Author Topic: Cato's Grammar Grumble  (Read 563526 times)

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Scarpia

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1120 on: March 17, 2010, 08:01:20 AM »
Redundancy and wordiness have their place and can be used to great rhetorical effect. Just look at Shakespeare.

Strunk and White's point is the redundancy and wordiness loose their rhetorical effect if every sentence is redundant and wordy.

Spotswood

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1121 on: March 17, 2010, 08:01:51 AM »
Strunk and White's point is the redundancy and wordiness loose their rhetorical effect if every sentence is redundant and wordy.

Yeah, but we knew that.

karlhenning

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1122 on: March 17, 2010, 08:03:29 AM »
OTOH, modifiers like "very" and "extremely" exist for a reason, and there's no need to pretend they don't.

Verily, verily.
 
Strunk and White's point is the redundancy and wordiness loose their rhetorical effect if every sentence is redundant and wordy.

They lose rhetorical effect, but they become the tone . . . look at minimalism.

Spotswood

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1123 on: March 17, 2010, 08:04:43 AM »

Franco

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1124 on: March 17, 2010, 08:06:33 AM »
Must we?

I'd rather look at it than listen to it.

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1125 on: March 17, 2010, 08:06:54 AM »
look at minimalism.
A rose is a rose is a rose.
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Spotswood

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1126 on: March 17, 2010, 08:15:48 AM »
A rose is a rose is a rose.

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?
Philip Glass

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1127 on: March 17, 2010, 08:37:48 AM »
Knock knock ...
Who's there?

Knock knock ...
Who's there?

(repeat)

Philip Glass
Ah, yes...but Ms Stein's statement is the pithiest manual of style ever penned.
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Spotswood

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1128 on: March 17, 2010, 08:42:16 AM »
Ah, yes...but Ms Stein's statement is the pithiest manual of style ever penned.

You should read James Thurber's essay on Stein.

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1129 on: March 17, 2010, 09:04:58 AM »
You should read James Thurber's essay on Stein.
I read it in college (back in the dark ages).  Stein, like many of us, was better the more she kept her mouth shut.  But her influence on 20th Century art was profound.  She might not have been all that gifted herself, but she sure could recognize it in others.
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Offline The Six

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1130 on: March 29, 2010, 10:48:50 AM »
"...reaches a crescendo" is a pretty popular phrase now, but it seems that when people use it they're actually referring to a climax. Of course, the crescendo isn't the climax, it's the build to it.

Offline Opus106

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1131 on: March 29, 2010, 11:04:48 AM »
"...reaches a crescendo" is a pretty popular phrase now, but it seems that when people use it they're actually referring to a climax. Of course, the crescendo isn't the climax, it's the build to it.

In a similar vein: Quantum leap; Light-years ahead.

 
Regards,
Navneeth

Offline Cato

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1132 on: March 30, 2010, 04:29:30 PM »
Many thanks for the previous remarks above, especially the Glass joke!  Wocka Wocka!

Last night Blondie Bubblehead, Anchor Woman for a local station's opinion of what is news, regaled her audience about a local fire in an apartment building.

The cause?

"Fire Department officials said that unintended food was the cause."

I have suspected for years that food has the capability of bursting into flames if people buy it without the proper intention.

You do hear about all that food bought unintentionally, and then the food feels unwanted, rejected, and then becomes pyromaniacally mischievous?   0:)
« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 04:36:03 PM by Cato »
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Offline The Six

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1133 on: April 06, 2010, 02:41:59 PM »
Why can't people use apostrophe's correctly anymore?

Offline listener

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1134 on: April 06, 2010, 03:03:12 PM »
Why can't people use apostrophe's (sic) correctly anymore?

Because critics are likely to use cant.

(does not make much sense, but I could not resist)
« Last Edit: April 06, 2010, 03:05:19 PM by listener »
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Offline Sydney Grew

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1135 on: April 06, 2010, 03:48:56 PM »
Why can't people use apostrophe's correctly any[ ]more?
It is just one symptom of the widespread intellectual impoverishment of to-day - sometimes referred to as "dumbing down." We see it all around us do not we.
Rule 1: assiduously address the what not the whom! Rule 2: shun bad language! Rule 3: do not deviate! Rule 4: be as pleasant as you can!

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1136 on: April 11, 2010, 02:58:40 PM »
Is there ever a reason to put a space before an exclamation or question mark at the end of a sentence? It seems common practice with a lot by Romance language writers on the internet (or at least, most times I see it done it is by an Italian/French/Spanish speaker)...

Example: "'O Sole Mio !"
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

Online Papy Oli

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1137 on: April 12, 2010, 10:50:11 AM »
Is there ever a reason to put a space before an exclamation or question mark at the end of a sentence? It seems common practice with a lot by Romance language writers on the internet (or at least, most times I see it done it is by an Italian/French/Spanish speaker)...

Example: "'O Sole Mio !"

Just did a quick search on the French side and that's only due to grammatical accepted "rules" of our language : basically, if it is a "single" mark (e.g. comma, point...), it is a single space afterwards. If it is a double mark (e.g. exclamation, question mark), you use a "double" space (one either side). Lots of fiddling about really for something that's done unconsciously  ;D





« Last Edit: April 13, 2010, 11:47:49 AM by papy »
Olivier

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1138 on: April 13, 2010, 04:25:45 AM »
Thank you!
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

Offline Cato

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1139 on: April 15, 2010, 04:20:23 PM »
My local moronic television reporter, Blondie Bubblehead, recently intoned - complete with the phrase as a caption at the bottom of the screen - the following phrase:

"Coming up: Diffusing a dangerous situation!"

Why anyone would want to do that, rather than defusing it, is a mystery to me!   $:)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)