Author Topic: New Releases  (Read 2125882 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7295
  • Raoul Dufy, "Tragédie, Comédie"
  • Location: La Villa y Corte
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12240 on: September 12, 2021, 10:27:18 AM »
Coming in January (82 CDs, plus 4 Blu-ray Discs for the “Centennial Ring”—also given in its audio only version on CD):



https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/pierre-boulez-the-conductor-complete-recordings-on-deutsche-grammophon-philips/hnum/10705227

 
ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
« Je me suis rarement perdu de vue ; je me suis détesté, je me suis adoré ; puis, nous avons vieilli ensemble. »

Online JBS

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5026
  • If music be the food of love, play on!
  • Location: USA
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12241 on: September 12, 2021, 10:36:09 AM »
Neither do I, in general.

However, having said that, the 2-piano version of Rachmaninov's Symphonic Dances, as played by Ashkenazy and Previn, is one of the most brilliant things I own so never say never.

Bear in mind that the 2 piano version came into being along side the orchestral version
Quote
Rachmaninoff wrote an arrangement for two pianos concurrently with the orchestral version. This arrangement was first performed by the composer with Vladimir Horowitz at a private party in Beverly Hills, California in August 1942.
......
Two organs   
There exists a transcription of the entire piece by French composer/performer Jean Guillou, written for two organs.

Piano solo
There exists an unpublished transcription of the entire piece by the late Israeli pianist/composer/arranger Yahli Wagman, written between 1982-1986, for piano solo.[citation needed] There also exists a recording of Rachmaninoff playing through the piano reduction for Eugene Ormandy, during which he sings, whistles and talks about how he thinks the Dances should be performed. Rachmaninoff played the first movement coda differently to the score; these minor changes were reproduced by the pianist Stephen Kovacevich when he performed the work with Martha Argerich at his 75th birthday concert at Wigmore Hall.

(From Wikipedia)

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline Symphonic Addict

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3548
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12242 on: September 12, 2021, 10:57:36 AM »
This statement is too general to make any sense. Some piano "reductions" are simply a practical measure to enable a person to hear music that would otherwise be inaccessible to them. Others are a reimagining of the orchestral work which qualify as a works of art in their own right. The two piano version of Brahms' Haydn variations is magnificent. The two piano versions of the Debussy orchestral works made me understand that the "color" I was hearing was mostly harmony, and not orchestration, as I had previously believed. I can think of numerous piano reductions which are at least as interesting as the orchestral versions of the same piece.

Amen to this.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Online Brian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22488
    • Brian's blog
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12243 on: September 12, 2021, 11:10:30 AM »
Wow, if I had a time machine I know where I'd go in August 1942.

Offline Madiel

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10605
    • A musical diary
  • Location: Canberra, Australia
  • Currently Listening to:
    Whatever's listed in my blog.
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12244 on: September 12, 2021, 12:55:33 PM »
That is one of my favorite performances of anything ever. It's like they're on fire.

Amen!
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Madiel

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10605
    • A musical diary
  • Location: Canberra, Australia
  • Currently Listening to:
    Whatever's listed in my blog.
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12245 on: September 12, 2021, 12:57:07 PM »
Bear in mind that the 2 piano version came into being along side the orchestral version
(From Wikipedia)

Yes, I was aware. Concurrent versions seem to be better (or maybe that’s just confirmation bias talking).
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Madiel

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10605
    • A musical diary
  • Location: Canberra, Australia
  • Currently Listening to:
    Whatever's listed in my blog.
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12246 on: September 12, 2021, 12:59:00 PM »
Interesting!  When did they record it?  I'll have to see if I can find it to listen to.  :)

PD

It’s from the 70s. These days it’s in several Ashkenazy collections.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 6799
  • Location: USA
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12247 on: September 12, 2021, 01:59:42 PM »
It’s from the 70s. These days it’s in several Ashkenazy collections.
Thanks!  :)

PD

Klavier

  • Guest
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12248 on: September 12, 2021, 02:20:09 PM »
This statement is too general to make any sense. Some piano "reductions" are simply a practical measure to enable a person to hear music that would otherwise be inaccessible to them. Others are a reimagining of the orchestral work which qualify as a works of art in their own right. The two piano version of Brahms' Haydn variations is magnificent. The two piano versions of the Debussy orchestral works made me understand that the "color" I was hearing was mostly harmony, and not orchestration, as I had previously believed. I can think of numerous piano reductions which are at least as interesting as the orchestral versions of the same piece.
I might be a little biased since I’m a pianist, but I agree, and sometimes piano reductions can expose the lack of compositional “meat” once the pretty colors are removed! From a playing standpoint, it’s fun for me to hear how a pianist copes with often extreme technical demands of some orchestral works.

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1677
  • Location: U.S.A.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Eric Dolphy, Persian music, Sorabji, Scriabin, Sex Pistols
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12249 on: September 12, 2021, 02:23:59 PM »
Being an extremely huge fan of this work, I can't miss this. This kind of rarities is always welcome to be tasted. I'm not sure about Jeffrey, but I do have a hunch.

+1.

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3104
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12250 on: September 14, 2021, 05:51:40 AM »
This statement is too general to make any sense. Some piano "reductions" are simply a practical measure to enable a person to hear music that would otherwise be inaccessible to them. Others are a reimagining of the orchestral work which qualify as a works of art in their own right. The two piano version of Brahms' Haydn variations is magnificent. The two piano versions of the Debussy orchestral works made me understand that the "color" I was hearing was mostly harmony, and not orchestration, as I had previously believed. I can think of numerous piano reductions which are at least as interesting as the orchestral versions of the same piece.

