Author Topic: Willem Mengelberg  (Read 9673 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Willem Mengelberg
« on: July 02, 2011, 09:36:06 AM »
He’s one of my favourite conductors. I admire him for the nobility of his performances and the rapt intensity he can produce. In my opinion he is one of the greatest “historical”  conductors, along with Furtwangler and  Scherchen. And like Furtwängler and Scherchen the recordings are mostly live, they are often hard to find, and interpretations differ.

The recordings which  I cherish the most:

Beethoven2
Beethoven 3 – The live recording on Music and Arts --  “Public Performances”
Beethoven 6 – The live on  Tahra
Bach Matthew Passion and BWV 157 (cantata)
Schubert 9 –   the live recording (1940), unavailable commercially as far as I know, I'm afraid.
Mahler 4
Brahms  1 and 4
Strauss’s Heldenleben NYPO, 1928


For recordings, some of the best transfers are from Hubert Wendel at http://www.willem-mengelberg.com/fr/fr-archive-mengelberg-cd.html. He is a joy to deal with.

Also Tahra , Naxos and Opus Kura.

    (Hubert Wendel Vol 1 for BWV 157)

There's a discography here:

http://web.kyoto-inet.or.jp/people/thase29/Willem2/Willem2.html
« Last Edit: July 04, 2011, 07:52:09 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

DieNacht

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2011, 11:13:12 AM »
   I totally agree with you; very few conductors have been able to consistently produce such interesting and engaged music-making. There´s really a lot on you-tube now, including lesser known recordings like the Debussy Fantaisie and Rach 2.Cto with Gieseking, the Tchaikovsky 1.Cto. with Conrad Hansen, Franck orchestral works etc. ... And he´s been widely circulating on super-budget labels especially in Germany.

   Unfortunately, Mengelberg´s recordings are so dated that the sound quality often will discourage people from trying them; but they should make the effort - what a contrast to the routinely performances found in so many cases elsewhere !
 

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2011, 11:18:42 AM »
Yes -- but unfortunately the Rach 3 with Gieseking isn't on youtube.

Some of the sound is very good -- as I type I'm listening to his Beethoven 6 on the Tahra CD I mentioned and the sound is outstanding. The Eroica I mentioned has inferior sound, but it is certainly one of the finest Eroicas ever -- no one is more inward in the extraordinary music of the basses at the start of ii.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

DieNacht

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2011, 11:40:44 AM »
Like Furtwängler, Scherchen, Klemperer and Celibidache, he also did a bit of composing now and then. His orchestral "Rembrandt Engravings" (1906) have been recorded by Jaap van Zweden and Orkest van Het Osten together with the Mussorgsky Pictures, issued by the Rembrandthuis in Amsterdam (a friend of mine owns it but I haven´t heard it yet). There is at least a page in Dutch about this work and the recording:
http://www.deraa.nl/Concerten/Archief/EtsenRembrandt.html

He also recorded a work by his Dutch composer-colleague, Cornelis Dopper - the "Chaconne" for orchestra, which is likewise on you-tube.

 
« Last Edit: July 02, 2011, 11:42:49 AM by DieNacht »

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2011, 02:33:51 PM »
His Dopper chaconne is indeed impressive, as is the 7th symphony - it sounds quite different from the straight-forward Bakels recording.
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

Offline Draško

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2011, 11:20:54 AM »
Mengelberg was fantastic accompanist. Beside already mentioned Rachmaninov with Gieseking do check out Schumann concerto with Emil von Sauer on youtube (Arbiter otherwise). Always makes me sad there isn't any more Schumann from Mengelberg.
de gustibus, aut bene aut nihil

Offline mjwal

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2011, 03:18:07 AM »
He’s one of my favourite conductors. I admire him for the nobility of his performances and the rapt intensity he can produce. In my opinion he is one of the greatest “historical”  conductors, along with Furtwangler and  Scherchen. And like Furtwängler and Scherchen the recordings are mostly live, they are often hard to find, and interpretations differ.

