Author Topic: [Article Discussion] Why classical programmes need to be more readable  (Read 3458 times)

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Offline Est.1965

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Re: [Article Discussion] Why classical programmes need to be more readable
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2009, 07:16:50 AM »
Do the performers themselves ever write the notes? I realise that they would be busy rehearsing, but wouldn't it be nice if you, the listener, were able to know what the soloist/ensemble/conductor has in store beforehand?

Don't know what other Orchestras do, but an hour before curtains up Stéphane Denève [or other luminary] and the RSNO have a half hour or so walkthrough of the piece they're going to play - and indeed, so do the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.  It's a great idea, wish other orchestras would so the same.  But maybe they do.
Oh I'm so provincial.
Dear Hans Rott
In the 1980s there was a creative punk group called "Big Audio Dynamite".  I have decided to apply the term to you, my man.  And I still haven't properly finished your Screenplay yet.  Too bad.  Take care anyway old chum, I'm off to listen to Brahms!
Kind regards, John

Kuhlau

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Re: [Article Discussion] Why classical programmes need to be more readable
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2009, 07:21:32 AM »
That's a shame about Hewitt's WTC liner notes - yet totally understandable, too. Why would she write otherwise?

Having said that, I understand Stephen Hough writes very well and can gear his writing towards a non-technical audience. He wrote something which was rather engaging for BBC Music magazine a while back.

FK

Offline Brian

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Re: [Article Discussion] Why classical programmes need to be more readable
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2009, 12:53:50 PM »
I know performers sometimes write their own CD liner notes.

FK
Yevgeny Sudbin's notes for his Scriabin CD are not just a model for great notes, but an example of a composer's style infecting the writing of the performer - Sudbin's trippy imagery in describing the music goes right over the top, Scriabin-style!

karlhenning

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Re: [Article Discussion] Why classical programmes need to be more readable
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2009, 12:57:07 PM »
I remember ghastly notes that Nigel Kennedy wrote for the original release of his recording of Sibelius & Tchaikovsky.

Kuhlau

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Re: [Article Discussion] Why classical programmes need to be more readable
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2009, 01:58:22 PM »
Yes, Kennedy needs to be restrained whenever he's near to a keyboard (the letter-faced type, and probably also the 88-keyed type).

FK

karlhenning

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Re: [Article Discussion] Why classical programmes need to be more readable
« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2009, 02:01:49 PM »
I don't literally remember them, but I have a yet-powerful memory of their ghastliness.