Author Topic: New Releases  (Read 1915801 times)

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Offline Old San Antone

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11360 on: February 22, 2021, 06:59:50 PM »
For a while I've fantasized of chamber versions of Mahler symphonies - so, these Joolz Gale recordings seem just what I've been hoping for. 

Listening to the 9th right now on Spotify.

Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11361 on: February 23, 2021, 05:30:40 AM »


That's a box set for the Paavo Beethoven cycle released something like a decade ago on individual SACDs. SACDs in the box too, and the overture disc is included.

Offline Todd

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11362 on: February 26, 2021, 05:27:09 PM »
After straining a bit, I spotted the reason to buy this new Strauss release.
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Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11363 on: February 28, 2021, 12:20:04 PM »


Offline kyjo

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11364 on: March 02, 2021, 08:42:32 AM »
Same. Classical music is about the composers for me. I don't care who's performing the music.

I’m glad I’m not the only person who feels this way! As a performer myself, the reason I perform is because I love the music, not for self-glorification.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline kyjo

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11365 on: March 02, 2021, 08:51:25 AM »
As it happens I JUST got an email from the Dallas Symphony Orchestra telling me to buy tickets to this Thursday's concert - which is Mahler 4, in a chamber arrangement by Klaus Simon. It was supposed to be the normal, big Mahler 4, but due to coronavirus restrictions, they can only have so few players on the stage, so they're going with the chamberfied version.

Per NML, the Klaus Simon version of Mahler 4 is scored for string quintet (quartet + one double bass), one flute doubling on piccolo, one oboe doubling on cor anglais, one clarinet/bass clarinet, one bassoon, two French horns (one plays in the third movement only), two percussionists, piano, harmonium, and soprano. 15 musicians. NML has a full recording (which takes a zippy 50'), I'll try some samples now...

EDIT: Well that was terrible. The violin and cello have fully developed parts going all the way through, and the pianist has to do a lot of work, but every other instrument just jumps in with its usual short solo bits, which gives the scoring a fragmented, haphazard feel as if it the symphony was written by a hyperactive 7-year-old who kept shouting things like, "now the clarinet plays three notes! okay stop, clarinet, now the oboe plays three notes! okay stop, now the horn!" Also, I skipped ahead to what I think of as The Magic Bit in the slow movement - near the end, when the clouds lift and all you have are the strings, alone, hushed, playing a super high note. And the strings here are so wimpy (Simon omits the bassist) that Simon adds the flute and clarinet. Gross.

Seriously, why perform this live? I know, because Fabio Luisi is a Very Serious Conductor who likes Mahler. But like...just do the Schubert octet, dude. I'd go to the Schubert octet.

Some musicians will come up with any excuse to play Mahler or Beethoven in some deranged form instead of actually looking for repertoire that specifically fits their instrumentation needs... ::)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11366 on: March 02, 2021, 05:44:05 PM »
Some musicians will come up with any excuse to play Mahler or Beethoven in some deranged form instead of actually looking for repertoire that specifically fits their instrumentation needs... ::)

So what. Orchestras stopped playing interesting repertoire for quite some time now. You must’ve missed the memo. ::)
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline DavidW

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11367 on: March 02, 2021, 07:54:38 PM »
Chamber orchestras could do loads of baroque and classical era works (I used to attend concerts of a chamber orchestra).  A chamber version of a Mahler symphony does seem to miss the mark.

One of my fav concerts I've attended they performed Haydn's 1st symphony.  I think that would be about the same number of performers.

That could be a fun thread topic.  Do to covid restrictions you have less than 20 performers.  What do you play?

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11368 on: March 02, 2021, 08:07:05 PM »
Chamber orchestras could do loads of baroque and classical era works (I used to attend concerts of a chamber orchestra).  A chamber version of a Mahler symphony does seem to miss the mark.

One of my fav concerts I've attended they performed Haydn's 1st symphony.  I think that would be about the same number of performers.

That could be a fun thread topic.  Do to covid restrictions you have less than 20 performers.  What do you play?

