Author Topic: The Art of Fugue  (Read 98073 times)

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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #80 on: March 13, 2011, 04:14:03 AM »
It is time to go to bed in my country now, but to morrow I shall upload a couple of Counterpoints´s from Bergels recording.

Here are some examples from Bergel´s AoF.

Erich Bergel (1930 - 1998) conducting the Cluj Philharmonic Orchestra.
He was himself an organist, and obviously his point of departure was the sound of the organ. One can in a way say, that he registers rather than arranges  the work for orchestra. He even made a conclusion for the unfinished Fugue. I have included this in the examples. The sound quality is mp3 , 320 kbps


Contrapunctus I
http://www.mediafire.com/file/2v1yfdm4volo5jr/Contrapunctus%20I.mp3


Contrapunctus III
http://www.mediafire.com/file/7fe73zz8poye7hc/Contrapunctus%20III.mp3


Contrapunctus VII
http://www.mediafire.com/file/9zzdgy63y6lge7c/Contrapunctus%20VII.mp3


Contrapunctus Inversus a 4, Inversus
http://www.mediafire.com/file/cusyk5ulc0tq47x/Contrapunctus%20inv.%20a%204%2C%20inversus.mp3


Fuga a 3 soggetti (conclusion by Erich Bergel)
http://www.mediafire.com/file/3h53smi57nl3h65/Fuga%20a%203%20soggetti.mp3
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Offline Marc

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #81 on: March 13, 2011, 04:23:30 AM »
In Bergel's own words:

Bach's last great composition: The Art of Fugue is widely regarded as the climax of his creative work; indeed, some see it as the apogee of all European music. Here his contrapunctual technique reaches a crystalline clarity which has no equal in the music of all times. [....] It would be wrong to classify The Art of Fugue as either a pedagogical or art work. The one does not exclude the other; they are complementary. [....] Without a doubt the organ is the most suitable instrument to do justice to the polyphonic structures of Bach's concepts. However, in contrast to the objectivity of the organ sound, violinist and woodwind players are better equipped to express intense emotions. Consequently, the ideal choice seems to be a form of instrumentation which has the possibility of being expressive as well as powerful: the symphony orchestra. The orchestra need not necessarily be used according to the principles of Richard Strauss or Stravinsky. By means of octave doublings and combinations of instruments with different tone colours, it is possible to approximate the tonal qualities of the organ. These considerations served as guidelines for my orchestration. [....]

Btw: I ordered his version yesterday. Thanks for mentioning him!
(Listening to the downloaded final fugue right now .... I must say: I still prefer the organ or harpsichord ....)

« Last Edit: March 13, 2011, 04:28:09 AM by Marc »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #82 on: March 13, 2011, 04:41:44 AM »
(Listening to the downloaded final fugue right now .... I must say: I still prefer the organ or harpsichord ....)

So do I, and I do not intend trying to convert anybody to prefer chamber- or orchestral arrangements to keyboard renderings.
But some of these "arrangements" may be rather interesting even if they only rarely are relevatory.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2011, 04:43:25 AM by aulos »
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Online Mandryka

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #83 on: March 13, 2011, 05:39:08 AM »
Here are some examples from Bergel´s AoF.

Erich Bergel (1930 - 1998) conducting the Cluj Philharmonic Orchestra.
He was himself an organist, and obviously his point of departure was the sound of the organ. One can in a way say, that he registers rather than arranges  the work for orchestra. He even made a conclusion for the unfinished Fugue. I have included this in the examples. The sound quality is mp3 , 320 kbps


Contrapunctus I
http://www.mediafire.com/file/2v1yfdm4volo5jr/Contrapunctus%20I.mp3


Contrapunctus III
http://www.mediafire.com/file/7fe73zz8poye7hc/Contrapunctus%20III.mp3


Contrapunctus VII
http://www.mediafire.com/file/9zzdgy63y6lge7c/Contrapunctus%20VII.mp3


Contrapunctus Inversus a 4, Inversus
http://www.mediafire.com/file/cusyk5ulc0tq47x/Contrapunctus%20inv.%20a%204%2C%20inversus.mp3


Fuga a 3 soggetti (conclusion by Erich Bergel)
http://www.mediafire.com/file/3h53smi57nl3h65/Fuga%20a%203%20soggetti.mp3

That's very very  kind and generous. Much appreciated.

