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Gurn Blanston:

--- Quote from: SonicMan on July 04, 2010, 01:42:16 PM ---Well received a small box from BRO yesterday, and one of my selections was a classical composer who is completely 'new' to me and likely has no other recordings (can't even find a WIKI article!) -  :D

Pratsch, Johann Gottfried (ca. 1750-1818) (a.k.a. Ivan Pratsch) - Chamber Music from St. Petersburg w/ Lubimov on fortepiano; works for piano, piano + cello, and a Mozart transcription (K. 493) arranged for two fortepianos.

Pratsch was Czech (born in Silesia) but went to St. Petersburg in his mid-20s; he was associated w/ teaching music to aristocratic family members (assume quite popular at the time!), other teaching responsibilities, and in the maintenance and repair of pianos (which would be fortepianos then), harpsichords, and clavichords.  He first came to 'fame' for the publication of a collection of Russian Folk Songs about 1790, where the first name 'Ivan' was used.  Pratsch apparently composed a considerable amount of music, but how much? Plus, the liner notes leave little information as to his own instrumental prowess? Yet another 'lost soul' from the classical era - how many of these Europeans (including John Field) ended up to the courts of Russia?  Is there a book, and if not, a topic of potential interest?  Dave  :)



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Wow, Dave, he IS obscure! Nice catch. Here is his article in Grove's:


--- Quote ---Pratsch, Johann Gottfried [Prach, Ivan; Práč, Jan Bohumir]
(b Silesia, c1750; d ?St Petersburg, c1818). Czech composer, teacher and folksong collector. Much of his life was spent in Russia. From 1780 until 1795 he taught music at the Smolnïy Institute, and in 1784 he was appointed harpsichord teacher at the St Petersburg Theatre School. His keyboard compositions include a sonata in C (1787), six variations on an allemande by Martín y Soler (1794), Fandango (1795), 12 variations (1802), a sonata based on Russian themes (1806), eight variations on the folktune Tï podi, moya korovushka, domoy (‘Be off home with you, my little cow!’, 1815) and an unpublished rondo. He also made a keyboard arrangement of the music from Martín y Soler’s opera Gorebogatïr Kosometovich (‘The Sorrowful Hero Kosometovich’) and Pashkevich’s Fevey (both 1789). His most important work, however, was the Sobraniye narodnïkh russkikh pesen s ikh golosami (‘Collection of Russian folksongs with vocal parts’), one of the earliest collections of Russian folktunes, which he made in collaboration with N.A. L'vov. In its first edition (St Petersburg, 1790) this comprised 100 songs; larger revised editions were published in 1806 (repr. as A Collection of Russian Folk Songs by Nikolai Lvov and Ivan Prach, 1987) and 1815.

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I'm going to zip over there right now and see if there is still a copy waiting for me. A man who can write variations on ‘Be off home with you, my little cow!’ is someone I need to look into! :)  Thanks for the tip.

8)


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Now playing:
Ensemble Claviere - G 414 Quintet in Bb for Clavier & Strings Op 57 #2 1st mvmt - Allegretto moderato

Gurn Blanston:
Speaking of St. Petersburg, Catherine must have had some kind of musical establishment. It seems as though half the musicians in Europe spent some time there. Another one who stayed for the duration of his life was Anton Ferdinand Titz. Once again the adventurous Sonic Guy turned me on to this composer, and I ended up with 2 of his disks, not knowing if there are any others available. That would be these:



They are worth seeking out, nice music.

