the spot last year, and he has already played for the Finnish National Opera for a while, so yeah, the players are definitely extremely high-quality.

About Dutoit and Argerich - they obviously still have a special relationship even though they may not be married anymore, you can really see that between them on stage, and this naturally only helps the music-making!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on February 26, 2008, 06:41:32 AM
Thanks, Greta. I had missed this thread entirely... Excellent review! the ARG man described also th eDudamel Simon Bolivar concert (part of a Yout Orchestra series at Disney Hall). He likened it to an exciting one night stand, and the Dutoit-Verbier as a profoundly satisfying relaitonship.

Dutoit is an outstanding orchestral trainer (first and foremost) and an excellent musician (second). If he can achieve the desired results in his first goal, it fires him to let his interpretive skills take charge of the proceedings. In Montreal the first five years were truly outstanding. Once they were at a really professional level he (and the orchestra) became complacent. So you wouldn't know what to expect from one concert (or disc) to another. A concert Elektra is one occasion I'll never forget.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 26, 2008, 07:39:58 AM
Turn of the Screw tonight at the Sacremento Opera.


Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on February 26, 2008, 07:50:56 AM
Wish her a "break a leg," Allan!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on February 26, 2008, 11:09:11 AM
Toi toi toi is the opera version,  Karl. (I think that's how it's spelled)

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on February 26, 2008, 03:10:48 PM
This next Thursday:

APN News & Media Premier Series 2008 Concert 2

Thu 6 Mar 2008 8:00pm - Auckland Town Hall THE EDGE®

Schumann & Sibelius
 
Okko Kamu Conductor
   
Richard Harwood Cello
   
Sallinen  At the Palace Gates                           
Sibelius   Scene with Cranes
Schumann  Cello Concerto
Sibelius   Symphony No.5

Your chance to hear Sibelius conducted by one of the finest interpreters of his work, Okko Kamu, who is also a master of the great romantic repertoire. He is joined for Schumann’s passionate cello concerto by Richard Harwood, whose performance in Don Quixote in 2007 was warmly acclaimed.

Should be grand  :)
 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on February 27, 2008, 10:00:49 AM
Sallinen  At the Palace Gates                           
Sibelius   Scene with Cranes
Schumann  Cello Concerto
Sibelius   Symphony No.5

That's a great program.  I don't know the first two at all.  (You rarely see any Sallinen on concert programs here.)

Tonight I'm looking forward to this one:

AXIOM
Jeffrey Milarsky, Conductor
Conor Hanick and Matthew Odell, Piano
James Ferree, French horn
Tomoya Aomori, Glockenspiel
Chihiro Shibayama, Xylorimba

MESSIAEN: Des Canyons Aux Étoiles ... (1974)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: c#minor on February 28, 2008, 12:20:03 PM
Pretty much most of the Nashville Symphony's lineup


John Corigliano - Triple Play: Concerto for Percussion Soloist and Strings
Shostakovich - Symphony No. 10 in E minor, Op. 93

Roberto Sierra - Fandangos for Orchestra
Beethoven - Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 "Pastoral"
Grieg - Concerto for Piano in A minor, Op. 16

Shostakovich - Festive Overture, Op. 96
Rachmaninoff - Concerto for Piano No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18
Michael Torke - Jasper
Roy Harris - Symphony No. 3 in One Movement

Academy of St. Martin in the Fields performs!!!!!!
Mozart - Symphony No. 31 in D major,"Paris"
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major
Bach - Piano Concerto in D major, BWV 1054
Haydn - Symphony No. 104 in D major, "London"

Verdi - Messa da Requiem

Copland/D. Wilson Ochoa - Emblems
Mozart - Concerto for Piano No. 27 in B-flat major, K. 595
Berlioz - Symphonie Fantastique, Op. 14
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on March 01, 2008, 02:32:50 PM
I was looking forward to this concert but didn't post about it earlier because, first, Mrs. Rock and I were fighting colds all week and we didn't know if we'd be well enough to go; and second, when we finally got well it was too late to book seats and we just went to the concert hall this evening hoping it wasn't sold out. It wasn't. :)

Grigory Sokolov at the BASF Feierabendhaus in Ludwigshafen. The program:

Mozart Sonata F major, K.280
Mozart Sonata F major, K.332
Chopin 24 Preludes Op.28

Unusual for a German audience, he received a standing ovation, and blessed us with four encores.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on March 04, 2008, 03:08:14 AM
Looking forward to this tomorrow evening:

ecat - New Music For Scotland presents
Peter Hill, piano recital

Messiaen: La Colombe; Morceau de lecture a vue; Le Tombeau de Paul Dukas
Le Merle Bleu, Le Traquet stapazin, Canteyodjaya, L’Alouette lulu


This is all new to me - the only Messiaen piano music I'm familiar with are his Vingt Regards and Visions de l'Amens. I do know, however, that Peter Hill is a great Messiaen interpreter. He came by last year to perform the Quartet with members of the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and I really enjoyed that.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Harry on March 04, 2008, 03:12:48 AM
Since in my parts of the Netherlands there  are almost no live performances of any quality, exceptions excluded, my experience in that area is quite limited. :P
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 05, 2008, 09:34:37 AM
Tonight, seeing this concert with Alan Gilbert, the conductor who will take over when Maazel leaves.  Gilbert is quite, quite good.

New York Philharmonic
Dawn Upshaw, Soprano
Alan Gilbert, Conductor

Haydn: Symphony No. 48, "Maria Theresia"
Berio: Folk Songs
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on March 05, 2008, 09:47:56 AM
Sunday's Chamber Music Concert.  Actually bringing my fiancee to this one, as she likes Schubert.   :)

On the menu:

Beethoven - Piano Trio No. 1 in E flat major, Op. 1/1
Schubert - Impromptu in B flat major, Op. 142/3
Schubert - String Quartet in A minor, D804 "Rosamunde"

Winnipeg Chamber Music Society
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on March 05, 2008, 11:58:59 PM
Sunday's Chamber Music Concert.  Actually bringing my fiancee to this one, as she likes Schubert.   :)

On the menu:

Beethoven - Piano Trio No. 1 in E flat major, Op. 1/1
Schubert - Impromptu in B flat major, Op. 142/3
Schubert - String Quartet in A minor, D804 "Rosamunde"

Winnipeg Chamber Music Society


Excellent! Your fiancee has impeccable taste.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on March 06, 2008, 06:36:19 AM
Pretty much most of the Nashville Symphony's lineup

I had never even heard of the Nashville Symphony, but a few weeks ago while I was driving across the continent, we also went through Nashville and drove around there a little bit. We also saw the symphony hall (don't remember what the actual name was though).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on March 06, 2008, 01:07:51 PM
Next Mondays Chamber Music Concert  :)

Mon 10 Mar 2008 6:30pm - Auckland Town Hall Concert Chamber THE EDGE®

Richard Harwood [Cello] & Caroline Almonte [Piano]
   
Schumann - Adagio and Allegro
Brahms - Cello Sonata in E minor
Shostakovich - Cello Sonata
Bridge - Cello Sonata

Brilliant young cellist Richard Harwood appears with, Melbourne based soloist and chamber musician Caroline Almonte, in a programme of lyrical masterpieces.

Especially looking forward to the Brahmns and the Bridge.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Morigan on March 06, 2008, 09:49:13 PM
I'm looking forward to a concert dedicated to the Baroque flute this Saturday by a very good local baroque chamber music ensemble. I just hope it doesn't get canceled because of the upcoming snowstorm (the next one, I should say)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bonehelm on March 06, 2008, 10:38:03 PM
Anyone know if the Seattle symphony is any good? I'm going down to Washington and Oregon in early april during my orchestra tour, if I have free time i'll drop by the SSO a bit and check em out.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 07, 2008, 12:57:03 PM
Anyone know if the Seattle symphony is any good? I'm going down to Washington and Oregon in early april during my orchestra tour, if I have free time i'll drop by the SSO a bit and check em out.

You should definitely check out the Seattle group.  While I've not heard them live, they have done some excellent recordings, and I hear that Benaroya Hall, where they perform, is quite good acoustically. 

That concert the first week in April looks like an excellent one:

Seattle Symphony
Gerard Schwarz, conductor
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, violin

Wagner: Three Excerpts from Act III of Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
Barber: Violin Concerto
R. Strauss: Don Juan 
R. Strauss: Suite from Der Rosenkavalier
 
--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Michel on March 08, 2008, 07:22:47 AM
I am seeing Eugene Onegin on Monday at Covent Garden.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: mikkeljs on March 09, 2008, 09:34:09 AM
Tonight I´m going to a Nřrgĺrd concert, where Nřrgĺrd himself will come and play Turn on a special tuned piano.   8) That will be the 7th time I meet him!  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on March 10, 2008, 06:17:17 AM
Sunday's Chamber Music Concert.  Actually bringing my fiancee to this one, as she likes Schubert.   :)

On the menu:

Beethoven - Piano Trio No. 1 in E flat major, Op. 1/1
Schubert - Impromptu in B flat major, Op. 142/3
Schubert - String Quartet in A minor, D804 "Rosamunde"

Winnipeg Chamber Music Society


Fantastic, all around.  Fiancee also enjoyed it also, and would like to come to more of the chamber concerts in the future.  :)

Although I thoroughly enjoyed my favorite Schubert quartet, the highlight ended up being the energetic performance of the Beethoven Opus 1 # 1 Trio. 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on March 10, 2008, 06:55:27 AM
I'm not exactly looking forward to this. The program is pleasant enough but not adventurous. Still, hearing La Mer live is usually a treat. We're taking Mrs. Rock's parents...the tickets were our Christmas present to them.


Ludwigshafen, BASF-Feierabendhaus

Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz

Herbert Schuch, piano
Mario Venzago, conducting

Debussy La Mer

Mozart Piano Concerto #27 B major KV 595

Schumann Symphony #3 "Rheinische"


Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bonehelm on March 13, 2008, 08:21:05 PM
You should definitely check out the Seattle group.  While I've not heard them live, they have done some excellent recordings, and I hear that Benaroya Hall, where they perform, is quite good acoustically. 

That concert the first week in April looks like an excellent one:

Seattle Symphony
Gerard Schwarz, conductor
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, violin

Wagner: Three Excerpts from Act III of Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
Barber: Violin Concerto
R. Strauss: Don Juan 
R. Strauss: Suite from Der Rosenkavalier
 
--Bruce
Hey, thanks Bruce, my band director booked the one on the night of April 2nd. It's Annie-Sophie Mutter playing Brahms violin sonatas if I remember correctly. I should be in for a treat, since the violinist is among my idol's most treasured musicians..
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 14, 2008, 01:20:50 PM
Decided at the last minute to go to this tonight, after some persuasive friends called who are going:

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, Conductor
Women of the Philadelphia Singers Chorale
David Hayes, Music Director

BARTÓK: The Miraculous Mandarin Suite 
DEBUSSY: Nocturnes
HOLST: The Planets, Op. 32 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: orbital on March 14, 2008, 01:26:05 PM
Decided at the last minute to go to this tonight, after some persuasive friends called who are going:

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, Conductor
Women of the Philadelphia Singers Chorale
David Hayes, Music Director

BARTÓK: The Miraculous Mandarin Suite 
DEBUSSY: Nocturnes
HOLST: The Planets, Op. 32 

--Bruce
You probably had a 105F fever if you needed persuasion for this program  ;D Bartok... Debussy... Philadelphia... Bruce... needs a push... ??? can't compute  ;D

PS - Is this the year of Debussy in NY?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on March 15, 2008, 09:06:15 AM
Tonight the BSO plays the Shostakovich Fifth, and the Schumann Piano Concerto with soloist Garrick Ohlsson
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on March 15, 2008, 05:46:15 PM
Decided at the last minute to go to this tonight, after some persuasive friends called who are going:

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, Conductor
Women of the Philadelphia Singers Chorale
David Hayes, Music Director

BARTÓK: The Miraculous Mandarin Suite 
DEBUSSY: Nocturnes
HOLST: The Planets, Op. 32 

--Bruce

I would make it to the above concert with a 105F fever, somehow...my word! I really could hardly of a more possibly fetching program for that conductor/orchestra pair. How was it?  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 16, 2008, 10:27:09 AM
You probably had a 105F fever if you needed persuasion for this program  ;D Bartok... Debussy... Philadelphia... Bruce... needs a push... ??? can't compute  ;D

PS - Is this the year of Debussy in NY?

 ;D  Well, I had been out all week and needed a break...hence the "persuasion."  ;D 

It was very good, if not at the tip-top level, but I enjoyed it.  Dutoit and Philadelphia are a good match, I think.  The Debussy was a little too driven, and the chorus--excellent though it was--was a little too loud in the final "Sirčnes."  (I think the voices should sound more ethereal, as if they're in the distance.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on March 16, 2008, 10:59:29 AM
Decided at the last minute to go to this tonight, after some persuasive friends called who are going:

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, Conductor
Women of the Philadelphia Singers Chorale
David Hayes, Music Director

BARTÓK: The Miraculous Mandarin Suite 
DEBUSSY: Nocturnes
HOLST: The Planets, Op. 32 

--Bruce


That's a great programme, although it's a shame they weren't playing the complete Mandarin. Some people are a bit sniffy about The Planets, but I think it's an amazing piece. Accessible, perhaps even populist, but still quite radical and adventurous. Some of the influences may be a bit obvious (Stravinsky, Debussy, Wagner), but Holst absorbs them and creates his own distinctive sound world. I'm impressed that you managed to get tickets for this at the last minute. Here in London, that concert would have sold out months ago.

I've been a bit crap at going to concerts lately. I went to see Salome at Covent Garden on Wednesday and loved it. Unless I get my arse into gear and start booking some more tickets, my next concert is in early May; it's the second of two performances of Nono's Prometeo at the Royal Festival Hall. That should be interesting.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 16, 2008, 11:04:40 AM

That's a great programme, although it's a shame they weren't playing the complete Mandarin. Some people are a bit sniffy about The Planets, but I think it's an amazing piece. Accessible, perhaps even populist, but still quite radical and adventurous. Some of the influences may be a bit obvious (Stravinsky, Debussy, Wagner), but Holst absorbs them and creates his own distinctive sound world. I'm impressed that you managed to get tickets for this at the last minute. Here in London, that concert would have sold out months ago.

I've been a bit crap at going to concerts lately. I went to see Salome at Covent Garden on Wednesday and loved it. Unless I get my arse into gear and start booking some more tickets, my next concert is in early May; it's the second of two performances of Nono's Prometeo at the Royal Festival Hall. That should be interesting.

Yes, the complete Mandarin is marvelous.  Awhile back Boulez did it here with Chicago and it was one of my favorite concerts of the year.  And I like The Planets, too.  (I have enjoyed Dutoit's recording for many years.) 

And as far as getting tickets, my experience has been that there are almost always seats to be had, from those who cancel at the last minute and return tickets.  If you are patient and keep trying--and only need a single--you can often have success.

Very envious of the Salome and Nono!  Do report on the latter!  (Not much Nono gets performed here.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on March 16, 2008, 10:41:43 PM
Tonight the BSO plays the Shostakovich Fifth, and the Schumann Piano Concerto with soloist Garrick Ohlsson

Indeed they did, and I could go, too, because Karl's wife did not feel way, but I was there on his side  ;D Thanks again for the ticket! It was a very good concert, and I was very impressed by Daniele Gatti's direction. I only have one album with him (Respighi's tone poems with the Santa Cecilia orchestra) and have never seen him conduct live or on video. His conducting techinque and contact with the orchestra is very good, very relaxed and laid back but effective and with natural authority. He was very much on top of things, obviously had a thought-through and ripened concept and let the orchestra play without micromanaging and drawing attention to himself, but he gave exactly the right signs at the right moments to shape the music in a nuanced way as it happened. From a conducting point of view, really first class, much better than a lot of the vain posers out there on the podiums. I am delighted to read that he will become MD of the Orchestra National de France, an orchestra whose very specific sound I have always liked. Thet will actually be coming to Boston next month, I hope I can go, even though that will still be with Masur who is OK but not necessarily someone I would go to see in concert if I had a fever.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 18, 2008, 06:34:12 AM
Tonight:

Wagner: Tristan und Isolde

Conductor: James Levine
Isolde: Deborah Voigt
Brangäne: Michelle DeYoung
Tristan: Gary Lehman
Kurwenal: Eike Wilm Schulte
King Marke: Matti Salminen

Still no word on whether the ailing Ben Heppner will sing Tristan at the HD film broadcast on Saturday afternoon...  :(

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Haffner on March 18, 2008, 06:38:27 AM
Tonight:

Wagner: Tristan und Isolde

Conductor: James Levine
Isolde: Deborah Voigt
Brangäne: Michelle DeYoung
Tristan: Gary Lehman
Kurwenal: Eike Wilm Schulte
King Marke: Matti Salminen

Still no word on whether the ailing Ben Heppner will sing Tristan at the HD film broadcast on Saturday afternoon...  :(

--Bruce




Bruce, I am supremely envious. And I hope you have a terrific time!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 18, 2008, 06:44:39 AM



Bruce, I am supremely envious. And I hope you have a terrific time!

Thanks, Haffner!  I'm very much looking forward to it.  I've seen this production on television (with Heppner and Jane Eaglen, IIRC), and listened to it on the Saturday afternoon radio broadcast when it premiered in 1999, but haven't seen it in the house.  I do like the production--a lot.  Lots of cool photos of it, here (http://66.187.153.86/Imgs/TristanIsolde0708.htm).

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on March 18, 2008, 06:49:54 AM
I do like the production--a lot.  Lots of cool photos of it, here (http://66.187.153.86/Imgs/TristanIsolde0708.htm).

Had it not been for the legends I couldn't have told Isolde from Brangaene. Actually, I could have had it the other way around, as Brangaene looks slightly younger.  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 18, 2008, 06:56:46 AM
IIRC when the production premiered there was a most unfortunate photo in the paper, with Heppner and Eaglen...and a large rock.  All three pretty much looked the same.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on March 18, 2008, 07:03:36 AM
IIRC when the production premiered there was a most unfortunate photo in the paper, with Heppner and Eaglen...and a large rock.  All three pretty much looked the same.

--Bruce

 :D

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on March 18, 2008, 10:43:02 AM

Peter Hill, piano recital

Messiaen: La Colombe; Morceau de lecture a vue; Le Tombeau de Paul Dukas
Le Merle Bleu, Le Traquet stapazin, Canteyodjaya, L’Alouette lulu

A belated report :).

I enjoyed this recital very much. The colourful pieces from Catalogue contrasted nicely with the earlier works, with a bit of Bach thrown in for good measure. Hill isn't flashy but gets the colours and tones just right, IMO.

In fact, it turned out to be almost a full day of Messiaen. In the afternoon, Peter Hill gave a talk on Messiaen's use of birdsong, charting his progression from the earlier ornithologically 'fundamentalist' phase of Réveil des Oiseaux, when he insisted that he was merely transcribing nature, in a 'sing, Heav'nly Muse' kind of way I guess, through to a more flexible use in Oiseaux exotiques, and ultimately to the complex licence of Catalogue d'oiseaux.

While Messiaen made many field trips, he also worked from recordings, and what is really great is that Hill has managed to locate a few of these. He matched these with the relevant sections from Messiaen's notebooks (apparently he's left a huge archive). This was the most interesting part of the paper: to hear the passage of birdsong while following Messiaen's notation; then to hear the passage played as a single line; then the final incarnation (I think it was Oiseaux exotiques - can't remember after this time :-[).

This was followed by a paper on Et Expecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum by a Professor Nigel Simeone, who'd co-authored a biography of Messiaen with Peter Hill. Another good talk, this time more focused on the historical context of the piece. Interesting to note that after hearing Boulez conduct the piece, Messiaen wrote in his notes, 'formidable!!!' with the three exclamation marks :). The talk was complemented by a performance from the RSAMD students: impressive, although the hall was perhaps a bit too echo-y and resonant.

Apparently there will be an outdoor performance of Et Expecto on a mountain somewhere in France this summer. Can't remember the details though, but sounds pretty cool.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Dana on March 18, 2008, 06:26:50 PM
      I saw Micheal Tilson Thomas and the San Fransisco Symphony last Friday and well... I was impressed :) They are the single most underrated orchestra in all of America. I say this because most people I speak to seem to be under the impression that while they're a good orchestra, they can't stand toe to toe with the New York Philharmonics and Philadelphia Orchestras (maybe this is only an East Coast superiority complex?). Stated simply, they can. They can, they can, they can.
      The program opened with Sibelius' 7th, which was the reason I attended the concert (aside from my curiosity regarding the orchestra). It's my favorite Sibelius, and MTT played it as the late romantic symphony that it is. While honoring the rough four-movement outline that most theorists and conductors have applied to the symphony, this performance, more than any I've heard before, unified the symphony into a single romantic work. The orchestra played to the works strength as struggling, deeply romantic melodies rested atop Sibelius' characteristic sound-blocks, and they got more character out of the scherzo-section than most others that I've heard.
      The other half of the program, was the one which I was most skeptical about. Beethoven's 3rd, it seemed to me, did not play to MTT's strengths of sensitivity and romanticism. For me, this symphony has always been primarily a classically influenced symphony of epic proportions, and much to my relief, that was how MTT played it. The orchestra scaled back their interpretive attentiveness just so much that it wasn't ridiculously romantic, but it still had a lot of flavor to it, especially the first movement. You could clearly hear how Haydn's compositional style influenced Beethoven, even as he was busting every mold that had ever been conceived.
      MTT has gotten a very European sound from the strings. I haven't heard such a homogeneous sound from the strings since the Vienna Philharmonic was in town last year (and I in no way mean that as an insult). The brass and woodwinds similarly showcased their ensemble. There's entering together, and there's entering as a single unit, and this orchestra had every single one of their entrances down pat (there was a single botched entrance in the entire performance). As for MTT himself, he looked like every caricature I've ever seen of Stokowski; the man looked downright ridiculous, and I don't think most of the techniques he used would ever be found in any conducting textbook (especially cut-offs). However, the ensemble trusted him completely, and there's no arguing with the kind of sound the orchestra produced.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 25, 2008, 05:29:35 AM
Tonight, the first concert of Keys to the Future, a 3-night festival of contemporary piano music played by some excellent musicians. 

Louis Andriessen: The Memory of Roses (1993)
Poul Ruders: Star-Prelude and Love Fugue (1990)
Joan Tower: Throbbing Still (2000)
John Fitz Rogers: Variations (2003)
Joseph Rubenstein: Romance No. 2 (aurora)* (2007)
Henry Martin: Preludes and Fugues (4 selections) (1998)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: c#minor on March 25, 2008, 11:34:20 AM
Tonight the BSO plays the Shostakovich Fifth, and the Schumann Piano Concerto with soloist Garrick Ohlsson


Ahhh i saw him play the Schumann Concerto with the Nashville Symphony, then he gave an encore with a Chopin Nocturne. It was great.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 26, 2008, 12:02:49 PM
Tonight, the second concert of Keys to the Future.  I've actually heard Bolcom's Graceful Ghost, a nostalgic little bit of ragtime.

Chester Biscardi: Incitation to Desire (1984)
Hans Otte: Book of Sounds #11 (1982)
David Rakowski: Four Études (1997-2002)
Martin Kennedy: Theme and Variations (2004)
Charles Wuorinen: Bagatelle (1988)
William Bolcom: Graceful Ghost (1970) 
John Musto: In Stride (1994) 
Elena Kats-Chernin: Backstage Rag (1999)
John Halle: Rozology (2000)
Derek Bermel: Carnaval Noir (1997)**

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 27, 2008, 07:37:44 AM
Tomorrow night:

Birmingham Contemporary Music Group
Thomas Adčs, Conductor
Stephen Wallace, Countertenor (Pleasure)
William Purefoy, Countertenor (Truth)
Christopher Lemmings, Tenor (Beauty)
Roderick Williams, Baritone (Deceit)
Stephen Richardson, Bass (Time)

GERALD BARRY: The Triumph of Beauty and Deceit (Concert Performance, NY Premiere)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 28, 2008, 08:35:03 AM
And on Sunday, this concert:

The MET Chamber Ensemble
James Levine, Artistic Director and Conductor

Mozart: Serenade in B-flat Major, K. 361, "Gran Partita" 
Gunther Schuller: Grand Concerto for Percussion and Keyboards (NY Premiere) 
Mozart: Eine kleine Nachtmusik, K. 525

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on March 28, 2008, 09:11:51 AM
Mozart: Serenade in B-flat Major, K. 361, "Gran Partita" 

Ah, Bruce!  Envy isn't the word.  Just love this work.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 28, 2008, 10:27:57 AM
Ah, Bruce!  Envy isn't the word.  Just love this work.

These MET Chamber Orchestra concerts are usually great.  The musicians play with such passion--as if they've been set free from the opera house pit and given the chance to do stuff they never play normally.  I imagine it will be quite something.  (Plus, I haven't heard Eine Kleine in decades, by anyone, so that will be fun, actually.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on March 28, 2008, 12:00:29 PM
APN News & Media Premier Series 2008 Concert 3

Thu 3 Apr 2008 8:00pm - Auckland Town Hall THE EDGE®

Rachmaninov & Brahms
     

Johannes Fritzsch Conductor
John Chen Piano
   
Glinka   Overture to Rusian and Ludmila                   
Rachmaninov  Piano Concerto No. 2 
Brahms   Symphony No. 2

Auckland favourite John Chen returns to perform one of the great piano showpieces: Rachmaninov’s magnificent second concerto. After the interval, Brahms’ moving and joyous second symphony under the expert baton of maestro Johannes Fritzsch.

Should be a good one.  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 28, 2008, 12:16:25 PM
Nice program!  That Glinka is one of my alltime favorites, too...

PS, I don't know why I didn't find it before, but the Auckland Town Hall looks like a cool place to hear a concert! 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on March 28, 2008, 12:48:16 PM
Nice program!  That Glinka is one of my alltime favorites, too...

PS, I don't know why I didn't find it before, but the Auckland Town Hall looks like a cool place to hear a concert! 

--Bruce

Hi Bruce:

Yes, the Auckland Town Hall is a wonderful building. It has a great reputation for its superb acoustics.

Theres an underground carpark from which you emerge at the Town Halls front door and a great Japanese resturant next door which we usually frequent before a concert.

All in all it makes for a perfect evening of life and music  :)

By the way, I'm not familiar with the Glinka so that will be the musical surprise for the night.  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on March 28, 2008, 01:00:36 PM
Hi Bruce:

Yes, the Auckland Town Hall is a wonderful building. It has a great reputation for its superb acoustics.

Theres an underground carpark from which you emerge at the Town Halls front door and a great Japanese resturant next door which we usually frequent before a concert.

All in all it makes for a perfect evening of life and music  :)

By the way, I'm not familiar with the Glinka so that will be the musical surprise for the night.  ;)

All sounds totally great, including the Japanese food. 

The Glinka is one of my favorite overtures.  It is fast and very infectious.  (I've heard Gergiev and the Kirov do it as an encore--lots of fun!)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on March 28, 2008, 05:04:08 PM
Last Tuesday: WTC excerpts with Angela Hewitt, Gabrieli brass canzoni (MSO brass) and the Bruckner 5th symphony with the Montreal Symphony under Nagano.

My first ever 5th symphony in concert. Kent Nagano had come up with the bizarre idea of a first half comprised of solo piano and brass pieces. No orchestra. Angela Hewitt played 3 P&F from the Well-Tempered Piano Grand, while members of the orchestra's brass played two canzoni by Giovanni Gabrieli in alternance with the piano works. The idea, you see, was to offer a program based on counterpoint (incl. fugue). Not a bad plan, as it offered an interesting variety of repertoire, eras, styles, sonorities. If one was game enough, it made for a different kind of Evening at the Symphony.
 
Pianist Hewitt is well-known as a Bach specialist, but there's no way she can make us think of what she played as anything other than a travesty of how the music was conceived and how it must have sounded in the 1700s. This was heart on sleeve playing of the grandest kind, with myriad agogic and tempo adjustments always used to colour the music in the most ravishing shades of pastel. The Gabrieli works were something else altogether, grandly sonorous and also, of necessity, completely divorced from its more than 400 years' probable sonoristic complexion. I don't know what kind of trombones and sackbuts were used back then (around 1595), but it can't have been that kind of burnished, resonant sound.
 
The main offering was described in the local papers as "rather good". Plain as it may look, it's quite an appropriate assessment. One reviewer pointed to the fact that this reading was very removed from the intimate connection we've heard Franz-Paul Decker bring to his Bruckner in Montreal. Quite true.
 
Approximate timings were 21 - 18 -15 and 24. Technically it was generally well conceived, save for a much too slow scherzo and an indifferent, nondescript adagio.The orchestral detail Nagano brought out was sometimes mesmerizing in its beautiful complexity. It was fascinating to watch the interplay of string voices, the really surprising brass lines. Textures kept changing from 2 horns here to 4 the minute after, then 3, or 5, etc. Trumpets also switched from 2 to 4, to 1 or 3. I had no idea there was so many minute adjustments to the textures.
 
On a technical level this was excellent. The strings and winds in particular were unfailingly beautiful and sonorous. But it was not really more than that. I never, at any moment, sensed any real tension in the playing, any involvement from the podium. Considering the ultimately blah result, I wonder: What for? Who ever told Nagano he was a brucknerian? ::) After his lackadaisical, spent 9th and this polished but uninvolved 5th, I think the jury has enough evidence to damn him with the faintest praise.  Would that he'd turn his attention to repertoire where comparisons will not inevitably turn in his disfavour: some Martinu, Schmitt, Prokofiev, Nielsen, Villa-Lobos for example...
 