So do I, and I do not intend trying to convert anybody to prefer chamber- or orchestral arrangements to keyboard renderings.
But some of these "arrangements" may be rather interesting even if they only rarely are relevatory.

I don't want to put you on the spot -- but please, give me an example of a performance of a fugue played on organ or harpsichord or piano which is revelatory in the sense you mean -- I'm having a hard time getting what you're driving at. On the one hand there's internal variety.  On the other hand it's best not to try to listen analytically, but rather enjoy the musical expression. And on the third hand orchestral versions are may actually distract the listener from appreciating this internal variety (?) because of the colour, the sensuality, they bring.

I hope that doesn't sound too aggressive -- I should say that I'm finding this discussion one of the most interesting I've been involved in on the web for a long time. It's certainly making me think -- though I suspect that my paraphrase above is full of misunderstandings. If so. sorry!
« Last Edit: March 13, 2011, 05:49:10 AM by Mandryka »
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Antoine Marchand

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #84 on: March 13, 2011, 06:42:05 AM »
Here are some examples from Bergel´s AoF.

Erich Bergel (1930 - 1998) conducting the Cluj Philharmonic Orchestra.
He was himself an organist, and obviously his point of departure was the sound of the organ. One can in a way say, that he registers rather than arranges  the work for orchestra. He even made a conclusion for the unfinished Fugue. I have included this in the examples. The sound quality is mp3 , 320 kbps


Contrapunctus I
http://www.mediafire.com/file/2v1yfdm4volo5jr/Contrapunctus%20I.mp3


Contrapunctus III
http://www.mediafire.com/file/7fe73zz8poye7hc/Contrapunctus%20III.mp3


Contrapunctus VII
http://www.mediafire.com/file/9zzdgy63y6lge7c/Contrapunctus%20VII.mp3


Contrapunctus Inversus a 4, Inversus
http://www.mediafire.com/file/cusyk5ulc0tq47x/Contrapunctus%20inv.%20a%204%2C%20inversus.mp3


Fuga a 3 soggetti (conclusion by Erich Bergel)
http://www.mediafire.com/file/3h53smi57nl3h65/Fuga%20a%203%20soggetti.mp3

Thanks for this!

I found the 2-CD set with this wonderful cover:



I supposse it reflects the mental image of many of our about the AoF.

Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #85 on: March 13, 2011, 08:52:37 AM »
If you want to hear the ultimate realization of the final fugue, listen to Busoni's 30-minute Fantasia Contrapuntistica--it's his attempt to complete the piece!  :) (I suggest Jon Ogdon's on the Altarus label.)

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #86 on: March 13, 2011, 09:18:06 AM »
I don't want to put you on the spot -- but please, give me an example of a performance of a fugue played on organ or harpsichord or piano which is revelatory in the sense you mean -- I'm having a hard time getting what you're driving at. On the one hand there's internal variety.  On the other hand it's best not to try to listen analytically, but rather enjoy the musical expression. And on the third hand orchestral versions are may actually distract the listener from appreciating this internal variety (?) because of the colour, the sensuality, they bring.

The AoF is without doubt concieved for harpsichord or organ (manual only) enabling all the parts to sound in perfect equilibrium. This ideal is realised in the recording Gerd Zacher made (Aeolus 1999) on the restored Balthasar König-organ (1714) der Pfarrkirche St.Leodegar, Niederehe. The organ contains a manual section of nine stops and a pedal section of three stops. He only uses the manual for this recording. In his interpretation one can concentrate upon the internal variety or upon the musical expression.  If one does not know the work so well it is tempting to concentrate upon the internal variety (the counterpoint which often is so dense as to become confusing) in order not to loose the orientation, but as one gets to know the work better it may be relevatory deliberately to ignore the counterpoint and just listen to the rich musical expression. Zacher´s version is indeed contemplative and expressive. This IMO concerning these issues (counterpoint and expression) ideal interpretation permits both points of view in equal mesure, and ideally even both ways of listening at the same time, experiencing the balanced synthesis of spirit and emotion, which this work reflects more than any other of Bach´s (or anyone else´s) works, and which I consider the essential meaning of the work. It takes time to reach this way of listening, compare the way Marc, Velimir and I described our initial problems about understanding the work at all. Hope you understand. It is indeed difficult to explain things like these in a foreign language.