In any case, here is some info on Titz, also from Grove's:

--- Quote ---Titz [Tietz, Dietz, Dietzsch], Anton [August] Ferdinand (b Nuremberg, c1742; d St Petersburg, 25 Dec 1810/6 Jan 1811).
German violinist and composer, active in Russia. He was orphaned at an early age and was taught painting in Nuremberg by Johann C. and Barbara R. Dietzsch, his uncle and aunt. By the age of 16 he was a violinist at St Sebaldus’s church there. After an unhappy love affair a few years later he went to Vienna, where he played in the opera orchestra and may have studied with Haydn. In 1771 he became a member of the Hofkapelle in St Petersburg; Catherine the Great paid him the highest salary of any of her court musicians. He also taught at the theatre school, gave the future Tsar Aleksandr I violin lessons, directed a court chamber orchestra (which included the clarinettist Joseph Beer and other outstanding musicians), and performed publicly, for instance in 1782, but most of his performances were at court, as a violinist and viola d'amore player. Later in life he suffered a mental disorder that sometimes prevented him from working, but he was encouraged and protected by Senator A.G. Teplov, a St Petersburg amateur musician. He dedicated three string quartets to Teplov and three more to Aleksandr I.
Titz was particularly admired for his sensitive playing of adagio passages, but by the time Spohr met him in St Petersburg in 1803 his technical assurance had gone. His compositions are mainly chamber works in the Viennese Classical style; his string quartets strive for a large dramatic compass and the three upper parts have considerable independence. He also wrote some small vocal works (now lost), including Le pigeon bleu et noir gémit, a romance that was popular in Russian salons until the mid-19th century. He has often been confused with the Dresden violinist Ludwig Tietz.
WORKS
Str qts: 6 quatuors, op.1 (Vienna, c1781–9, Paris, n.d.); 3 quatuors (Bonn, c1802, Leipzig, n.d.); 6, A-Wn; 3 pubd in St Petersburg, cited in Mooser
Other inst: 3 duos … avec romance & rondeaux, 2 vn (Vienna, c1785); Sonate, hpd/pf, vn obbl, op.1 (St Petersburg, 1795); Sonate, op.2 (St Petersburg, c1799); Sonate, op.3 (St Petersburg, c1799); 3 sonatas, vn, b (Vienna, c1802); Sonate, vn, b (Moscow, n.d.); Sonate, vn, b (Leipzig, n.d.); 10 str qnts, A-Wgm, Wn; Sym., Pavloskiy dvorets-muzey; Vn Conc., 2 sonatas for vn, b, all Wgm; Sonata, vn, b, pubd in St Petersburg, cited in Mooser

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Now playing:
Ensemble Claviere - G 414 Quintet in Bb for Clavier & Strings Op 57 #2 2nd mvmt - Minuetto: Tempo giusto - Trio

SonicMan46:

--- Quote from: Gurn Blanston on July 04, 2010, 01:52:03 PM ---Wow, Dave, he IS obscure! Nice catch. Here is his article in Grove's:

I'm going to zip over there right now and see if there is still a copy waiting for me. A man who can write variations on ‘Be off home with you, my little cow!’ is someone I need to look into! :)  Thanks for the tip.

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Good evening Gurn - thanks for the added information on Pratsch - the liner notes are not that informative regarding his biography or his output!

Concerning your follow-up post on Titz, he has been my 'wish list' for ages but just have not bought a CD yet - will explore; and YES that Russian court at Catherine's time must have been a fun place (and for a variety of reasons) - Dave  :D

Opus106:
It is with the last movement that the quartet [Op. 59 No. 1] earns the sobriquet "Russian". In this movement Beethoven quotes an actual Theme Russe though modified somewhat, said to be found in a collection of Russian folk music published by Ivan Pratsch.

Interesting, no?

Source

Gurn Blanston:

--- Quote from: Opus106 on July 04, 2010, 08:57:02 PM ---It is with the last movement that the quartet [Op. 59 No. 1] earns the sobriquet "Russian". In this movement Beethoven quotes an actual Theme Russe though modified somewhat, said to be found in a collection of Russian folk music published by Ivan Pratsch.

Interesting, no?

Source

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Interesting yes! I had forgotten altogether that the source of that folksong was named at one time, since it is usually given without attribution. Very interesting, thanks, Navneeth! :)

8)

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Now playing:
Ensemble Claviere - G 417 Quintet in E for Clavier & Strings Op 57 #5 2nd mvmt - Adagio

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