The recordings which  I cherish the most:

Beethoven2
Beethoven 3 – The live recording on Music and Arts --  “Public Performances”
Beethoven 6 – The live on  Tahra
Bach Matthew Passion and BWV 157 (cantata)
Schubert 9 –   the live recording (1940), unavailable commercially as far as I know, I'm afraid.
Mahler 4
Brahms  1 and 4
Strauss’s Heldenleben


For recordings, some of the best transfers are from Hubert Wendel at http://www.willem-mengelberg.com/fr/fr-archive-mengelberg-cd.html. He is a joy to deal with.

Also Tahra , Naxos and Opus Kura.

    (Hubert Wendel Vol 1 for BWV 157)

There's a discography here:

http://web.kyoto-inet.or.jp/people/thase29/Willem2/Willem2.html
Could you be more specific about some of these? Is the Beethoven #2 the same as appeared on Philips LP in a big box of mostly live recordings with the Concertgebouw 1939-1940? Is the #6 on Tahra different from the one on that set? I thought the Schubert #9 with the Concertgebouw on Philips CD was live too - a remarkable performance, anyway (I can't check now). Which Heldenleben do you mean? I prefer the 1927 recording with the NYPO by a long shot. The Mahler #4 is a classic, of course - I would like to mention the live premiere of Bartok's Violin Concerto, the Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet, the Tannhäuser Overture (which one I cannot say at present), and what is for me the definitive interpretation of Bruch's Violin Concerto #1 with Bustabo.
I have not listened to him much recently - in the 70s I enthused about his interpretations with someone who turned me on to him and went to get the odd obscure dim or crackly sounding LP at the London shop of Michael G. Thomas , who was a great Mengelberg supporter and did much for his reputation, I believe . The Matthäuspassion is astounding; Erb is price- and timeless, of course, and it has an unrivalled intensity, though sounding nothing at all like any other Bach played from the 50s to the present day, in my experience! In fact I find his Beethoven also often sounded as if channelled by other composers at times: Liszt, Bruckner, Mahler. One of those crackly dim LPs has Gieseking playing the Liszt Piano Concerto #1, by the way: tremendous, the Germans would say fulminant.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2011, 03:20:33 AM by mjwal »
The Violin's Obstinacy

It needs to return to this one note,
not a tune and not a key
but the sound of self it must depart from,
a journey lengthily to go
in a vein it knows will cripple it.
...
Peter Porter

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2011, 07:02:58 AM »
Is the Beethoven #2 the  same as appeared on Philips LP in a big box of mostly live recordings with the Concertgebouw 1939-1940?

There are three  Beethoven 2s, one for Philips and one for Telefunken and a live from 1936. I wouldn't like to say which one I like the most

Is the #6 on Tahra different from the one on that set?

Yes it is (it's 22 May 1938) and it is superior in every way to the Philips. My favourite recording of my favourite Beethoven symphony.

I thought the Schubert #9 with the Concertgebouw on Philips CD was live too - a remarkable performance, anyway (I can't check now).

I'm not sure either (I'll check tonight) I'll put the 1940 on symphonyshare in the next few days.

Which Heldenleben do you mean? I prefer the 1927 recording with the NYPO by a long shot.

I meant the December 11-13 1928 with the NYPO. I have it on Pearl: an Orbert-Thorn transfer.  -- I'll edit the original post to make that clear.

I have not listened to him much recently - in the 70s I enthused about his interpretations with someone who turned me on to him and went to get the odd obscure dim or crackly sounding LP at the London shop of Michael G. Thomas , who was a great Mengelberg supporter and did much for his reputation, I believe .

Was that a very strange place near Paddington Station? With a lot of Melodiya LPs piled high in random disorder, filthy, dusty,  and an elderly gent with tatty old clothes who smoked a lot?