Preferring a rendering with all the parts in equilibrium, I think chamber and orchestral versions often disturb the balance of the work, the parts being scored in different colours, and the playing often with enhanced focus on the thematic statements, the purpose of which seems to be some wish for expression rather than to bring contrapunctal clarity to the playing. I only mention this as some kind of tendency. There are exceptions - the recording by Stuttgart CO / Münchinger being one such exception, because of the homogeneous sound of the very disciplined Stuttgart strings, and because of Münchinger´s balanced vision of the work. 

Gerd Zacher The Art of Fugue

Contrapunctus I
http://www.mediafire.com/file/m6ccs8d5woib38j/01%20-%20Contrapunctus%20I%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3

Contrapunctus III
http://www.mediafire.com/file/yfo0mtmdsoo7uj7/03%20-%20Contrapunctus%20III%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3

Contrapunctus VII
http://www.mediafire.com/file/xx8ngbb2fwdqht9/07%20-%20Contrapunctus%20VII%20%28A%204%20Per%20Augmentationem%20Et%20Diminutionem%29%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3


It might seem relevant to choose Walcha´s recording for my purpose, but as he uses the pedal almost throughout, he does not really illustrate my argument.

« Last Edit: March 13, 2011, 09:31:45 AM by aulos »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #87 on: March 13, 2011, 09:38:01 AM »




I supposse it reflects the mental image of many of our about the AoF.

At least it is more telling than the cover of the original  issue, which depicts some blurred landscape in strange brown nuances (reminds me of Lars von Trier´s movies).
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Online Mandryka

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #88 on: March 13, 2011, 12:27:17 PM »
Thanks for everything Aulos. I've just downloaded the files and I'm looking forward to hearing them.
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Offline Marc

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #89 on: March 13, 2011, 12:48:04 PM »
Thanks for everything Aulos. I've just downloaded the files and I'm looking forward to hearing them.

Same here!

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Online Mandryka

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #90 on: March 14, 2011, 01:01:28 PM »
The AoF is without doubt concieved for harpsichord or organ (manual only) enabling all the parts to sound in perfect equilibrium. This ideal is realised in the recording Gerd Zacher made (Aeolus 1999) on the restored Balthasar König-organ (1714) der Pfarrkirche St.Leodegar, Niederehe. The organ contains a manual section of nine stops and a pedal section of three stops. He only uses the manual for this recording. In his interpretation one can concentrate upon the internal variety or upon the musical expression.  If one does not know the work so well it is tempting to concentrate upon the internal variety (the counterpoint which often is so dense as to become confusing) in order not to loose the orientation, but as one gets to know the work better it may be relevatory deliberately to ignore the counterpoint and just listen to the rich musical expression. Zacher´s version is indeed contemplative and expressive. This IMO concerning these issues (counterpoint and expression) ideal interpretation permits both points of view in equal mesure, and ideally even both ways of listening at the same time, experiencing the balanced synthesis of spirit and emotion, which this work reflects more than any other of Bach´s (or anyone else´s) works, and which I consider the essential meaning of the work. It takes time to reach this way of listening, compare the way Marc, Velimir and I described our initial problems about understanding the work at all. Hope you understand. It is indeed difficult to explain things like these in a foreign language.

Preferring a rendering with all the parts in equilibrium, I think chamber and orchestral versions often disturb the balance of the work, the parts being scored in different colours, and the playing often with enhanced focus on the thematic statements, the purpose of which seems to be some wish for expression rather than to bring contrapunctal clarity to the playing. I only mention this as some kind of tendency. There are exceptions - the recording by Stuttgart CO / Münchinger being one such exception, because of the homogeneous sound of the very disciplined Stuttgart strings, and because of Münchinger´s balanced vision of the work. 