Fair enough! :)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3104
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12251 on: September 16, 2021, 05:35:56 PM »
Spotted this on the Chandos website. Looks very intriguing to say the least:



(Klebanov, 1907-1987, was a Ukrainian composer.)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 57077
  • Igor Stravinsky (1882 - 1971)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    19th Century up to the 21st Century
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12252 on: September 16, 2021, 06:29:16 PM »
Spotted this on the Chandos website. Looks very intriguing to say the least:



(Klebanov, 1907-1987, was a Ukrainian composer.)

Never heard of him, Kyle, but that particular series is quite interesting. I only own the Ben-Haim one, but enjoyed it immensely.
“My music is best understood by children and animals.” - Igor Stravinsky

Offline T. D.

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1597
  • Location: Rural upstate NY
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12253 on: September 16, 2021, 06:55:13 PM »
Spotted this on the Chandos website. Looks very intriguing to say the least:



(Klebanov, 1907-1987, was a Ukrainian composer.)

That looks really appealing, but I will wait for reviews.
I looked up Klebanov's bio on Wikipedia and found:

Unfortunately, the first symphony "In Memoriam to the Martyrs of Babi Yar" (1945) fell afoul of Stalinist critics who found it anti-patriotic. Being accused of distortion of the historic truth about the Soviet people and of national narrow-mindedness it was exiled for a life in archives. Stalin made his infamous attack on Soviet artists. The Soviet Composers' Union adopted the unwritten rule that one composer would be selected to take the heat for all of them—Klebanov was it. Although Klebanov was spared exile to Siberia, or worse, he was relegated to an obscure existence and spent most of this period composing politically correct works of "socialist realism" with titles like Ode for the Party and "First of May" Symphony. Following thirty years in de facto exile, Klebanov thawed out with the rest of the USSR in the 1980s.

(Only having read this did I recall that I'd previously seen his name in connection with "taking the heat"...)
The works on the CD are from the 1950s, when Klebanov was toeing the political line, so I vaguely fear they could be less interesting than his early or late compositions.


Online JBS

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5026
  • If music be the food of love, play on!
  • Location: USA
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12254 on: September 17, 2021, 04:13:38 PM »
Cover and back of Warner's Bartok set


Also Capucon does Part as both soloist and conductor


Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 19936
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12255 on: September 18, 2021, 05:02:04 AM »


A 28'+ opening movement for D960,which has movements split across two discs.  Very thinky.



Guaranteed supreme technical excellence.





Recorded over the summer.  Quite enticing.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 57077
  • Igor Stravinsky (1882 - 1971)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    19th Century up to the 21st Century
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12256 on: September 18, 2021, 05:13:39 AM »
Cover and back of Warner's Bartok set


Also Capucon does Part as both soloist and conductor



Both of these have already been mentioned.
“My music is best understood by children and animals.” - Igor Stravinsky

Online Brian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22488
    • Brian's blog
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12257 on: September 18, 2021, 07:50:18 AM »
NOVEMBER





All three quartets + arranged Op. 118 No. 2







The world's oldest working lute, made by Sixtus Rauwolf in 1590ish, returns to perform music written over 100 years later!





I am super interested in this Kalevala collection. Here's an explanation of how the Sibelius is a world premiere:
"Compared to the first version, Lemminkäinen in Tuonela was reduced by almost a quarter in 1897: the 32-bar introduction was omitted completely and the middle section was substantially shortened. In the 1939 version the structure was further condensed, as Sibelius cut twenty more bars from the latter part of the middle section. The orchestration was also revised and fine-tuned: the harp in the original version was omitted from the 1897 version, and the final version omitted the tuba as well."



« Last Edit: September 18, 2021, 08:04:23 AM by Brian »

Online Brian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22488
    • Brian's blog
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12258 on: September 18, 2021, 07:59:06 AM »
NOVEMB-MORE



Unfortunately the Pierne disc is the two suites from each piece, not complete works.



Giorgini's Liszt is one 85' CD with a Bosendorfer. Benediction 17:41, Funerailles 12:22



Second complete Pelleas this year after the Alpha recording.





Scriabin, Alexander - Classical Composer
        3 Pieces, Op. 45
    .   » 1.   No. 1. Feuillet d'Album
    .   » 2.   No. 2. Poème fantasque
    .   » 3.   No. 3. Prélude
Langgaard, Rued - Classical Composer
    .   4.   Sponsa Christi tædium vitæ, BVN 297
Scriabin, Alexander - Classical Composer
    .   5.   Piano Sonata No. 10 in C Major, Op. 70
Langgaard, Rued - Classical Composer
        Afgrundsmusik (Music of the Abyss), BVN 169
    .   » 6.   I. Inflessibile mostruoso
    .   » 7.   II. Frenetico, quasi rondo
Scriabin, Alexander - Classical Composer
    .   8.   Piano Sonata No. 9 in F Major, Op. 68, "Black Mass"
Langgaard, Rued - Classical Composer
    .   9.   Flammekamrene (The Flame Chambers), BVN 221
Scriabin, Alexander - Classical Composer
    .   10.   Vers la flamme, Op. 72


Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 19936
Re: New Releases
« Reply #12259 on: September 18, 2021, 09:43:16 AM »


Giorgini's Liszt is one 85' CD with a Bosendorfer. Benediction 17:41, Funerailles 12:22


I'll take it.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General