If you look into the 20th Century, there are plenty of chamber symphonies --- those by Schoenberg, Enescu, Milhaud, Schreker et. al. Of course, these names don’t draw in crowds like Beethoven or Mahler, so really the bottomline here is money and in a time of such uncertainty in regards to the arts, it seems like it might be a good idea for orchestras to play for the money at this juncture. This is a point that Kyjo has continuously failed to address. Sorry, but Atterberg isn’t going to sell out a crowd of people. That’s just the way it is and one needs to learn to accept this reality.
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline amw

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11369 on: March 02, 2021, 09:49:42 PM »
Chamber orchestras could do loads of baroque and classical era works (I used to attend concerts of a chamber orchestra).  A chamber version of a Mahler symphony does seem to miss the mark.

One of my fav concerts I've attended they performed Haydn's 1st symphony.  I think that would be about the same number of performers.

That could be a fun thread topic.  Do to covid restrictions you have less than 20 performers.  What do you play?
Obviously you commission someone to arrange Mahler's Eighth for eight solo singers and twelve instrumentalists.... just imagine how majestic the opening Te Deum will sound with the massed forces of a harmonium, three pianos, some tuned percussion instruments and Amarcord vocal ensemble!

Offline ultralinear

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11370 on: March 03, 2021, 03:40:21 AM »
Chamber orchestras could do loads of baroque and classical era works (I used to attend concerts of a chamber orchestra).  A chamber version of a Mahler symphony does seem to miss the mark.

One of my fav concerts I've attended they performed Haydn's 1st symphony.  I think that would be about the same number of performers.

That could be a fun thread topic.  Do to covid restrictions you have less than 20 performers.  What do you play?

Having heard an exceptional performance in concert, I can testify that the Eisler/Stein/Rankl arrangement of Bruckner's 7th symphony for 10 players can be effective in a chamber setting.  Unfortunately there's no recording I know that makes a persuasive case for it, Linos Ensemble being perhaps the best of an indifferent bunch.   I suspect it's something that's quite easy to do, but quite difficult to do well. :-\

Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11371 on: March 03, 2021, 06:26:13 AM »
If you look into the 20th Century, there are plenty of chamber symphonies --- those by Schoenberg, Enescu, Milhaud, Schreker et. al. Of course, these names don’t draw in crowds like Beethoven or Mahler, so really the bottomline here is money and in a time of such uncertainty in regards to the arts, it seems like it might be a good idea for orchestras to play for the money at this juncture. This is a point that Kyjo has continuously failed to address. Sorry, but Atterberg isn’t going to sell out a crowd of people. That’s just the way it is and one needs to learn to accept this reality.
We have a local nonprofit chamber symphony that operates with about 15-18 musicians and is sort of given permission to take over a city-owned concert hall for free a few nights a year. They have only 3-4 full time employees and their main cost is plane tickets for guest artists. They pay the bills by doing silent movie nights where they play the scores while Buster Keaton or Charlie Chaplin stumbles around - including newly commissioned scores! The last concert of theirs I attended was a new commission by a local woman, the Bacewicz symphony for strings, and then the original chamber-sized Appalachian Spring in order to sell some tickets. Was nice. First Bacewicz I've seen live, certainly.

DavidW - starting your thread in General Discussion!

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11372 on: March 03, 2021, 08:03:49 AM »
We have a local nonprofit chamber symphony that operates with about 15-18 musicians and is sort of given permission to take over a city-owned concert hall for free a few nights a year. They have only 3-4 full time employees and their main cost is plane tickets for guest artists. They pay the bills by doing silent movie nights where they play the scores while Buster Keaton or Charlie Chaplin stumbles around - including newly commissioned scores! The last concert of theirs I attended was a new commission by a local woman, the Bacewicz symphony for strings, and then the original chamber-sized Appalachian Spring in order to sell some tickets. Was nice. First Bacewicz I've seen live, certainly.

DavidW - starting your thread in General Discussion!

Very nice, Brian. That sounds like a program that would be right up my alley. The orchestra you mention sounds like they do good work. It is good to see creativity like this in an age where one doesn’t know when the next orchestra will fold up and never perform again.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2021, 10:44:34 AM by Mirror Image »
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline steve ridgway

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #11373 on: March 03, 2021, 08:38:26 AM »
Obviously you commission someone to arrange Mahler's Eighth for eight solo singers and twelve instrumentalists.... just imagine how majestic the opening Te Deum will sound with the massed forces of a harmonium, three pianos, some tuned percussion instruments and Amarcord vocal ensemble!

I don’t know the piece but in general a “rock” type group might be the most effective option. 8)
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