The Matthäuspassion is astounding; Erb is price- and timeless, of course, and it has an unrivalled intensity

Yes but there is also Scherchen's Matthew Passion




« Last Edit: July 04, 2011, 07:54:20 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2011, 07:05:20 AM »
Mengelberg was fantastic accompanist. Beside already mentioned Rachmaninov with Gieseking do check out Schumann concerto with Emil von Sauer on youtube (Arbiter otherwise). Always makes me sad there isn't any more Schumann from Mengelberg.

And in Chopin 2 with Cortot
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Offline RJR

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2011, 09:01:55 AM »
And in Chopin 2 with Cortot
I sent you a PM about two hours ago.

Just listened to Mengelberg 1939 Schubert 8th, first movement. Great conductor, great orchestra. Visceral emotions and tragic with a capital T. What more could anyone ask for? Beats me.

Offline mjwal

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2011, 09:16:26 AM »
There are three  Beethoven 2s, one for Philips and one for Telefunken and a live from 1936. I wouldn't like to say which one I like the most

Yes it is (it's 22 May 1938) and it is superior in every way to the Philips. My favourite recording of my favourite Beethoven symphony.

I'm not sure either (I'll check tonight) I'll put the 1940 on symphonyshare in the next few days.

I meant the December 11-13 1928 with the NYPO. I have it on Pearl: an Obert-Thorn transfer.  -- I'll edit the original post to make that clear.

Was that a very strange place near Paddington Station? With a lot of Melodiya LPs piled high in random disorder, filthy, dusty,  and an elderly gent with tatty old clothes who smoked a lot?

Yes but there is also Scherchen's Matthew Passion
Your description sounds familiar - except for the smoking and the address, which was Lymington road, N.W.6. He had a huge store of knowledge about vocal recordings, produced some Mengelberg LP reissues himself and a discography, i believe, sold records all over the world.
- Yes, of course, Scherchen, which I listen to more often. But the Mengelberg has moments of timeless raptness that, to me, are unparalleled. Pity he/the concert transmission left out my favourite aria - "Mache dich mein Herze rein".
I must look for that Tahra Beethoven #6.
The Violin's Obstinacy

It needs to return to this one note,
not a tune and not a key
but the sound of self it must depart from,
a journey lengthily to go
in a vein it knows will cripple it.
...
Peter Porter

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #11 on: July 04, 2011, 10:20:57 AM »
Your description sounds familiar - except for the smoking and the address, which was Lymington road, N.W.6. He had a huge store of knowledge about vocal recordings, produced some Mengelberg LP reissues himself and a discography, i believe, sold records all over the world.
- Yes, of course, Scherchen, which I listen to more often. But the Mengelberg has moments of timeless raptness that, to me, are unparalleled. Pity he/the concert transmission left out my favourite aria - "Mache dich mein Herze rein".
I must look for that Tahra Beethoven #6.

I first met him in Lymington Road NW6 in about 1984. I remember finding the shop. I lived between Swiss Cottage and Belsize Park, and I used to go shopping in Waitrose on the Finchley Road. Well, one day I decided to explore a bit further up towards Hampstead and I stumbled across the shop. I was into opera at the time and I remember my first purchase was a recording of Salome with Vickers singing Herod.

He moved from Finchley Road to Paddington. I went there a couple of times -- he seemed in a bad way actually. Very unkempt and insalubrious, sitting in a cold damp shop, piles and piles and pile of LPs everywhere. I wonder what happened to him. At the time I thought "what a terrible life" -- now it doesn't seem so bad. Is that what they call the wisdom of experience?

You must know Gramex too I suppose -- do you remember "NO RIFF RAFF"? That shop -- which is now on The Cut near Waterloo Station, is the same as it always was.

« Last Edit: July 04, 2011, 10:22:44 AM by Mandryka »
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DieNacht

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #12 on: July 04, 2011, 01:03:55 PM »
Didn´t know about the Chopin with Cortot - it turns out that it is partly on youtube as well. Thanks.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2011, 01:09:48 PM by DieNacht »

Offline Draško

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2011, 01:43:24 PM »
Didn´t know about the Chopin with Cortot - it turns out that it is partly on youtube as well. Thanks.