Gerd Zacher The Art of Fugue

Contrapunctus I
http://www.mediafire.com/file/m6ccs8d5woib38j/01%20-%20Contrapunctus%20I%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3

Contrapunctus III
http://www.mediafire.com/file/yfo0mtmdsoo7uj7/03%20-%20Contrapunctus%20III%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3

Contrapunctus VII
http://www.mediafire.com/file/xx8ngbb2fwdqht9/07%20-%20Contrapunctus%20VII%20%28A%204%20Per%20Augmentationem%20Et%20Diminutionem%29%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3


It might seem relevant to choose Walcha´s recording for my purpose, but as he uses the pedal almost throughout, he does not really illustrate my argument.

I listened to Contrapunctus 7. It is just as you say.

The organ performance I know best is Tachezi's. He is helpful because he uses colours to highlight themes coming and going. And Zacher doesn't do that. And as you say, the counterpoint is confusing -- hard to follow without some help from the performer.

So I'm left with the expression. But what do you mean -- expression? On the emotional, affective, level, Zacher's Cpt 7 is a sort of noble, powerful, somewhat contemplative field of moving sounds. That's nice.

I guess what I'm scared of is that they will all be just that. 19 noble powerful, somewhat contemplative fields of moving sounds!

I've ordered the CD to find out.

This is a new way of listening to AofF for me -- great! You have really made me rethink things.

And I can imagine how hard it must have been to write what you did in a foreign language  (I often try to write in French -- I'm an anglophone). You did it perfectly though -- I wish my French were as good as your English.
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Offline purephase

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #91 on: March 14, 2011, 05:08:43 PM »
IMO the logical sequence is

Contrapunctus I - XI
Four-part mirror fugue + inversion
Three-part mirror fugue + inversion
Canon I - IV
Incomplete Fugue á 4

You may even consider the Canons a kind of appendix (like the Duets in Clavierübung III).

But maybe any supposed sequence only serves editoral purposes, since it is uncertain whether the work was meant to be performed in one sitting or not.

Bach probably beforehand completed the unfinished Fugue á 4 in his head, but never managed to write it down.

It is also possible that more complex Contrapuncti was intended to follow.
I quite liked Indra Hughes' theory that Bach left the Fugue á 4 unfinished as a kind of musical riddle for the student or performer to resolve.  It's hard to fully buy into his view simply because it involves a good deal of numerological speculation, but I do think he makes some very strong criticisms of the idea that a page of the manuscript went missing or that Bach died in the middle of writing the work.

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #92 on: March 14, 2011, 10:35:06 PM »
The AoF is without doubt concieved for harpsichord or organ (manual only) enabling all the parts to sound in perfect equilibrium. This ideal is realised in the recording Gerd Zacher made (Aeolus 1999) on the restored Balthasar König-organ (1714) der Pfarrkirche St.Leodegar, Niederehe. The organ contains a manual section of nine stops and a pedal section of three stops. He only uses the manual for this recording. In his interpretation one can concentrate upon the internal variety or upon the musical expression.  If one does not know the work so well it is tempting to concentrate upon the internal variety (the counterpoint which often is so dense as to become confusing) in order not to loose the orientation, but as one gets to know the work better it may be relevatory deliberately to ignore the counterpoint and just listen to the rich musical expression. Zacher´s version is indeed contemplative and expressive. This IMO concerning these issues (counterpoint and expression) ideal interpretation permits both points of view in equal mesure, and ideally even both ways of listening at the same time, experiencing the balanced synthesis of spirit and emotion, which this work reflects more than any other of Bach´s (or anyone else´s) works, and which I consider the essential meaning of the work. It takes time to reach this way of listening, compare the way Marc, Velimir and I described our initial problems about understanding the work at all. Hope you understand. It is indeed difficult to explain things like these in a foreign language.

