Author Topic: Cato's Grammar Grumble  (Read 554317 times)

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Offline Cato

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble: "Epic Fail - ure"
« Reply #1020 on: March 04, 2010, 03:03:31 PM »
Several sources claim it goes back to 1974 and the Dungeons and Dragons handbook, where a disastrous roll of the dice could cause an "epic fail."  Either the word "fail" was misprinted or the word was shortened on purpose for unknown reasons.

Others claim it goes back to 1980's Japanese videogames not using proper English.  Another claim is that early computer programmers used it to refer to crashing programs.  You might remember: "Abort?  Retry?"  If the computer still crashed or failed to reboot, it was an "epic fail."

Why those 3 last letters cannot be used...who knows?
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Offline Lethevich

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1021 on: March 04, 2010, 03:12:53 PM »
Fail is definitely influenced by poor translation from Japanese (like a lot of post 2000s nerd talk - it began to be used ironically, but then gained greater popularity, but still with that "we know this sounds absurd" edge to it) -

Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

greg

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1022 on: March 04, 2010, 06:00:19 PM »
unrelated to that, this one had me in stitches:

That must suck having that on...
trying to figure what's so bad about it, if you cover up the bottom of the nose and the whole mouth, it's not too bad. I'm not sure how appropriate the shading is, though.

karlhenning

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1023 on: March 04, 2010, 07:03:37 PM »
John Singer Sargent, he wasn't.

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1024 on: March 05, 2010, 06:41:58 AM »


"In Loving Memory" -- Looks as if the artist wanted her remembered as a zombie.  (And I don't mean a member of the band that did "Time of the Season.")
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Franco

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1025 on: March 05, 2010, 06:53:52 AM »
The tattoo appears to me to be a tribute to a loved one who has died.  For sure, tattoo art is often crude and does not always portray a complimentary image from a photograph, but the artist did his best to respond to the wishes of this patron.   

This aspect of online activity, i.e. making fun of people we don't know, is one of the least positive.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2010, 09:48:26 AM by Franco »

karlhenning

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1026 on: March 05, 2010, 09:35:32 AM »
This aspect of online activity, i.e. making fun of people we don't know, is one of the least positive.

"In Loving Memory" -- Looks as if the artist wanted her remembered as a zombie.

I think, Franco, that this artist fully deserves his lumps.
 
John Singer Sargent, he wasn't.

Spotswood

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1027 on: March 05, 2010, 12:03:58 PM »
What the heck do kids these days mean when they use the terms "surreal" and "epic?"

They mean cool, boss, rad, gear, superbad and wicked. I did a column  once on the way every generation uses different words to say essentially the same thing: we like something or we don't like it. The words are different, but the sentiment never changes. Shame I can't find the thing online. It was epic.

karlhenning

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1028 on: March 05, 2010, 12:22:14 PM »
Straight from the fridge, daddy-o.

Spotswood

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1029 on: March 05, 2010, 01:48:59 PM »
John Singer Sargent, he wasn't.

She looks like she's decomposing.

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1030 on: March 05, 2010, 01:49:36 PM »
They mean cool, boss, rad, gear, superbad and wicked. I did a column  once on the way every generation uses different words to say essentially the same thing: we like something or we don't like it. The words are different, but the sentiment never changes. Shame I can't find the thing online. It was epic.
Hip mod a-go-go and groovalicious, slick.
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Offline The Six

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1031 on: March 05, 2010, 05:57:14 PM »
She looks like she's decomposing.

She is.

Offline knight66

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1032 on: March 06, 2010, 06:13:04 AM »
Perhaps rather like Wilde's Portrait of Dorian Gray, the tat will decompose whilst the dear departed will remain fresh as the daisies she pushes up. We will revisit him in a couple of years and report back.

The former film director of 'Death Wish', Michael Winner, has for years been writing a weekly restaurant review in the Sunday Times. He abuses the word, 'historic' which is attached to any outstanding dish he is served. So, weekly there is a sentence or so along the following lines:

The treacle tart was exactly what was to be expected of this chef, truly historic.

Alternatively

Sadly, my quest for 'the' historic souffle turned into disappointment; as I sent back the better half of the congealed mess that was delivered to me.


You get the style of him, no doubt.

He has just started a TV show where he descends from his mansion and his chauffeur dumps him at the house of some 'real' person eager for 15 minutes of fame. He then proceeds to criticise everything from the foolish participants to their wallpaper and food. I am unclear whether watching it is less painful than going over your privates with sand paper, but this writer is unwilling to give either a try right now.

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1033 on: March 06, 2010, 07:40:38 AM »
He has just started a TV show where he descends from his mansion and his chauffeur dumps him at the house of some 'real' person eager for 15 minutes of fame. He then proceeds to criticise everything from the foolish participants to their wallpaper and food. I am unclear whether watching it is less painful than going over your privates with sand paper, but this writer is unwilling to give either a try right now.
Sounds historic.

As for your uncertain comparison, I suppose it depends on the sandpaper's grit.  Hmmm.  Reminds me of an episode of particular foolishness as a child when I spilled turpentine on my privates.  Sandpaper might be preferable to that.
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Offline knight66

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1034 on: March 06, 2010, 08:03:12 AM »
Yes, as an adolescent I discovered that after-shave was not a great, or historic, idea either.

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1035 on: March 06, 2010, 08:30:56 AM »
Yes, as an adolescent I discovered that after-shave was not a great, or historic, idea either.
Epic!  (Or should that be, "Surreal!"?)
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Offline knight66

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1036 on: March 06, 2010, 08:34:00 AM »
Not too sure what I exclaimed, but I think my eyebrows met my hairline.

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1037 on: March 06, 2010, 09:12:53 AM »
Off topic a bit but I'm grateful to Cato for this thread, on which I've often found the same playful spirit that attracted me to GMG in the first place.  I wonder what Nigel's up to these days.  Still seeing more opera in a season than I'll see in a lifetime, I imagine, and still cracking wise with admirable pith and dryness best shaken, not stirred.  8)
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

"The problem with socialism is that sooner or later you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

Offline knight66

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1038 on: March 06, 2010, 09:51:12 AM »
I am in a bit of contact with him, but don't hold a lot of info. He is still attending the opera and travelling around.

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.

karlhenning

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Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Reply #1039 on: March 08, 2010, 07:54:02 AM »
There are enjoyable grumbles in Why Begins With W, too (not surprisingly).