Malibran Music released two double CDs containing two complete concerts with Mengelberg conducting Paris Radio Orchestra in January 1944: Tchaikovsky 6th and Franck symphonies, Dvorak Cello Cto with Tortelier and Chopin 2nd with Cortot.
de gustibus, aut bene aut nihil

Offline mjwal

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #14 on: July 05, 2011, 03:24:00 AM »
I first met him in Lymington Road NW6 in about 1984. I remember finding the shop. I lived between Swiss Cottage and Belsize Park, and I used to go shopping in Waitrose on the Finchley Road. Well, one day I decided to explore a bit further up towards Hampstead and I stumbled across the shop. I was into opera at the time and I remember my first purchase was a recording of Salome with Vickers singing Herod.

He moved from Finchley Road to Paddington. I went there a couple of times -- he seemed in a bad way actually. Very unkempt and insalubrious, sitting in a cold damp shop, piles and piles and pile of LPs everywhere. I wonder what happened to him. At the time I thought "what a terrible life" -- now it doesn't seem so bad. Is that what they call the wisdom of experience?

You must know Gramex too I suppose -- do you remember "NO RIFF RAFF"? That shop -- which is now on The Cut near Waterloo Station, is the same as it always was.
Ah, that explains it. I probably don't remember his smoking because I was enveloped in a cloud of smoke myself in those days. I believe Mr Thomas has since died. One can find tributes to him online. - I didn't know Gramex - I didn't live in London, was visiting on a regular basis for several years and stayed in West Hampstead. Not having very much money, I did not roam very far afield. There was a place near Charing Cross station, I remember - too expensive for me.
If I didn't feel too old to work on a regular basis and had some money to spare for the starting capital, I think I'd like to run a combined poetry and recorded music shop here in Berlin - preferably not cold and damp, though.
The Violin's Obstinacy

It needs to return to this one note,
not a tune and not a key
but the sound of self it must depart from,
a journey lengthily to go
in a vein it knows will cripple it.
...
Peter Porter

jlaurson

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Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2012, 10:32:36 AM »
Courtesy Frank Forman.

Quote

UPLOAD! Willem Mangelberg complete commercials


http://www.filefactory.com/f/44eb80876ed8046e/

Thanks to "tinear," a misnormer if there ever was one, for identifying the takes and sides of the NYP-SO Egmont overture!

Zipped file included.

+++

WILLEM MENGELBERG: THE COMPLETE ISSUED 78 RPM RECORDINGS
Gathered onto Cassettes by Frank Forman
1990 October

(Josef) Willem Mengelberg (1871.3.28 Utrecht, Holland-1951.3.21 Suort, Switzerland)
Please see a surprisingly brief Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willem_Mengelberg
See also:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Bio/Mengelberg-Willem.htm
http://web.kyoto-inet.or.jp/people/thase29/Willem2/Willem2.html (for a discography (200)
http://www.classicalnotes.net/reviews/mengel.html

During his lifetime, 426 rpm sides were released, two of the second takes. Since then an umpublished acoustic test pressing has surfaced:
Wilhelmus Praeludium NYPO. 24.4.14. Matrix C 29,790, which is included.

An electric test pressing of the rejected take 1 of Tchaikovsky: Serenade Waltz. 28.5.12, COA, has also surfaced. I am proud to have contributed it to the Pearl reissue of his complete Columbia recordings.

I have added other test pressings, owned by other collectors, but they all use the same takes as the published discs. May have better sound.

Also, alternative takes for all sides of the NYP Heldenleben have surfaced. They are not included, since they have been issued only on Biddulph WHL 025-026CD and hence are in copyright.

