Author Topic: New Releases  (Read 1706951 times)

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Offline Madiel

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9760 on: March 27, 2020, 04:00:31 AM »
Oh look "nominative determinism" is a rabbit-hole you can spend hours going down. Many years ago New Scientist ran something on it, and then had to get stricter and stricter on the examples they'd accept because they were inundated by readers.

My permanent favourite, though, is the names of the 2 lawyers involved in the very first case in the Australian High Court in 1903. Mr Wise and Dr Sly.

I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Florestan

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9761 on: March 27, 2020, 04:03:02 AM »
Doctor Mors

That's the one that will cure us all eventually.  ;D
"Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.”  --- Victor Hugo

Offline The new erato

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9762 on: March 27, 2020, 04:51:36 AM »
I once knew a dentist named dr. Snoep, which in Dutch means: "candy"....  :D

Q
Snop means candy as well in Bergen where I live.

Offline Mookalafalas

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9763 on: March 27, 2020, 05:21:02 AM »
That's the one that will cure us all eventually.  ;D

 ;D
It's all good...

Offline André

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9765 on: March 27, 2020, 07:31:56 AM »


I just received this email

Quote
Dear friends and clavichord enthusiasts,

I would like to bring this new CD to your attention.

The project has been a most interesting collaboration with the clavichord maker Andreas Hermert, and of course with Johann Jacob Froberger himself who has become a close partner in my recent musical explorations.

Playing Froberger on such a tiny clavichord is quite an audacious statement and casts his music in a completely new light. You can listen to the final track here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jngUgayqFYU&list=RDjngUgayqFYU&start_radio=1&t=0

The Fantasias and Canzonas are some of Froberger’s most beautifully crafted yet paradoxically most neglected works. They have been selectively performed and recorded in recent times on organ and harpsichord, but hardly at all on the clavichord. This recording counteracts that neglect.

The CD will be released later in the year, but I can offer advance copies for £12 including postage and packing — to UK addresses only (my apologies to the rest of the world but the postage is now more than the CD!)

If you would like a copy, please send me your address. I will then post one out to you (UK only) with my BACS details for payment.

I trust you are keeping well.

Kind regards,

Terry.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Holden

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9766 on: March 27, 2020, 02:46:45 PM »
I've seen this gentleman's works posted before, but am even more struck by the great misalignment of his name and profession... It's like a boxer named Glassjaw, or porn actor named Softwood...



I decided to give this a listen to see what his timing is actually like. The Diabellis are one of the LvB works that I admire the most simply because to produce a recording that is both interesting and has a sense of cohesion about it is very hard to do. How you play Diabelli's little waltz (and there are a number of ways to do this) will inform how you should approach the variations. Do you use bombast, wit, elegance? How do use dynamic range? How fast do you play it? This should all be in evidence in the variations and it is this that gives this feeling of coherence and not 34 separate little works with a similar theme.

The pianist who does this best, in my opinion, is Claudio Arrau. I have other recordings that I am very happy with including Schnabel (the first recording of these?), Kovacevich's Philips recording, Richter and Rudolf Serkin's recording on Sony Masterworks.
Cheers

Holden

Offline Mandryka

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9767 on: March 27, 2020, 08:56:41 PM »



https://www.vivacerecords.com/

If anyone buys it please comment.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 09:13:37 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9768 on: March 28, 2020, 08:07:51 AM »
I decided to give this a listen to see what his timing is actually like. The Diabellis are one of the LvB works that I admire the most simply because to produce a recording that is both interesting and has a sense of cohesion about it is very hard to do. How you play Diabelli's little waltz (and there are a number of ways to do this) will inform how you should approach the variations. Do you use bombast, wit, elegance? How do use dynamic range? How fast do you play it?

I was once told by someone who knew Richter that he used to quip that the best thing to do with the waltz is to get it out of the way as quickly as possible for the real music to begin!

I’ve come to appreciate Arrau’s second recording, I can certainly see why you have so consistently singled it out. But my own view of the music was changed when I saw Andseszewsky play it last year, or maybe 2018, because he made the piano sounds so symphonic. The range of timbres, colours, textures, dynamics. I don't think it was fragmentary. I was right next to him, centre front row of the Wigmore Hall, so maybe I was spoilt for life.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 08:16:34 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9769 on: March 28, 2020, 08:34:15 AM »
The Diabelli Variations is one of the late Beethoven works to which I have yet to give a fair shot. I have two recordings: Barenboim/Erato, which I suspect is not really a great recording, and I don't like Barenboim anyway—and Richter, an old recording that I got as part of a Musical Concepts cheap download from Amazon or somewhere. It's marred by bad sound.

Going to try and check out Arrau, and Anderszewski (presumably this is who you meant, Mandryka?  ;D)—and then I'm curious about Brendel too, who said, I think, that the Diabelli Variations is the greatest piano work of all time.

Offline André

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9770 on: April 02, 2020, 05:15:06 AM »

Not sure if this has been mentioned:





Performances by the Royal Philharmonic and the Vienna State Opera orchestra. Includes 2 additional performances of symphonies 3 and 8.

Online MusicTurner

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9771 on: April 02, 2020, 05:19:10 AM »
Thanks.
Good stuff, and nice to see the stereo versions of Symphonies 3+6 there, plus the many ouvertures. I only own a mixture of LPs and CDs, sometimes from minor labels.

Offline JBS

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9772 on: April 02, 2020, 06:48:15 AM »
The Diabelli Variations is one of the late Beethoven works to which I have yet to give a fair shot. I have two recordings: Barenboim/Erato, which I suspect is not really a great recording, and I don't like Barenboim anyway—and Richter, an old recording that I got as part of a Musical Concepts cheap download from Amazon or somewhere. It's marred by bad sound.

