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Mark G. Simon:

--- Quote from: lukeottevanger on April 07, 2007, 06:34:02 AM ---Tha't s very true. My point is always that one needs to be conscious of one's influences, to think on them, weigh them up and absorb them, because if that doesn't happen, they might as well just be imitation. None of this is a comment on Rappy's piece, just general discussion.

--- End quote ---

I had no intention of countering anything you said, and wouldn't dream of arguing with you on this point.

I think anyone who wants to compose should listen to as much music as possible, study as many scores as possible, absorb as much as possible from the music that's already out there, and write as much as possible. Hopefully, this knowledge and experience will put the composer in a position to synthesize his own personal style.

I don't think this conflicts with anything you've said, Luke, does it?

lukeottevanger:
On, no, I never thought it did - sorry if I suggested that. I was just latching on to your useful imitation/influence distinction to help clarify what I'd meant earlier.

rappy:

--- Quote ---I think anyone who wants to compose should listen to as much music as possible, study as many scores as possible, absorb as much as possible from the music that's already out there, and write as much as possible. Hopefully, this knowledge and experience will put the composer in a position to synthesize his own personal style.

--- End quote ---

This is what I try to do (of course time is a limit, always).
Of course influence is not a bad thing. All famous composers got influenced - Beethoven by Haydn, Brahms by Beethoven and Schumann etc.
They did never simply copy a style, though. But I also don't think that I do that. The trombone sonata - although in a conventional harmonic and formal language - I could not assign to any composer of the past. Nevertheless, very few serious musicians would accept it as anything different than an inferior emulation, even if it was much better, even if it was as good as e.g. let's say a Mendelssohn sonata.
Why? Because it's too ordinary. It's what a conservative listener expects. It's not different enough.
Thus if this was my (original) style, it would not be accepted. This is quite a dilemma, isn't it?

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