In addition, Telefunken accidentally issued in 1994, and for the first time anywhere, on 4509-95515 (CD), the remake in, I think 1942.4.15, of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 (Old No. 6), thought it gave the data 1937.5.4) and timings of the recording that was actually issued on Telefunken SK 2210/3 (and Capitol 87092/5 (78 rpm), EDL 8110 (78 rpm set), KDM 8110 (45 rpm), and P 8110 (33 rpm)). Being under copyright, I have not included it.

For the record, Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6 was also recorded twice:
1937.12.21 and issued on SK 2214/8 and, much later, on HT 3 (33 rpm) and
1941.4.22 on SK 3176/80 and Capitol P 8103 (33 rpm).
The problem is that reissues, esp. on CDs, often mix the two recordings. Here, you have them from the 78s, and there should be no confustion.

A large number of live perfroances have been offered for sale, but only the St. Matthew Passion on Columbia and twelve LPs on Philips are less than fifty years old. Highlights are Schubert 9 (Old No. 7), Mahler 4 (the most authentic recording ever issued, tied only by the recordings of the Bohemian Quartet), Brahms 1 (the only original issue in my collection), and all the Beethoven symphonies except the Eroica. They are all my favorite recordings of the music.

His live performances are even more exciting than those he made in the studio! The brass rings incomparably in the Schubert (Mengelberg is to brass as Scherchen is to drums). Beware, though, confusion in identification of recording dates given in various issues. There have been a few spurious issues as well.

These 78s constitute the core of the recordigs of the greatest of all conductors.

F1401a
VICTOR acoustic recordings, New York Philharmonic Orchestra, probably made in Camden, N.J.
Beethoven: Coriolan Overture. 22.4.11. 74,756/7
Beethoven 5 (on 6): 1. 22.4.11,14. 1069
Weber: Oberon Ov. 22.4.14. 74,766/7
Liszt: Les Preludes. 22.4.18,20 74,780/1/2 and 66,131
Tchaikovsky 6:2 abr. 23.4.19. 6374a

F1401b
Tchaikovsky 6:4 abr. 23.4.23. 6374b
Saint-Saens: Spinning Wheel. 23.4.23. V.989
Strauss: Tales of Vienna Woods (abr). 23.4.23. 6247a
Tchaikovsky: Serenade Waltz. 23.4.26. 6427b
Schubert: Rosamunde: Entr'acte. 23.4.2o. 6479b
Mendelssohn: War March of the Priests. 24.4.16. 6464a
Halvorsen: March of the Boyars. 24.4.16. 6464b
Schubert: Rosamunde Ov. 24.4.17 24.4.17. 6479a

ELECTRICS FROM HERE ON
BRUNSWICK recordings.
25.10. ?NYC Wagner: Ride of the Valkyries. 50,161

F1402a
Strauss: Tales of Vienna Woods (abr.) 50,096a
Strauss: Artist's Life (abr). 50.096b
Tchaikovsky: Marche Slave. 50,072

VICTOR ?NYC
Wagner: Flying Dutchman Ov. 25.10.6 6547
Schelling: A Victory Ball. 25.10.9 1127/8

F1402b
COLUMBIA with the Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam. All Concertgebouws were recorded in Amsterdam.
Wagner: Tannhaueser Ov. 26.5. English Columbia.L 1770/1

Berlioz: Damnation of Faust: Rakoczy March and Dance of the Sylphes. 26.5 Eng.C.L 1810
Beethoven: Egmont Ov. 26.5. American Columbia.67,220D
Beethoven: Coriolan Ov. 26.5. 67,273D
Mahler 5:4. 26.5. 11798

F1403a
J.C.Bach: Symphony in Bb, Op. 18.2:1,2 27.6.10. Australian Columbia.0 4111
Wagner: Lohengrin Prelude. 27.6.10. Eng.C.L 1948
Cherubini: Anacreon Ov. 27.6.10 Am.C.67,420/laD
Beethoven 8:2. 27.6.10. 67,421aD
Tchaikovsky: Serenade Waltz. 28.5.12
Rejected take 1. Test pressing AND
Published take 3. Eng.Col.L 2182b