The house was packed.  2950 seats, with a real pair of buns on each. At first I thought people were showing up for the soloist and I wasn't sure all would stay after the intermission, but no, all these buns came back in place for the Bruckner. Dear Anton has always drawn big crowds here, and that can be attributed to the longstanding tradition initiated by Decker. He has the knack to bring fire and dedication to the orchestra when they play that composer's symphonies. He's scheduled to be back next season, which will mark the orchestra's 75th anniversary. I hope he conducts some Bruckner (I'd love to hear him in the 8th!).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on March 28, 2008, 06:05:00 PM
Tomorrow night, I am going to the BSO. They will play Bartók’s 3rd piano concerto with András Schiff and Schubert's Great C major symphony - probably my favorite piece of music. The baton will be operated by Bernard Haitink.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on March 28, 2008, 06:45:50 PM
Next Sunday a cello friend will be performing a recital that I've been looking forward to since he first told me that he was thinking of doing.  The major works are Bach and Britten's first suite there are 2 filler pieces that I'm not sure what they are.   

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bonehelm on March 29, 2008, 12:26:46 AM
April 2, 2008

Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin
Lambert Orkis, piano

Brahms: Violin Sonata No. 2
     in A major, Op. 100 d
Brahms: Violin Sonata No. 1
     in G major, Op. 78 d
Brahms: Violin Sonata No. 3
     in D minor, Op. 108 d


Benaroya Hall, Seattle


As part of our orchestra's US tour in April.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Guido on April 01, 2008, 06:50:16 AM
Tonight I am going to the Cadogan Hall London to see RVW Tallis Fantasia, Finzi Cello Concerto and RVW Symphony no.5. I am really looking forward to it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 01, 2008, 06:57:35 AM
Tonight I am going to the Cadogan Hall London to see RVW Tallis Fantasia, Finzi Cello Concerto and RVW Symphony no.5. I am really looking forward to it.

Great program!  I don't know that Finzi at all...

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 01, 2008, 08:29:31 AM
Tonight, the second concert of the MATA Festival (http://www.matafestival.org/index.html), celebrating young composers.  The venue is a hoot: the Brooklyn Lyceum (below), formerly "Public Bath #7," with separate entrances for men and women.  Some of the tile is still on the walls (and even a little mildew smell as well). 

This will also be my first time with this Boston group, and I hear they are excellent.

Boston Modern Orchestra Project
Gil Rose, conductor

(All New York premieres)

Alejandro Rutty: The Conscious Sleepwalker Loops (MATA commission)
Ken Ueno: On a Sufficient Condition for the Existence of Most Specific Hypothesis, Ken Ueno, throat singer
Derek Hurst: Clades, Concerto for the Firebird Ensemble
Lisa Bielawa: Double Violin Concerto, Colin Jacobsen and Carla Kihlstedt, violins

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Guido on April 01, 2008, 05:12:34 PM
Wow that looks like an excieitng concert - do report back!

The concert was very enjoyable, though the Finzi concerto was a little rough I thought. It is an immense work of the absolute highest quality and is probably his best work (I ama huge Fnzi fan) - an absolute must. Get the naxos recording with Tim Hugh - easily the best around, and it comes coupled the incredibly beautiful Eclogue for piano and strings, and the spiffy Grand Fantasia and Toccata. One of my favourite CDs.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 02, 2008, 06:15:52 AM
Tonight, the second concert of the MATA Festival (http://www.matafestival.org/index.html), celebrating young composers.  The venue is a hoot: the Brooklyn Lyceum (below), formerly "Public Bath #7," with separate entrances for men and women.  Some of the tile is still on the walls (and even a little mildew smell as well). 

This will also be my first time with this Boston group, and I hear they are excellent.

Boston Modern Orchestra Project
Gil Rose, conductor

(All New York premieres)

Alejandro Rutty: The Conscious Sleepwalker Loops (MATA commission)
Ken Ueno: On a Sufficient Condition for the Existence of Most Specific Hypothesis, Ken Ueno, throat singer
Derek Hurst: Clades, Concerto for the Firebird Ensemble
Lisa Bielawa: Double Violin Concerto, Colin Jacobsen and Carla Kihlstedt, violins

--Bruce

This concert was notable just as much for the buzz as for the music: there must have been around 500 people packed into the space.  I overheard someone say, "It's a great night for new music," and it would be hard to disagree, with all the people crammed in.  (Extra chairs were brought upstairs, for the balcony ledge overlooking the stage.)  The clear favorites were Alejandro Rutty and Lisa Bielawa's pieces, although all four had their moments.  Rutty's work sounded almost like a Hollywood film score--sort of--interrupted with extreme dissonances and other things.  Bielawa wrote for Carla Kihlstedt, who sings while playing violin, so the obvious question is who will be able to do this piece afterward? 

I'm going back on Friday for the final concert, featuring two groups, Either/Or and Newspeak:

Either/Or
Richard Carrick: Towards Qualia
Andrew Byrne: White Bone Country

Newspeak
Missy Mazzoli: In Spite of All This
David T. Little: sweet, light, crude
Oscar Bettison: Breaking and Entering (with aggravated assault)

Members of Either/Or & Newspeak
Sean Griffin: Buffalo '70 (world premiere, MATA commission)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: hornteacher on April 06, 2008, 01:42:35 PM
In a few weeks the Charlotte Symphony is playing the following:

Mozart's Ballet Music from Idomemeo
Barber's Violin Concerto
Dvorak's New World Symphony

Looking forward to it very much.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Danny on April 06, 2008, 03:39:51 PM
Next Friday/Saturday, octogenarian Leon Fleisher will be in Modesto, playing with the legenday and world famous Modesto Symphony Orchestra at the newly created Gallo Center for the Arts.  Look foward to these performances, I do. 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 07, 2008, 06:12:52 AM
Tonight in Ludwighafen, the Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz in an all Russian program:

Stravinsky Scherzo ŕ la russe

Tschaikovsky Violin Concerto

Prokofiev Symphony No.5

Renaud Capucon, Violin
Jac van Steen, conducting



Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on April 07, 2008, 06:53:09 AM
This Saturday,April 12th (concert I've been looking forward to the most, other than Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1 earlier this year :D)

DeBussy - La Mer

Bartok - Violin Concerto No. 1  Jinjoo Cho, violin

Beethoven - Symphony No. 6 Pastoral

Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra
Alexander Mickelthwate
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Shrunk on April 07, 2008, 08:41:01 AM
This Saturday,April 12th (concert I've been looking forward to the most, other than Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1 earlier this year :D)

DeBussy - La Mer

Bartok - Violin Concerto No. 1  Jinjoo Cho, violin

Beethoven - Symphony No. 6 Pastoral

Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra
Alexander Mickelthwate

I'm originally from Winnipeg, and as a student worked at the Centennial Concert Hall, so got to see lots of WSO shows for free.  How is the symphony doing these days?

Two of my most anticipated shows are coming up here in Toronto.

On April 12, countertenor Daniel Taylor and soprano Carolyn Sampson will be performing Handel arias with the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra. (http://www.tafelmusik.org/index.htm) 

Then, on the 27th, it's a performance of Idomeneo by the period ensemble Opera Atelier (http://www.operaatelier.com), with Measha Brueggergosman as Elettra.  Toronto's a HIP town!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on April 07, 2008, 10:15:20 AM
I'm originally from Winnipeg, and as a student worked at the Centennial Concert Hall, so got to see lots of WSO shows for free.  How is the symphony doing these days?

WSO is doing fantastic!  Attendance is up, and it seems like more younger people are attending concerts.  Alexander Mickelthwate, our young conductor, has brought a lot of vigour, energy and passion to the WSO, and you can feel it anytime he is present.  There have already been 3 sell-out concerts this season, when there hadn't been any in several years.

I really think the sky is the limit for Maestro Mickelthwate.  I see him going places.  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on April 07, 2008, 05:21:59 PM
Seen a couple of good ones lately in Houston....and have two in May to look forward to, namely Mahler 2nd under HSO Music Director Hans Graf.

Saturday I saw:

Part: Cantus in Memoriam for Benjamin Britten
Ravel: Piano Concerto for the Left Hand
(Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7

Houston Symphony
Kwame Ryan, conductor


Sidenote here: Mr. Ryan is a young Canadian/Trinidadian African-American, which is refreshing to see, and quite talented and expressive, with round sweeping arms and excellent clear technique. He excelled most in slow movements, the Part Cantus and the 2nd mvmt of LvB were outstanding, where he drew very fine musical playing from the orchestra. And Thibaudet was incredible!

The Thursday before last, a very interesting concert at the Rice University Shepherd School of Music (which our Brian also attended) in tribute to retired CSO principal trumpet Adolph 'Bud' Herseth, who was also there in attendance (resplendent in emerald green blazer and lemon colored tie!) It featured the Shepherd School Brass Choir and the Houston Symphony and Grand Opera trumpet sections in a variety of great brass music.

Two neat new pieces we heard were a world premiere of a jazzy piece for 12 trumpets by Arthur Gottschalk called fittingly "220 S. Michigan Avenue", dedicated to Herseth, and a colorful piece called "Fandango" for horn quartet that took advantage of a lot of contemporary techniques.

Most impressive were the Rice Univ students opening up with a rip-roaring DSCH "Festive Overture", the runs navigated with aplomb and antiphonal symphony/opera trumpets in the balcony, and Wagner's "Gathering of the Armies on the River Scheldt", from "Lohengrin" also with all players and offstage placement. And a piece I absolutely loved that I was not aware of before was the closer by Henri Tomasi called "Fanfares Liturgiques", a weighty and gorgeous over 20min work for 20 brass and percussion, breathtaking live!!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on April 07, 2008, 05:55:56 PM
The Montreal Symphony's 2008-9 season has ben unveiled and there's the usual assortment of the good, the bad and the ugly. Unfortunately the sole Bruckner (7) is entrusted to Nagano :P. Our echt-brucknerian, Franz-Paul Decker, will be conducting yet another asinine 'Viennese evening' assortment of waltzes and polkas. But he will also be conducting the other Strauss in the Bourgeois Gentillhomme suite, Burleske (Hamelin) and the Sinfonia Domestica. I'll make sure to buy tickets for that one!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Henk on April 10, 2008, 08:28:21 AM
Tonight I'm going to hear the North Netherlands Orchestra which will perform Bruckner 7 and a new piece by  Zuidam. I'm very curious. It's the first time I go to a concert since I've been listening classical music. I hope I'll appreciate Bruckner live more.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on April 10, 2008, 12:33:46 PM
Tonight I'm going to hear the North Netherlands Orchestra which will perform Bruckner 7 and a new piece by  Zuidam. I'm very curious. It's the first time I go to a concert since I've been listening classical music. I hope I'll appreciate Bruckner live more.

Cool! Enjoy your concert and be sure to report back :).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Henk on April 10, 2008, 01:22:31 PM
Cool! Enjoy your concert and be sure to report back :).

I was impressed by the concert. I could really feel the greatness of Bruckner's symphony. But that don't make me like Bruckner. It's great but not beautifull IMO and that gave me an unsatisfied feeling. Music should be beautifull in the first place.
Going to listen to Shostakovich 10 next. Maybe that's both great and beautifull. I know a symphony which is, Ives' 4th.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on April 10, 2008, 05:57:45 PM
Henk, beauty is what Bruckner's music is all about. But it's a mature kind of beauty. Beauty of what's thought, not of what's seen (heard). And Bruckner was not his own best advocate. If he had cared about popularity, he would have composed differently. I trust that if you find it great, you will find it beautiful in the long run. After 35 years of brucknerian passion, I hear so much more beauty now than at the beginning. The music's sheer greatness just obscured it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on April 10, 2008, 08:22:54 PM
I was impressed by the concert. I could really feel the greatness of Bruckner's symphony. But that don't make me like Bruckner. It's great but not beautifull IMO and that gave me an unsatisfied feeling.

Eeek! Bruckner #7? The first 2 movements are the definition of beauty! :) Honestly, for me those movements describe pretty much what beauty is. The 2nd movement, the music for the "master of all masters", is additionally an extraordinary piece of funeral music. It works. At least on the long run. BTW, has the climax in the 2nd mvmt been played with a cymbal?  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Henk on April 11, 2008, 01:03:18 AM
Ok, I think I'm wrong about it then. I think I've to be patient to appreciate Bruckner more. However another drawback to Bruckner: a guy said to me Bruckner as well as Mahler repeat the same things in their compositions, their compositions are not so different from each other. I haven't notice it myself but this guy has a lot knowledge about classical music.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on April 11, 2008, 04:55:49 PM
There's always two sides to a coin. Truth is just the opinion of the majority. Having a recognizable aesthetic and style is another way of saying a composer may seem to repeat himself form one work to another. That's why after a while you'll never mistake Schumann for Mendelssohn ;).  You're not 'wrong', it's just a question of keeping your options open and not jumping to conclusions.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on April 12, 2008, 12:03:01 AM
Apparently I'm not looking forward to a Sokolov recital next month in Glasgow :'(:

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/leading-articles/leading-article-tone-deaf-807767.html

Quote
Mr Sokolov has been put off by the Home Office's new requirement that anyone applying for a UK work visa must supply their biometric data before entering the country. Mr Sokolov would prefer to stay at home than submit to this. This is Mr Sokolov's personal choice, of course. But it seems worth asking whether it makes sense for Britain to lose the opportunity to hear such a brilliant musician because of some new visa procedures?

Pity - we don't get many piano recitals and I'd been looking forward to this one.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on April 12, 2008, 08:28:16 PM
You guys should cut Henk some slack here. After all, he said it was his first live concert experience - and who knows how Bruckner 7 sounds when played by the "North Netherlands Orchestra"?  :P Maybe his observation was simply correct.  0:)

However, I think that most experienced listeners will agree with the above posters that there are indeed very few more sheerly beautiful pieces of music than this. The long sweeping opening theme alone must be one of the most beautiful "melodies" ever thought up - and it gets better and better because Bruckner does so much with the material. Anyway, I am sure Henk will eventually find to that music. It is also quite a big piece to be confronted with, especially for "beginners". It is not that easy to follow, and and a lot of listeners blank out at some point.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on April 12, 2008, 08:39:36 PM
The Thursday before last, a very interesting concert at the Rice University Shepherd School of Music (which our Brian also attended)
Oh! Hello! :)
 
in tribute to retired CSO principal trumpet Adolph 'Bud' Herseth, who was also there in attendance (resplendent in emerald green blazer and lemon colored tie!) It featured the Shepherd School Brass Choir and the Houston Symphony and Grand Opera trumpet sections in a variety of great brass music. ... a piece I absolutely loved that I was not aware of before was the closer by Henri Tomasi called "Fanfares Liturgiques", a weighty and gorgeous over 20min work for 20 brass and percussion, breathtaking live!!
Got to agree with you on the Tomasi. That was a fabulous surprise all around.

Just got back from the Cuarteto Latinoamericano and guitarist Manuel Barrueco doing a couple hours of Latin American music by Revueltas, Piazzolla, and Rice University alum Gabriela Lena Frank. The highlight, in my view, was a suite by Barrios for solo guitar; the quintet's encore was the inevitable, glorious "Libertango". A good time was had by all...

Friday night it was the Houston Grand Opera's new production of La boheme. The bad news is that the Rodolfo (a certain Garrett Sorenson) was simply unforgivable; his Rodolfo was timid and lame, his voice did not project at all, and he was often washed out by the sound of the orchestra or, in duet, by Marcello's voice! A disaster. Fortunately, the supporting cast was fabulous, the sets were mighty fine, the orchestra played the pants of the piece, and Marcello and Musetta were sung terrifically. But the real news - Ana Maria Martinez as Mimi. She was impossibly beautiful - in the quietest moments, one could feel the audience leaning forward to listen to her. What a unique voice, soothing, rich and just plain gorgeous. I hope that we'll be hearing an awful lot more of her in the future, and I hope too that I'll get to see this opera again (putting up with the crap Rodolfo) to hear Ms Martinez once more.

In fact, quite frankly the largest disappointment of the night was finding out that Ana Maria is married. Now what am I going to do?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Henk on April 13, 2008, 10:40:15 AM
You guys should cut Henk some slack here. After all, he said it was his first live concert experience - and who knows how Bruckner 7 sounds when played by the "North Netherlands Orchestra"?  :P Maybe his observation was simply correct.  0:)

However, I think that most experienced listeners will agree with the above posters that there are indeed very few more sheerly beautiful pieces of music than this. The long sweeping opening theme alone must be one of the most beautiful "melodies" ever thought up - and it gets better and better because Bruckner does so much with the material. Anyway, I am sure Henk will eventually find to that music. It is also quite a big piece to be confronted with, especially for "beginners". It is not that easy to follow, and and a lot of listeners blank out at some point.

I think the performance by the NNO was fine. There was a very huge applause and I don't think all these people were wrong. The performance sounded fine to me as well. Also the conductor, Tabachnik, seemed very professional and energetic.
I think I just have to get used with this kind of music, more then it's a question of to follow it in the sense that I can follow also music which is more "difficult" then Bruckner's.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: The new erato on April 13, 2008, 10:55:35 AM

Just got back from the Cuarteto Latinoamericano and guitarist Manuel Barrueco doing a couple hours of Latin American music by Revueltas,
I've got their disc of the Revueltas quartets coming in the mail.

For me it is Bach BWV 21/31 the coming Saturday with local forces, Richard Thompson in early May as well as Gurrelieder as part of the Bergen Festival.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Haffner on April 13, 2008, 04:19:47 PM
Ok, I think I'm wrong about it then. I think I've to be patient to appreciate Bruckner more. However another drawback to Bruckner: a guy said to me Bruckner as well as Mahler repeat the same things in their compositions, their compositions are not so different from each other. I haven't notice it myself but this guy has a lot knowledge about classical music.



There are a couple of mutual quotes, especially in the middle Symphonies of each. I believe it would have been Mahler quoting Bruckner. Also, there is a strong Tristan und Isolde vibe to the Mahler's 9th. Most would notice it right off.

That written, composers quote from each other quite alot. Takes nothing away from what they accomplished. In some ways, it enhances it, because it can be fun to "pick" familiar stuff out!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Haffner on April 13, 2008, 04:22:10 PM
You guys should cut Henk some slack here. After all, he said it was his first live concert experience - and who knows how Bruckner 7 sounds when played by the "North Netherlands Orchestra"?  :P Maybe his observation was simply correct.  0:)

However, I think that most experienced listeners will agree with the above posters that there are indeed very few more sheerly beautiful pieces of music than this. The long sweeping opening theme alone must be one of the most beautiful "melodies" ever thought up - and it gets better and better because Bruckner does so much with the material. Anyway, I am sure Henk will eventually find to that music. It is also quite a big piece to be confronted with, especially for "beginners". It is not that easy to follow, and and a lot of listeners blank out at some point.



I was awestruck from the very first listening to Bruckner's 7th, and I agree here. The ending of the first movement makes the length of it completely transform in retrospect. As soon as I heard the violins in the last bars, behind the monumental melody, I was hitting the "repeat" button. The rest of the symphony is just as extraordinary.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on April 13, 2008, 08:18:52 PM
WSO is doing fantastic!  Attendance is up, and it seems like more younger people are attending concerts.  Alexander Mickelthwate, our young conductor, has brought a lot of vigour, energy and passion to the WSO, and you can feel it anytime he is present.  There have already been 3 sell-out concerts this season, when there hadn't been any in several years.

I really think the sky is the limit for Maestro Mickelthwate.  I see him going places.  :)

That's great to hear about Alexander.  I was in school with him and played in one of his degree recitals as well as in the orchestra that played for the conducting class.  Terrific to hear that he's doing good work.

Allan 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on April 13, 2008, 08:41:47 PM
I think the performance by the NNO was fine. There was a very huge applause and I don't think all these people were wrong.

That's the second time now within just a few posts that you go "this guy knows a lot about classical music, so he must be right" and "I don't think these people were wrong". The point of a discussion forum is to share and discuss *your* opinions, not report those of others.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on April 14, 2008, 04:00:15 AM
That's great to hear about Alexander.  I was in school with him and played in one of his degree recitals as well as in the orchestra that played for the conducting class.  Terrific to hear that he's doing good work.

Allan 

His enthuasiasm is contagious.  I enjoy listening to his pre-concert chats, great sense of humor.

Thanks for your reply Allan.  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on April 15, 2008, 05:17:21 PM
That's the second time now within just a few posts that you go "this guy knows a lot about classical music, so he must be right" and "I don't think these people were wrong". The point of a discussion forum is to share and discuss *your* opinions, not report those of others.

I may be wrong, but I think a lot of first-timers form an opinion out of some sort of consensus. First reaction is often to open the morning papers to find out what the professional critic wrote. And eventually buy a Penguin guide or something similar. Useful, but ultimately not conducive to helping forge an informed opinion. It can take years to shake these habits.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 16, 2008, 06:58:21 AM
Tomorrow night:

eighth blackbird
Susan Marshall, Stage Direction

Steve Reich: Double Sextet (NY Premiere, Co-commissioned by The Carnegie Hall Corporation
David Lang/Michael Gordon/Julia Wolfe: singing in the dead of night (NY Premiere; with stage direction by Susan Marshall)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on April 17, 2008, 09:10:37 PM
Just opened my school's newspaper to see what kind of edits my opera review was subjected to. Mostly they left what I had written intact, but for some reason half of the final sentence got cut off, so that the whole conclusion is completely nonsensical.

Original final sentence:

"Music lovers who have never seen an opera before should take warning before hearing her [soprano Ana Maria Martinez]: they might just fall in love."

New final sentence:

"Music lovers who have never seen an opera before should take warning before hearing her:"      [that's it, no period even]

Ha! Ha! Uh ... is that funny?  ??? I prefer to think of it as postmodern absurdism.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on April 18, 2008, 04:40:41 AM
Ouch, Brian.....

guess she's not gonna be able to use that in here bio materials!!!!


Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 18, 2008, 06:03:08 AM
Just opened my school's newspaper to see what kind of edits my opera review was subjected to. Mostly they left what I had written intact, but for some reason half of the final sentence got cut off, so that the whole conclusion is completely nonsensical.

Original final sentence:

"Music lovers who have never seen an opera before should take warning before hearing her [soprano Ana Maria Martinez]: they might just fall in love."

New final sentence:

"Music lovers who have never seen an opera before should take warning before hearing her:"      [that's it, no period even]

Ha! Ha! Uh ... is that funny?  ??? I prefer to think of it as postmodern absurdism.

Well isn't that ridiculous!  Sorry that your well-designed structure got torpedoed... :(

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on April 18, 2008, 06:09:23 AM
"Music lovers who have never seen an opera before should take warning before hearing her:"      [that's it, no period even]

Ha! Ha! Uh ... is that funny?  ??? I prefer to think of it as postmodern absurdism.

I hope they correct that in the next edition. Your editor is an idiot.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 18, 2008, 12:58:51 PM
Tomorrow night, this all-Stravinsky evening.  Repertoire aside, the interesting thing is the venue: the vast Park Avenue Armory (http://www.armoryonpark.org/index.php) (check the photo gallery!).  I've never been to a concert there, so I have no idea what the sound will be like. 

Stravinsky Festival

Vox Vocal Ensemble
Gotham City Orchestra
George Steel, conductor

Symphony of Psalms (1930)
Mass (1944-48)
Requiem Canticles (1965-66)
Variations (Aldous Huxley in memoriam) (1963-64)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on April 18, 2008, 01:47:26 PM
Tomorrow night, this all-Stravinsky evening.  Repertoire aside, the interesting thing is the venue: the vast Park Avenue Armory (http://www.armoryonpark.org/index.php) (check the photo gallery!).  I've never been to a concert there, so I have no idea what the sound will be like. 

Stravinsky Festival

Vox Vocal Ensemble
Gotham City Orchestra
George Steel, conductor

Symphony of Psalms (1930)
Mass (1944-48)
Requiem Canticles (1965-66)
Variations (Aldous Huxley in memoriam) (1963-64)

--Bruce
OK, I'm envious. Three of my favourite Stravinsky works on one concert.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Daedalus on April 20, 2008, 03:03:55 AM
Tonight I am seeing Valery Gergiev conduct the LSO at the Barbican in a performance of Strauss' Metamorphosen and Mahler's Symphony No. 2.  8)

I don't know much about the former piece of music, which I have just downloaded to have a quick listen to before I go, but I cannot wait to hear Symphony No. 2!

So far Gergiev's Mahler cycle has been hit (great 7th and 1st) and miss (average 5th). I think I will find out just how good a Mahler interpreter Gergiev is tonight with the fantastic and complex 2nd.

Anyone else going?

D.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on April 20, 2008, 09:45:29 AM
I wouldn't mind going but I am in Boston right now, that's kind of a long drive. Although I wouldn't be too keen to go to a concert at the Barbican, that hall totally sucks. Metamorphosen and Mahler 2? There may be a vague connection there between the two pieces because both are about loss and all that, but I think the symphony itself is quite enough. I haven't heard any Mahler conducted by Gergiev yet, but I am downloading the 3rd symphony right now a friend gave me a recording of the 3rd, so I guess I will listen to that later.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Daedalus on April 20, 2008, 03:22:30 PM
Although I wouldn't be too keen to go to a concert at the Barbican, that hall totally sucks.

What have you got against the Barbican?  ???
I love that place!  :) It's my nearest major arts centre and the nearest place for me to get to see classical music live!
I don't actually live in London but I travel in by train and it's really the closest place for me to get to. Plus, the LSO are fantastic.

Quote
Metamorphosen and Mahler 2? There may be a vague connection there between the two pieces because both are about loss and all that, but I think the symphony itself is quite enough.

I think the connection between the pieces is a juxtaposition of darkness and light, plus despair and hope.
Metamorphosen is a doleful, melancholy piece for 23 strings expressing a great sadness at the end of WW2 and particularly of the death of culture and arts in Germany due to the atrocities. I have to say I really enjoyed this piece of music, having only listened to it twice before hearing it played at the concert.

Symphony no. 2 was just superb in my opinion. The first movement and third movement were excellently orchestrated by Gergiev in particular. I felt it nearly lost its way towards the end. But otherwise, there were many spine tingling moments for me and I felt that the LSO got everything just right (how I like it anyway!)

The only negative was the large amount of people coughing in the audience and not even waiting for a break between movements or a loud bit! Just coughing during the most heart-rendering parts. I wanted to throw them all out!  >:(
London crowds, eh?  ::)

D.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on April 20, 2008, 03:51:15 PM
What have you got against the Barbican?  ???

The Barbican Centre as such is pretty nice and the hall has an OK athmosphere, too, but the acoustics are pretty bad, rather dry and muffled, if you sit further away from the orchestra, the music also happens quite far away. There are certainly worse halls, but there are also much better ones.

Metamorphosen is a doleful, melancholy piece for 23 strings expressing a great sadness at the end of WW2 and particularly of the death of culture and arts in Germany due to the atrocities.

It's really more about the widespread destruction of the country and most of its artistic institutions, especially the opera houses in Dresden and Munich during the war. I find it a little eerie when I go to concerts in Boston because Symphony Hall is modelled after the old Gewandhaus in Leipzig - which is gone, like almost all the old opera houses and concert halls. Although the Nazis did indeed also do very massive damage to German culture and art in general, they didn't cause its death - it's still there and alive! And most of the arts institutions have been reconstructed or built new, so Germany still is the country with by far the greatest density of opera houses and concert venues.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Daedalus on April 21, 2008, 01:18:54 AM
The Barbican Centre as such is pretty nice and the hall has an OK athmosphere, too, but the acoustics are pretty bad, rather dry and muffled, if you sit further away from the orchestra, the music also happens quite far away. There are certainly worse halls, but there are also much better ones.

I'd have to disagree with both of those statements and, in fact, reverse them.  :)
I find the atmosphere to be pretty bad and dry - London audiences often seem apathetic to me.
However, the acoustics are excellent as far as I am concerned and I don't experience any problems when sitting right at the back of the hall (although I prefer to sit somewhere in the middle but prices can dictate   ;D )

Quote
It's really more about the widespread destruction of the country and most of its artistic institutions, especially the opera houses in Dresden and Munich during the war.
Yes, that's pretty much what I said it was about  ;)
But you are absolutely right - the destruction of the artistic institutions, in particular, appears to have been the main motivation behind the dolorous nature of the piece. The quotation in the programme notes was something along the lines of 'Metamorphosen is a threnody for German musical life'. Strauss wrote the words 'In Memoriam!' underneath the score during the grief striken second theme. There is where Gergiev made the link to Symphony No. 2, I believe.

Another interesting point about the piece is that Strauss took the title from Goethe, who used the word metamorphosen to describe his mental development and his evolving complete works.

As I said before, I was rather charmed with the piece.  :)

D.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on April 21, 2008, 09:16:16 AM
I wouldn't mind going but I am in Boston right now, that's kind of a long drive. Although I wouldn't be too keen to go to a concert at the Barbican, that hall totally sucks. Metamorphosen and Mahler 2? There may be a vague connection there between the two pieces because both are about loss and all that, but I think the symphony itself is quite enough. I haven't heard any Mahler conducted by Gergiev yet, but I am downloading the 3rd symphony right now a friend gave me a recording of the 3rd, so I guess I will listen to that later.
It's probably a fairly banal observation, but I think the best pairing I've ever heard for Mahler 2 was on the original Double Decca reissue of Mehta's WP recording: preceding it with Schmidt's 4th symphony (one of the most profoundly gloomy yet non-theatrical pieces I know) really does generate a powerful "darkness to light" narrative.

