Author Topic: A couple of questions: Editions and the Layman of the Pre-recording Era  (Read 3463 times)

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Offline Opus106

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There's one question of mine and another I saw elsewhere which was thought-provoking, but which went unanswered.

What are the different editions when one speaks of the score of a composition?  I mean, how do they differ from each other. Is this actually an interpretation in its own way, or does the editor just make room for more/different instruments compared to those from the composers time. (Beethoven and his small orchestra and true period instruments v large ones that the play the music now with modern instruments.) And, do all non-HIP conductors stick to one edition?


Wow, that was a fairly large number of one question. 0:) Now, to the other one I said I had read elsewhere...

How did the layman from the times before recordings were available (who did not know how to read a score or play an instrument, but liked the contemporary "classical" music) get to enjoy these works? There weren't as many concerts as they are today to memorise the tunes.


And I wonder how they managed to this in different parts of the world.
Regards,
Navneeth

Offline Opus106

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Re: A couple of questions: Editions and the Layman of the Pre-recording Era
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2008, 07:47:53 AM »
*D'oh!*

Could someone please answer them?
Regards,
Navneeth

Offline The new erato

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Re: A couple of questions: Editions and the Layman of the Pre-recording Era
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2008, 08:48:55 AM »

How did the layman from the times before recordings were available (who did not know how to read a score or play an instrument, but liked the contemporary "classical" music) get to enjoy these works? There weren't as many concerts as they are today to memorise the tunes.[/i]



They learnt to read music and play an instrument (a basic requirements for the bourgeoisie) and played the works with family and friends, often in reductions of the score. For the more difficult works, they could be members of music societies with concerts. But the basic assumption that this music was heard by a majority of the public is wrong. I seem to remeber having read in a book about the social background to Beethovens string quartets that the Vienna of Beethovens day had a couple of thousand musically active inhabitants. This was the potential public for which Beethoven wrote.

But "the time before recordings were available" is a rather impresise period and the answer all depends.....

Offline Opus106

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Re: A couple of questions: Editions and the Layman of the Pre-recording Era
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2008, 09:12:29 AM »
I seem to remeber having read in a book about the social background to Beethovens string quartets that the Vienna of Beethovens day had a couple of thousand musically active inhabitants. This was the potential public for which Beethoven wrote.

And you could fit them all in a modern-day concert hall! :o
Regards,
Navneeth