Mendelssohn: MSND Scherzo. 28.5.12
Take 1. Am.Co1.67,486bD
Take 2. Eng.Co1.9560b

F1403b
Weber: Oberon Ov. 28.5.12. 67,485/6aD

VICTOR, Philharmonic Symphonny-Orchestra of New York. Carnegie Hall
Wagner: Forest Murmurs. 28.12.14. 7192
Meyerbeer: Coronation March. 29.1.15 7104b
Saint-Saens: Spinning Wheel. 29.1.15. 7006
Bach: Suite 3:2. 29.1.16. 7484b
Mendelssohn: War March of the Priests. 29.1.16. 7104a

COLUMBIA, COA
Tchaikovsky 5. 28.5.10. L 2176/82a
VICTOR, PS-ONY, Carnegie Hall

F1404b
Strauss: One Hero's Life. 28.12.11-3. Victor.M 44

F1405a
Handel: Alcina Suite. 29.1.16. 1435/6
J.C.Bach: Symphony. Op. 18.2 (complete) 29.1.16. 7483/4a

COLUMBIA, COA. 29.6
Liszt: Les Preludes. Side 1: English Col.L 2362; side 2: Am.Col. 67,724D (Viva-Tonal); side 3: Am.Col. 67,725D (Viva-Tonal); side 4: English Columbia.L 2363
Bizet: L'Arliesienne: Adagietto. Am.C.67,794bD

F1405b
Tchaikovsky 4. Sides 1-6: English Col.L 2366/8; sides 7-8: Australian Col.LOX 9; sides 9-10: L 2370

F1406a
VICTOR, PS-ONY, ?Carnegie Hall Beethoven 3. 30.1.4,9. M 115

F1406b
mvt. 4
Beethoven 1. 30.1.9. M 73

F1407a
Mozart: Magic Flute Ov. 30.1.14. 1486
Beethoven: Egmont Ov. 30.1.14:
matrix CVE 58191-1 Victor 7291a (side 1, take 1)
matrix CVE 58191-2 Gramophone DB 6003a (side 1, take 2)
matrix CVE 58192-1 Victor 7291b (side 2, take 1)
{Thanks to "tinear," a misnomer if there ever was one, for clarifying the cassette side for me. I know of no other issue or reissue of the first take of side 1, meaning that this collection is complete and not "complete." Other than a few friends of mine, this is the first public hearing of the side )

Humperdinck: Hansel and Gretel Prelude 30.1.14. 7436

COLUMBIA, COA

Beethoven: Leonore 3. 30.5.30. Am.Co1.67,987D/8aD

F1407b
Brahms: Academic Festival Ov. 30.5.30 Eng.Col.LX 58/9a
Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet Ov. 30.5.30. Co1.67,868/9D
Ravel: Bolero. 30.5.31. Sides 1-2: Am.C.67890D; side 3: Australian Col.LOX 61a; side 4: 67891bD

F1408a
Beethoven: Turkish March. 30.5.31. 67,988bD
Brahms 1:3. 30.5.31. Test pressing (same as issued disc)
Weber: Euryanthe Ov. 31.6.1. 68,069D
Weber: Freischtltz Ov. 31.6.1. 68,042D

Test pressing Beethoven: Coriolan Ov. 31.6.1. 68,049D (same as issued disc)
Beethoven: Egmont Ov. 31.6.2. 68,058D

F1408b
Beethoven: Leonore 1. 31.6.2. 68,055
Bach: Suite 2. 31.6.2. 68,013/5D
Grieg: Elegiac Melodies. 31.6.3. Australian Columbia.LOX 163

F1409a
Brahms 3. 32.5.10. 68,103/6D
Suppe: Poet and Peasant Ov. 32.5.11. American Columbia.9075M