But of course that would be way too long for an actual concert.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on April 21, 2008, 12:43:57 PM
However, the acoustics are excellent as far as I am concerned and I don't experience any problems when sitting right at the back of the hall (although I prefer to sit somewhere in the middle but prices can dictate   ;D )

Have you ever been to a really good hall like the Musikverein, Concertgebouw, Philharmonie Berlin? If not, then I can promise you a very, very pleasant surprise about just how good some halls can sound. Not just in terms of timbre, but also dynamic response. You will be overwhelmed by just how much "bigger" that sound can be. The Barbican (and also the Royal Festival Hall) are well known and feared for their mediocre acoustics which is why all the live recordings made in the Barbican are extemely closemiked and very dry (which gives them rather good and clean definition, but also an unpleasant dry boxiness without much athmosphere).

Another interesting point about the piece is that Strauss took the title from Goethe, who used the word metamorphosen to describe his mental development and his evolving complete works.

Interesting observation. I wasn't aware of that reference.

Strauss wrote the words 'In Memoriam!' underneath the score during the grief striken second theme.

I haven't seen the score in many years, but IIRC, those words appear in the score at the end where the lower strings play the funeral march theme from the Eroica which is alluded to throughout the piece, but only appears in its complete original shape there at the end.


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Daedalus on April 21, 2008, 01:18:45 PM
Have you ever been to a really good hall like the Musikverein, Concertgebouw, Philharmonie Berlin? If not, then I can promise you a very, very pleasant surprise about just how good some halls can sound.

No, I must say that I have not been to any of the concert halls you mention.
I do visit different venues, however like I said before, the Barbican is the easiest venue for me to get to. I always enjoy the sound there - it is good enough for me!  ;D
I understand your point but you won't convince me to the contrary because I believe that you must always support your local venue!  ;) 

Quote
Interesting observation. I wasn't aware of that reference.

Yes, apparently Strauss set himself a project to read through his entire works before writing this piece. It's another interesting observation and one that might add to the interpretation of the piece when one considers Strauss's age at the time of composing Metamorphosen. Also, how about the way that the music gradual evolves itself?

Quote
I haven't seen the score in many years, but IIRC, those words appear in the score at the end where the lower strings play the funeral march theme from the Eroica which is alluded to throughout the piece, but only appears in its complete original shape there at the end.

Yes, I noted the Beethoven reference.
I have no doubt you are right about where it is marked upon the manuscript. I was quoting from the programme notes and I may well have got that detail wrong.

Thank you for your comments about Metamophosen. As I said in my opening post, the piece was new to me prior to the concert and I can now turn to it with new knowledge and unlock new meanings.  :)

D.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on April 21, 2008, 02:06:47 PM
I hope they correct that in the next edition. Your editor is an idiot.

Sarge
Update, there is no next edition - it was the last newspaper of the year.  ;D  I've had a lot of people ask me what the sentence was supposed to be...

But, I hope the editor's not an idiot. While they were working on the paper I stopped by and brought them cookies, so I hope I didn't waste any precious dessert materials.  >:( :D

This weekend I am looking forward to seeing a live re-creation of the album Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, employing 40 Houston-area musicians, including sitarists, tablas, and more.  8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Haffner on April 21, 2008, 04:20:48 PM
I hope I didn't waste any precious dessert materials.  >:( :D



I hate it when that happens!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on April 21, 2008, 06:48:52 PM
Have you ever been to a really good hall like the Musikverein, Concertgebouw, Philharmonie Berlin? If not, then I can promise you a very, very pleasant surprise about just how good some halls can sound. Not just in terms of timbre, but also dynamic response. You will be overwhelmed by just how much "bigger" that sound can be.

I have been many, many times to Montreal Symphony concerts in Salle Wilfrid Pelletier. A huge, ungainly hall where the sound expands grandly, yet fails to fill the expanses with what you imagine should be a tremendous dynamic range (of which the orchestra is certainly capable). Conversely, the somewhat smaller sounding Orchestre Métropolitain fills the church surroundings where it usually plays with almost overwhelming sonic presence. It really is a major factor. One of the most surprising things about attending a concert in one of those great halls (like the Concertgebouw) is that even the tiniest pp sounds project with such a purity of tone and presence that you never feel you're straining to hear even the smallest details. And when they let the stops go, there is a sense of saturation without sonic overload that is simply awesome.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on April 23, 2008, 07:24:41 AM
A Musical Space Odyssey
April 12, 2008    ( Sat, 8:00 PM )
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Vladimir Jurowski,  conductor
Nikolaj Znaider,  violin
LIGETI  Atmosphčres
BRAHMS  Violin Concerto
R. STRAUSS  Also sprach Zarathustra
J. STRAUSS  "On the Beautiful Blue Danube" Waltz

This was the last concert I heard, but Mr Jurowski was unable to attend due to illness. Roberto Minczuk filled in and did a great job. To be honest, I was really looking forward to hearing Zarathustra live (Dawn was amazing), but I found that the piece I enjoyed hearing the most was the Ligeti. I'm not sure I'd like it as much on a recording, but in the concert hall it really set the mood. Znaider played the Brahms brilliantly, excellently balanced with the orchestra too. Rounding out the program, the Blue Danube waltz was a good way to send people off humming and in good spirits. At the start of each section though, Minczuk had the orchestra start at a slow tempo which quickened to more standard waltz tempo, almost like a music box starting up. I'm not sure if that's in the score, but it was a curious effect. At any rate, a very good evening out. Next up - Mahler's 8th.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 23, 2008, 08:15:57 AM
Thanks for that report!  I wish I'd been able to get to that concert, since it's a very good program.  The Ligeti is amazing in person, isn't it! 

I'm hearing the Mahler 8 when they do it here at Carnegie on May 6, and can't wait. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Shrunk on April 24, 2008, 09:07:28 AM
This is going to be big opera weekend for me!  I've already mentioned the HIP performance of  Idomeneo  (http://www.operaatelier.com/home_idomeneo.htm)I'll be seeing Sunday.  Then, just a few days ago, my brother called to let me know he had an extra ticket for Eugene Onegin (http://www.coc.ca/performances/onegin.html) at the Canadian Opera Company on Saturday.  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 24, 2008, 09:13:37 AM
Those look great!  (I browsed the Onegin photos.)  Do report back...

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on April 26, 2008, 11:55:31 AM
I've just walked down to the Southbank Centre and bought tickets for:

October 16: Messiaen: La Transfiguration (Kent Nagano/Philharmonia)
October 21: Xenakis: Pithoprakta / Messiaen: Chronochromie / Ligeti:Atmospheres / Benjamin:Sudden Time (Benjamin/Philharmonia)
November 8: Stockhausen concert. They're not playing any of my favourites, but it should be interesting. Anyway, Gruppen, Trans and Inori are all coming to town between the Proms and early next year, so whoo-hoo!  ;D

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on April 26, 2008, 02:12:24 PM
Off to see the  Kiev Ballet (http://russianmusicandvideos.com/kiev_ballet.htm) perform The Sleeping Beauty accompanied by the APO today.

Should be fantastic  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on April 27, 2008, 01:52:53 PM
This concert on Tuesday:

Juilliard String Quartet
Charles Neidich, clarinet

Carter: Clarinet Quintet (2007, world premiere)
Carter: Riconoscenza per Goffredo Petrassi for solo violin (1984)
Carter: Figment for solo cello (1994)
Carter: Gra for solo clarinet (1993)
Carter: Rhapsodic Musings for solo violin (2001)
Carter: Figment IV for solo viola (2007)
Carter: Clarinet Quintet (2007) - repeat performance

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Shrunk on April 28, 2008, 08:39:05 AM
This is going to be big opera weekend for me!  I've already mentioned the HIP performance of  Idomeneo  (http://www.operaatelier.com/home_idomeneo.htm)I'll be seeing Sunday.  Then, just a few days ago, my brother called to let me know he had an extra ticket for Eugene Onegin (http://www.coc.ca/performances/onegin.html) at the Canadian Opera Company on Saturday.  :D

So here's the report on my operatic weekend.

Eugene Onegin.  This was actually my first time at Toronto's new Four Seasons Centre.  The opera house has been much criticized on architectural grounds for its bland exterior, justifiably I would add.  However, having now seen a performance there, it is obvious that the money was put where it counts: the auditorium itself.  It posesses great acoustics and sightlines, with the balconies rising at an almost perpendicular pitch to that no seat is far from the action.  My kids' violin teacher, who plays in the COC orchestra, says that the orchestra pit is unusually comfortable for the musicians, as well.  So it's good to see that the company had its priorities in order when designing the concert hall.  It may not be Sydney or the Walt Disney Concert Hall, but it's a perfect place to watch opera.

The production itself was a success, as well.  The staging is quite innovative, as can be seen in the photo gallery above.  The set resembles a German Expressionist film, with oversized doors and walls going off at odd angles and the floor being steeply pitched to one side and towards the front, creating weird perspective effects as the performers move about it.  The opera is staged as a dream or flashback, with Onegin wandering the stage or standing on the lip as an unseen observer thru much of it.  The cast was uniformly strong, with Brett Polegato a particular standout in the title role.  In addition to the requisite voice, he is also an excellent actor, important here as much of the time he is called upon to display emotion thru physical action without a part to sing.

Idomeneo.  This was really something special.  Opera Atelier specializes in baroque and renaissance opera but, like many others in the HIP scene, have been making increasing incursions into the classical repertoire. Most of the attention for this production has been focussed on Measha Brueggergosman, Canada's soprano of the moment, who rarely performs opera and was here playing Elettra.  She didn't disappoint, especially in the final mad scene, but neither did she overshadow or dominate the performance.  Particularly striking was "male soprano" Michael Maniaci as Idamante, usually played as a trouser role.  A male soprano is not the same thing as a counter tenor; whereas the latter typically sings in falsetto, Maniaci's voice never "broke" during adolescence, leaving him with a true natural soprano voice.  It really is quite a unique voice, without the "edge" that most counter tenors have, yet still quite distinct from a female soprano.  As usual, Opera Atelier lavishes attention on all aspects of the production, from the sets and costumes, to the acting style and choreography, to recreate a period performance as much as possible.  You can read some more detailed reviews on the links below:

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/Music/article/419017

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080428.watelier28/BNStory/Entertainment/home

http://www.torontosun.com/Entertainment/Theatre/2008/04/28/5406546-sun.html

Anyway, if anyone is going to be in Toronto I'd highly recommend seeing either (or both) of these shows.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on April 28, 2008, 08:50:20 AM
WSO's season finale - Friday May 2nd

Tan Dun - Concerto for water instruments

Mahler - Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor

 :)

Also, the season finale for the 2008/2009 WSO season will also be Mahler, number 6.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on April 28, 2008, 08:53:06 AM
Sunday, May 4th

Winnipeg Chamber Music Society

Haydn - Piano Trio in D major, Hob XV:7

Piazzolla - L'histoire du Tango for saxophone and piano

Schumann - Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44   (one of my favorite Schumman works  :))

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on April 30, 2008, 07:03:54 PM
May 3rd, M8. 'nuff said. :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 02, 2008, 09:12:49 AM
Tonight, the second concert of Look & Listen, with Mark Stewart, the Daedalus String Quartet, Electric Kompany and Ethel.

Pre-concert music:
Stockhausen: Gesang der Jünglinge

Mark Stewart: Music for Plumbing and Other Non-traditional and Neglected Instruments
Carl Christian Bettendorf: II y a l'Ocean
Kristin Hevner: Vignettes
Stravinsky: Three Pieces for String Quartet
Mark Stewart: On the Origin of the Species
Nick Didkovsky: Human Dog
Mark Stewart: Stop, Look & Listen--Speedy Feety

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on May 02, 2008, 11:49:15 AM
May 3rd, M8. 'nuff said. :)

Hey, not good 'nuff >:( ;). Who? Where? :)

Hope you enjoy it, at least more than I did my one and only live performance. I had rotten seats and couldn't hear a thing and had a canoodling couple next to me to boot.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 02, 2008, 02:44:30 PM
Particularly striking was "male soprano" Michael Maniaci as Idamante, usually played as a trouser role.  A male soprano is not the same thing as a counter tenor; whereas the latter typically sings in falsetto, Maniaci's voice never "broke" during adolescence, leaving him with a true natural soprano voice.  It really is quite a unique voice, without the "edge" that most counter tenors have, yet still quite distinct from a female soprano.

That's interesting. I hadn't heard of this singer. What's even more interesting though is the fact he's having some problems getting roles:

http://www.operatoday.com/content/2005/04/an_interview_wi_4.php

One would think he'd be ideal for those roles that were written for castrato.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on May 04, 2008, 06:15:59 AM
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach, conductor
Christine Brewer, soprano
Michaela Kaune, soprano
Marisol Montalvo, soprano
Stephanie Blythe, mezzo-soprano
Charlotte Hellekant, mezzo-soprano
Vinson Cole, tenor
Franco Pomponi, baritone
James Morris, bass
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale,  David Hayes, music director
Westminster Symphonic Choir,  Joe Miller, music director
Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia,  Alan Harler, music director
The American Boychoir,  Fernando Malvar-Ruiz, music director

MAHLER  Symphony No. 8 ("Symphony of a Thousand")

M8, live. Wow. A little slower than I would've liked but not distractingly so. The female soloists were uniformly excellent, and the male soloists were good, but inaudible sometimes when singing with the chorus. Still, what a thrill to actually be there. As good as recordings are, there's nothing like hearing it live. They were recording for a possible CD release, which I will buy if/when it does come out.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Monsieur Croche on May 04, 2008, 07:16:16 AM
I'm going to this concert on May 17th:

Ari Rasilainen, conductor
Daniel Hope, violin

PROKOFIEV - Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 25 ‘Classical’
MENDELSSOHN - Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64
SIBELIUS - Symphony No. 1 in E minor, Op. 39
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: DavidRoss on May 04, 2008, 08:18:20 AM
Next Sunday the Brahms piano quintet and 2nd SQ -- The Alexander String Quartet with Lara Downes. 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 04, 2008, 12:23:26 PM
I'm going to this concert on May 17th:

Ari Rasilainen, conductor
Daniel Hope, violin

PROKOFIEV - Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 25 ‘Classical’
MENDELSSOHN - Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64
SIBELIUS - Symphony No. 1 in E minor, Op. 39

That's really interesting. Rasilainen is the conductor of my local orchestra, the Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pflaz (more commonly known as the DSPRP, and locally as Die Friggin' Pfälzers). Your're Indonesían, right? What orchestra is he conducting?

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Shrunk on May 04, 2008, 03:29:59 PM
My operatic feast continues with Pelleas et Melisande (http://www.coc.ca/performances/pelleas.html) this Friday.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 04, 2008, 03:47:00 PM
Last night, a local event in Winston-Salem (North Carolina, USA), my home town - 30th anniversary of the Piedmont Chamber Singers (http://www.piedmontchambersingers.org/), a local group doing vocal works from all periods - my wife was a member in the late '70s-early '80s - the highlight for me was the presence of William Bolcom (http://www.bolcomandmorris.com/), the composer - some premier presentations of his works (written w/ conjunction of the North Carolina poet laureate) - this is not a great choral group, but seeing Bolcom was great (actually was sitting just across the aisle from me) & the last performances included alumni on the stage (including my wife, of course) - not a bad evening -  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 04, 2008, 03:50:14 PM
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach, conductor
Christine Brewer, soprano
Michaela Kaune, soprano
Marisol Montalvo, soprano
Stephanie Blythe, mezzo-soprano
Charlotte Hellekant, mezzo-soprano
Vinson Cole, tenor
Franco Pomponi, baritone
James Morris, bass
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale,  David Hayes, music director
Westminster Symphonic Choir,  Joe Miller, music director
Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia,  Alan Harler, music director
The American Boychoir,  Fernando Malvar-Ruiz, music director

MAHLER  Symphony No. 8 ("Symphony of a Thousand")

M8, live. Wow. A little slower than I would've liked but not distractingly so. The female soloists were uniformly excellent, and the male soloists were good, but inaudible sometimes when singing with the chorus. Still, what a thrill to actually be there. As good as recordings are, there's nothing like hearing it live. They were recording for a possible CD release, which I will buy if/when it does come out.

Mahler 8 live is always an occasion. Glad you enjoyed it, Stingo. The slower tempos wouldn't have bothered me...I prefer it that way.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 04, 2008, 04:50:08 PM
Mahler 8 live is always an occasion.

Even with Eschenbach?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 04, 2008, 05:28:20 PM
Even with Eschenbach?

Okay...so I may be guilty of hyperbole  ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 05, 2008, 06:40:21 AM
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach, conductor
Christine Brewer, soprano
Michaela Kaune, soprano
Marisol Montalvo, soprano
Stephanie Blythe, mezzo-soprano
Charlotte Hellekant, mezzo-soprano
Vinson Cole, tenor
Franco Pomponi, baritone
James Morris, bass
The Philadelphia Singers Chorale,  David Hayes, music director
Westminster Symphonic Choir,  Joe Miller, music director
Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia,  Alan Harler, music director
The American Boychoir,  Fernando Malvar-Ruiz, music director

MAHLER  Symphony No. 8 ("Symphony of a Thousand")

M8, live. Wow. A little slower than I would've liked but not distractingly so. The female soloists were uniformly excellent, and the male soloists were good, but inaudible sometimes when singing with the chorus. Still, what a thrill to actually be there. As good as recordings are, there's nothing like hearing it live. They were recording for a possible CD release, which I will buy if/when it does come out.

Thanks for these comments!  I'm hearing the same concert tomorrow night at Carnegie Hall.  The one minus: Carnegie has no pipe organ, so they'll be using the little electronic number they wheel out for such occasions.  But never mind, I'm still excited.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 07, 2008, 12:57:38 PM
Speaking of Carnegie Hall, M will be in New York next week. Last time I was there (2 weeks ago), I went to Lincoln Center and heard the New York Philharmonic conducted by Charles Dutoit with André Watts as soloist in (I think he stepped in for an indisposed Martha Argerich). After opening the program with a light-footed Overture to Le Nozze di Figaro, they played Beethoven's 1st piano concerto, fairly lean and straightforward, rather "classicist" but not without fine musical nuances and Watts played his part with crisp rhythm and articulation and, something you see rarely these days, with the music in front of him. After the intermission, Dutoit led a fabulous, very spirited and virtuoso performance of Rachmaninoff's Symphonic Dances with the NYP in top form and also playing rather more animated and into it (especially the string sections which played *together as a group* very well, not just all together in a technical sense) than you often see American orchestras play. The evening ended with a richly nuanced, sonorous and very stylish reading of Ravel's La Valse. Although the acoustics in Avery Fisher Hall aren't exactly good, I found them a little better than I had expected (or rather, feared) after the many horror stories I had heard about the hall. Or maybe I was in a lucky spot (my seat was in the first balcony on the left side). The sound of the hall from there wasn't "great", but it was listenable. Still, I wish the NYP had a better home - the hall certainly is butt-ugly!  ;D Nonetheless, a great concert night!

The NYP won't be in action next week, but the Chicago Symphony Orchestra will appear on two consecutive nights in Carnegie Hall under the direction of Bernard Haitink. These are the two programs:

Thursday
RAVEL  Menuet antique 
PETER LIEBERSON  Neruda Songs 
MAHLER  Symphony No. 1, "Titan" 

Friday
HAYDN  Symphony No. 101 in D Major, "The Clock" 
SHOSTAKOVICH  Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43 


I am not exactly a big fan of either the orchestra or the conductor, nor the combination of the two (last year, I heard a fairly mediocre and uninteresting performance of Bruckner 7 with them in Chicago), but it might still be a decent occasion to check out Carnegie Hall. I am just not sure I want to hear Mahler 1 yet again, for the 378th or so time, as nice as the piece is... Shostakovich 4 might be interesting though, so I am considering going to that concert or maybe even both.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 07, 2008, 01:28:16 PM
M,

Haven't heard the Mahler here last week (heard mixed reports), but I may check out the Shosty 4 tomorrow evening. Will let you know how it goes if I go. FWIW, the Mahler 1 may have, for you, the possibly interesting curiosity that Haitink has dug out some documentation that claims to show that Mahler had intended the solo bass opening of the third movement to be played by the entire bass section, muted and pianissimo, but that he never found a bass section that was up to the job, so to get an approximation of the desired effect it has always been played solo. Haitink restores this in these performances to have it played by the entire bass section as supposedly originally intended. Hovnanian has a post about it (http://csobassblog.blogspot.com/2008/05/week-33.html). Not sure that will persuade you to hear it (it didn't do it for me), but thought I'd mention it.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 07, 2008, 01:51:08 PM
I can believe that. I always held the opinion that the "solo" in Mahler 1 isn't really a "solo", just in the sense of one bass alone, not in the sense of "a solo!", if you know what I mean. It is obvious to me that by writing for 1 bass alone *with a mute* - even though this is often left off by players who want to produce themselves, and they usually play the passage too loud and too expressive -, Mahler basicaly wanted the darkest and most subdued color he could get in the orchestra. I can imagine he wanted that played by a whole section, with mutes, that should be a great effect. Apart from that, I can only echo what Hovnanian said there in his blog:

The lack of concerts in my schedule is no mistake. Even though it was not my turn, I volunteered to be on call this week to avoid the Mahler 1st Symphony. Over the years I’ve come to loathe the piece and so take advantage of every opportunity to get out of playing it. Unfortunately for me it is one of those things that comes up at least once a year. If I’m not mistaken, the orchestra played it at subscription concerts less than 12 months ago. What is the deal with that? I wonder if listeners get as tired of it as I do. Anyway, the frequency of programming makes for some tricky maneuvering in order to avoid it.

It does make me a little curious though to read Haitink did 4 full rehearsals for this, the piece isn't really that complex and a good orchestra should be able to actually clear up even the musical fine detail in 2 rehearsals or less. So maybe Haitink worked a lot on the fine detail? That might be interesting to hear after all.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on May 07, 2008, 03:22:49 PM
So Sunday, I saw my first live Mahler, this that I had mentioned a while back:

MAHLER Symphony No. 2 'Resurrection'

Houston Symphony
Hans Graf, conductor
Erin Wall, soprano
Meredith Arwady, contralto
Houston Symphony Chorus

Wow. The whole group I went with, it was our first live Mahler experience, and it was simply overwhelming. There is so much going on in the music that hearing (and seeing!) it live reveals compared to listening to recordings, it's fascinating. All the offstage stuff was a highlight, not to mention the percussionist who had to traipse 20 ft in the air to hit three VERY large tubular bells...

The performance was just fantastic, the best I've heard this orchestra over my visits this year, great chemistry with MD Hans Graf, and a far more dramatic and blazing account than I would have expected from his intellectual, refined performances earlier this season of other fare. It was nice to see them really play at full tilt! I will write more in the Mahler thread...

So I have one concert left in my HSO subscription - but I can't decide which one to go to...these are the last two:

May 9-11

RAUTAVAARA: Cantus Articus, Concerto for Birds and Orchestra
MOZART: Violin Concerto No. 4
SCHUMANN: Symphony No. 3, Rhenish

Hannu Lintu, conductor
Cho-Liang Lin, violin

May 15-18

FALLA: Suite from El Amor Brujo
RODRIGO: Concierto de Aranjuez
FALLA: Nights in the Gardens of Spain
RIMSKY-KORSAKOV: Capriccio espagnol

Hans Graf, conductor
Eliot Fisk, guitar
Shai Wosner, piano
Katherine Ciesinski, mezzo-soprano

I'm torn! I would really love to see Cho-Liang Lin, but the Spanish season finale looks fun and will probably be the better performance...and anyway I love Falla...  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 07, 2008, 07:44:48 PM
M,

Haven't heard the Mahler here last week (heard mixed reports), but I may check out the Shosty 4 tomorrow evening. Will let you know how it goes if I go. FWIW, the Mahler 1 may have, for you, the possibly interesting curiosity that Haitink has dug out some documentation that claims to show that Mahler had intended the solo bass opening of the third movement to be played by the entire bass section, muted and pianissimo, but that he never found a bass section that was up to the job, so to get an approximation of the desired effect it has always been played solo. Haitink restores this in these performances to have it played by the entire bass section as supposedly originally intended. Hovnanian has a post about it (http://csobassblog.blogspot.com/2008/05/week-33.html). Not sure that will persuade you to hear it (it didn't do it for me), but thought I'd mention it.

Vanska has been doing the same thing in up in Minnesota.

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on May 08, 2008, 01:31:26 AM
An article from today's Guardian about Nono's Prometeo. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, I'm going to the second performance on Saturday, May 10th.


Scribbles for a sonic revolution


People from all over the world are flying in to Britain to hear an extraordinary piece of music this weekend. By Marshall Marcus

Thursday May 8, 2008
The Guardian


For the past few weeks, I have been receiving some extraordinary emails. Today's concerns a request from some young Australian composers to attend rehearsals at the Royal Festival Hall in the coming days. At first, I assumed they lived in London, but it seems they are flying in from Australia especially to hear a particular piece of music this weekend. This is extreme stuff, but not an isolated case. Yesterday, it was an elderly German lady. Tomorrow, who knows? But then, something astounding is about to happen: the most remarkable piece of 20th-century music is set to hit London for the first time.

Article continues

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I've been living with this work for almost two years. In 53 years, I've known nothing remotely like it. So what is it - and why does it provoke such strong reactions? The composer, who died in 1990, is the Italian Luigi Nono. And the piece is Prometeo, a grand, haunting Promethean music drama, a labyrinthine meditation on the act of creation. It makes huge demands on performers and listeners alike, and is difficult to approach without real commitment (Southbank Centre, where I am head of music, has put notes online in advance, to help the audience prepare).
Over its two-hour-plus span, you will hear the cracking of notes and desperate breathing, as well as sudden, terrifying fanfares and unimaginably beautiful floated sound. This is sound as extremity, with no narrative action to help. But the rewards are phenomenal. Nono puts you in touch with your own listening in a manner I have never experienced; he provokes an organic line between musician, instrument, voice, microphone, speaker, concert hall and, finally, audience.

British composer Simon Bainbridge is an acknowledged expert on the work. "One of the most amazing features is the composer's ability to draw you into his time," he says. "I remember slowly being transported out of real time into this complex structure, which plays continuously for two hours 20 minutes; it could easily have been five hours. It's an outstanding achievement - to be able to transport the listener into that environment. At the end, it was a good five or six minutes before I could get back into clock time again. It's so monumental, so extraordinary, that it takes you a while to get back to life."

The forces involved are epic - four orchestras, a choir, solo singers and instrumentalists, narrators, two conductors, a sound director. Not surprisingly, it is rarely performed; only now, almost a quarter of a century after its first performance, is the work receiving its UK premiere. To understand more about it, it is worth considering what happens when we watch a normal concert. I use the word "watch" deliberately. In an age so dominated by visual imagery, watching is what we tend to do in concerts, with even the architecture of the halls collusive in this perceptual skewing. The stage is designed to be spatially divorced from the audience, and this "room within a room" separates the sound source from the listener, forcing us to listen across space rather than within it. It's no surprise that we are often looking when we might be listening.

Nono demolished this arrangement by placing the performers around the sides of the hall at different heights and configurations. Multiple loudspeakers hang throughout the hall, choreographing the sound of the musicians. The old centralised "listening-by-looking" stage vanishes, as the whole hall becomes a giant stage and listening instrument; the audience find themselves at the centre of this setup, actually inside the sound. The results are spellbinding.

It's not surprising that this game originated in Venice. With its history of grand, spatially inspired music from the Gabriellis to Monteverdi, Vivaldi and beyond, this is a city whose architectural contexts and decentralised plan provoked sound experiments. Nono was born in, and often returned to, Venice. As his widow, Nuria Schoenberg Nono, relates, Prometeo is inspired by the sound of Venice and was conceived for St Mark's - although the first performance took place in San Lorenzo during the 1984 Venice Biennale. The preparations were astounding. Architect Renzo Piano constructed a wooden boat-like edifice within the church, into which the performers and audience were placed. The Freiburg Sound Studio worked with Nono to develop the electronics, while philosopher (and current Mayor of Venice) Massimo Cacciari assembled an astonishing combination of ancient and modern texts for the libretto.

Who can blame our Australian composers for grabbing the chance while they can? I am reminded of the writer Rachel Holmes' words on first hearing Prometeo: "What does democracy and freedom feel and sound like? It sounds and feels like this."

Prometeo is at the Royal Festival Hall, London SE1, on Friday and Saturday. Box office: 0871 663 2500.




Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 08, 2008, 08:44:14 PM
M,

I just caught the Haydn/Shosty program here in Chicago. I thought the Haydn was superb. Very elegant, finely balanced and excellent string articulation. Shosty 4 is such a strange piece. I loved the performance, but it's not a gut wrenching intense sort of Shosty that Haitink does. It's more one that gradually creeps up on you. It's more measured, but there was a lot of detail that made it really worth hearing. Terrific woodwind playing. FYI, they are performing these programs five (!) times here in Chicago (preceded by four rehearsals). I guess Haitink is leaving nothing to chance for the tour. Which means by the time it hits Carnegie it will either be mindbogglingly fantastic or deadly boring from sheer repetition.  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on May 08, 2008, 10:25:04 PM
M,

I just caught the Haydn/Shosty program here in Chicago. Shosty 4 is such a strange piece. I loved the performance, but it's not a gut wrenching intense sort of Shosty that Haitink does. It's more one that gradually creeps up on you. It's more measured, but there was a lot of detail that made it really worth hearing. Terrific woodwind playing. FYI, they are performing these programs five (!) times here in Chicago (preceded by four rehearsals). I guess Haitink is leaving nothing to chance for the tour. Which means by the time it hits Carnegie it will either be mindbogglingly fantastic or deadly boring from sheer repetition.  ;)

Interesting. Haitink and the CSO are bringing Shostakovich 4 to the Proms this year and I'm quite tempted, although they are playing Mahler 6 the day before. I've seen Haitink a few times in concert and he's always worth catching. He doesn't go for a shock-and-awe approach, but he always sustains interest and, crucially, tension, which makes his performances ultimately satisfying and rewarding. His performance of Mahler 6 with the London Philharmonic a decade or so ago in the Festival Hall was probably the finest I've ever heard live.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 08, 2008, 11:07:04 PM
Interesting. Haitink and the CSO are bringing Shostakovich 4 to the Proms this year and I'm quite tempted, although they are playing Mahler 6 the day before. I've seen Haitink a few times in concert and he's always worth catching. He doesn't go for a shock-and-awe approach, but he always sustains interest and, crucially, tension, which makes his performances ultimately satisfying and rewarding. His performance of Mahler 6 with the London Philharmonic a decade or so ago in the Festival Hall was probably the finest I've ever heard live.

And maybe the only one you ever heard live?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on May 08, 2008, 11:49:02 PM
And maybe the only one you ever heard live?

Don't be facetious. I've heard it live at least eight times, probably closer to ten. Other conductors include Tennstedt, Rattle, Fischer, Maazel... I'd have to do a bit of research to remind myself of the others.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on May 09, 2008, 12:24:20 AM
And maybe the only one you ever heard live?

Seriously, what's with the snarky comment? What did I say in my innocuous post that justified that kind of response?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on May 09, 2008, 07:05:50 AM
Seriously, what's with the snarky comment? What did I say in my innocuous post that justified that kind of response?

M is suffering from PMS. You know how cranky he gets just before his period.  ;D

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Harry on May 09, 2008, 07:23:10 AM
M is suffering from PMS. You know how cranky he gets just before his period.  ;D

Sarge

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 09, 2008, 08:03:19 AM
Tomorrow night, this concert at Carnegie, with a world premiere by Charles Wuorinen, and Sarah Chang in the Vivaldi.  I don't recall ever hearing the Respighi live, so that will be a treat, too.

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Sarah Chang, Violin

Respighi: Gli Uccelli (The Birds)  
Wuorinen: Synaxis, Concerto Grosso for four soloists (oboe, clarinet, horn, contrabass), Strings and Timpani 
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 09, 2008, 11:13:36 AM
Seriously, what's with the snarky comment? What did I say in my innocuous post that justified that kind of response?

Nothing, I was just curious on what live concert experiences background that statement was based. A lot of people here know 2 or 3 recordings of a particular work but feel it will enrichen everyone else if they throw in their "opinion" that one of them is "the greatest ever" and you have a lot of people here who have never heard one of the great orchestras live but who participate in endless discussions about "the world's best orchestra" and similar nonsense, or they base their enthusiasm (to which we all are very entitled of course) on just one concert experience (see also 4 posts above yours) and of course, we are happy for them, but the information density and value for other people is just not there.

BTW, I also respect and value Haitink's very solid professionality and his refusal to clown around and try to come up with random musical ideas as a substitute for lack of insight and study, like so many other interpreters do. I have seen him many times in Berlin and twice in the past year (last year in May in Chicago, as I mentioned, and very recently here in Boston with Bartók's 2nd PC and Schubert's 9th which was, once again, very solid but nothing really particularly "exciting" or "interesting"). He does have some great moments though, for instance, the Mahler 6 he conducted in Berlin just before they made the Philips recording was very impressive. There is also a highly interesting recording of the same symphony with the Orchestre National de France. There are few recordings of Mahler symphonies with French orchestras, so it is highly interesting to hear how the ONF which has retained some elements of the traditional French orchestral style plays this piece and how they sound - and they do very well, plus it is obvious that Haitink led the performance with a clear concept because the balancing of the sections and the music context are very convincing.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 09, 2008, 11:57:16 AM
Interesting. Haitink and the CSO are bringing Shostakovich 4 to the Proms this year and I'm quite tempted, although they are playing Mahler 6 the day before. I've seen Haitink a few times in concert and he's always worth catching. He doesn't go for a shock-and-awe approach, but he always sustains interest and, crucially, tension, which makes his performances ultimately satisfying and rewarding. His performance of Mahler 6 with the London Philharmonic a decade or so ago in the Festival Hall was probably the finest I've ever heard live.

MDL, FWIW, I heard Haitink and the CSO do the Mahler 6 here last fall which I thought was absolutely terrific. IMHO, Haitink's best work here so far. Again, not in your face, but a devastating emotional musical landscape nonetheless. Alas, the recording the CSO brought out on its new in-house label does not refelect the performance I heard at all. The recording is somehow congested, boomy basses, with the edges rounded off. It has no impact whatsoever.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 09, 2008, 01:07:46 PM
MDL, FWIW, I heard Haitink and the CSO do the Mahler 6 here last fall which I thought was absolutely terrific.

But then you always think the CSO is "absolutely terrific"  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: SonicMan46 on May 09, 2008, 05:01:26 PM
Tomorrow night, this concert at Carnegie, with a world premiere by Charles Wuorinen, and Sarah Chang in the Vivaldi.  I don't recall ever hearing the Respighi live, so that will be a treat, too.

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Sarah Chang, Violin


Bruce - that looks like a great concert! The Orpheus Chamber Orch is a favorite of mine!  Plus, I've not been to the Carnegie in years - would be a great treat!

Wife & I are currently on a long weekend in Abingdon, VA (about 2.5 hrs from us only) - staying at the historic Martha Washington Inn (http://www.marthawashingtoninn.com/) - just had a great meal in their dinning room (will return tomorrow night); will be seeing a show on Saturday afternoon at the historic Virginia Barter Theater (http://www.bartertheatre.com/), Keep On the Sunny Side - about the Carter Family and their early success, including the '27 recordings in Bristol, TN, which is just a half hour or so down I-81 - looking forward to that show -  :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 09, 2008, 06:48:43 PM
But then you always think the CSO is "absolutely terrific"  ;)

I'll comment on this the day I hear you make a critical remark about the SK Dresden.   >:D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 09, 2008, 09:58:28 PM
I'll comment on this the day I hear you make a critical remark about the SK Dresden.   >:D

Well, that wouldn't make so much sense to compare that out of context, would it, and it would be rather unfair to compare an orchestra with as little direct relationship to the musical traditions of central Europe as the CSO with an orchestra which has more than 460 years of continuous history and which is pretty much the embodiment of living tradition, but here you go (we only have to reach back a few days):

I highly recommend this recording, not just because I am a big fan of this orchestra-conductor combination in general which however doesn't mean that I like everything they did - and there is actually a fairly weak and disappointing Beethoven 9 from a live concert in Japan with these forces on video

Your turn now.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on May 10, 2008, 02:16:06 PM
Coming up next Thursday  :)

APN News & Media Premier Series 2008 Concert 4

Thu 15 May 2008 8:00pm - Auckland Town Hall THE EDGE®

Moments of Discovery

 
Tecwyn Evans Conductor

Deborah Wai Kapohe Mere Boynton Soprano
Mere Boynton  Mezzo-Soprano
James Eggleston Tenor
George Henare Baritone
   
Falla ~  The Three Cornered Hat
Farr ~  Ex Stasis

The Three Cornered Hat is set in a sunny Spanish village and is full of local flavour, romance, intrigue, mistaken identity and rumbustious comedy. Full of life and laughter, it is guaranteed to get toes tapping. Afterwards, be the first to hear a major new piece from APO Composer-in-Residence Gareth Farr – a symphonic song cycle featuring four voices and themes of self-discovery and revelation. Farr’s works are a central part of New Zealand music and this promises to be one of his best yet.

Very interesting line-up...

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 10, 2008, 09:47:55 PM
CityMusic Cleveland has been performing this week and I'm excited to go to the final performance as an audience member tomorrow evening.  Especially looking forward to the Ligeti.

Antonio Vivaldi: Sinfonia in B minor (Al santo sepulcro)
György Ligeti: Violin Concerto
Charles Ives: The Unanswered Question
Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No.1

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: DavidRoss on May 11, 2008, 05:06:55 AM
Sounds like an interesting program, Allan.  One question: is the Ives before or after the break? 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 11, 2008, 06:02:26 AM
Well, that wouldn't make so much sense to compare that out of context, would it, and it would be rather unfair to compare an orchestra with as little direct relationship to the musical traditions of central Europe as the CSO with an orchestra which has more than 460 years of continuous history and which is pretty much the embodiment of living tradition, but here you go (we only have to reach back a few days):

Your turn now.

I don't visit this forum regularly anymore, remember? I'm not going to engage in a reductive debate about silly stereotypes. PS: I think the Czechs, Hungarians, Germans and Eastern-European Jews who formed the bulk and the backbone of the CSO for at least its first six decades of existence would seriously beg to differ with your uninformed comment re: musical traditions. Never mind, e.g., the current French principal flute, or the second horn who played in German orchestras for many years.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 11, 2008, 06:20:20 AM
Sounds like an interesting program, Allan.  One question: is the Ives before or after the break? 

Hi David,

I have no idea,  I cut and pasted that directly from their website.  I should have added that the program is entitled Revolutionary Music.

Allan 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on May 11, 2008, 04:04:07 PM
Tomorrow night, this concert at Carnegie, with a world premiere by Charles Wuorinen, and Sarah Chang in the Vivaldi.  I don't recall ever hearing the Respighi live, so that will be a treat, too.

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Sarah Chang, Violin

Respighi: Gli Uccelli (The Birds)  
Wuorinen: Synaxis, Concerto Grosso for four soloists (oboe, clarinet, horn, contrabass), Strings and Timpani 
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons 

--Bruce


Must have been an excellent concert, Bruce!  8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 11, 2008, 06:14:59 PM
CityMusic Cleveland has been performing this week and I'm excited to go to the final performance as an audience member tomorrow evening.  Especially looking forward to the Ligeti.

Antonio Vivaldi: Sinfonia in B minor (Al santo sepulcro)
György Ligeti: Violin Concerto
Charles Ives: The Unanswered Question
Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No.1

Allan

What a badass concert this was.  One of best performances I've attended in a long time.


Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MISHUGINA on May 11, 2008, 08:21:59 PM
Two concerts this month which i am going to

Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra

Daniel Hope, violin

BRITTEN Violin Concerto
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis
SIBELIUS Symphony no 7

and another

HAYDN Symphony no. 101 "Drumroll"
MAHLER Symphony no. 10

both concerts conducted by Hannu Lintu. I'm skeptical about the Sibelius because the last time I heard him conduct Sibelius 5 its all bombast and orchestral playing was scrappy. Most likely for Mahler 10 maestro Lintu will use the Cooke 2 version.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 12, 2008, 06:13:30 AM
Must have been an excellent concert, Bruce!  8)

Why, indeed it was!   8)

What a badass concert this was.  One of best performances I've attended in a long time.


Allan

Did you enjoy the Ligeti Violin Concerto?  (Or perhaps it should be called "Concerto for Violin and Ocarinas."  ;D)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 12, 2008, 08:45:11 AM


Did you enjoy the Ligeti Violin Concerto?  (Or perhaps it should be called "Concerto for Violin and Ocarinas."  ;D)

--Bruce

Hehe,  I did enjoy it. I'm glad I got to see it live.  The entire concert was terrific, but the Ligeti was just a hair raising, vital performance.  Stellar, engaged playing from the entire ensemble. 

Allan 
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 12, 2008, 11:53:25 AM
This Saturday, this concert called Food & Music, by the American Modern Ensemble.  The Bolcolm song is hilarious...I'm curious to see how they use it in the program.  Don't know any of the other pieces, including the Bernstein.

Aaron Jay Kernis: The Four Seasons of Futurist Cuisine
Barbara Kolb: Three Place Settings
Marc Mellits: Fruity Pebbles
Leonard Bernstein: La Bonne Cuisine
Robert Paterson: Eating Variations (world premiere)
Yotam Haber: The Gourmand's Lament
William Bolcolm: Lime Jello Marshmallow Cottage Cheese Surprise
Derrick Wang: Hors d'oeuvres (NYC premiere)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on May 12, 2008, 12:29:57 PM
Marc Mellits: Fruity Pebbles

Isn't that a trademark?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 12, 2008, 12:59:38 PM
Isn't that a trademark?

Oh, sorry...

Marc Mellits: Fruity Pebbles

 ;D  *running away*

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 12, 2008, 01:01:12 PM
Sheesh.....the freakin' jokers in this place ;) ;D

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on May 12, 2008, 01:09:38 PM
Oh, sorry...

 8)

I do wonder (in a distant, professional way) how Mellits can use that for a title, though.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on May 12, 2008, 01:10:32 PM
Sheesh.....the freakin' jokers in this place ;) ;D

Bruce is irrepressible, Allan.  Nor do I know anyone capable of pressing him even once . . . .
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 15, 2008, 08:05:47 AM
Tonight at Carnegie:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Bernard Haitink, Principal Conductor
Kelley O'Connor, Mezzo-Soprano

Ravel: Menuet antique 
Peter LiebersonNeruda Songs 
Mahler: Symphony No. 1

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: toledobass on May 15, 2008, 09:14:07 AM
Tonight at Carnegie:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Bernard Haitink, Principal Conductor
Kelley O'Connor, Mezzo-Soprano

Ravel: Menuet antique 
Peter LiebersonNeruda Songs 
Mahler: Symphony No. 1

--Bruce


I really can't imagine taking upon the daunting task of singing those songs. 

Allan
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 15, 2008, 12:17:03 PM
I really can't imagine taking upon the daunting task of singing those songs. 

Allan

True, Lorraine Hunt Lieberson's touching version will be hard to forget (if that's what you meant).   :'(  The songs are so good, though, they should really become concert hall staples.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 16, 2008, 08:58:01 AM
Tonight:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Bernard Haitink, Principal Conductor

Haydn: Symphony No. 101 in D Major, "The Clock"  
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43 

Can't wait for the Shostakovich, especially!

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on May 16, 2008, 09:21:30 AM
If I may say so, Bruce: yowza!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 16, 2008, 09:32:40 AM
I feel very lucky to have heard the Shostakovich 4 live fairly recently (last December) and came away thinking this might--repeat, might--be his greatest symphony.  I have Haitink's studio recording (which I haven't heard in a long time) but have never heard him do it live. 

Also, the way the orchestra was playing last night... :o...quite, quite impressive.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 16, 2008, 11:36:50 AM
I didn't make it to the concert last night because I had food poisoning! As it turned out, the fruit salad I had for breakfast in the hotel wasn't "the healthy choice" after all  :o

Fortunately, since I also had a lot of work to do and wasn't sure if I would make it in any case, I didn't buy a ticket, although I know there was some risk it might be sold out. I checked availability of seats regularly, and it got fairly close. But then I couldn't go anyway.

So, how was the bass thing in the third movement? How different did it sound to the way we normally hear it, with one bass? Did they play all with mutes on? Did they manage to play that really in tune? I am not asking because I doubt they can, but that passage is simply very difficult to get in tune. It is not really difficult, but it lies really awkwardly on the fingerboard.

Fortunately, I am feeling better today and I am still in town, so I just bought a nice ticket (parquet 24 H) for tonight, so now I am looking forward to that! My first time in Carnegie Hall!

I actually heard DSCH4 live very recently, maybe 6 weeks or so ago, with the BSO conducted by Mark Elder. Elder made a little speech before the concert, he talked about the music and said that the BSO hadn't played the piece in 25 years. They certainly played it technically very well, but Elder and the orchestra didn't connect so well, so while his conducting was very "animated", the performance was rather stiff and angular. This was only the second time I ever heard it live, the other time was in the mid-late 80s with the RSO Berlin conducted by Rostropovich - a devastating performance. Back then, the music still had very contemporary rather than just historical relevance. The iron curtain was still up, and in Berlin, we were right on the edge of the Eastern Block - the Philharmonie at that time was only a few hundred feet from the Wall -, so hearing that message from the other side of the iron curtain was particularly intense.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on May 16, 2008, 04:24:55 PM
I feel very lucky to have heard the Shostakovich 4 live fairly recently (last December) and came away thinking this might--repeat, might--be his greatest symphony.  I have Haitink's studio recording (which I haven't heard in a long time) but have never heard him do it live. 

A little birdie tells me that the DSCH 4 from this past week's Chicago concerts may make it onto a future CSOResound release.  ;)

I didn't make it to the concert last night because I had food poisoning! As it turned out, the fruit salad I had for breakfast in the hotel wasn't "the healthy choice" after all  :o

Ouch! Hope you feel better.

They certainly played it technically very well, but Elder and the orchestra didn't connect so well

What orchestra does Elder connect with? Your above description could be applied to the concerts I heard him give here. We seem to be getting a disproportionate amount of Elder here in Chicago lately. He's doing a whole Dvorak festival for the last several weeks of next season.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 16, 2008, 09:29:32 PM
Sorry to hear that!  ;) Well, there aren't that many really good conductors around anymore, so I guess orchestras have to take what they can get...Elder reminded me a lot of Eschenbach in his clumsy gesturing which didn't really transmit to the orchestra.

Anyway, the concert tonight was very good. Not really special, but very solid and good. The orchestra played very well on the whole, especially the violins and the basses pleased with crisp and finely chiseled playing although the middle string sections were competent, but rather pale and didn't fill out the sound very well. The result was a slender and well articulated, but anemic string sound. The brass was basically very good, but while they actually sounded very good in pianos, the pressed and thinnish sound they produce in f and ff may be relatively "loud", but it fails to fill the room. The sound more pokes at you from behind the orchestra than really coming at you in a broad wave of sound. A couple of weeks ago, I heard the Orchestre National de France, and with about half the brass section (they played Tchaikovsky 5), they managed to fill the room much more with glowing, well projecting brass sound. There was some very exquisite woodwind playing, although the bassoon with its very prominent and extended solo part in the last movement failed to really project with its rather choked sound.

Musically, it was an evening of solid, it slightly understated music making. The Haydn (101, "The Clock") was reasonably refined and there was some very finely articulated playing from the strings in the slow movement, but overall, it was more a powdered wig cliché kind of Haydn, the kind which substitutes real insights into the music with just general niceness and some "sensitive" touches here and there. It was obvious that while Haitink knew what should come next, he hadn't really reflected on the many fine details in the score, so they all just kind of jogged past the listener.

In the Shostakovich, he also let the music pretty much speak for itself, or rather, play the orchestra for itself. Haitink is without doubt an immensely experienced and professional conductor who avoids random and vain effects, and in a world in which there are many posers on the podium, we have to respect that. But then, at 78, he doesn't seem to have gained or be interested in realizing the kind of detail insights other well aged maestros have/had. The music was well executed and he contributed his tried and tested small repertoire of gestures to the orchestra playing although that didn't have much of an effect. He has exactly 1.5 facial expressions - the cheese face (#1) and then the cheese face with a flicking of the neck (#1.5) which apparently indicates that he wants things somehow animated. Then he has about 2.5 conducting gestures - the wrist flick, the note-quite-so-flicked-wrist, and for the left hand, the little fist which he shakes in the air from time to time. Whether he did that or not, did not have any noticeable effect on the orchestra. He didn't seem to know the piece too well either, or maybe he has forgotten much about it, since he had his head in the score for extended periods of time and gave a number of wrong entries and dynamic indications (professionally ignored by the orchestra members who came in at the right time anyway and delivered). The very long, subdued coda almost fell apart but the orchestra members, especially the basses and the timpani, kept the pulse alive he failed to provide.

Still, a rather pleasant evening, if not exactly the kind of flattening experience one would expect from hearing live this incredibly original and daring, very disturbing and multilayered work.

My most positive impression was Carnegie Hall. A wonderful hall with a really stylish, elegantly understated look and slightly glassy and reverberant, but still very good acoustics.

On the whole, I still think Haitink is good for the orchestra. While I wasn't really overwhelmed by anything I have heard from him in a long time, on disc or in recent live concerts (Bruckner 7 in Chicago last year, Schubert 9 with the BSO 2 months ago, and tonight's concert), it still has to be respected that what he does with the orchestra is basically solid, honest musical work. I talked with some members of the bass section who I have known for many years. One of them I hadn't met since the mid-90s and when I mentioned that we had last met when they came to Berlin with Barenboim, he said "I am glad Barenboim is gone!" and everybody nodded...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on May 16, 2008, 10:02:17 PM
A very interesting and unusually detailed report from our man in Carnegie Hall. For me it brings to the fore a few questions:

- Is it wise to program a Haydn symphony with one of the repertoire's acknowledged juggernauts ? Is it possible for an orchestra/conductor/evening to do both justice? Which one comes up short in the process ?

- What leads to programming decisions anyway: musical logic, the need for contrast ? the complementary nature of the programmed works? Or what else? I would have imagined a Honegger symphony or Stravinsky concerto (violin? piano?) to be more appropriate and at least of no detrimental influence on the patrons' attendance.

- What is it that leads a world-renowned conductor to expose himself to artistic scrutiny in a specialists' piece such as the Shostakovich 4th ? (or Mahler 7, or Bruckner 5 ?)
Quote
at 78, he doesn't seem to have gained or be interested in realizing the kind of detail insights other well aged maestros have/had
. It would seem that some elderly baton wielders age better than others, buth then again , don't the lesser mortals know who they are, and where their limitations lie ? I've seen/heard many concerts in which a mismatch of conductor and repertoire was obvious right from the evening program, and none has ever proved me wrong. Either I (the concertgoer) am prejudiced, or the concert programmer (MD?) is misguided.

- Season after season I scrutinize the MSO'S program and I rarely come up with more than a couple interesting evenings. Recently I scrutinized the Amsterdam, Cologne, Ličge and Brussels seasons, and I count myself lucky to have found a program that could hold my interest for a whole evening. Is it surprising to find more interest in "What are you listening to" threads than in the "concerts you attended" ones ?

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Greta on May 17, 2008, 11:38:34 PM
Lilas, programming could be it's own whole thread, and I think has been...

Haydn 101 and Shostakovich 4 do seem odd bedfellows, and Haitink has never really clicked with me personally, though I do respect his musicmaking.

Speaking of pairings, I was looking at the offerings in Houston next year, and saw two interesting programs in September. One, absolutely charming, is Stravinsky's Violin Concerto (Gil Shaham) and Ravel's Le Tombeau de Couperin, bookended by Mozart's Symphony 29, and last the "Haffner" No. 35. I'm already looking forward to that one. The program makes a lot of good sense. The concert after that though - is Mozart's PC No. 21....and DSCH No. 13 'Babi Yar'...with Yevgeny Yevtushenko coming to read his famous poem "Babi Yar". That, I'm not sure what to think about.

I won't be there then though, but in Atlanta, and am looking forward to seeing the ASO on their opening weekend...but, I see it's Brahms 1st, LvB PC 3, and the Stokie/Bach C minor Passcaglia and Fugue. Kind of a disappointing program. In fact, looking at Atlanta's season, it looks shockingly like Houston's in programming. A parade of warhorses, paired with a token palatable contemporary work and tradiational concerto being the usual setup. A a few choral spectaculars and a big Mahler thrown in. It almost seems that somehow a "standardized American orchestra season" has fallen into place...

But, anyway, I saw a nice concert this evening, getting back to topic. I went to the Houston season finale, the Spanish themed program, and it was mostly quite good. Falla's El Amor Brujo, which I was totally not familiar with, I liked a whole lot and it got a great performance, save the awful singer who was just distracting and could barely be heard. Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain I'd heard live once before, and I liked it much more than I remembered, with its grace and pastel washes of sound.

The disappointment though was Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez. I admit I was only familiar with the melody from the 2nd mvmt, and the piece as a whole just seemed very long and samey throughout. The guitarist was Eliot Fisk, who seemed very good, but he never quite jived with the orchestra tempo wise, they didn't connect. Fisk offered two impressive encores though, one a Bach partita.

Last was clearly what they had been waiting for, they lit into a red-blooded Capriccio Espagnol that was played extremely well and musically, with fine ensemble communication and great solo contributions, especially from their young concertmaster who has grown immensely over her first year here.  Nice to end the season with some sparks.

I'm not subscribing next year as I don't know if I'll be in this vicinity the whole season, but next year looks great, some fun programs and good guest artists to boot.

Shame with all the moolah down here the orchestra still has to play in that dated soundtrap called Jones Hall though...high time for some new digs. ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on May 18, 2008, 05:03:35 AM
It's very much a situation that repeats itsdelf around the musical world. Next season here in Montreal I think there's only one concert that really interests me. The rest is made up of halfs only. Woul would want to pay a day's wages for half a concert ? :P. And in a dated soundtrap on top of that :-\ (yes, we have that, too, here.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 20, 2008, 09:09:57 AM
Thursday night, this interesting program.  They did the Carter in 2005, but of course it's worth hearing as often as anything else they might play!  I like Biss more each time I hear him, and with the size of the ensemble the Tchaikovsky will probably be larger than life.

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, Music Director and Conductor
Jonathan Biss, Piano

Carter: Variations for Orchestra 
Schumann: Piano Concerto 
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 4 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on May 20, 2008, 03:46:20 PM
NZSO next Friday:

TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto
SCHOLES Bonk for Percussion and Orchestra (World Premiere)
BRAHMS Symphony No 1

DMITRI SITKOVETSKY Conductor
BAIBA SKRIDE Violin
BRUCE McKINNON Percussion

Tchaikovsky’s much-loved Violin Concerto, written during the spring of 1878 in Switzerland after an Italian sojourn, displays eloquent lyricism and southern warmth. Brahms, conscious of the comparison, was not pleased when conductor Hans von Bülow praised the C minor Symphony as “Beethoven’s Tenth”. Guaranteed a future by its muscularity, performances of Brahms’s First underline the truth of contemporary critical assessment in Vienna, which reported it to be “an inexhaustible fountain of sincere pleasure”.

Had the Brahms #1 a few years ago, but always great to have it again.

Should be great  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 22, 2008, 09:05:23 AM
On Saturday night, this concert by the Boston-based Xanthos Ensemble (http://www.xanthosensemble.com/), playing at an interesting venue here called Roulette (http://www.roulette.org/).  Founded in 2005, the group is in residence at the Boston Conservatory.

Charles Wuorinen: New York Notes 
Derek Charke: What Do the Birds Think? 
Mario Davidovsky: Flashbacks  
Pierre Boulez: Dérive 
Donald Hagar: Missing Time 
Daniel Knaggs: Three Nature Songs (2008) 
Pozzi Escot: Aria IV 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Monsieur Croche on May 22, 2008, 09:05:21 PM
It's still quite some time away (July 13), but perhaps I'll be attending this concert:

Messiaen and the French Connection

Vaughan Williams - Blake Songs
Messiaen - La Mort du Nombre
Messiaen - Theme and Variations for Violin and Piano
Messiaen - Louange a l'immortalite de Jesus (from the Quartet for the End of Time)
Chen Qigang - Dance (allegedly Messiaen's last student).
Leong Yoon Pin - Sketches

The concert would include a multimedia spectacle specially choreographed to music. Now that sounds both ominous and fascinating at the same time!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on May 22, 2008, 09:12:54 PM
Derek Charke: What Do the Birds Think? 
--Bruce
Poor quality but:

(http://lwlolm.150m.com/Pix/how_birds_see_world.jpg)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on May 24, 2008, 01:27:29 PM
Tonight I am going to the Boston Pops Film Night with John Williams. I am not that much into film music, but Williams has contributed some very classic scores to a lot of movies I like, and I think it will be interesting to see him live at least once (and he isn't getting younger either, so who knows how long he will still be in action).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 26, 2008, 11:56:09 AM
Next Sunday, this fascinating concert by the American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein.  I have never heard anything by Panufnik or Langgaard live.

Toru Takemitsu: Cassiopeia
Andrzej Panufnik: Symphony No. 5, "Symphony of the Spheres" (US Premiere)
Rued Langgaard: Music of the Spheres (US Premiere)
György Ligeti: Apparitions
György Ligeti: Atmosphčres

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on May 26, 2008, 12:00:43 PM
I'm very envious. (Though no doubt you envy the all-Scelsi concert I'm going to on Thursday.)

It's astonishing for those of us who've known and loved it for years to see such a great work as Langgaard's Music of the Spheres getting its US premiere only now.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 26, 2008, 12:09:25 PM
I'm very envious. (Though no doubt you envy the all-Scelsi concert I'm going to on Thursday.)

 :o You got that right!  Do report back, please.  What will you be hearing?

It's astonishing for those of us who've known and loved it for years to see such a great work as Langgaard's Music of the Spheres getting its US premiere only now.