Preferring a rendering with all the parts in equilibrium, I think chamber and orchestral versions often disturb the balance of the work, the parts being scored in different colours, and the playing often with enhanced focus on the thematic statements, the purpose of which seems to be some wish for expression rather than to bring contrapunctal clarity to the playing. I only mention this as some kind of tendency. There are exceptions - the recording by Stuttgart CO / Münchinger being one such exception, because of the homogeneous sound of the very disciplined Stuttgart strings, and because of Münchinger´s balanced vision of the work. 

Gerd Zacher The Art of Fugue

Contrapunctus I
http://www.mediafire.com/file/m6ccs8d5woib38j/01%20-%20Contrapunctus%20I%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3

Contrapunctus III
http://www.mediafire.com/file/yfo0mtmdsoo7uj7/03%20-%20Contrapunctus%20III%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3

Contrapunctus VII
http://www.mediafire.com/file/xx8ngbb2fwdqht9/07%20-%20Contrapunctus%20VII%20%28A%204%20Per%20Augmentationem%20Et%20Diminutionem%29%20-%20Gerd%20Zacher%20%281929%29.mp3


It might seem relevant to choose Walcha´s recording for my purpose, but as he uses the pedal almost throughout, he does not really illustrate my argument.

Thanks that's fantastic.

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #93 on: March 15, 2011, 02:35:33 PM »
So I'm left with the expression. But what do you mean -- expression? On the emotional, affective, level..

Yes, on the affective level. The expression of the affect, which the performer thinks the music represents
The affect expressed by the AoF is in my opinion confidence, sometimes in the shape of silent consolation, sometimes in the shape of jubilant conviction, and often something in between. The conviction that a guiding principle (in Bach´s world the will of God) permeates the confusing diversity of our world. In a similar way as the main subject of the AoF permeates the diversity of the entire work as a kind of guiding principle.




« Last Edit: March 15, 2011, 02:54:55 PM by aulos »
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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #94 on: March 15, 2011, 02:53:52 PM »
I quite liked Indra Hughes' theory that Bach left the Fugue á 4 unfinished as a kind of musical riddle for the student or performer to resolve.  It's hard to fully buy into his view simply because it involves a good deal of numerological speculation, but I do think he makes some very strong criticisms of the idea that a page of the manuscript went missing or that Bach died in the middle of writing the work.

One has to take into consideration, that the unfinished fugue maybe wasn´t intended to become a part of the AoF. Bach worked quite a lot with counterpoint in these days and he might have had plans for other kinds of works. However it is thought provoking that the main subject of the AoF theoretically fits into the unfinished fugue, and that Bach also used the Bach-theme in an elaborated variant already in Contrapunctus VIII and XI.

It is also possible that the idea of how the piece was to end (considering the complexity of the task) was something which had not yet matured fully in his mind. He also left other difficult tasks unfinished, compare with the rather complex incomplete fugue for harpsichord BWV 906 c-minor.
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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #95 on: March 15, 2011, 03:20:33 PM »
While Gerd Zacher in his recording plays the Contrapuncti I - XI in sequence and adds the incomplete fugue as an appendix, but omits the four Canons and the mirror fugues, Rudolf Scheidegger omits the mirror fugues and the incomplete fugue, but includes Contrapuncti I - XI and the four Canons. He spreads the Canons in between the Contrapuncti like intermezzi and spoils the effect of the growing tension in Cpt. I - XI when played in sequence. But his playing is still expressive with the parts in perfect balance.

Rudolf Scheidegger playing the Martin Pflüger organ (1994) in St. Corneli in Tosters near Feldkirch, Austria.

Contrapunctus I
http://www.mediafire.com/file/748bahuo5sj3z73/cpt1.mp3

Contrapunctus III
http://www.mediafire.com/file/5w4f4pphqof5p0j/cpt3.mp3

Contrapunctus VII
http://www.mediafire.com/file/g4rovafrcixrhrt/cpt11.mp3


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Online Mandryka

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #96 on: March 20, 2011, 08:32:42 AM »
I've lived with the Zacher A of F for quite a few days now and I'm clear that I was wrong to be worried about expressive variety. This is a great recording in a style completely new to me which has made me see this work in a completely new light. Cpt 6 is haunting me particularly powerfully at the moment. Also the way the thing climaxes towards the end -- cpt 11 I think -- is quite astonishing.