F1409b
Wagner: Tannhguser Ov. 32.5.9. Am.C.68,082/3D
J.Strauss: Perpetuum Mobile. 32.5.11 Eng.Col.LX 240b
DECCA, COA. 35.(?6.24)
Gluck: Alceste Ov. Eng.D.K 771
TELEFUNKEN, COA
Berlioz: Damnation of Faust: Will o' the Wisps, Dance of the Sylphes, Rakoczy March. 42.4. SK 3243/4a
Schubert: Marche Militaire. 42.4. SK 3244b

F1410a
Beethoven 5. 37.4.4. Ultraphon.G 14,712/5
Vivaldi: CG 8.3. 37.12.21  French Telefunken.SK 2401-14/02-15a
Bach: Suite 3:2. 37.12.21 French Telefunken.SK 2402-15B

F1410b
Berlioz: Roman Carnival Ov. 37.12.21 German Telefunken.SK 2489
Franck: Psyche and Eros. 38.1 French Telefunken.SK 2463-111
Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings. 38.11.7. German/Dutch T.SK 2901/3

F1411a
Beethoven 1. 38.11.7-9. German Telefunken.SK 2770/2
Strauss: Don Juan. 38.11.9. - German Telefunken.SK.2743/4
Hymn of Thanksgiving AND Dutch National Anthem. 38.11.30. Tel.A 2899

F1411b
Brahms 4. 38.11.30. Ger T.SK 2773/7

F1412a
Beethoven 4. 38.12.1,2. GerT.SK 2794/7
Schubert: Rosamunde Ov. 38.11.30. Am.Capitol/Telefunken.86,006

F1412b
Debussy: Faun Prelude. 38.11.30 Supraphon.G 22,172
Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture. 40.4.9 French Telefunken.SK 3080-16/81-17
Dopper: Gothic Chaconne. 40.4.9. Sides 1,2: Cap/Tel.ECL 8031 (78 rpm); sides 3,4: Cap/Tel.KCM 8031 (45 rpm); sides 5: French Tel.SK 3157-123a (78 rpm)

F1413a
Beethoven 3. 40.11.11-3. German Telefunken.SK 3117/22

F1413b
Roentgen: Old Dutch Dances: 5-6. 40.11.11-3. French T.SK 3157
Franck: Symphony in d. 40.11.21-25. French Telefunken.SK 3145-142/9-146

F1414a
Strauss: One Hero's Life. 41.4 German Telefunken.SK 3181/5

F1414b
Wagner: Meistersinger Ov. 40.11.21-5. Am.Capitol/Telefunken.80,036
Wagenaar: Cyrano de Bergerac Ov. 42.4.16 German Tel.SK 3744/5
Brahms: Tragic Overture. 42.4 Am.Cap/Tel.set EBL 8014
Beethoven: Turkish March. 42.11. #Capitol/Telefunken.P 8078

F1415a
BERLIN PHIL. ORCH. 40.7.11 Berlin.
Tchaikovsky 5. Tel.SK 3086/91

F1414b
CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA OF AMSTERDAM
Tchaikovsky 6. 37.12.21. Ultraphon.G 14,214/8

F1416a
Schubert 9. 42.11. Tel.SK 3341/6

F1416b
mvt. 4
Dvorak 9. 41.4. Tel.SK 3190/4

F1417a
Beethoven 6 (on 5). 38.1. German/Swiss Telefunken.SK 2424/8

F1417b
Brahms 2. 40.4.9. Cap/Tel.EEL 8070
Debussy: Faun. 38.11.30. Same perf. as the Supraphon above. German Telefunken.SK 2955

F1418a
Tchaikovsky 6. 41.4.22. Capitol/Telefunken.KEM 8103 (45 rpm)

F1418b
Beethoven 8. 38.11.9. Ger.T.SK 2760/2

DECCA, COA 35.(?6.24)
Bach: Concerto for two violins. Louis Zimmerman and Ferdinand Helman. Dutch Decca.K 20,043/4
Tape filler:
Cimarosa: The Secret Marriage Overture. Leo Blech, BPO. G.DA 4404

F1419a
SOME GREAT RARITIES!