Yes, more than a little surprising (speaking as someone who only recently discovered the piece, and how wonderful it is).  I can't recall seeing anything by Langgaard even programmed recently.  He appears to be completely off concert planners' radar.  I'm not super-excited by the conductor--he's a much better programmer and scholar--but still, to hear it live should be interesting.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: edward on May 26, 2008, 12:20:12 PM
:o You got that right!  Do report back, please.  What will you be hearing?
The program appears to be a mixture of vocal works (Lilitů, Hô, Litanie, Sauh I and II, CKCKC, Ogloudoglou, chamber works (Okanagon and I Presagi) and the bass-and-ensemble Yamaon. Since the last three are amongst my favourite Scelsi works, I'm pumped about this. ;)

The following Thursday, I'm looking forward to this one, too:

A concert featuring the Montreal-based Transmission ensemble (Lori Freedman, clarinet; Guy Pelletier, flutes; Clemens Merkel, violin; Julie Trudeau, cello; D’Arcy Gray, percussion; Brigitte Poulin, piano). Repertoire to include works by Pierre Boulez (Dérive), Iannis Xenakis (Plekto), Tristan Murail (13 couleurs du soleil couchant), Georges Aperghis (Quatre pieces fébriles) and Claude Vivier (Paramirabo).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 26, 2008, 12:29:52 PM
Wow, two excellent programs!  I think the only Scelsi I've heard of those is Okanagon.  And that Transmission program almost sounds even more winning.  Rhetorical rant: why no Xenakis on programs?  At Carnegie Hall next season, there is not a single Xenakis piece being performed, by anyone.  That just seems really odd.  Anyway, will be interested in your comments on that one, too.

I just heard Dérive on Saturday night by an excellent group new to me, the Xanthos Ensemble from Boston.  They did a beautiful job with it, and I was thinking that it might be a piece to which I'd point people who historically don't care for Boulez.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on May 27, 2008, 08:55:26 AM
OK, this is a concert I'll be attending in the middle of my living room, with popcorn and soda.  :D

Airing on PBS, June 11th

Bruckner - Symphony No. 5

Cleveland Orchestra
Franz Welser-Most

Recorded at the Abbey of St. Florian in Linz, Austria, during the 2006 Brucknerfest.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 28, 2008, 08:06:48 AM
On Saturday, the annual Bang on a Can marathon gets underway at 6:00 p.m., ending 12 hours later at 6:00 a.m. Sunday morning.  Here (http://www.bangonacan.org/marathon/schedule) is the complete schedule, and at the moment I'm planning to stay for the entire thing.  (We'll see how that goes.  ;D)

Things I'm most looking forward to hearing:

Birtwistle: Carmen Arcadiae Mechanicae Petpetuum (by Alarm Will Sound, scheduled for around 7:00 p.m.)
Gudmunsen-Holmgreen: Convex-Concave-Concord (Bang on a Can All Stars, around 10:30 p.m.)
Reich: Daniel Variations (SIGNAL, around midnight)
Stockhausen: Stimmung (Toby Twining Music, about 5:00 a.m.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on May 29, 2008, 06:09:36 AM
On Saturday, the annual Bang on a Can marathon gets underway at 6:00 p.m., ending 12 hours later at 6:00 a.m. Sunday morning.  Here (http://www.bangonacan.org/marathon/schedule) is the complete schedule, and at the moment I'm planning to stay for the entire thing.  (We'll see how that goes.  ;D)

Things I'm most looking forward to hearing:

Birtwistle: Carmen Arcadiae Mechanicae Petpetuum (by Alarm Will Sound, scheduled for around 7:00 p.m.)
Gudmunsen-Holmgreen: Convex-Concave-Concord (Bang on a Can All Stars, around 10:30 p.m.)
Reich: Daniel Variations (SIGNAL, around midnight)
Stockhausen: Stimmung (Toby Twining Music, about 5:00 a.m.)

--Bruce

Blimey! I don't think I'd have the stamina. Still, that's quite a programme and if you make it all the way through and stay awake, I'd imagine that listening to Stimmung at that time of night/morning, when you're probably a bit woozy, should be quite an experience. Good luck with that. Drink lots of coffee.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on May 29, 2008, 06:18:59 AM
Coming Sunday I will be at the Muziektheater in Amsterdam, with two of my best friends. On the menu - Messiaen, François d'Assise. I like many of Messiaen's organ pieces and the Turangalila Symphony, but this enormous opera (duration and the forces required) is new to me.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 29, 2008, 07:59:14 AM
Coming Sunday I will be at the Muziektheater in Amsterdam, with two of my best friends. On the menu - Messiaen, François d'Assise. I like many of Messiaen's organ pieces and the Turangalila Symphony, but this enormous opera (duration and the forces required) is new to me.

I'm very envious.  Do report back!  (I have a friend from here who is going to see it, too: Pete Matthews, whose blog is called Feast of Music (http://www.feastofmusic.com/).  Just in case you happen to run into him!  Edit: just checked his blog, and he'll be there on Sunday, too!)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on May 29, 2008, 08:57:52 AM
Blimey! I don't think I'd have the stamina. Still, that's quite a programme and if you make it all the way through and stay awake, I'd imagine that listening to Stimmung at that time of night/morning, when you're probably a bit woozy, should be quite an experience. Good luck with that. Drink lots of coffee.

 ;D  I'm planning to take a nap Saturday afternoon, so I'll be able to stay up with no problem.  It should be lots of fun, since the venue has huge expanses of glass (see below), and they're predicting thunderstorms "after midnight." 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on May 29, 2008, 09:20:44 AM
I'm very envious.  Do report back!  (I have a friend from here who is going to see it, too: Pete Matthews, whose blog is called Feast of Music (http://www.feastofmusic.com/).  Just in case you happen to run into him!  Edit: just checked his blog, and he'll be there on Sunday, too!)

--Bruce

I'll be looking out for him... And I'll report back, of course!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on May 30, 2008, 01:42:54 AM
;D  I'm planning to take a nap Saturday afternoon, so I'll be able to stay up with no problem.  It should be lots of fun, since the venue has huge expanses of glass (see below), and they're predicting thunderstorms "after midnight." 

--Bruce

That looks fantastic. Very, very, very stupidly, for reasons that I cannot even begin to fathom, I missed a performance of Stimmung a few years ago that was held at the top of the Swiss Re building in London. I suppose Stimmung has never really been my favourite Stockhausen work (although I've just bought the new Theatre of Voices recording and actually quite like it). But I missed the chance to catch the view from one of London's tallest buildings. I've been banging my head with the fridge door ever since.

(http://www.aidan.co.uk/md/LonSwissReMdV5623.jpg)

(http://rosenblumtv.files.wordpress.com/2007/06/001-gherkin3.jpg)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 01, 2008, 04:18:04 AM
So I've finally booked my Proms tickets:

July 27: Messiaen: La Transfiguration. (I'm also going to the Southbank Transfiguration later in the year.)
August 2: Stockhausen Day: Gruppen (x2), Klang 13th Hour, Klang 5th Hour, Harmonien, Kontakte. Late-night concert: Stimmung.
Augst 22: Mahler: Symphony No.5, Stockhausen: Punkte. The third part of this concert consists of Schubert and Beethoven, but I doubt I'll stick around for that. It would be such an anticlimax after the Stockhausen.
September 7: Messiaen: Saint Francis of Assisi (complete concert performance).

There are many other concerts that I'm tempted by, including Haitink/CSO Mahler Symphony No.6, Rattle/BPO Messiaen Turangalila, but I don't want to overdo it.
I often end up having to miss at least one concert for one reason or another.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 02, 2008, 12:30:49 PM
Off to see  La Boheme (http://www.nzopera.com/productions/2008/la_boheme.cfm) today  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on June 02, 2008, 01:53:45 PM
This July 10th or 12th, I'll be seeing the Cactus Pear Music Festival in the following works:

MENDELSSOHN String Quintet Op 18
GOETZ Piano Quintet
BRAHMS The Greatest Clarinet Quintet of All Time

It should be unforgettable.  0:)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Shrunk on June 03, 2008, 06:30:28 AM
I know it's not the kind of thing usually posted in this thread, but I'm looking forward to seeing Leonard Cohen this Saturday, on his first concert tour in 14 years.

Reviews and videos from the first show on the tour here. (http://www.webheights.net/speakingcohen/tourrev1.html)

A quote from that show: "This is the first time in 14 years I have stood before you in this position as a performer. (Back then) I was just a kid of 60 with crazy dreams."
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 03, 2008, 07:31:01 AM
So I've finally booked my Proms tickets:

July 27: Messiaen: La Transfiguration. (I'm also going to the Southbank Transfiguration later in the year.)
August 2: Stockhausen Day: Gruppen (x2), Klang 13th Hour, Klang 5th Hour, Harmonien, Kontakte. Late night concert: Stimmung.
Augst 22: Mahler: Symphony No.5, Stockhausen: Punkte. The third part of this concert consists of Schubert and Beethoven, but I doubt I'll stick around for that. It would be such an anticlimax after the Stockhausen.
September 7: Messiaen: Saint Francis of Assisi (complete concert performance).

There are many other concerts that I'm tempted by, including Haitink/CSO Mahler Symphony No.6, Rattle/BPO Messiaen Turangalila, but I don't want to overdo it.
I often end up having to miss at least one concert for one reason or another.

Wow, so you're hearing Stimmung, too!  (Among all the other great-sounding items.)  I had a great time Saturday night (actually Sunday morning  :D) hearing it at dawn, as the sun was coming up.  And birds were chirping, high up in the upper reaches of the building, which was wild.  (The singers noticed them and looked up, smiling.)

This performance was 80 minutes but apparently it can go on 2 or 3 hours, depending on the choices the performers make in the score.  I was totally transported by it.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 03, 2008, 03:32:30 PM
Wow, so you're hearing Stimmung, too!  (Among all the other great-sounding items.)  I had a great time Saturday night (actually Sunday morning  :D) hearing it at dawn, as the sun was coming up.  And birds were chirping, high up in the upper reaches of the building, which was wild.  (The singers noticed them and looked up, smiling.)

This performance was 80 minutes but apparently it can go on 2 or 3 hours, depending on the choices the performers make in the score.  I was totally transported by it.

--Bruce

Bruce, that sounds fantastic! I've listened to my CD and can imagine how, if you're in the mood, you can lose yourself in this piece.

But I do hope that the Proms performance of Stimmung doesn't spread over three hours, otherwise I've got a bloody long walk home from Kensington (cab drivers who work the posh parts of London won't take anybody to my part of town after midnight - not because it's rough but because they can get more money staying in the posh areas - and the night buses running at that time of night on Saturday are utterly terrifying).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 03, 2008, 03:41:34 PM
Bruce, that sounds fantastic! I've listened to my CD and can imagine how, if you're in the mood, you can lose yourself in this piece.

But I do hope that the Proms performance of Stimmung doesn't spread over three hours, otherwise I've got a bloody long walk home from Kensington (cab drivers who work the posh parts of London won't take anybody to my part of town after midnight - not because it's rough but because they can get more money staying in the posh areas - and the night buses that time of night on Saturday are utterly terrifying).

It was really, really beautiful.  Oh, and FYI, at 5:30 in the morning, there must have been 500 people there, hearing the thing.  :o  Here (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/02/arts/music/02mara.html?ei=5124&en=a92661792f70838c&ex=1370145600&adxnnl=1&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink&adxnnlx=1212536242-w7lAPb2R6iixqP6wdIlHUA) is the New York Times review by Steve Smith (also there the entire 12 hours), with the Stockhausen mentioned at the very end.

I suspect most people don't stretch the piece much beyond an hour or so, mostly because of the singers' stamina.  (Someone let me know if I'm wrong.)  They sit on the floor, cross-legged, which can't be very comfortable for very long, and since it's just nonstop vocalizing...well, I know Wagner tests people even longer, but... :-\

Edit: After seeing another thread, I couldn't resist playing with www.churchsigngenerator.com, one of my fave sites... ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 03, 2008, 04:13:49 PM
It was really, really beautiful.  Oh, and FYI, at 5:30 in the morning, there must have been 500 people there, hearing the thing.  :o  Here (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/02/arts/music/02mara.html?ei=5124&en=a92661792f70838c&ex=1370145600&adxnnl=1&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink&adxnnlx=1212536242-w7lAPb2R6iixqP6wdIlHUA) is the New York Times review by Steve Smith (also there the entire 12 hours), with the Stockhausen mentioned at the very end.

I suspect most people don't stretch the piece much beyond an hour or so, mostly because of the singers' stamina.  (Someone let me know if I'm wrong.)  They sit on the floor, cross-legged, which can't be very comfortable for very long, and since it's just nonstop vocalizing...well, I know Wagner tests people even longer, but... :-\

Edit: After seeing another thread, I couldn't resist playing with www.churchsigngenerator.com, one of my fave sites... ;D

--Bruce

www.churchsigngenerator.com

Ha! I've not seen that site before. Snork! No, don't start me off again!

Seriously, thanks for the info about Stimmung. I'm actually really excited about Stockhausen Day and the Mahler 5/Stockhausen Punkte concert. I'll let you know how they pan out.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 03, 2008, 11:03:19 PM
www.churchsigngenerator.com

Ha! I've not seen that site before. Snork! No, don't start me off again!

Seriously, thanks for the info about Stimmung. I'm actually really excited about Stockhausen Day and the Mahler 5/Stockhausen Punkte concert. I'll let you know how they pan out.

Snork?! That word is always used on The Archers message board (BBC Radio Four) to describe a screen-splattering reaction to reading something funny when you're sitting behind your computer with coffee (or tea)!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: The new erato on June 04, 2008, 02:17:12 AM
Gurreleider - yesterday. Pretty amazing and awe-inspiring.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 04, 2008, 02:41:55 AM
Gurreleider - yesterday. Pretty amazing and awe-inspiring.

Nice one. I love hearing Gurrelieder in the flesh. Where and who?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 04, 2008, 02:57:15 AM
Snork?! That word is always used on The Archers message board (BBC Radio Four) to describe a screen-splattering reaction to reading something funny when you're sitting behind your computer with coffee (or tea)!

Is it? I'm not an Archers fan so I've never been on that forum.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: The new erato on June 04, 2008, 03:37:15 AM
Nice one. I love hearing Gurrelieder in the flesh. Where and who?
Sorry about the leider !

Bergen festival, Andrew Litton conducting. I'm still shaking. 360 performers on the stage, (incl glockenspiel, 4 harps, 4 bassons and 2 (!) bass-basoons (is that counterbasoons?), bass clarinet, some seriously large trombonesm  10 man strong percussion, 10 flutes of varying sizes, etc, etc....) .
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 04, 2008, 03:58:38 AM
Is it? I'm not an Archers fan so I've never been on that forum.

Funny. Because that is where it originated! I became active on that board in October 2006. So the word must have 'broken loose' as it were!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MISHUGINA on June 04, 2008, 04:28:37 AM
I attended Mahler 10th last weekend. Here is my review:

http://mishuginaguide.blogspot.com/2008/06/hannu-lintu-leads-mpo-in-haydn-103-and.html
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 04, 2008, 05:02:07 AM
Sorry about the leider !

Bergen festival, Andrew Litton conducting. I'm still shaking. 360 performers on the stage, (incl glockenspiel, 4 harps, 4 bassons and 2 (!) bass-basoons (is that counterbasoons?), bass clarinet, some seriously large trombonesm  10 man strong percussion, 10 flutes of varying sizes, etc, etc....) .

Contrabassoons, I believe. Why contra I have no idea.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: The new erato on June 04, 2008, 05:04:46 AM
Contrabassoons, I believe. Why contra I have no idea.
Sounds right. Thanks.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 06, 2008, 07:03:48 AM
Tomorrow night, I'm hearing Lorin Maazel and the New York Philharmonic in Mahler's Ninth.  The Wednesday night performance got an excellent review in the paper today, but I'm almost more excited about my listening companions: a graphic designer friend and her husband, who will be hearing their first live Mahler concert.  They are very excited about it.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 06, 2008, 06:02:38 PM
Contrabassoons, I believe. Why contra I have no idea.

The term "contra" in musical terminology is to be understood not in the sense of "opposed" but "opposite", as indicating a "mirrorred" relationship between two elements rather than a "conflict". Counterpoint is the art of putting two melody lines in relationship to each other ("opposite" of each other), but not in a conflicting way, in a way in which they relate to each other harmoniously. Instrumental or vocal ranges are typically denoted "contra" when they extend a range by mirroring it. Therefore, the extension of the "basso" range is the "contrabasso" which mirrors it. But it can also go the other way. The high male voice is the "tenor", the higher male voice which "mirrors" or extends it is the "counter tenor".
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 07, 2008, 02:12:19 AM
The term "contra" in musical terminology is to be understood not in the sense of "opposed" but "opposite", as indicating a "mirrorred" relationship between two elements rather than a "conflict". Counterpoint is the art of putting two melody lines in relationship to each other ("opposite" of each other), but not in a conflicting way, in a way in which they relate to each other harmoniously. Instrumental or vocal ranges are typically denoted "contra" when they extend a range by mirroring it. Therefore, the extension of the "basso" range is the "contrabasso" which mirrors it. But it can also go the other way. The high male voice is the "tenor", the higher male voice which "mirrors" or extends it is the "counter tenor".

Thanks for the explanation. Also, I suppose that while it's logical to refer to bass clarinets, trumpets, trombones and flutes, a "bass bassoon" sounds a bit clunky.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on June 07, 2008, 03:56:30 AM
Thanks for the explanation. Also, I suppose that while it's logical to refer to bass clarinets, trumpets, trombones and flutes, a "bass bassoon" sounds a bit clunky.

It's more often called a 'double bassoon'.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 12, 2008, 04:02:45 PM
Tomorrow, June 13th at Avery Fischer Hall, Lorin Maazel conducts the NYPO, one of the worlds great Mahler orchestras, in Mahler's 9th Symphony. I am really excited.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 12, 2008, 04:20:33 PM
Tomorrow, June 13th at Avery Fischer Hall, Lorin Maazel conducts the NYPO, one of the worlds great Mahler orchestras, in Mahler's 9th Symphony. I am really excited.

I heard this last Saturday night, and took a husband-and-wife couple for their first live Mahler performance.  (Not to worry; they are familiar with Mahler from recordings--I would never spring the 9th on someone by surprise.  :D) 

Anyway, I hope I don't oversell it, but you are in for a treat: the wife said afterward, "That gave me the vapors!"  Even with a few brass glitches (just to be fair), it was marvelous in many ways. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 12, 2008, 04:26:03 PM
I heard this last Saturday night, and took a husband-and-wife couple for their first live Mahler performance.  (Not to worry; they are familiar with Mahler from recordings--I would never spring the 9th on someone by surprise.  :D) 

Anyway, I hope I don't oversell it, but you are in for a treat: the wife said afterward, "That gave me the vapors!"  Even with a few brass glitches (just to be fair), it was marvelous in many ways. 

--Bruce
Yeah, Mahler's 9th is like pizza: even when it's average it's pretty damn good.

I am also looking forward to next Saturday night, June 20, at Avery Fischer Hall, Lorin Maazel and the NYPO perform Anton Bruckner's 8th Symphony.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 13, 2008, 01:26:30 AM
Yeah, Mahler's 9th is like pizza: even when it's average it's pretty damn good.

PIZZA?!?!  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 13, 2008, 06:26:38 AM
I am also looking forward to next Saturday night, June 20, at Avery Fischer Hall, Lorin Maazel and the NYPO perform Anton Bruckner's 8th Symphony.

And I'll be hearing that same concert on Friday night.  (Saturday night I will be at a jazz concert.) 

Tonight looking forward to this at Zankel Hall.  The Ensemble ACJW (ungainly name) is a group of young players, a joint project between Carnegie Hall and Juilliard.

Ensemble ACJW
Pablo Heras-Casado, Conductor

Bach: Orchestral Suite No. 4 
Cavalli (arr. Jacob Druckman): Delizie contente che l'alme beate 
Druckman: Delizie contente che l’alme beate 
Kagel: "East" from The Compass Pieces 
Adčs: Chamber Symphony, Op. 2 
Carter: Asko Concerto

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 13, 2008, 06:50:00 PM
Yeah, Mahler's 9th is like pizza: even when it's average it's pretty damn good.

That pretty much sums up your understanding of music. And pizza, too, I guess. Thanks for this contribution.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 13, 2008, 07:19:25 PM
That pretty much sums up your understanding of music. And pizza, too, I guess. Thanks for this contribution.
And someone put a gun to your head and forced you to read it and reply right? Shouldn't you be worrying about which gig as a prop you are going for next?
My contributions do not include such absolutely stupid and insipid comments as to how Szell and Reiner killed music making in America, give me a break. Actually you are pretty close to a Nazi, a cultural Nazi that is. This includes every clunker made by central European orchestras is somehow more idiomatic than anything from the U.S.. And please do us a favor, stop recommending the Sinopoli Mahler cycle on DG. It is terrible, from first note to last. You go to the store and grab any Mahler recording off the shelf and the conducting, playing and recorded sound are all better.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 13, 2008, 07:35:26 PM
Except that you don't know anything about conducting, playing, or recorded sound, so why should your "opinion" impress me? What musical experience do you base your deep analysis on?

This includes every clunker made by central European orchestras is somehow more idiomatic than anything from the U.S.

I don't think you even begin to understand what may or may not be "idiomatic" in orchestral music. That is a cultural world that is completely alien to you and that you can only look at from the outside, as you have often demonstrated. Yes, I guess it is pretty "nazi" when someone who has actually grown up in a particular culture, studying and playing the music himself has the nerve to think that he may understand that better than someone who hasn't, who lacks the most basic insights into that culture...

That's pretty completely idiotic even for you. That would be like me saying I understand Chinese culture better than you and it would make you a "Nazi" for disagreeing.

BTW, if the above is true, why did I rip and upload the complete Schubert 9 with CSO/Giulini just recently to offer it to other members as a "special treat"?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on June 14, 2008, 01:34:43 AM
That pretty much sums up your understanding of music. And pizza, too, I guess. Thanks for this contribution.

Blimey, who crapped on your corn flakes? Not nice.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on June 17, 2008, 09:10:08 AM
I'll be attending the final two concerts for the Winnipeg Chamber Music Society this week:

Last Night:

Mozart - Piano Trio in B flat major, K254 
Brahms - Violin Sonata in A major, Op. 100
Beethoven - String Trio in G major, op. 9. no. 1  (This was a fantastic performance!)  :)


Thursday:

Mozart - Piano Quartet in G minor, K478
Lutoslawski - Four Silesian Melodies for 4 violins
Mendelssohn - Octet in E flat major, Op. 18
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on June 22, 2008, 01:40:22 PM
NZSO this Friday: Auckland Friday 27 June 6.30pm Town Hall


RAVEL La Valse
SAINT-SAËNS Piano Concerto No 2
TCHAIKOVSKY Manfred Symphony

YOEL LEVI Conductor
SIMON TRPČESKI Piano

The Ballets Russes never danced the score Diaghilev requested from Ravel but La Valse took to the concert hall instead. Its colourful depiction of a crowded ballroom increases in nightmarish tumult to finally dissolve in an excitingly unstable cataclysmic whirl. Saint-Saëns’ Second Piano Concerto initially pays homage to Bach, then treats us to a concoction of Gallic wit, sprinkled with brittle ghostliness, before ending theatrically with a driving, tarantella-like force.  Romantic composers were drawn to the supernatural elements of Tchaikovsky’s four scenes that form the symphony based on Byron’s Manfred Symphony.

About the Artists
YOEL LEVI is Music Director Emeritus of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Artistic Adviser of the Flemish Radio Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Israel Philharmonic. He is a frequent guest conductor of leading orchestras throughout North America, Europe and the Far East.

SIMON TRPČESKI first came to public at the London International Piano Competition in 2000 and then at his exceptional Wigmore Hall debut recital in 2001. A born performer with astonishing technical command and a magnetic personality, he has delighted audiences in Europe, North America, Australia and Asia.

Especially looking forward to the Manfred Symphony.

 :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 23, 2008, 06:59:53 AM
I am also looking forward to next Saturday night, June 20, at Avery Fischer Hall, Lorin Maazel and the NYPO perform Anton Bruckner's 8th Symphony.

Well, I enjoyed this so much on Friday that I went again on Saturday night.  Maazel was much better in this than I might have expected: strong architectural grasp, with many details well-worked out, and most of the time the orchestra really sounded splendid.  There were some brass bobbles (especially the first night) but not enough to ruin the experience.  If there were anything I'd want improved, it would be the attention to dynamics.  The soft moments needed to be even softer, in a reading that was basically very loud.  (The climaxes were really loud.)  But overall, I thought Maazel acquitted himself very, very well.  Now I'll think about getting that Berlin recording.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 23, 2008, 07:21:27 AM
Well, I enjoyed this so much on Friday that I went again on Saturday night.  Maazel was much better in this than I might have expected: strong architectural grasp, with many details well-worked out, and most of the time the orchestra really sounded splendid.  There were some brass bobbles (especially the first night) but not enough to ruin the experience.  If there were anything I'd want improved, it would be the attention to dynamics.  The soft moments needed to be even softer, in a reading that was basically very loud.  (The climaxes were really loud.)  But overall, I thought Maazel acquitted himself very, very well.  Now I'll think about getting that Berlin recording.

--Bruce
I came away with the same impression overall. Personally I think at times it sounded a bit too brassy (like that metallic buzz you sometimes hear from the brasses). The Wagner Tubas were good but not great, but the horns were great. Overall I think it is a very good presentation. It doesn't bow me over and really enhance my appreciation of the work but I can't complain. Also I really have to hand it to the timpanist (I think it was Christ Lamb) who handled the really difficult part with aplomb.

I am not sure why Judith Leclaire and Robert Langevin (the principal bassoon and flute respectively) weren't there but they didn't really miss them by the sound of it.

Also after the concert a woman complained that Philip Myers (the principal horn) had some funny articulation which I didn't hear and that the flutes were out of tune which was totally ludicrous.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 23, 2008, 07:34:04 AM
Also after the concert a woman complained that Philip Myers (the principal horn) had some funny articulation which I didn't hear and that the flutes were out of tune which was totally ludicrous.

There was at least one horn passage that is usually done very legato, which he did with more articulation, but I definitely felt that was Maazel's call, not Myers's.  And I didn't hear anything but goodness from the flutes.

PS, on both nights the audience was remarkably quiet, much more so than usual for Philharmonic audiences, and perhaps even more amazing: I didn't hear a cell phone, ever.  

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 23, 2008, 07:43:24 AM

PS, on both nights the audience was remarkably quiet, much more so than usual for Philharmonic audiences, and perhaps even more amazing: I didn't hear a cell phone, ever.  

--Bruce
You didn't hear a watch beeping RIGHT at the start of the piece? And I mean right at the start like as soon as Maazel gives the downbeat the damn thing started beeping. It went on for a good 10 seconds or so.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on June 23, 2008, 07:49:22 AM
You didn't hear a watch beeping RIGHT at the start of the piece? And I mean right at the start like as soon as Maazel gives the downbeat the damn thing started beeping. It went on for a good 10 seconds or so.

 :o  Wow, no...missed that completely (thankfully).  Where were you sitting?  On Saturday, I was in the back right corner of the orchestra, just out from under the overhang.  (The sound was better than on Friday, when I was on the left side, about halfway back.)

Yikes...I hate those watches.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 23, 2008, 08:00:28 AM
:o  Wow, no...missed that completely (thankfully).  Where were you sitting?  On Saturday, I was in the back right corner of the orchestra, just out from under the overhang.  (The sound was better than on Friday, when I was on the left side, about halfway back.)

Yikes...I hate those watches.

--Bruce
I must have been right on top of you then, but I was sitting pretty much dead center. I wonder whether Maazel heard that CASIO watch. The funniest thing was the guy/girl must have been trying to silence the damn thing and it went on beeping twice as fast for a few seconds. I am surprised they didn't kick the offender out. THe music was real quiet at the point and that beeping sound stuck out like a white guy in Harlem.

I almost missed the concert. I waited for the 2 train for what seemed like an eternity and came in seconds before Dicterow came out...

What also surprised me was that while reading the program notes it says the last time the NYPO performed this piece was in 2000, which is incidentally the last time they performed last week's piece - Gustav Mahler's 9th Symphony. Eight years with no Bruckner 8th or Mahler 9th is unfathomable IMHO. I think the blame rests on the shoulders of Kurt Masur.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 23, 2008, 04:08:08 PM
Yeah, Masur is know for not liking Bruckner. What can you do?

There was at least one horn passage that is usually done very legato, which he did with more articulation, but I definitely felt that was Maazel's call, not Myers's.

Where was that?

And I didn't hear anything but goodness from the flutes.

Could be, of course, but I would really like to read a critical review from you (just once!), not critical nitpicking for its own sake, just critical. That would make statements like this much more believable.

BTW, which edition did they do? Haas or Nowak?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 23, 2008, 06:16:53 PM
What also surprised me was that while reading the program notes it says the last time the NYPO performed this piece was in 2000.

I think that was with Eschenbach. That 2000 performance is still seared into my memory as the most amazing Bruckner 8th I have ever heard, as well as the most terrific orchestral playing I have ever heard from the sometimes inconsistent NYPO.

I think the blame rests on the shoulders of Kurt Masur.

Hardly. He did a fair amount of Mahler and Bruckner with the NYPO. I lived in NY for five years of his reign and don't recall a particular shortage of either composer. IIRC, Masur especially liked to program Bruckner for the free concert they do annually at St.John the Divine for whatever that holiday is. Then again, it's a bit redundant to program Bruckner and Mahler in NY, since so many of their works are considered warhorses these days which orchestras like to take on tour and which therefore invariably show up on Carnegie Hall programs. I remember a number of seasons where you could have literally heard at least partial Mahler and Bruckner cycles a few times over between Carnegie and Lincoln Center, but without hearing e.g. a single Schubert symphony at either place.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 23, 2008, 06:24:23 PM
I think that was with Eschenbach. That 2000 performance is still seared into my memory as the most amazing Bruckner 8th I have ever heard, as well as the most terrific orchestral playing I have ever heard from the sometimes inconsistent NYPO.