What is this like?





As Prem... err, Aulos said: variety in abundance! :)

I just saw that -- I didn't know I was speaking to you! Not the first time you've helped me  :)

Another good one, IMO, is played by Alessio Corti (organ again), part of his integral. Unfortunately, this one is not easy to get.
But here's a link to a live performance:

http://avaxhome.ws/music/classical/bach_kunst_der_fuge.html

For the harpsichord, I would recommand Christian Rieger:



I'll try Conti and Rieger soon -- thanks for the pointers. I've never heard it on harpsichord, so I'm particularly looking forward to hearing Rieger. I have Rogg's CD , though I haven't played it for years: I remember being very impressed by the colourfulness and the sense of forward motion (even though it's slower than Tachezi's I think)
« Last Edit: March 20, 2011, 11:11:42 AM by Mandryka »
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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #97 on: March 20, 2011, 01:57:56 PM »
I've lived with the Zacher A of F for quite a few days now and I'm clear that I was wrong to be worried about expressive variety. This is a great recording in a style completely new to me which has made me see this work in a completely new light. Cpt 6 is haunting me particularly powerfully at the moment. Also the way the thing climaxes towards the end -- cpt 11 I think -- is quite astonishing.

Happy to see this.

What is this like?


I have not heard it. It belongs so far I can understand to that kind of arrangements I usually avoid.

I'll try Conti and Rieger soon -- thanks for the pointers. I've never heard it on harpsichord, so I'm particularly looking forward to hearing Rieger. I have Rogg's CD , though I haven't played it for years: I remember being very impressed by the colourfulness and the sense of forward motion (even though it's slower than Tachezi's I think)

For variety I would prefer Rieger. You describe Rogg´s interpretation very well. Corti´s is much in the same vein, actually he is a pupil of Rogg.
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Offline Marc

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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #98 on: March 20, 2011, 08:50:14 PM »
[....]
I'll try Conti and Rieger soon -- thanks for the pointers. I've never heard it on harpsichord, so I'm particularly looking forward to hearing Rieger. I have Rogg's CD , though I haven't played it for years: I remember being very impressed by the colourfulness and the sense of forward motion (even though it's slower than Tachezi's I think)

[....]
For variety I would prefer Rieger. You describe Rogg´s interpretation very well. Corti´s is much in the same vein, actually he is a pupil of Rogg.

Since a couple of days I've also grown attached to Leonhardt (& Van Asperen) on harpsichord. There's no Fuga à 3 soggetti in this one, though.
For a more chamber-like organ version, Bernard Foccroulle comes to mind. But yes, Tachezi is quite good, too!
And for the piano, I would suggest Pierre-Laurent Aimard (Deutsche Grammophon), with good mastering of the counterpoint and some very powerful climaxes. I must admit though that I do not own other paino versions to compare with.
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Re: The Art of Fugue
« Reply #99 on: March 21, 2011, 12:31:36 AM »
Since a couple of days I've also grown attached to Leonhardt (& Van Asperen) on harpsichord. There's no Fuga à 3 soggetti in this one, though.
Leonhardts second version has always been my favorite harpsichord version. But the choice  above seemed to be between Rieger and Corti, and my remark about variety was adressed to Rieger versus Corti, since Mandryka already knows Rogg´s version.

Quote from: Marc
For a more chamber-like organ version, Bernard Foccroulle comes to mind. But yes, Tachezi is quite good, too!
And for the piano, I would suggest Pierre-Laurent Aimard (Deutsche Grammophon), with good mastering of the counterpoint and some very powerful climaxes. I must admit though that I do not own other paino versions to compare with.

Aimard´s version gets rather hectic and "hammering" during the course of the work, as the counterpoint gets more dense. I do not think his way suits the work. Your countryman Ivo Janssen is much to prefer to Aimard. But most (on the piano) I prefer Hans Petermandl (Gramola) and Walter Riemer (ORF). Both are noble and balanced accounts.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.