ODEON, COA, not issued by Columbia Tchaikovsky 5:3,2. 27.6.10. Odeon. 123,533/5. Ronnie Russell told me he had the outer two discs, and Don Hodgman later told me he had just gotten the middle one. I informed Don of Ronnie's discs and Don repaired to Ronnie's and made a trade.

TELEFUNKEN, COA
Schubert 8. 42.11. #Past Masters.22 from Telefunken SK 3352-4

F1419b
Mozart: Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. 42.11 #Past Masters.35 from Telefunken SK 3570/1
Rudolf Mengelberg: Salve Regina and Andriessen: Magna res est amor. Jo Vincent, s. 40.4.9. #Past Masters.9 from Telefunken SK 3084-5
Borodin: In the Steppes of Central Asia. 41.4. Cap/Te1.80,153,
Beethoven: Prometheus: Over. and Finale. 42.11. Cap/Te1.86,011

F1420a
Strauss: Death and Transfiguration. 42.4. #Past Masters.36 from Telekunken SK 3738-40

UNPUBLISHED VICTOR TEST PRESSING
Willem Mengelberg: Wilhelmus Praeludium NYPO. 24.4.14. Matrix C 29,790

Tchaikovsky: PC 1. Conrad Hansen, BPO. 40.7.11 Berlin. SK 3092/5

C1420b
movements 2 and 3

I add some fillers here, which I announce and which I shall replace in case anything new turns up. Will someone tell me what they are?





Offline Roberto

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  • Posts: 167
    • Egalizer
  • Location: Hungary
  • Currently Listening to:
    from 18th century to 21st century
Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2013, 12:13:48 PM »
I've found two Mengelberg videos on the Hungarian  "Filmhíradók" website (Filmhíradó is an old form of news "broadcasting" in Hungary when news was presented in cinemas. It was very common in the first half of the 20th century.) These are very short but maybe you will find these interesting.

Mengelberg conducted Tchaikovsky 5th with Budapest Symphony Orchestra in Budapest (Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music):
http://filmhiradok.nava.hu/watch.php?id=4915

Mengelberg at the Budapest airport when he arrived at Hungary:
http://filmhiradok.nava.hu/watch.php?id=2819

Offline Beaumarchais

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  • Location: London
  • Currently Listening to:
    Virtually anything orchestral but especially the romantic period.
Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2015, 07:26:50 AM »
I was recently listening to Toscanini's take on Ein Heldenleben with the NBC symphony orchestra and, among the Youtube comments, someone mentioned Mengelberg's 1928 New York performance. Although I have his 1941 Concertgebouw recording, I would like to get the earlier version which, although it's possible to hear the first 4 minutes on a couple of internet sites, leaves me wondering about the rest of the recording. Despite the very old sound quality, it's better than the later performance with amazing precision and dynamism. Is there any way I could hear it over the internet or is it available for purchase as a CD ? 
“Music is what tells us that the human race is greater than we realize.”
 ― Napoleon Bonaparte

Sean

  • Guest
Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2015, 02:35:06 AM »
His Strauss tone poems are probably the most creative and memorable before Karajan.

Offline Beaumarchais

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  • Location: London
  • Currently Listening to:
    Virtually anything orchestral but especially the romantic period.
Re: Willem Mengelberg
« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2015, 02:50:01 PM »
I didn't know that Mengelberg was the dedicatee of Ein Heldenleben until today. I have just sent off for his 1928 NYPO recording of it that's on CD with pieces by Bach and Ravel and I'm very much looking forward to hearing it. Other recordings of his that I have were made somewhat later but 1928 must have been a vintage year if this version of Oberon is anything to go by. Why is it that amazing performances of this stature are no longer heard either in concert or on modern recordings. The energy released here sometime threatens to blow up the recording venue.

http://youtu.be/jhsPlIAFBHs
“Music is what tells us that the human race is greater than we realize.”
 ― Napoleon Bonaparte

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