Hardly. He did a fair amount of Mahler and Bruckner with the NYPO. I lived in NY for five years of his reign and don't recall a particular shortage of either composer. IIRC, Masur especially liked to program Bruckner for the free concert they do annually at St.John the Divine for whatever that holiday is. Then again, it's a bit redundant to program Bruckner and Mahler in NY, since so many of their works are considered warhorses these days which orchestras like to take on tour and which therefore invariably show up on Carnegie Hall programs. I remember a number of seasons where you could have literally heard at least partial Mahler and Bruckner cycles a few times over between Carnegie and Lincoln Center, but without hearing e.g. a single Schubert symphony at either place.
THey are doing Mahler's 2nd and 5th and 8th next year - 5th with Dudamel - 8th with Maazel and 2nd  with Kaplan. Also Bruckner's 9th is on the schedule and I think that is with Eschenbach but I don't remember who they listed. So it looks like more Bruckner and Mahler next year. Schubert's Great C Major is also on the schedule as well.

Incidentally the edition Maazel used with the Bruckner 8th is Nowak according to the notes.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 23, 2008, 07:23:40 PM
Thanks - but why are you saying "according to the notes"? Weren't you there yourself? Do you think it was actually Haas, not Nowak?

THey are doing Mahler's 2nd and 5th and 8th next year - 5th with Dudamel -

Oh wow, I have to hear that! This is such a complex piece with so many things happening on so many layers, I have always wanted to hear that conducted by someone who has studied the music for many years, reflected on how to bring all those details together, how to balance and illuminate all those layers, someone who really leads the listener inside the music instead of doing the monkey thing in front of a highly trained group of musicians on autopilot. So I have to go to that concert!!!

8th with Maazel

That might be neat. But - in Carnegie Hall or Avery Fisher Hall?

2nd  with Kaplan

That might be interesting, too. Kaplan certainly deserves to be taken seriously for all the work and studying he has invested in figuring the music out. His two recordings are very solid and there is a lot of good stuff in them which shows that he really knows what he wants and how he wants it.

I think that was with Eschenbach. That 2000 performance is still seared into my memory as the most amazing Bruckner 8th I have ever heard, as well as the most terrific orchestral playing I have ever heard from the sometimes inconsistent NYPO.

Your greatest live Bruckner 8 was with Eschenbach? Man I - am - so - sorry  :'(  But maybe we should look at it from the positive side. That means that you have many potentially really great Bruckner experiences ahead of you, like with...uh...uh...well...you know...well, I guess Eschenbach is better than nothing!  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PSmith08 on June 23, 2008, 08:29:04 PM
That might be interesting, too. Kaplan certainly deserves to be taken seriously for all the work and studying he has invested in figuring the music out. His two recordings are very solid and there is a lot of good stuff in them which shows that he really knows what he wants and how he wants it.

I've always sort of wished that Kaplan would approach some of the other works by Mahler, given his comprehensive and critical study of the 2nd, as I think he could do some very interesting things with the other symphonies. Of course, that's a bit of a pipe dream, as I think that it was his deep interest in the 2nd that motivated his protean scholarship. Still, his recordings of the 2nd are very nice.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 23, 2008, 09:08:03 PM
Not a pipe dream. A few conductors have done that. Kaplan's insights are very deep, but not extremely and unusually deep. It just took him a long time because he had no solid musical training and experience before. Which makes his achievements all the more impressive but it has to be kept in mind that for him the learning process was particularly slow because of the lack of these abilities, not because he spent so much longer than anyone else studying that particular score. Well, maybe that, too, it is hard to "gauge". But a number of conductors have approached the Mahler symphonies equally well prepared and with very well reflected interpretations. The best current example, I guess, is Boulez - and it is interesting to note that there are quite a few parallels between his and Kaplan's style.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 24, 2008, 06:16:10 AM
Your greatest live Bruckner 8 was with Eschenbach? Man I - am - so - sorry  :'(  But maybe we should look at it from the positive side. That means that you have many potentially really great Bruckner experiences ahead of you, like with...uh...uh...well...you know...well, I guess Eschenbach is better than nothing!  :)

Say what you want about the guy (I'm sure you will), but it was indeed an amazing performance. I have had extremely inconsistent experiences with Eschenbach. That astounding B8 on one end of the spectrum and a just atrociously bizarre Dvorak 9 on the other end and a lot in the middle. So I can see why people don't like him too much. But that one evening the stars somehow aligned. And in many, many concerts I have never heard such playing from the NYPO before or since. They outdid themselves. The Adagio, especially, was amazingly nuanced and just "alive".
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 24, 2008, 06:50:25 AM
Thanks - but why are you saying "according to the notes"? Weren't you there yourself? Do you think it was actually Haas, not Nowak?

I don't know the score well enough to say definitely whether it was Haas or Nowak. Then the notes also say an earlier and a newer Nowak edition so there is no way I am going to know most of the differences unless I am on the lookout for them. Also there were moments where I spaced out while staring at the legs of this girl with high heels sitting on the side so whatever differences there might be I didn't quite catch. I am sorry but I find it really difficult to give 100% attention for an hour and a half no matter what the piece is. The performance lasted close to 90 minutes which would make a pretty long Nowak presentation.

Back to Mahler's 5th, there is a recording with Mehta conducting the NYPO recorded at Manhattan Center which I think is pretty good in presenting the orchestra close to what it sounds like when you take it out of the somewhat dry acoustics of Avery Fischer Hall. I picked that recording up by accident when a seller on Amazon sent that cd instead of something else. But it really presents the tonal palette of the different sections of the Philharmonic quite nicely, especially those rifts in the horns in the 2nd movement.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 24, 2008, 09:26:11 AM
I think the best recordings of the NYP sonically that I have heard are the DG recordings with Sinopoli which are also musically outstanding (I believe they were made in Manhattan Center, too). I didn't find Avery Fisher Hall too bad when I was there a while ago, but then I also had a potentially very good seat in the second balcony from the front on the left side. And considering that it didn't sound too great there either, I can easily imagine that it must suck further back in the hall. Overall, the concert (with Beethoven, Rachmaninoff and Ravel conducted by Dutoit) was by a fair margin the most impressive concert by an American orchestra I have heard since I came here 5 years ago, so I hope to catch them live again before not too long. I will actually be back in NY in July but there are no more "serious" concerts with them then. In any case, they really deserve a better hall. Apart from the sound, it is stunningly ugly.

The easy way to tell whether it is Haas or Nowak, BTW, is that in the finale, after the massive "rex tremendae majestatis" passage where the brass build up ever higher piled long-held chords over a steady march-like ostinato in timpani and lower strings, in the Nowak edition, there are only four quiet bars with timpani and pizzed strings as bridge to the next section which opens with a quiet, pastoral motif in the horns while in the Haas edition, there is a fairly extensive interlude with a violin solo (the only place I can think of actually that a violin solo occurs in Bruckner's symphonies). That passage comes from the earlier version and was reinserted by Haas into the later version which is pretty much exactly represented by Nowak's edition because he felt that without it, there was a structural hole there and that Bruckner can only have been pressured into cutting the passage. There are a number of prominent Bruckner interpreters who have the same opinion and choose Haas mainly for that reason.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 24, 2008, 09:51:42 AM
I think the best recordings of the NYP sonically that I have heard are the DG recordings with Sinopoli which are also musically outstanding (I believe they were made in Manhattan Center, too). I didn't find Avery Fisher Hall too bad when I was there a while ago, but then I also had a potentially very good seat in the second balcony from the front on the left side. And considering that it didn't sound too great there either, I can easily imagine that it must suck further back in the hall. Overall, the concert (with Beethoven, Rachmaninoff and Ravel conducted by Dutoit) was by a fair margin the most impressive concert by an American orchestra I have heard since I came here 5 years ago, so I hope to catch them live again before not too long. I will actually be back in NY in July but there are no more "serious" concerts with them then. In any case, they really deserve a better hall. Apart from the sound, it is stunningly ugly.

The easy way to tell whether it is Haas or Nowak, BTW, is that in the finale, after the massive "rex tremendae majestatis" passage where the brass build up ever higher piled long-held chords over a steady march-like ostinato in timpani and lower strings, in the Nowak edition, there are only four quiet bars with timpani and pizzed strings as bridge to the next section which opens with a quiet, pastoral motif in the horns while in the Haas edition, there is a fairly extensive interlude with a violin solo (the only place I can think of actually that a violin solo occurs in Bruckner's symphonies). That passage comes from the earlier version and was reinserted by Haas into the later version which is pretty much exactly represented by Nowak's edition because he felt that without it, there was a structural hole there and that Bruckner can only have been pressured into cutting the passage. There are a number of prominent Bruckner interpreters who have the same opinion and choose Haas mainly for that reason.
I know which passage you are referring to now. The bridge passage occurs about 6 minutes into the finale (I have the Boulez/WP recording in front of me right now which uses the Haas). The Haas has either 10 or 20 bars of bridge material depending on whether you count in 2s or 4s which isn't TERRIBLY longer than the 4 bars in the Nowak I guess. Maazel definitely used the Nowak then. Incidentally the horn solo after that passage is probably what the girl referred to as "funny articulation" after the concert. During the concert I had an itch that it didn't sound quite normal (in the sense that the horn passage sounds different from the recordings I have) but it was a fleeting moment that I didn't remember afterwards.

The Avery Fisher Hall acoustics really depend on where you sit. A few months ago I sat pretty much a few rows back dead center in the orchestra level and heard Masur and the Orch. Nat. France do an unbelievable Tchaikovsky 5th (talk about a performance that make you rethink how well you know a work). The suavity and beauty of that orchestra really took my breath away. Then I sat in the first balcony for the Mahler 9th and acoustically it was pretty dead. The opening walls of string sound that opens the finale as a non-event. But somehow Bruckner sounded pretty well from the same spot...

There is NO question the NYPO needs a new hall. They use that place for high school graduations (I had mine there about 15 years ago). You take the number of high schools in the city and figure out how much wear and pounding that hall takes. You wouldn't even think about pretty anything nice in there because you know teenagers, they will destroy anything and everything. You go a few hundred feet further into the MET and the acoustics is much warmer and less agressive.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on June 24, 2008, 11:04:04 AM
They use that place for high school graduations (I had mine there about 15 years ago).

And law school graduations.  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 24, 2008, 11:10:12 AM
And law school graduations.  ;)
You don't realize how ugly it is until you get up to the stage area. It's like the whole stage needs to be repainted or something. It is quite embarassing actually.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 24, 2008, 11:43:01 AM
I heard the ONdF/Masur play Tchaikovsky 5 in Boston and I was literally blown away by that, too. That was an awesome performance in every respect (and as you know, I have heard, or as you like to call it, "been a prop" at many outstanding concerts, so that really means something) and it was also "interesting" for me to see how I reacted to that because I had had very mixed expectations.
I have heard the ONdF live a number of times before and they were, quite contrary to the general reputation French symphony orchestras still have, very good every time and some of the concerts very really very good - a Tchaikovsky 6 I heard with them with Maazel in the 80s to this day remains one of the great concert experiences of my life. I have also always enjoyed the rather special sound they have retained with very silky strings, rather bright but very sonorous brass and woodwind playing which always lived up to the high expectations one has of French woodwind players.
Before this concert, I had wondered how Masur's tenure might have "affected" the orchestra since, I have to admit, I used to be quite "biased" against him which is partially based on many very solidly crafted, but rarely really outstanding recordings I have heard with him (a lot of which I generally listen to more for the quality and style of the GOL than for his interpretive insights) but also on having played under his baton a number of times and I have to say, basically rather competent as he is, he also is (or maybe used to be) a real asshole   ::) ::)
Anyway, the concert was great and while Masur's leadership there has definitely resulted in a noticeable "Germanization" of the sound, it is still relatively very refined and sonorous - I talked to some members of the orchestra afterwards and they all said they were very happy with how he has influenced the sound and playing style of the orchestra - and the music making was stunningly nuanced and spirited. Plus, even though they didn't force the sound at all, they really filled the hall well with round, deep, glowing sound (I wish O Mensch could hear something like that some time)  ;) Even though I have also heard Tchaikovsky 5 way too many times and did not look particularly forward to hearing it again, but then I didn't want to miss the chance to catch the orchestra live as it has been a while since I last heard them, I enjoyed this concert enormously and there was not one dull moment.
 :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 24, 2008, 12:19:36 PM
Don't know whether Masur is an asshole or not but the orchestra seems to like him. I know going by how they smile at him when he comes on and off the stage is probably not a good indicator of their affinity towards him. The audience seem to like him more now that he only shows up occasionally instead of seeing him day in and day out. A couple of things that really stood out as far as the playing of the ONdF is as you said the silken playing of the strings - both in the 3rd movement of the Tchaikovsky 5th and also in the encore, the Polonaise from Eugene Onegin. What really blew me away was the playing of the woodwinds. The phrasing and legato was so perfect I swear you never think those guys need to take a breath. I think the Tchaikovsky 5th is on the menu next year at the NYPO as New Yorkers can't seem to get enough of the piece.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 24, 2008, 03:14:29 PM
He must have mellowed out a lot because the orchestra members I talked to (one of the bass players I had played together with a long time ago in a French-German student orchestra) had nothing but very positive things to say about him and their work together (which is fairly rare for orchestra musicians).
The woodwind were indeed very impressive, especially the lady (http://www.cvillechambermusic.org/images/photos/cismondi.jpg) who played the first oboe who really played in very long arches, especially in her long solo passages in the slow movement which also rose effortlessly above the strings when these got louder. And it was great to see and hear the original French bassoon ("le basson") in action which is rare these days since even some French orchestras have switched to the German system, a pity as it is one more characteristic color of the orchestral palette gone...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: PerfectWagnerite on June 24, 2008, 03:36:46 PM
Don't know whether Masur mellowed out a lot but he seems a lot older. I know he is no spring chicken so to speak but since I heard him about 5-6 years ago and now he looks like he has aged 15 years, to the point he looks like he has trouble standing. Well at least he doesn't need a chair like Levine does nowadays. My wife asked whether there is something wrong with his left arm since it always seem to move uncontrollably and I told her I don't know.

It would be interesting to hear the other famous French orchestra - namely the Orch. de Paris if and when they come to town.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 26, 2008, 05:06:33 PM
These look like Parkinson's disease symptoms  :P
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 26, 2008, 06:04:51 PM
Maybe, but it could also be late consequences of a very bad car accident Masur was involved in in the 70s. IIRC, in the accident, his wife was killed and several more persons who were in one of those small plasticky cars the East Germans had ("Trabant") were killed, too, when Masur ran the Mercedes that he as priviledged Gewandhauskapellmeister had into that car. Apparently the accident was his fault but everything was covered up because he had good contacts to the regime. That story was dragged out again by newspapers after the fall of the wall and reunification when Masur was celebrated by some as a hero because he had played a role in de-escalating the situation in Leipzig in 1989.
He sustained some lasting injury in the accident, exactly what I don't know, but it led to him not being able to hold a baton anymore which is the actual reason he started conducting without one.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: paul on June 26, 2008, 07:20:15 PM
I think the blame rests on the shoulders of Kurt Masur.

Kurt Masur hasn't been music director of the Philharmonic since 2002, so I don't think that he has had much to do with any recent programming of Bruckner. Maazel's performance of Bruckner 8 with the Philharmonic received such positive responses from the musicians that it ultimately landed him the job and I don't think that he wanted to risk another performance of it too soon. Right before his "farewell season" seems like a better time to do it. I agree that Friday's performance was exceptional and I'm sorry that I couldn't go see the concert again the next night.

Also for the record, Masur is still an asshole and as frustrating as ever to play under. He is just older.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: paul on June 26, 2008, 07:22:01 PM
Maazel's first performance in 2000, that is.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 26, 2008, 07:49:10 PM
Also for the record, Masur is still an asshole and as frustrating as ever to play under. He is just older.

How do you know?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: paul on June 27, 2008, 05:13:56 AM
How do you know?

I have played under him and gone to many rehearsals and concerts with him and the Philharmonic. My teacher is in the Philharmonic as is her student who I occasionally study with (who won his job under Masur) and I get an earload about working with Masur all the time from them and other members of the orchestra I've talked to. His relationship with the NYPO is not the happiest.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on June 27, 2008, 02:43:40 PM
Are you referring to back when he was MD or more recently? Does he come back as guest regularly? What's the synopsis of what you hear (the "earloads"). I remember him being usually competent and prepared, fairly insistent, but often unnecessarily unfriendly back then in Leipzig (and one time, I also happened to play with a smaller orchestra in Jena for a conducting seminar he led, that was pretty bad, how he acted the world star who condescended to work with half-talented students and a smaller, "provincial" orchestra, and he made sure everyone knew what he felt about them). Where did you play under him, BTW?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on June 27, 2008, 03:03:27 PM
Yikes! When shit hits the fan...  :o . What is it with conductors' egos anyway?  :P
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 01, 2008, 08:16:03 AM
Next week seeing Zimmermann's opera, Die Soldaten, in the production from the 2006 Ruhr Festival (below).  The narrow stage stretches the length of the venue (the Park Avenue Armory), some 300 feet long, with the audience seated on a huge unit that straddles the stage on either side, mounted on railroad tracks.  The seating is able to move 7" per second, moving the audience closer to the action as required.  It looks totally amazing!

--Bruce

(http://www.omm.de/veranstaltungen/festspiele2006/bilder/RUHR2006-die-soldaten3.jpg)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on July 01, 2008, 08:34:56 AM
The seating is able to move 7" per second, moving the audience closer to the action as required.  It looks totally amazing!

--Bruce

(http://www.omm.de/veranstaltungen/festspiele2006/bilder/RUHR2006-die-soldaten3.jpg)

WTF?! Are you serious? So is the whole audience going to be shunting backwards and forwards like they're on something that's escaped from Disney World? Have seat belts been provided? What's going to happen to the we're-in-a-box-with-a-crate-of-champagne brigade? Too many questions. I think I'm going to be sick.

That looks amazing! Don't suppose you can sneak some footage onto YouTube, can you?  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 01, 2008, 08:57:23 AM
WTF?! Are you serious? So is the whole audience going to be shunting backwards and forwards like they're on something that's escaped from Disney World? Have seat belts been provided? What's going to happen to the we're-in-a-box-with-a-crate-of-champagne brigade? Too many questions. I think I'm going to be sick.

That looks amazing! Don't suppose you can sneak some footage onto YouTube, can you?  ;D

 ;D  Yes, you are correct!  And a theme park ride is exactly what I was thinking of.  (And a friend said, "Whoa, 7 inches a second...don't you think that's a little fast!")  Apparently it's not so fast: during Act I the seating makes one traversal up to the front and then back, and a similar "up and back" during Act II.  But still...

Opening night is Saturday, so there should be a review in the NY Times shortly after.  Will definitely post it here, if so.  (And I assume they will have at least one photo.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 01, 2008, 09:28:50 AM
Just found the video about the piece, including building the set, that I saw on Sunday--they must have just posted it. 

http://www.thirteen.org/sundayarts/die-soldaten/96

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: uffeviking on July 01, 2008, 10:41:14 AM
Fantastic video, thank you so much Bruce!

You better eat light before you attend, don't want you to get airsick, or car sick, or audience sick, whatever.

I have the video of the 1989 Harry Kupfer production at the Staatsoper Stuttgart where Kupfer moved the action on to two levels, stage floor and second story platform. Not a bad idea either. A conductor friend of mine spent time in Stuttgart during the rehearsals as one of the many advisers and he was overwhelmed at the multitude of actions.

Looking forward to your review! :-*

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 01, 2008, 10:45:26 AM
Fantastic video, thank you so much Bruce!

You better eat light before you attend, don't want you to get airsick, or car sick, or audience sick, whatever.

I have the video of the 1989 Harry Kupfer production at the Staatsoper Stuttgart where Kupfer moved the action on to two levels, stage floor and second story platform. Not a bad idea either. A conductor friend of mine spent time in Stuttgart during the rehearsals as one of the many advisers and he was overwhelmed at the multitude of actions.

Looking forward to your review! :-*



Yes, I've seen some still photos of that production, which also looks quite fine.  (I don't recall the production here at NY City Opera being nearly as complex as either of these sound.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on July 01, 2008, 02:16:29 PM
Just found the video about the piece, including building the set, that I saw on Sunday--they must have just posted it. 

http://www.thirteen.org/sundayarts/die-soldaten/96

--Bruce

Thanks for the link, Bruce.

Sarge
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Monsieur Croche on July 01, 2008, 11:02:29 PM
Tonight: Jenö Jandó

Bach – Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, BWV 903
Bach – Italian Concerto, BWV 971
Bartók – Suite, Op. 14
Kodaly – Dances of Marosszek
Liszt – Sonata in B Minor

------------------------------------------------------------------

Tomorrow: Jennifer Micallef & Glen Inanga

Bach-Reger – Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068
Beethoven – Grosse Fuge in B Flat Major, Op. 133
Mozart-Busoni – Duettino Concertante (from PC #19)
Holloway – Selections from Gilded Goldbergs
Martinu – Fantasy
Stravinsky – Three Dances from Petrushka
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Day after tomorrow: Kim Sung-Hoon

Bach – Partita No. 6 in E Minor, BWV 830
Scriabin – Sonata No. 5, Op. 53, “Poem of Ecstasy”
Brahms – Sonata No. 3 in F Minor, Op. 5

-----------------------------------------------------------------

And the day after: Christopher Taylor***

Bach – Goldberg Variations, BWV 988
Rzewski – The People United Will Never Be Defeated!

-------------------------------------------------------------------

And the next day: Konstantin Scherbakov

Bach-Godowsky – Violin Sonata in B Minor, BWV 1002
Shostakovich – Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87 (selections)
Beethoven-Liszt – Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, “Choral”

Man, do I have a busy week ahead of me!  8) 8) 8)

***I’m especially looking forward to this one.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on July 02, 2008, 01:59:44 AM
Just found the video about the piece, including building the set, that I saw on Sunday--they must have just posted it. 

http://www.thirteen.org/sundayarts/die-soldaten/96

--Bruce

Great video, what I've seen of it. (I'm at work and I'd got halfway through when a colleague came over to ask a question so I had to look busy.) Didn't an early, abortive scenario for Soldaten consist of putting the audience on swivel chairs and surrounding them with 12 screens and stages? Maybe I dreamt one up that. Whatever.

I saw ENO's Soldaten back in 1996/7 and loved it. It was a modern-dress affair, unlike the DVD, but it worked fine.

BTW, does anybody know why the original Wergo Soldaten was recorded in mono, even though it was taped in the '60s? If any work cries out for stereo sound, this is it. (Well, my LPs are mono. Perhaps it's been reissued in stereo on CD.)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 02, 2008, 07:56:58 AM
And the day after: Christopher Taylor***

Bach – Goldberg Variations, BWV 988
Rzewski – The People United Will Never Be Defeated!

***I’m especially looking forward to this one.


I would be, too.  A couple of years ago he did the complete Ligeti etudes here--all 18 of them--and it was one of the finest, most intense recitals I've ever been to.  You are in for a treat.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 23, 2008, 10:07:25 AM
Tonight, a recital by Philippe Entremont (Yes, he's still with us!), part of the International Keyboard Institute & Festival (http://www.ikif.org/) at Mannes College of Music.  The program:

Mozart:  Sonata in A Major, KV 331
Beethoven:  Sonata, Op. 57 "Appassionata"
DebussyImages, Book I
DebussySuite pour le piano
RavelPavane pour une Infante defunte
RavelAlborada del gracioso

And Saturday night at the same festival, Marc-André Hamelin in this one:

Mozart:  Sonata in A minor, K. 310
Chopin:  Two Nocturnes, Op. 27
Scriabin:  Sonata No. 7, Op. 64
Ives:  Concord Sonata

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 24, 2008, 12:47:02 PM
Looking forward to  Romeo & Juliet  (http://www.nzballet.org.nz/) tomorrow.

 Here's  (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1501119/story.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=10523375) a review in todays NZ Herald.

 :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 24, 2008, 12:55:44 PM
Looking forward to  Romeo & Juliet  (http://www.nzballet.org.nz/) tomorrow.

 Here's  (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1501119/story.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=10523375) a review in todays NZ Herald.

 :)

What a gorgeous production!  That scene with the edge of the moon, looming huge behind the building, is pretty stunning.  Enjoy and do report back. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 24, 2008, 12:58:43 PM
Yes, Bruce it does look special and great review in the Herald.

I will post my thoughts  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: calvin on July 25, 2008, 11:01:47 PM
tonight i'll be attending the concert of mehta conducting tchaikovsky 6 and picture at an exhibition with Israel Philharmonic at the Sydney Opera House......
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on July 26, 2008, 03:54:33 AM
My first Prom of the season, Sunday 27th. Three choirs, no less. Should be fairly loud!

Messiaen La Transfiguration de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ (98 mins)
There will be no interval

Gerard Bouwhuis piano
Adam Walker flute
Julian Bliss clarinet
Sonia Wieder-Atherton cello
Colin Currie xylophone
Adrian Spillett marimba
Richard Benjafield vibraphone


Philharmonia Voices
BBC Symphony Chorus
BBC National Chorus of Wales
BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Thierry Fischer conductor


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 28, 2008, 09:33:15 AM
And Saturday night at the same festival, Marc-André Hamelin in this one:

Mozart:  Sonata in A minor, K. 310
Chopin:  Two Nocturnes, Op. 27
Scriabin:  Sonata No. 7, Op. 64
Ives:  Concord Sonata

Hamelin's recital was absolutely astounding.  Even the works I don't normally enjoy were a delight to listen to--e.g., I am not the biggest fan of Mozart's sonatas, but nevertheless greatly enjoyed his crisp, rhythmically precise reading of this one.  The two Chopin Nocturnes were exquisite, with dynamic shading about as subtle as it gets.  In pretty much the entire concert, Hamelin's soft moments were very impressive. 

The devilish Scriabin was piercing, mysterious, weird, with huge chords that seemed to link it to the Ives that followed.  And for most of us, the Ives was the climax.  Although many fine pianists play this piece today--and play it extremely well--Hamelin really makes sense out of its sprawling structure and holds it together.  Plus, he can do the folksky "hoedown" portions with humor. 

Two encores, including one he wrote himself: Little Nocturne (2007), a dreamy miniature in a fairly conservative style--it actually didn't sound too unlike the Scriabin.  And then, "the Diabelli Variation that Beethoven never wrote," a 30-second riff on "Chopsticks" that was totally hilarious. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on July 28, 2008, 01:40:43 PM
My first Prom of the season, Sunday 27th. Three choirs, no less. Should be fairly loud!

Messiaen La Transfiguration de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ (98 mins)
There will be no interval

Gerard Bouwhuis piano
Adam Walker flute
Julian Bliss clarinet
Sonia Wieder-Atherton cello
Colin Currie xylophone
Adrian Spillett marimba
Richard Benjafield vibraphone

Philharmonia Voices
BBC Symphony Chorus
BBC National Chorus of Wales
BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Thierry Fischer conductor

This was amazing! If not quite in the Mahler 8/Gurrelieder league, the forces on stage were nevertheless enormous. I liked the way the metal percussion was spread around the stage; seven gongs to the left, three tam-tams to the right and bells at the back. It added a bit of theatre to the ritualistic chiming that recurs throughout the piece. Obviously, the big climaxes were mindblowing, but I was really impressed by some of the quieter passages that, experienced live, had a weight and mystery that I've not tuned into when listening to recordings. Obviously, listening to a gargantuan piece live is always a revelation, but I've been listening to various recordings of Transfiguration on and off for almost three decades and I was still bowled over by how it sounded in the flesh.

And I'm going to hear/see it again in the Festival Hall in the autumn under Nagano. Can't wait.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 28, 2008, 03:52:54 PM
This was amazing! If not quite in the Mahler 8/Gurrelieder league, the forces on stage were nevertheless enormous. I liked the way the metal percussion was spread around the stage; seven gongs to the left, three tam-tams to the right and bells at the back. It added a bit of theatre to the ritualistic chiming that recurs throughout the piece. Obviously, the big climaxes were mindblowing, but I was really impressed by some of the quieter passages that, experienced live, had a weight and mystery that I've not tuned into when listening to recordings. Obviously, listening to a gargantuan piece live is always a revelation, but I've been listening to various recordings of Transfiguration on and off for almost three decades and I was still bowled over by how it sounded in the flesh.

And I'm going to hear/see it again in the Festival Hall in the autumn under Nagano. Can't wait.

Thanks for this interesting report, on what must have been an overwhelming experience.  Huge Messiaen works definitely need to be experienced in person, and I can't believe you're going to hear it twice, live, within just a few months!  (I still have not heard it on recordings.)  So did you mention your favorite?  If not, please feel free to recommend one.  :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on July 29, 2008, 02:12:36 AM
Thanks for this interesting report, on what must have been an overwhelming experience.  Huge Messiaen works definitely need to be experienced in person, and I can't believe you're going to hear it twice, live, within just a few months!  (I still have not heard it on recordings.)  So did you mention your favorite?  If not, please feel free to recommend one.  :D

--Bruce

La Transfiguration is by some distance my favourite Messiaen piece. I only found out at the Prom that it was one of Messiaen's favourites, too. I've got all five recordings.  I didn't mean to collect them all; I just kept on stumbling over them in sales. (The most recent I picked up in either Boston or New York in 2003.) I got to know the piece via Antal Dorati's Washington performance on Decca Headline, so inevitably, perhaps, that's probably my favourite. In the review of recordings in the Proms brochure, Dorati's performance was singled out for its intensity. It's due for reissue soon, so snap it up.