Going to try and check out Arrau, and Anderszewski (presumably this is who you meant, Mandryka?  ;D)—and then I'm curious about Brendel too, who said, I think, that the Diabelli Variations is the greatest piano work of all time.

Try Rudolf Serkin. I'm not sure about availability.

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline j winter

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9773 on: April 02, 2020, 06:43:21 PM »
Not sure if this has been mentioned:





Performances by the Royal Philharmonic and the Vienna State Opera orchestra. Includes 2 additional performances of symphonies 3 and 8.


I REALLY don't need another Beethoven cycle, but I might have to make an exception for this....
The man that hath no music in himself,
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils.
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
And his affections dark as Erebus.
Let no such man be trusted.

-- William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9774 on: April 02, 2020, 09:58:06 PM »
April 9th on Qobuz, May 1st elsewhere.

« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 08:08:19 AM by Toccata&Fugue »

Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9775 on: April 03, 2020, 11:44:21 AM »
Some more MAY stuff to help us survive...





feat. Nico Muhly, David Lang, Libby Larsen, Abbie Betinis, Stephen Paulus, and trad.; four world premieres



The booklet does not explain whether he recorded separate piano and vocal tracks and mixed them, or sang while sitting.



Debussy: Images, Book 1
Ginastera: Sonata No. 1
Ligeti: Arc-en-ciel
Prokofiev: Sonata No. 6



"The new album Darlings of the Muses by The National Arts Centre Orchestra under the direction of Alexander Shelley is the first of four albums to be released over the next two years. This series will explore the closely intertwined personal and artistic connections between three musical giants: Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms. The album includes Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms’ First Symphonies, Clara Schumann’s Piano Concerto Op. 7, her first (and last) multi-movement orchestral work, and Gabriela Montero offers original improvisations inspired by Clara’s music."



"Many interwar Norwegian composers tried to create a new national music by combining elements of authentic folk music with new techniques. Eivind Groven was considered one of the most innovative composers in this quest, integrating the structure of folk dances from his rural upbringing into familiar formal principles. Both symphonies make use of techniques of so-called ‘progressive transformation’, which led fellow composer Arne Nordheim to declare: ‘While others made instrumentations of folk tunes, Groven created sounds, for example in his [two] symphonies which, in my opinion, are quite unique.’"



"This is the first project in a seven-volume series exploring the ‘Sturm und Drang’ movement, which swept through all art forms in the between the early 1760s and 1780s. The purpose of this movement was to frighten and perturb through the use of wild and subjective emotional means of expression. This series of ‘Sturm und Drang’ recordings incorporates iconic compositions by Mozart, Gluck and, above all, Joseph Haydn, but it also includes largely forgotten or neglected works by less familiar names. The music featured on this disc was all composed in the 1760s. It includes ballet and opera as well as symphonies, but is drawn together by the hallmarks of the remarkably visceral and dynamic style of music that we now call ‘Sturm und Drang’."

with Chiara Skerath, soprano:
Gluck - final scene from Don Juan
Jommelli - aria from Fetonte
Haydn - aria from La canterina
Beck - Symphony in G minor, Op. 3 No. 3
Traetta - two arias from Sofonisba
Haydn - Symphony No. 49 "La Passione"



Wolfl Op 33 No 3; Clementi Op 50 No 1; Hummel Op. 20 (No. 3); Dussek "Élégie harmonique sur la mort de son Altesse Royale le prince Louis-Ferdinand de Prusse"
WITH EIGHT MINUTE BONUS TRACK on which Bavouzet gives examples comparing these composers' works to similar passages in Beethoven sonatas

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9776 on: April 03, 2020, 12:35:04 PM »
That Ichmouratov release calls me!

Offline JBS

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9777 on: April 03, 2020, 12:40:09 PM »
The Sierra CD for me. And the Bavouzet.

TD
Amazon gives an in stock date of April 12


Quote
This is the first time a French violinist has joined the line of prestigious solo virtuosi recording for the Vivaldi Edition. Violinist Julien Chauvin and his Concert de la Loge founded in 2015, and modeled on one of the most celebrated orchestras of the late 18th century here reveal all the discreet charms of an inventive concertante style rich in detail, featuring Vivaldis favored instrument. This particular set of concerti highlight the consistently close links between Vivaldis instrumental and operatic works. Transcending the difference of genre, the Venetian composers unitary conception of language and style allowed him to pass with the deft skill of a juggler from one domain to the other, making them happily converge on common ground, writes Cesare Fertonani. In these six concertos we can hear superbly phrased cantabile, with all the players seeming to breathe as one: and above all a sense of dramatic and narrative tension in Vivaldis finest vein. Musical quotations, borrowings, reworkings and affinities here bring his instrumental music and operas closer together two genres of equal virtuosity, on which he lavished his genius in equal measure, and in every expressive register.

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9778 on: April 03, 2020, 01:01:14 PM »
I was once told by someone who knew Richter that he used to quip that the best thing to do with the waltz is to get it out of the way as quickly as possible for the real music to begin!
:(  I love waltzes (preferably dancing to them).

Offline Madiel

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #9779 on: April 03, 2020, 03:53:41 PM »


"The new album Darlings of the Muses by The National Arts Centre Orchestra under the direction of Alexander Shelley is the first of four albums to be released over the next two years. This series will explore the closely intertwined personal and artistic connections between three musical giants: Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms. The album includes Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms’ First Symphonies, Clara Schumann’s Piano Concerto Op. 7, her first (and last) multi-movement orchestral work, and Gabriela Montero offers original improvisations inspired by Clara’s music."

See, this was sounding kind of interesting until that last part. The world undoubtedly needs more Clara Schumann. But why the devil does the world need more Gabriela Montero noodling on Clara Schumann instead?
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!