I was listening to Chung again last night. It's beautifully recorded and gorgeously played, but occasionally lacks bite and impact. If you're in the mood for a softer-grained Messiaen, it's well worth a listen. De Leeuw's recording is very attractive and was highy regarded by the composer, apparently, although I think both Rickenbacker and Camberling provide bigger-boned, more appropriately monumental readings.

So I'd say wait until Dorati's recording resurfaces. If you can't wait, Rickenbacker on Koch is impressive. Perhaps you can pick up Chung as well for a fascinating comparison. Have you never heard this piece at all? If not, you need to wrap your ears around it pronto, and prepare to be amazed.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on July 29, 2008, 04:01:33 AM
So I'd say wait until Dorati's recording resurfaces. If you can't wait, Rickenbacker on Koch is impressive. Perhaps you can pick up Chung as well for a fascinating comparison. Have you never heard this piece at all? If not, you need to wrap your ears around it pronto, and prepare to be amazed.

Thanks much for the comments!  No, I've never heard the piece--not for any particular reason, just the usual "too much music and not enough time to get to it all."  (E.g., I only heard Des canyons aux étoiles for the first time last February.)

Anyway, I'll keep an eye out for the Dorati, but may get one of the others.  I have some of the other Chung Messiaen recordings and like them a lot.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Bogey on July 29, 2008, 05:09:39 AM
Attended this a couple days ago:

Baroque Chamber Orchestra of Colorado
 
Corelli,    Sonata in D Major for violin and continuo, opus 5 no. 1 (1700)     
Handel,    Chaconne in G Major for solo harpsichord
Marais,     Piece en Trio no. 5 in E minor (1692)
Muffat,     Sonata in D Major for Violin and Continuo (1677)    
Telemann, Trio in D Minor     
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 29, 2008, 02:29:18 PM
Looking forward to  Romeo & Juliet  (http://www.nzballet.org.nz/) tomorrow.

 Here's  (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1501119/story.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=10523375) a review in todays NZ Herald.

 :)

Well, it was an excellent performance but, sadly, attending a Saturday afternoon ballet matinee isn't a good idea if you want to really commit yourselve to the performance. The young Mums and kids were there in force and we ended up with a pre-schooler behind us who was never going to sit still and quiet for 3 hours. I found the constant chat, whispering and fidgeting very distracting. [the Mums as well as the kids]  :( I'm used to attending symphony orchestra concerts where the audience is made up of mature, serious music lovers who are there to focus exclusively on the performance. So, while I was able to enjoy the wonderful ballet as best I could it was a bit of a chore at times.

No more Saturday ballet mattinee's for me.  ;)

Edit: BTW we're not shy to shush people, but it was a tricky situation with such a young kid and a majority of families in attandance.  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 29, 2008, 02:42:25 PM
This Fridays NZSO concert:

HAYDN Cello Concerto No 2
SCHUMANN Symphony No 4
LODGE Winterlight for Bassoon and Orchestra (World Premiere)

JULIA JONES Conductor
ALBAN GERHARDT Cello
PREMAN TILSON Bassoon

Energy, subdued intimacy, and even menace interweave in Schumann’s Fourth Symphony, ostensibly in a sombre minor key, only for a major key conquest to prevail. Haydn’s Second Cello Concerto, with its once disputed authenticity, achieves symphonic proportions. Undoubtedly easier on audience ears than a performer’s technique, it is amiable yet demanding, undeniably a major contribution to the 18th century cello repertoire.

Should be good  :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on July 29, 2008, 10:56:42 PM
Well, it was an excellent performance but, sadly, attending a Saturday afternoon ballet matinee isn't a good idea if you want to really commit yourselve to the performance. The young Mums and kids were there in force and we ended up with a pre-schooler behind us who was never going to sit still and quiet for 3 hours. I found the constant chat, whispering and fidgeting very distracting. [the Mums as well as the kids]  :( I'm used to attending symphony orchestra concerts where the audience is made up of mature, serious music lovers who are there to focus exclusively on the performance. So, while I was able to enjoy the wonderful ballet as best I could it was a bit of a chore at times.

No more Saturday ballet mattinee's for me.  ;)

Edit: BTW we're not shy to shush people, but it was a tricky situation with such a young kid and a majority of families in attandance.  :)

Yes, this is a very embarrassing situation and it frequently happens at Bucharest National Opera as well. There is also something that I hate: in the first intermission people go to the bar and buy candy bars or chocolate or whatever. They then come back to their seats and chat all the time. Right after the second act begins, it also begins a "chorus" of unwrapping chocolates and candy bars and whatever. For God's sake, why don't they do it before, not after? Stupidity rules!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on July 30, 2008, 06:21:34 AM
There were a few irritants at the Messiaen Prom, too. I suspect (without anything like proof to back it up!!) that they were tourists who had come to the Proms because that's the sort of thing you do when you visit London, not realising that they were in for 100 minutes of hard-core modernism. Two young men left after about half an hour, and one of them made a really strange dismissive yelp as he reached the door, which was bloody rude. An Oriental family in the row behind me left after about 70 minutes; their children either wriggled or snored through most of the concert. And in front of me, two girls sniggered at some of the more unusual sections of the score; the string glissandi in Part 8 had them in stitches. They were silent, which was something, but they were still annoying.

Still, it was an amazing concert and I'd actually forgotten all about the tossers surrounding me until this thread reminded me.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on July 30, 2008, 02:17:29 PM
Yes, this is a very embarrassing situation and it frequently happens at Bucharest National Opera as well. There is also something that I hate: in the first intermission people go to the bar and buy candy bars or chocolate or whatever. They then come back to their seats and chat all the time. Right after the second act begins, it also begins a "chorus" of unwrapping chocolates and candy bars and whatever. For God's sake, why don't they do it before, not after? Stupidity rules!

Agreed! Yes, my wife and I always marvel at all the people eating ice cream on a stick at intermission; some of them look like their starving! And the noisey sweet packets can be distracting. The last thing I want to do at a concert is eat  ??? This is one of the reasons I seldom go to the movie theatre anyone; sitting there surrounded by people stuffing their faces is quite unpleasent.

There were a few irritants at the Messiaen Prom, too. I suspect (without anything like proof to back it up!!) that they were tourists who had come to the Proms because that's the sort of thing you do when you visit London, not realising that they were in for 100 minutes of hard-core modernism. Two young men left after about half an hour, and one of them made a really strange dismissive yelp as he reached the door, which was bloody rude. An Oriental family in the row behind me left after about 70 minutes; their children either wriggled or snored through most of the concert. And in front of me, two girls sniggered at some of the more unusual sections of the score; the string glissandi in Part 8 had them in stitches. They were silent, which was something, but they were still annoying.

Still, it was an amazing concert and I'd actually forgotten all about the tossers surrounding me until this thread reminded me.

Yes, I notice that problem at Opera's and the Ballet and even at Handels Messiah last year. People come along as a 'one-off' with little or no understanding of the event and treat the experience like they're at the movies and chat and eat and text etc. Even at the NZSO concerts you can spot the people who have come along as a one-off 'cause they start fidgeting half way through the symphony in the second half.  ;)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on August 01, 2008, 12:55:12 AM
August 2nd is Stockhausen Day at the Proms. I normally sit in the stalls to the side, but because several pieces in the first concert are in surround sound, I've got a seat in the middle of the stalls. The acoustics are too distant and unfocused for a standard concert, but should be OK for Gruppen and Kontakte.
I'm not sure if I'll make it to any of the films or talks. I might need to save my energy for the two concerts.

1.00pm: Film Music Masters: Stockhausen (48'), and In absentia (23’).
4.15pm - 5.00pm: Proms Intro Discussion around pieces by Stockhausen, with Paul Hillier, Morag Grant and Robin Rimbaud.
Prom 20: Stockhausen Day 1 - BBC Symphony Orchestra

Time 6.00pm - c9.10pm

Stockhausen
Gruppen (24 mins)
Stockhausen
Klang, 13th hour – Cosmic Pulses (for electronics) (UK premiere) (32 mins)
Stockhausen
Klang, 5th hour – Harmonien for solo trumpet (BBC commission: world premiere) (c15 mins)

Interval


Stockhausen
Kontakte (35 mins)
Stockhausen
Gruppen (repeat performance) (24 mins)

Marco Blaauw trumpet
Nicolas Hodges piano
Colin Currie percussion

BBC Symphony Orchestra
David Robertson conductor
Pascal Rophé conductor
Ludovic Morlot conductor


Prom 21: Stockhausen Day 2 - Theatre of Voices

Time 10.15pm - c11.35pm

Stockhausen
Stimmung (70 mins)

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: vandermolen on August 01, 2008, 09:53:54 AM
Vaughan Williams symphonies 5,6,9 on 2nd November (Festival Hall London) Hickox.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on August 08, 2008, 03:42:05 PM
Next Sunday looking forward to this:

NZSO

CELEBRITY SERIES
Yefim Bronfman
“The sky is the limit when Bronfman performs ...”
Pittsburg Post Gazette February 2007

BRAHMS Piano Concerto No 2
DVORAK Symphony No 9 in E Minor op 95 From the New World

JACQUES LACOMBE Conductor
YEFIM BRONFMAN Piano

Yefim Bronfman appears regularly with the Berlin, Vienna, Israel, New York and Los Angeles Philharmonics, the Dresden Staatskapelle, the Orchestre de Paris and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, working with celebrated conductors including Barenboim, Dohnányi, Dutoit, Gergiev, Maazel, Masur, Mehta and Salonen. As exclusive SonyBMG recording artist, he has won widespread praise for his recordings.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on August 08, 2008, 03:57:14 PM
We all know who Yefim Bronfman is. But who is Jacques Lacombe?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on August 08, 2008, 04:04:05 PM
We all know who Yefim Bronfman is. But who is Jacques Lacombe?

This from the NZSO website:

JACQUES LACOMBE was principal guest conductor of the Montreal Symphony and is currently Music Director of the Trois-Rivieres Symphony. As an opera conductor his engagements include the Metropolitan Opera, the Deutsche Oper Berlin, and opera companies in Vancouver, Montreal, Philadelphia and Ličge.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on August 09, 2008, 06:06:51 AM
Lacombe is an excellent technician and a very solid musician. He spent a lot of time in Vienna in his formative years (where he met his wife, cellist Carla Antoun, another very refined musician). But I've never heard him ignite the orchestra as Dutoit or Nézet-Séguin did.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 09, 2008, 02:34:30 PM
It's the Edinburgh International Festival again :).

I'm particularly looking forward to Król Roger

Mariinsky Opera Company
Valery Gergiev Conductor

Roger Andrzej Dobber
Roxana Elzbieta Szmytka
Edrisi Sergei Semishkur
Shepherd Pavlo Tolstoy

Unfortunately, I haven't been able to get hold of Kaspszyk's recording which Maciek and some others recommended so I'll be going into this one completely blind.


Also:

Collegium Vocale Gent
Philippe Herreweghe Conductor

Stravinsky Symphonies of wind instruments
Henri Pousseur Mnémosyne
Stravinsky Mass
Bruckner Mass in E minor

I haven't heard any Herreweghe outside of Bach, but love both the Stravinsky and Bruckner masses.


And a piano recital (oh yeah! 8))

Ivan Moravec

Chopin Two Nocturnes Op 27
Barcarolle in F sharp major
Ballade No 1 in G minor
Janáček  Selection from ‘On the Overgrown Path'
'In the Mists'
Debussy Pour le Piano


And a couple of concerts with the Staatskapelle Dresden (with Fabio Luisi) - a fair bit of Strauss here.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on August 14, 2008, 09:40:58 AM
And a piano recital (oh yeah! 8))

Ivan Moravec

Chopin Two Nocturnes Op 27
Barcarolle in F sharp major
Ballade No 1 in G minor
Janáček  Selection from ‘On the Overgrown Path'
'In the Mists'
Debussy Pour le Piano
HUMONGOUS ENVY ALERT. How come Ivan Moravec only performs in hemispheres I don't live in? And why, for that matter, doesn't some record label just give him a studio and a microphone and carte blanche to record anything he wants for as long as he wants?

Incidentally, I just ordered Houston Opera season tickets. Especially looking forward to the beautiful (in both voice and, well, things-other-than-voice) soprano Ana Maria Martinez in Pagliacci and to a terrific young cast in Rigoletto, including a wonderful soprano named Shigamuratova, or something similarly long.

EDIT: Albina Shagimuratova.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on August 14, 2008, 10:19:10 AM
EDIT: Albina Shagimuratova.

Really?  ;D

Really (just googled)

Sarge  Butthead
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on August 14, 2008, 10:40:09 AM
Tomorrow night, at the Mostly Mozart Festival, I'm going to one of the non-Mostly concerts.  ;D

La Passion de Simone
Kaija Saariaho composer (Mostly Mozart debut)
Amin Maalouf text (Mostly Mozart debut)

Dawn Upshaw soprano
Michael Schumacher dancer (Mostly Mozart debut)
Susanna Mälkki conductor (New York debut)
Peter Sellars director
Martin Pakledinaz costume design
James F. Ingalls lighting design
City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (Mostly Mozart debut)
London Voices (Mostly Mozart debut)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on August 14, 2008, 09:09:18 PM
HUMONGOUS ENVY ALERT. How come Ivan Moravec only performs in hemispheres I don't live in?

Because, from a culture point of view, you live at the end of the world.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on August 14, 2008, 09:10:26 PM
Because, from a culture point of view, you live at the end of the world.
Hey! Kinky Friedman is from Texas  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on August 14, 2008, 09:10:56 PM
Really?  ;D

Really (just googled)

Sarge  Butthead
It's Ana Maria Martinez (http://www.tokafi.com/static/2006/01/15questionsanamariamartinez-2006-01-04.6519900823.jpg) you should be checking twice...
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on August 14, 2008, 09:11:49 PM
Hey! Kinky Friedman is from Texas  ;D

As is George Bush. That's not an excuse.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on August 14, 2008, 09:37:13 PM
As is George Bush. That's not an excuse.
Kinky conquers all.

(http://weblog.timoregan.com/uploaded_images/kinky_friedman-763418.jpg)

"There's a fine line between fiction and non-fiction, and I believe I snorted it in 1976."
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 16, 2008, 08:33:28 AM
HUMONGOUS ENVY ALERT. How come Ivan Moravec only performs in hemispheres I don't live in? And why, for that matter, doesn't some record label just give him a studio and a microphone and carte blanche to record anything he wants for as long as he wants?

Incidentally, I just ordered Houston Opera season tickets. Especially looking forward to the beautiful (in both voice and, well, things-other-than-voice) soprano Ana Maria Martinez in Pagliacci and to a terrific young cast in Rigoletto, including a wonderful soprano named Shigamuratova, or something similarly long.

EDIT: Albina Shagimuratova.

Hi Brian - didn't realise you were a Moravec fan as well 0:). If I knew how, I'd make a sneaky recording for you ;D.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Wendell_E on August 16, 2008, 08:45:46 AM
I just bought my tickets for a Chicago trip in November:  Berg's Lulu at the Lyric Opera, and Mahler's 2nd (Haitink) at the CSO.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: AB68 on August 25, 2008, 04:34:43 AM
Edinburgh Festival

27 August
Staatskapelle Dresden/Fabio Luisi
Richard Strauss Don Juan
Bernhard Lang Monadology II for large orchestra
Richard Strauss Don Quixote

28 August
Ivan Moravec, piano
Chopin Two Nocturnes Op 27
Barcarolle in F sharp major
Ballade No 1 in G minor
Janáček  Selection from ‘On the Overgrown Path'
'In the Mists'
Debussy Pour le Piano

BBC Proms, London

30 August
Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra/Jukka-Pekka Saraste conductor
Nikolai Lugansky, piano
Magnus Lindberg Seht die Sonne
Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No.3
Sibelius Symphony No.1

31 August
Lang Lang, piano
Marc Yu*, piano
 Mozart Piano Sonata No.13 in B flat major, K.333
Rachmaninov Prelude in G minor, Op.23 No.5; Prelude in Bb Major, Op.23 No.2 
Chopin Grand Polonaise in E-flat major 
Schubert Fantasia in F minor for piano duet, D940* 
Debussy Preludes, Book 1 - La fille aux cheveux de lin; Les collines d'Anacapri 
Traditional Chinese Moonlight Reflections; Spring Dance 
Liszt transc. Horowitz Hungarian Rhapsody No.2, S.244

2 September
Berliner Philharmoniker/Sir Simon Rattle
Wagner Tristan und Isolde - Prelude and Liebestod
Messiaen Turangalîla Symphony








Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 26, 2008, 02:16:10 PM
Ivan Moravec

Chopin Two Nocturnes Op 27
Barcarolle in F sharp major
Ballade No 1 in G minor
Janáček  Selection from ‘On the Overgrown Path'
'In the Mists'
Debussy Pour le Piano


 :'( :'( :'(

Quote
Dear Festival Supporter,

I see from our records that you have booked tickets for Ivan Moravec on Thursday 28 August. I have to inform you that due to ill health Mr Moravec is unable to perform.

Steven Osborne is stepping in and while I like Osborne well enough, Moravec had been the highlight of the season for me. He'd been scheduled to perform a couple of years ago but pulled out of that as well. This is so not my year for piano recitals - first I miss out on Sokolov, now Moravec.

There - another one for good measure :'(

I really hope Moravec isn't seriously ill. He must be well in his 70s.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: stingo on August 26, 2008, 03:54:00 PM
Looking forward to (and excited to get) my subscription tickets to the Philly Orchestra. I understand they're going to be mailed on Friday of this week.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on August 27, 2008, 09:48:53 AM
2008/2009 Winnipeg Chamber Music Society concerts :)

September 21, 2008

Haydn - Piano Trio in A flat major, Hob XV:14
Peters, Randolph - Intrada (for string quartet and piano duet)
Beethoven - String Quartet No. 8 in E minor, Op. 59 (Razumovsky II)

November 16, 2008

Brahms - Piano Quartet in C minor, Op. 60
Messiaen - Quartet for the End of Time

January 11, 2009

Beethoven - String Quartet No. 11 in F minor, Op. 95 (Serioso)
Beethoven - Violin Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 96
Beethoven - Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 (Archduke)

March 1, 2009

Haydn - String Quartet in C, Hob III:32 (Sun)
Schubert - Fantasy in F minor for piano duet, D940
Shostakovich - Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57

May 3, 2009

Boccherini - String Trio in D major
Ho, Vincent - Violin Sonata (2008)
Dvorak - Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 87

June 9, 2009

Mozart - String Quartet in B flat major, K458 (Hunt)
Puccini - Crisantemi
Saint-Saens - Violin Sonata in D minor, Op. 75

June 11, 2009

Mozart - Piano Quartet in E flat major, K452
Grieg - String Quartet in G minor, Op. 27
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on August 27, 2008, 09:52:56 AM
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra concerts I'll be attending for the 2008/2009 Season  :)

September 26, 2008

Strauss, R. - Also Sprach Zarathustra
Korngold - Violin Concerto (James Ehnes, violin)
Strauss, R. - Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks

November 1, 2008

Ho, Vincent - Red Zen
Corigliano, John - The Red Violin:  Chaconne (Nikki Chooi, violin)
Holst - The Planets

November 10, 2008

Pinchas Zukerman, National Arts Center - Ottawa
Alexina Louie - Infinite Sky with Birds
Tchaikovsky - Piano Concerto No. 1 (Jon Kimura Parker, piano)
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5

November 14, 2008

Rossini - The Thieving Magpie Overture
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 22 (Stewart Goodyear, piano)
Beethoven - Symphony No. 7

January 16, 2009

Estacio, John - Spring's Promise
Davies, Victor - Concerto for Tubameister and Orchestra (Chris Lee, tuba)
Bottesini - Grand duo concertante for violin & double bass (Karl Stobbe, violin; Meredith Johnson, double bass)
Beethoven - Symphony No. 8

January 31, 2009

Messiaen - Turangalila Symphony (Pascal Gallet, piano; Jean Laurendeau, ondes martenot)

February 13, 2009

Bartok - Violin Concerto No. 2 (Gwen Hoebig, violin)
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 (Pathetique)

March 21, 2009

Ravel - Mother Goose Suite
Saint-Saens - Piano Concerto No. 2 (Yuja Wang, piano)
Mussorgsky - Pictures at An Exhibition (orch. Ravel)

April 11, 2009

Beethoven - Choral Fantasy for piano, orchestra and chorus (David Moroz, piano)
Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 in D minor (Choral)

May 15, 2009

Mahler - Symphony No. 6 (Tragic)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 27, 2008, 12:21:55 PM
Edinburgh Festival

27 August
Staatskapelle Dresden/Fabio Luisi
Richard Strauss Don Juan
Bernhard Lang Monadology II for large orchestra
Richard Strauss Don Quixote

28 August
Ivan Moravec, piano
Chopin Two Nocturnes Op 27
Barcarolle in F sharp major
Ballade No 1 in G minor
Janáček  Selection from ‘On the Overgrown Path'
'In the Mists'
Debussy Pour le Piano


Quote
... due to ill health Mr Moravec is unable to perform ...

Quote

Cancellation of Concert
Staatskapelle Dresden
Wednesday 27 August 8.00pm
Usher Hall


Dear Festival Supporter,

I see from our records that you have booked tickets for Staatskapelle Dresden who are due to perform tonight, Wednesday 27 August. Unfortunately the concert has been cancelled. The orchestra's instruments have not arrived in Edinburgh in time for the concert to go ahead ...

Oh dear, AB68, I feel for you :'(.

Hope you enjoy your time in Edinburgh nonetheless :).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on August 27, 2008, 12:25:01 PM
:'( :'( :'(

Steven Osborne is stepping in and while I like Osborne well enough, Moravec had been the highlight of the season for me. He'd been scheduled to perform a couple of years ago but pulled out of that as well. This is so not my year for piano recitals - first I miss out on Sokolov, now Moravec.

There - another one for good measure :'(

I really hope Moravec isn't seriously ill. He must be well in his 70s.
That's very bad news indeed.  :(  Indeed, Moravec is 78 years old.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Novi on August 29, 2008, 01:13:03 PM
That's very bad news indeed.  :(  Indeed, Moravec is 78 years old.

Wow, 78 - do you know if it is just general old age wear and tear?

Tomorrow:

Beaux Arts Trio

Mendelssohn Piano Trio No 1 in D minor
Kurtág Hommage ŕ Christian Wolff
Beethoven Piano Trio in B flat Op 97 ‘Archduke'

Bye bye :'( :-* 0:)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: DavidRoss on August 30, 2008, 09:20:28 AM
We've a full season ahead of us, starting next weekend in Berkeley with the Alexander String Quartet playing Opus 127, with an introduction by the inimitable and always entertaining Robert Greenberg.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: AB68 on September 04, 2008, 06:35:21 AM
Oh dear, AB68, I feel for you :'(.

Hope you enjoy your time in Edinburgh nonetheless :).

I did have a faboulus time in the beautiful city og Edinburgh, and I got to hear the SD the next day.
Very disapointed that Moravec had to cancel though, I only hope it's nothing serious. I have wanted to hear him live for years.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Est.1965 on September 04, 2008, 11:27:48 AM
A Flying Start
Denčve conducts Mahler 5
SAT 4 OCT 2008: 7.30PM

The new Glasgow Season sets sail with a spectacular
programme, as Stéphane Denčve continues his critically
acclaimed Mahler cycle with his most popular symphony,
the Fifth. Journey through a vast musical landscape: funereal
darkness, boisterous dancing, a joyous finale – and, of course,
the hauntingly beautiful Adagietto, famously used in Visconti’s
Death in Venice.

Wagner Overture to The Flying Dutchman
Szymanowski Sinfonia concertante
Mahler Symphony No5
Stéphane Denčve (conductor)
Piotr Anderszewski (piano)


Great...looking forward to it.  The RSNO should be in fine fettle,  but knackred form after another busy Summer!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 04, 2008, 11:39:43 AM
A Flying Start
Denčve conducts Mahler 5
SAT 4 OCT 2008: 7.30PM

The new Glasgow Season sets sail with a spectacular
programme, as Stéphane Denčve continues his critically
acclaimed Mahler cycle with his most popular symphony,
the Fifth. Journey through a vast musical landscape: funereal
darkness, boisterous dancing, a joyous finale – and, of course,
the hauntingly beautiful Adagietto, famously used in Visconti’s
Death in Venice.

Wagner Overture to The Flying Dutchman
Szymanowski Sinfonia concertante
Mahler Symphony No5
Stéphane Denčve (conductor)
Piotr Anderszewski (piano)


Great...looking forward to it.

Nice program!  You rarely see that Szymanowski on concerts (I can't recall it anywhere), so good for Denčve for programming it. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 05, 2008, 12:32:24 PM
Next weekend:

Xenakis: Oresteia (1965-1966) - This production is the U.S. premiere of the composer's only opera, and details are here (http://www.millertheatre.com/Events/EventDetails.aspx?nid=1215).  Program notes by Paul Griffiths are online, here (http://www.millertheatre.com/Pdf/ProgramNotes/Oresteia.pdf).

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on September 06, 2008, 09:19:24 AM
Sunday 7th September


Messiaen: St Francis at the Proms. I haven't sat through a concert this long since Gotterdammerung at the ENO. I hope I don't get fidgety.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on September 06, 2008, 11:57:06 AM
Next weekend:

Xenakis: Oresteia (1965-1966) - This production is the U.S. premiere of the composer's only opera, and details are here (http://www.millertheatre.com/Events/EventDetails.aspx?nid=1215).  Program notes by Paul Griffiths are online, here (http://www.millertheatre.com/Pdf/ProgramNotes/Oresteia.pdf).

--Bruce

Wow! Sounds amazing. I've never heard Oresteia. I had a bit of a Xenakis binge last weekend and worked my way through some of the Timpani CDs. The other half, who doesn't appreciate Xenakis one bit (reaction to Antikhthon: "What's that horrible din? Is somebody farting through bagpipes?"), was away for a few days.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Solitary Wanderer on September 06, 2008, 01:47:55 PM
I'm looking forward to this in two weeks:

NZSO

BERLIOZ Roman Carnival Overture
LEOPOLD MOZART Trombone Concerto
SANDSTRÖM Motorbike Odyssey
DVOŘÁK Symphony No 8

HANNU LINTU Conductor
CHRISTIAN LINDBERG Trombone

The Roman Carnival Overture is sheer exhilaration as a concert-opener.  The curtain will fall on another crowd-pleaser, Dvořák’s poetic Eighth Symphony, resonating so it seems with songs of the meadows and dances from the villages of his native Bohemia. Mozart’s father sacrificed his creative aspirations to promote his genius son, but still produced a sizeable opus, including a three-movement trombone concerto. Sandström’s Motorbike Odyssey is a journey as well as a vehicle for trombone virtuosity, late 20th century style.

The Sandstrom 'Motorbike Odyssey' should be fascinating  :)

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 10, 2008, 09:51:55 AM
Sunday 7th September


Messiaen: St Francis at the Proms. I haven't sat through a concert this long since Gotterdammerung at the ENO. I hope I don't get fidgety.

Hey, how was the Messiaen?  This was a concert version?  I've only heard the recording--and like it--but wonder how it would fare in concert. 

Wow! Sounds amazing. I've never heard Oresteia. I had a bit of a Xenakis binge last weekend and worked my way through some of the Timpani CDs. The other half, who doesn't appreciate Xenakis one bit (reaction to Antikhthon: "What's that horrible din? Is somebody farting through bagpipes?"), was away for a few days.

That Timpani series is just wonderful...I need to get the remaining one I don't have soon.  The bagpipes comment made me laugh...

I'm looking forward to this in two weeks:

NZSO

BERLIOZ Roman Carnival Overture
LEOPOLD MOZART Trombone Concerto
SANDSTRÖM Motorbike Odyssey
DVOŘÁK Symphony No 8

HANNU LINTU Conductor
CHRISTIAN LINDBERG Trombone

The Roman Carnival Overture is sheer exhilaration as a concert-opener.  The curtain will fall on another crowd-pleaser, Dvořák’s poetic Eighth Symphony, resonating so it seems with songs of the meadows and dances from the villages of his native Bohemia. Mozart’s father sacrificed his creative aspirations to promote his genius son, but still produced a sizeable opus, including a three-movement trombone concerto. Sandström’s Motorbike Odyssey is a journey as well as a vehicle for trombone virtuosity, late 20th century style.

The Sandstrom 'Motorbike Odyssey' should be fascinating  :)

Great program, please report back.  Very imaginative, pairing those two trombone pieces together!  (I don't know Sandström's work at all, although I am familiar with Sven-David Sandström.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Est.1965 on September 10, 2008, 11:15:10 AM
Next weekend:

Xenakis: Oresteia (1965-1966) - This production is the U.S. premiere of the composer's only opera, and details are here (http://www.millertheatre.com/Events/EventDetails.aspx?nid=1215).  Program notes by Paul Griffiths are online, here (http://www.millertheatre.com/Pdf/ProgramNotes/Oresteia.pdf).

--Bruce

Well, that wont come up too often, so it should be a real experience.  Look forward to your later review.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on September 11, 2008, 03:27:36 AM
Hey, how was the Messiaen?  This was a concert version?  I've only heard the recording--and like it--but wonder how it would fare in concert. 
--Bruce

The Messiaen was amazing. It was semi-staged, with a few props; the singers were dressed in white shirts and black trousers and moved around the stage very slowly; a few lighting effects were employed with varying degrees of success (I could have done without the flashing lights that accompanied the Angel's knocking on the door). The orchestra played brilliantly and the large chorus made an impressive noise when required. But the audience was tiny; the hall was less than half full and the top circle was almost deserted. There were almost as many people on stage as there were watching. I've been to late-night concerts at the Proms that had similar-sized audiences. But if it was dispiriting for the performers, there was no sign of that in the performance.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Drasko on September 16, 2008, 05:35:22 AM
Just bought some tickets for the next month:

Mahler - Das Lied von der Erde
Beethoven - Symphony No.4

Christianne Stotijn (mezzo)
Robert Dean Smith (tenor)
Budapest Festival Orchestra / Ivan Fischer

and

Venezia delle strade ai Palazzi
Le Počme Harmonique

When saw first notice I was really hoping for Lully's Cadmus et Hermione but they are coming with new production, sounds promising:
Quote
Le Počme Harmonique has created a new production that is once again more than a concert; it is a theatrical event with special lighting, costumes and Baroque gestures employed to evoke the spirit of Venice at a time when art music and popular forms mixed, creating artistic freedom of a new order. Venezia delle strade ai Palazzi includes Claire Lefilliâtre’s much-admired rendition of Monteverdi’s Lamento della Ninfa; music by Manelli, who introduced Venice to opera; canzonettes, bergamasques and many other facets of an art that was constantly evolving. The ensemble features soprano Lefilliâtre; tenor Jan van Elsacker; tenor Serge Goubioud; bass Arnaud Marzorati; Mira Glodeanu, violin; Lucas Guimaraes, treble and bass viol; Françoise Enock, violone; Joël Grare, percussion; and Jean-Luc Tamby, colascione and guitar. The production is directed by Benjamin Lazar.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: mozartsneighbor on September 16, 2008, 07:34:38 AM
Sokolov is coming to Vienna in December! Tickets haven't gone on sale yet, but I will be there on the first day when they do in early November.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: drogulus on September 16, 2008, 02:54:42 PM

     The Spectrum Singers will be performing in Cambridge this November

     (http://www.spectrumsingers.org/images/spectrum_member.jpg)

     Norman Dello Joio: To Saint Cecilia (1958)
     performed in memory of the composer

     Benjamin Britten: Hymn to St. Cecilia, op. 27 (1942)

     Daniel Pinkham: A Song for St. Cecilia's Day

     Herbert Howells: Hymn for St. Cecilia

     Gerald Finzi: For St. Cecilia
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 18, 2008, 08:19:12 AM
     The Spectrum Singers will be performing in Cambridge this November

     (http://www.spectrumsingers.org/images/spectrum_member.jpg)

     Norman Dello Joio: To Saint Cecilia (1958)
     performed in memory of the composer

     Benjamin Britten: Hymn to St. Cecilia, op. 27 (1942)

     Daniel Pinkham: A Song for St. Cecilia's Day

     Herbert Howells: Hymn for St. Cecilia

     Gerald Finzi: For St. Cecilia


Interesting program!  Like all those composers but don't know every last one of the St. Cecilia tributes. 

Tonight for me:

Cassatt String Quartet

Libby Larsen: She Wrote (New York Premiere)
Joan Tower: Night Fields
Maurice Ravel: Quartet in F Major

I haven't heard any of Larsen's work other than choral pieces, so this will be interesting, and I don't know the Tower quartet at all.  (The concert is a celebration of Tower's 70th birthday.) 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 18, 2008, 10:40:28 AM
Tonight at 18:30, at the ICA (http://www.icaboston.org):

The Firebird Ensemble (http://www.firebirdensemble.com/calendar.html) plays:

Danger Garden (2006) by Curtis Hughes (b. 1974)
Flashbacks (1995) by Mario Davidovsky (b. 1934)
Rhapsody (2003) Boston Premiere by Donald Martino (1931-2005)
Polish Folk Songs (2007) by Lee Hyla (b. 1952)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 18, 2008, 10:45:58 AM
Tonight at 18:30, at the ICA (http://www.icaboston.org):

The Firebird Ensemble (http://www.firebirdensemble.com/calendar.html) plays:

Danger Garden (2006) by Curtis Hughes (b. 1974)
Flashbacks (1995) by Mario Davidovsky (b. 1934)
Rhapsody (2003) Boston Premiere by Donald Martino (1931-2005)
Polish Folk Songs (2007) by Lee Hyla (b. 1952)


Oh great!  Nice program...don't know Hughes at all.  I heard them here and they are good!  Do report back...

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Senta on September 19, 2008, 12:49:35 AM
Not this weekend, but next:

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Robert Spano, conductor


Bach/Stokowski: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3
Emmanuel Ax, piano
Brahms: Symphony No. 1

And these two just took place, I had no idea I was going until we suddenly had to evacuate from Hurricane Ike!

Sun., Sept. 13
Dallas Symphony Orchestra
Jaap van Zweden, conductor


Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 25
Emmanuel Ax, piano (yep, again!)
Mahler: Symphony No. 5

Thurs., Sept. 18
Dallas Symphony Orchestra and Chorus
Jaap van Zweden, conductor

Laquita Mitchell, soprano
Kelley O'Connor, mezzo-soprano
Vale Rideout, tenor
Robert Orth, baritone

Stucky: August 4, 1964
(World Premiere)
Libretto by Gene Scheer

These concerts mark the first week of Jaap van Zweden's tenure in Dallas. Both were fantastic...honestly I was blown away.

He pushed the hell out of them in the Mahler...with death-defying accelerations and extremes...they responded like crazy. Thrilling playing. Big colorful sound, very musical. Great hall too...the Meyerson has very responsive acoustics that let the sound really bloom. I liked van Zweden, expressive but without histronics, very clear in his gestures. This is a fertile partnership with palpable chemistry.

The Stucky premiere was very impressive, I immediately wanted to hear it again. It's only 70 min long and was all that was on the program. This is an oratorio, about LBJ and two poignant events during his presidency, program notes and more here (http://kpac883.blogspot.com/2008/09/world-premiere-steven-stucky-august-4.html).

It's a gorgeous, sumptuous work, on the neo-Romantic side, and features a thought-provoking libretto by Gene Scheer. There are many amazing moments in the piece, including a central orchestral Elegy, a haunting ending that highlights the chorus...morse-code like percussive writing for the Oval Office scenes...quotes of "We Shall Overcome" mixed among LBJ's declamations. If I had to name a few references I heard, Adams' Doctor Atomic and the choral writing of Harmonium might come to mind, with echoes of Rouse, at times vaguely Copland.

All the soloists were stunning, and costumed in period-appropriate clothing for their characters. Especially Robert Orth as LBJ was great, affecting a long Southern drawl, and never lapsing while navigating huge tessituras - his duets in the last numbers w/ Vale Rideout were amazing. I hate to single out anyone really because they were all excellent as well as the orchestra...it was hard to believe this was only the first performance!

Stucky was double booked tonight with the NY Phil premiering "Rhapsodies" but was in attendance as well...a bit of ticker tape even floated down when he stepped on stage. Hope this piece is recorded, or broadcast, soon!!

This evacuation has been a tolerable one...  ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on September 19, 2008, 05:57:57 AM
2008/2009 Winnipeg Chamber Music Society concerts

September 21, 2008

Haydn - Piano Trio in A flat major, Hob XV:14
Peters, Randolph - Intrada (for string quartet and piano duet)
Beethoven - String Quartet No. 8 in E minor, Op. 59 (Razumovsky II)


This Sunday's concert.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 19, 2008, 06:20:18 AM
Nice program!  Interesting instrumentation on that Randolph Peters piece.  (Don't know his work at all.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 19, 2008, 11:29:15 AM
Oh great!  Nice program...don't know Hughes at all.  I heard them here and they are good!  Do report back...

--Bruce

Outstanding ensemble, and an electrifying performance. The core group is a quartet: Kate Vincent, Artistic Director & viola; Aaron Trant, Assistant Director & percussion (and he had a small truckload of gear he was swatting at all program long . . . there was another concert after, of Boston Musica Viva, and there was supposed to be a 45-minute break for the stage-change, but somehow that gap shrank to half an hour, and I do not envy Mr Trant the experience of that half-hour); David Russell, cello; Sarah Bob, piano. They were joined by guest flutist, two clarinetists, violinist and cellist.

Two guest cellists, as it turned out; for David Russell had been called away to hospital, where his wife was having their first child.

For that reason, the Martino was canceled, and a clarinet solo piece substituted.

The performance cannot be praised too highly; I was not crazy about the clarinet solo piece. Nor, really, about the two pieces which preceded it on the program. The program concluded, though, with a Lee Hyla piece (originally commissioned for Boston Musica Viva, which explained the rather-larger-than-usual-for-the-Firebird-Ensemble instrumentation . . . and which made for a cute tie-in with the fact that the other performance in that venue last night, was to be Boston Musica Viva) which, while in some ways not 'my thing', had a distinct and personal profile, and a largely affable profile at that.

(Well, I wasn't mad about the clarinetists, either, although one of them doubled outstandingly on bass; hat's off to her in that regard.)

The guest strings and flutist were marvelous; as indeed were "Firebird's Own" . . . a percussionist managing a tentful of gear is apt to look like the most impressive member of a new music group, but Mr Trant was un-flamboyantly expert. The most curious thing he was asked to play (by Hyla, as it turned out) seemed to be a sort of no-frills bagpipe substitute, resembling to no small degree an industrial-scale breathalyzer attached to an Easy Read edition harmonica.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 19, 2008, 11:43:31 AM
seemed to be a sort of no-frills bagpipe substitute, resembling to no small degree an industrial-scale breathalyzer attached to an Easy Read edition harmonica.

I might have to quote that somewhere... ;D

Thanks for the long comments.  The Lee Hyla pieces I've heard I've liked a lot, so interesting that it made an impression.  Maybe they'll bring that same program here.  I heard the group last April at the MATA Festival, where they served as the "concertino" in a new concerto grosso by Derek Hurst, with the Boston Modern Orchestra Project.  (Wasn't totally convinced by the piece, which was way too long.)

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 23, 2008, 07:09:20 AM
Tomorrow, opening night at Carnegie Hall, with an all-Bernstein program:

San Francisco Symphony
Michael Tilson Thomas, Music Director and Conductor
Dawn Upshaw, Soprano
Christine Ebersole, Vocalist
Thomas Hampson, Baritone
Yo-Yo Ma, Cello
Ensemble selected from the Vocal Arts Department and the Drama Division of The Juilliard School

Bernstein:  Symphonic Dances from West Side Story 
Bernstein: Selections from A Quiet Place
·· Prelude from Act I
·· You're Late
·· Morning. Good morning.
·· Postlude from Act I 

Bernstein:  "I Can Cook Too" from On the Town 
Bernstein:  Meditation No. 1 from Mass  
Bernstein:  "What a Movie!" from Trouble in Tahiti 
Bernstein:  "To What You Said" from Songfest 
Bernstein:  "Danzón" from Fancy Free 
Bernstein:  "Gee, Officer Krupke" from West Side Story 
Bernstein:  "Ya Got Me" from On the Town 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 23, 2008, 07:46:03 AM
"Ya Got Me" . . . is that Rilke or Apollinaire?  ;D ;) 8)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 23, 2008, 07:49:56 AM
"Ya Got Me" . . . is that Rilke or Apollinaire?  ;D ;) 8)

Alas, "mere" Comden and Green.  ;D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 23, 2008, 07:55:07 AM
Alas, "mere" Comden and Green.  ;D

In the past twelvemonth, I must have seen them on two or three DVD extra features.  They were quite institutional, weren't they?  Leaves me with mixed feelings.  In true Hollywood hyperbole, such contributors are routinely dubbed great . . . but, well, I'm not so sure.

But, hey, maybe Apollinaire wasn't great, either!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Est.1965 on September 23, 2008, 10:37:05 AM
Not this weekend, but next:

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Robert Spano, conductor


Bach/Stokowski: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3
Emmanuel Ax, piano
Brahms: Symphony No. 1


Saw Spano a few months ago here in Scotland doing Mahler 5 with BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra where he is a favourite visitor.  I like this conductor.

Mahler 5 features on your next concert I see, and it's featured so many times and in so many places.  What is it with Mahler 5?  Everybodys doing it this year.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 23, 2008, 10:39:09 AM
Spano does good work.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: karlhenning on September 23, 2008, 10:41:14 AM
And of course, no idle consideration for a Scot, Robert Spano is an anagram for to be sporran (a third option, after to be, or not to be).
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MishaK on September 23, 2008, 06:01:24 PM
Well, I am no longer really looking forward to these concerts:

Quote
Important Program Change Notice for all October 9-21 Ticketholders

Symphony Center today announced that conductors Jaap van Zweden and Neeme Järvi
have agreed to replace Riccardo Chailly for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's
subscription concerts scheduled for October 9-21.  It is with deep regret that
Chailly has withdrawn from his CSO performances.  According to his manager,
Chailly is to undergo tests for an ongoing heart condition, directly following
his tour with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. 

---

Please note the new concert programs:

Thursday, October 9, 8:30 (Note time)
Friday, October 10, 8:00
Saturday, October 11, 8:00
Tuesday, October 14, 7:30
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Jaap van Zweden, conductor

Bruckner Symphony No. 5

---

Thursday, October 16, 8:00
Friday, October 17, 1:30
Saturday, October 18, 8:00
Tuesday, October 21, 7:30
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi, conductor
Yefim Bronfman, piano

Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3
Taneyev Symphony No. 4

The original programming was Chailly conducting Bruckner 5 one week and Mahler 10 the next. I might still go hear the Bronfman/Järvi pairing. Taneyev should be fun for a change. Hope Chailly gets better soon.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on September 23, 2008, 10:20:58 PM
Mahler 5 features on your next concert I see, and it's featured so many times and in so many places.  What is it with Mahler 5?  Everybodys doing it this year.

Everybody is doing it all the time, everywhere. And orchestras are so well trained today and know the standard literature inside out so you could easily conduct it, too (and I am not kidding). Of course, that doesn't change the fact that few conductors really explore the depths of this music. And why should they? When they can strike poses on the podium with the orchestra more or less on autopilot, who cares about musical depth and the details?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Sef on September 24, 2008, 09:15:52 AM
October 4th
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor

Tilson Thomas -   Street Song for Symphonic Brass
Sibelius -   Symphony No. 4
Shostakovich -   Symphony No. 5

Two of my current favourites, so couldn't miss this.

December 13th
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
David Zinman, conductor
Julia Fischer, violin

Shostakovich -   Violin Concerto No. 1
Tchaikovsky -   Symphony No. 1 (Winter Dreams)

Violinist Julia Fischer, whose “uncanny accuracy of intonation and individuality of phrasing” has been praised by the Chicago Tribune, makes her CSO debut with Shostakovich’s brooding and demonic First Violin Concerto. Following this dark and demanding work is Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1, which was described as “better and richer in content than many other, more mature works” by the composer himself.

Looking forward to hearing Julia Fischer for the first time, though I have read mixed reviews. I'm also a bit puzzled by the program linking arguably the best 20th Century Violin Concerto with the lesser performed Tchaikovsky. Contrast is all I can come up with.

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 26, 2008, 12:12:19 PM
Tonight, this one:

San Francisco Symphony
Michael Tilson Thomas, Music Director and Conductor
Erin Wall, Soprano
Kendall Gladen, Mezzo-Soprano
Garrett Sorenson, Tenor
Alastair Miles, Bass
New York Choral Artists
Joseph Flummerfelt, Chorus Director

Knussen: Symphony No. 3 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on September 26, 2008, 06:50:24 PM
Bruce, what did you  make of the Knussen? Any good?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on September 27, 2008, 07:06:40 AM
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

September 26, 2008

Strauss, R. - Also Sprach Zarathustra
Korngold - Violin Concerto (James Ehnes, violin)
Strauss, R. - Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks

Fantastic concert!  James Ehnes was an amazing performer, in front of his very appreciate "home crowd".  He came back for an encore, playing the 2nd mvt. of Bach's Violin Concerto No. 1.   :)
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 27, 2008, 02:19:57 PM
Bruce, what did you  make of the Knussen? Any good?

Yes, quite good, and the friend with me enjoyed it even more than the Beethoven Ninth after intermission.  The Knussen is from 1979, dedicated to Tilson Thomas, and short--just 15 minutes--based on Shakespeare's Ophelia, and her ultimate drowning.  So the score is filled with watery effects (sometimes sounds like Debussy).  Lots of interesting percussion, and a solo trio up front of harp, celesta and guitar that intervenes now and then.  Audience seemed to like it, with scattered "bravo's" here and there. 

Now off to this concert:

New Juilliard Ensemble
Joel Sachs, Conductor
Toni Marie Marchioni, Oboe and English Horn

Roumen Balyozov: Juilliard Concerto (2007-08)***
Jonathan Harvey: Sprechgesang (2007)**
Balázs Horváth: POLY (2007)**
Atli Heimer Sveinsson: Íslenkst Rapp V (1998)**
Frederic Rzewski: Bring Them Home! (2004)*

*New York Premiere
** Western Hemisphere Premiere
***World Premiere (Composed for the New Juilliard Ensemble)


--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on September 27, 2008, 03:41:37 PM
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

September 26, 2008

Strauss, R. - Also Sprach Zarathustra
Korngold - Violin Concerto (James Ehnes, violin)
Strauss, R. - Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks

Fantastic concert!  James Ehnes was an amazing performer, in front of his very appreciate "home crowd".  He came back for an encore, playing the 2nd mvt. of Bach's Violin Concerto No. 1.   :)


Excellent! Ehnes is currently my favourite living violinist. Who was the conductor?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: ChamberNut on September 28, 2008, 05:43:05 AM
Excellent! Ehnes is currently my favourite living violinist. Who was the conductor?

Alexander Mickelthwate.  Wonderful young conductor, who's now in his 3rd year with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on September 28, 2008, 11:54:40 AM
Tonight at Rice University!
Pianist and University of North Texas (  :P ; I don't know who they are, but we beat their football team 77-20 yesterday  ;D ) professor Gustavo Romero plays Beethoven: Sonata in C Minor, Op. 10 No. 1; Sonata in G Major, Op. 79; Sonata in A Major, Op. 2 No. 2; Sonata in A-flat Major, Op. 110; and Sonata in C Major, Op. 53 “Waldstein.”

We'll see how it is ... I'm excited though!   :D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on September 28, 2008, 12:00:10 PM
Almost forgot! Two exciting concerts this weekend from Rice student orchestras:

Saturday, October 4
Shepherd School Symphony Orchestra
Berlioz - Le corsaire
Wagner - Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde
Smetana - "Vltava [The Moldau]"
Janacek - Sinfonietta

Sunday, October 5
Shepherd School Chamber Orchestra
Varčse - Ionisation (!!)
Tchaikovsky - Suite No 4, "Mozartiana"
Mendelssohn - Symphony No 3, "Scottish"
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Senta on September 28, 2008, 10:33:06 PM
Ooh, those concerts look good Brian!

I saw this today!!


Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Robert Spano, conductor


Bach/Stokowski: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3
Emmanuel Ax, piano
Brahms: Symphony No. 1

I'm liable to go into superlatives here if I get started!!

I wasn't familiar with the Bach at all, and the Brahms, only parts of it, now I am sold on both. ;)  And the Piano Concerto is such a neat piece.

The whole concert was a knockout...amazing pieces, and incredible performances! I was in awe of how technically stunning they were, how well balanced, how seamlessly they play together...I have many Atlanta SO recordings I treasure, and live they sound absolutely as they do on CD. And Spano is great! :D So energetic, he just radiates joy on the podium and it is infectious. I am thrilled I got the chance to see them live!

Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on September 29, 2008, 04:16:13 AM
Siouxsie Sioux (ex-Banshees) playing at Koko in Camden Town tonight. I should probably have posted this in The Diner or somewhere because it isn't classical, but it is a concert I'm looking foward to, so what the hell...   ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 29, 2008, 05:53:01 AM
Siouxsie Sioux (ex-Banshees) playing at Koko in Camden Town tonight. I should probably have posted this in The Diner or somewhere because it isn't classical, but it is a concert I'm looking foward to, so what the hell...   ;D

Please report back!  If it's part of the same tour, I heard her last spring here and she was great.

Tonight, I'm hearing the American Modern Ensemble in this interesting program titled Women Who Rock.

Missy Mazzoli: Lies You Can Believe In
Hannah Lash: Stalk
Alexandra du Bois: Dopo il duol, Dopo il mal (After Sorrow, After Woe)
Gabriela Frank: Adagio para Amantani
Vivian Fung: Miniatures
Roshanne Etezady: Mother-of-Pearl
Laura Schwendinger: High Wire Act
Augusta Read Thomas: Passion Prayers

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Wendell_E on September 30, 2008, 03:19:27 AM
Mobile Chamber Music Society
QNG -- Quartet New Generation
Recorder Collective

Thursday, October 16th, 7:30 pm

Diverse and Diagonal

Pavan—John Dowland (1563 - 1626)   

Mortal Flesh (2007-08)—Paul Moravec (b. 1957) 

Alla dolce ombra—(Diminutions by Girolamo Dalla Casa)—Cipriano de Rore (1516-1565)
 
Airlines (2008, written for QNG)—Woiciech Blecharz (b. 1981)
 
Ping Pong (2008, written for QNG)—Ulrich Schultheiß (b. 1956)
 
Intermission

Fuga a tre soggetti  (from The Art of the Fugue)—Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
 
Arak (2008)—Petros Ovsepyan (b. 1966)
 
Vexilla regis (1892)—Anton Bruckner (1824 - 1896)
 
Sitting Ducks—Chiel Meijering (b. 1954)
 
When the season was announced, a "recorder collective" sounded pretty missable, but the program may be interesting, with its mixture of "olde" and new.  Not sure about Brucker on recorders, though.   ;D
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on September 30, 2008, 03:53:01 AM
Please report back!  If it's part of the same tour, I heard her last spring here and she was great.

--Bruce

This was the final date of the the Mantaray tour, so Siouxsie played two sets, which is unsual for her. The evening was being filmed, so there'll probably be a DVD before long. There were also numerous costume changes, which added a bit of camp glamour to the evening.

This was the third time I'd seen her in 11 months; the previous shows were at the Roundhouse, also in Camden, and the O2 Festival in Hyde Park. The sets didn't vary a great deal; most shows included old faves Israel, Christine, Happy House, Dear Prudence, Spellbound, Arabian Knights, Hong Kong Garden and Night Shift, loads of tracks from Mantaray and some slightly underwhelming covers. Last night, I really could have done without the cover of These Boots Are Made For Walking (if that's the title), especially since Sioux played nothing from her albums Join Hands, A Kiss in the Dreamhouse, Hyaena, Tinderbox, Looking Glass, Peepshow, Superstition or The Rapture, and the only Creatures track she performed was Right Now.

Still, a fun evening in a gorgeously over-the-top venue that, shamefully, I'd never been to before.

At the O2 Festival, Siouxsie performed an amazing piece of choreography whereby she lifted her leg up to head height, grabbed hold of it and held that pose for a few moments (Madonna, eat your heart out), leading an acquaintance of mine to come out with a comment that I couldn't possibly repeat on a civilised forum such as this. Siouxsie didn't repeat that move last night.


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on September 30, 2008, 07:00:59 AM
This was the final date of the the Mantaray tour, so Siouxsie played two sets, which is unsual for her. The evening was being filmed, so there'll probably be a DVD before long. There were also numerous costume changes, which added a bit of camp glamour to the evening.

This was the third time I'd seen her in 11 months; the previous shows were at the Roundhouse, also in Camden, and the O2 Festival in Hyde Park. The sets didn't vary a great deal; most shows included old faves Israel, Christine, Happy House, Dear Prudence, Spellbound, Arabian Knights, Hong Kong Garden and Night Shift, loads of tracks from Mantaray and some slightly underwhelming covers. Last night, I really could have done without the cover of These Boots Are Made For Walking (if that's the title), especially since Sioux played nothing from her albums Join Hands, A Kiss in the Dreamhouse, Hyaena, Tinderbox, Looking Glass, Peepshow, Superstition or The Rapture, and the only Creatures track she performed was Right Now.

Still, a fun evening in a gorgeously over-the-top venue that, shamefully, I'd never been to before.

At the O2 Festival, Siouxsie performed an amazing piece of choreography whereby she lifted her leg up to head height, grabbed hold of it and held that pose for a few moments (Madonna, eat your heart out), leading an acquaintance of mine to come out with a comment that I couldn't possibly repeat on a civilised forum such as this. Siouxsie didn't repeat that move last night.

Three times in 11 months...you lucky dog.  8) 

And as for that choreography, she must be one of the most in-shape 50-year-old singers around.  (Feel free to P.M. me with the comment if you like.  ;D) 

Thanks for the post.  Here's a 2004 photo of her performing in NYC, at B.B. King's in Times Square.  Don't like this venue much at all--yours sounds much more interesting--but she was great.

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: springrite on October 02, 2008, 05:41:18 AM
squarez called and offered his extra ticket to the Duetch Opera performance of Der Rosenkavalier tomorrow night at the Beijing Poly Theatre. I know nothing about the cast nor conductor. But I am looking forward to it!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: M forever on October 02, 2008, 08:55:08 PM
Ignorance is bliss!
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: springrite on October 02, 2008, 09:20:38 PM
Ignorance is bliss!

Thank you. I meant I have no information about it at this point, not that I have never heard of them. Chances are, I have heard most of them before. It isn't often that Der Rosenkavalier is on stage in Beijing. Most of the time it is Carmen, La Boheme and La Traviata.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Florestan on October 02, 2008, 11:28:59 PM
Tonight, the season opening concert of the Romanian Radio Symphony Orchestra.

Beethoven

Wellington's Victory
Piano Concerto No. 5
Symphony No. 3 Eroica


Horia Andreescu, conductor
Gerhard Oppitz, piano


I've never heard Oppitz playing, what am I to expect of him?


Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brian on October 03, 2008, 06:19:55 AM
Friday, October 3
Shepherd School Symphony Orchestra
Berlioz - Le corsaire
Wagner - Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde
Smetana - "Vltava [The Moldau]"
Janacek - Sinfonietta
I just found out that, in alignment with a glorious and somewhat shady Rice tradition, my roommate has arranged a blind date for me for this concert.  :o
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on October 03, 2008, 07:34:41 AM

Festival Hall
Thursday 16 October 2008, 7.30pm

Olivier Messiaen La Transfiguration de notre seigneur Jesus-Christ for chorus & orchestra

Kent Nagano conductor
Pierre-Laurent Aimard piano
Kenneth Smith flute
Karen Stephenson cello
Mark van de Wiel clarinet
David Corkhill percussion
Kevin Hathway percussion
Peter Fry percussion
BBC Symphony Chorus
Philharmonia Voices


It should be interesting to compare this to the Proms performance I attended not too long ago. I don't know, you wait decades for a Transfiguration to make an appearance, and then they turn up in pairs.
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 03, 2008, 07:40:24 AM
Festival Hall
Thursday 16 October 2008, 7.30pm

Olivier Messiaen La Transfiguration de notre seigneur Jesus-Christ for chorus & orchestra

Kent Nagano conductor
Pierre-Laurent Aimard piano
Kenneth Smith flute
Karen Stephenson cello
Mark van de Wiel clarinet
David Corkhill percussion
Kevin Hathway percussion
Peter Fry percussion
BBC Symphony Chorus
Philharmonia Voices


It should be interesting to compare this to the Proms performance I attended not too long ago. I don't know, you wait decades for a Transfiguration to make an appearance, and then they turn up in pairs.

I am in awe that you will have heard this twice in little more than two months--amazing.  And I don't see even a single performance of it scheduled in New York this year.  :'(

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: adamdavid80 on October 03, 2008, 07:41:31 AM
Hey, Bruce, what concerts are you going to?  What here in NY is available this weekend?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 03, 2008, 07:50:31 AM
Tomorrow and Sunday I'll be at Carnegie Hall:

Toronto Symphony Orchestra
Peter Oundjian, conductor
Ute Lemper, vocalist
Hudson Shad, vocal group
Weill: The Seven Deadly Sins
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 11, "The Year 1905"

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, conductor
Christian Tetzlaff, violin
Beethoven: Große Fuge, Op. 133 
Messiaen: Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum
Brahms: Violin Concerto 

Are you going to either of those? 

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: MDL on October 03, 2008, 07:56:39 AM
I am in awe that you will have heard this twice in little more than two months--amazing.  And I don't see even a single performance of it scheduled in New York this year.  :'(

--Bruce

It's pretty unusual, certainly. I think it was done in London about a decade ago, possibly by the LSO in the Barbican, but I missed it for some reason. (I'm not 100 per cent sure about that, though; maybe I dreamt it.) Did you get around to buying a recording or are you waiting for the rerelease of the Dorati?
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: Brewski on October 03, 2008, 07:59:16 AM
Haven't bought a recording of it yet--not for any particular reason!--just overwhelmed with other music at the moment.  But I look forward to hearing it soon, during all this Messiaen fever.  To be fair, there *is* a great deal of Messiaen being programmed around town, including Reinbert de Leeuw conducting Turangalîla in December.   :D

--Bruce
Title: Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
Post by: adamdavid80 on October 03, 2008, 08:51:14 AM
Tomorrow and Sunday I'll be at Carnegie Hall:

Toronto Symphony Orchestra
Peter Oundjian, conductor
Ute Lemper, vocalist
Hudson Shad, vocal group
Weill: The Seven Deadly Sins
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 11, "The Year 1905"

The MET Orchestra
James Levine, conductor
Christian Tetzlaff, violin
Beethoven: Große Fuge, Op. 133 
Messiaen: <