Author Topic: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!  (Read 106786 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Gurn Blanston

  • Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 32144
  • Support your local Haydn Society
    • Gurn's Haydn Blog
  • Location: Texas, where else?
  • Currently Listening to:
    Haydn, I reckon.
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #320 on: January 29, 2021, 07:23:51 AM »
But I suppose they are not true historically informed baroque copies.

No, certainly they are merely fiddle-shaped pieces of wood with modern conformation. Of course, this is not a new phenomenon, I have my grandfather's old violin which was built in the 19th century and it also proudly displays a Strad label. It is modern in every significant way. :)

8)
Help support GMG by purchasing from Amazon using this link

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Follow me on Twitter @GurnBlanston106

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13779
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #321 on: January 29, 2021, 08:22:54 AM »
Thanks Tony for the discussion and the link - Dave :)

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5379
  • Location: USA
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #322 on: January 29, 2021, 12:08:44 PM »
Correct. For one thing, the necks of the originals were different than those required for more modern playing techniques. At some point during the 19th century, grafts were used to increase the neck length and angle of older instruments. I believe every genuine Strad in existence underwent that process at some point.
Oh, interesting!  I found this blog about some of the changes made.  http://blog.feinviolins.com/2015/06/your-violin-neck-used-to-be-shorter.html

PD

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13779
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #323 on: April 29, 2021, 12:33:15 PM »
Thanks PD for your comments - I was the one who posted about the book on the clarinet.  I've been to the Yale University Press website and saw the OOP notification and the $50 price - did not leave an email but will do; also Eric Hoeprich has an email address at Indiana University (where he teaches - assume periodically) which I might get his input if he replies?  My wife has gotten me a number of borrowed books in North Carolina by using the inter-library loan options - she's working on it now - we have a lot of musical university programs here and many likely have the book.  Dave :)

You're welcome!  And let us know how your quest turns out.  :)  PD

p.s.  And isn't inter-library loan great!  And a big hand to all of the librarians working hard to fulfill all of our book/dvd/cd, etc. needs (and a lot of them just being 'wants') during a pandemic!

Well, the clarinet book by Eric Hoeprich is sitting on the table next to my den chair, just delivered by my wife from our local library!  8)

A North Carolina inter-departmental loan from Appalachian State University's 'Music Library' in Boone, NC (up in the Blue Ridge Mountains) - the book has 316 text pages (with an index and detailed notes/references) and is written by an academic with much detail; many illustrations - have gotten through the first three chapters but likely will skim some material and in depth detail - has chapters on the basset horn and bass clarinet at the end - looking forward to reading those discussions.  Dave :)

 


Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5379
  • Location: USA
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #324 on: April 30, 2021, 02:48:55 AM »
Well, the clarinet book by Eric Hoeprich is sitting on the table next to my den chair, just delivered by my wife from our local library!  8)

A North Carolina inter-departmental loan from Appalachian State University's 'Music Library' in Boone, NC (up in the Blue Ridge Mountains) - the book has 316 text pages (with an index and detailed notes/references) and is written by an academic with much detail; many illustrations - have gotten through the first three chapters but likely will skim some material and in depth detail - has chapters on the basset horn and bass clarinet at the end - looking forward to reading those discussions.  Dave :)

 
Excellent!  I'm so glad for you that you managed to get ahold of a copy!  :)

PD

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13779
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #325 on: April 30, 2021, 03:49:57 AM »
Excellent!  I'm so glad for you that you managed to get ahold of a copy!  :)

PD

1+ PD - Dave 👍

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13779
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #326 on: May 01, 2021, 06:29:06 AM »
Well, the clarinet book by Eric Hoeprich is sitting on the table next to my den chair, just delivered by my wife from our local library!  8)

A North Carolina inter-departmental loan from Appalachian State University's 'Music Library' in Boone, NC (up in the Blue Ridge Mountains) - the book has 316 text pages (with an index and detailed notes/references) and is written by an academic with much detail; many illustrations - have gotten through the first three chapters but likely will skim some material and in depth detail - has chapters on the basset horn and bass clarinet at the end - looking forward to reading those discussions.  Dave :)

   

ADDENDUM: For those who might be interested in Hoeprich's book on the clarinet, I've inserted the 'Table of Contents' w/ the chapter listings above - this is an excellent book, although I've been skimming some of the more obscure/detailed parts - now on chapter 5 'The Classical Clarinet' - last one on the 'Chalumeau' was fascinating, and concentrated of such composers as Telemann, Vivaldi, and Graupner, the latter considered by the author to be the most prolific composer for that family of instruments; click on the listing to enlarge, if interested.  Dave :)

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5379
  • Location: USA
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #327 on: May 01, 2021, 12:55:55 PM »
Correct. For one thing, the necks of the originals were different than those required for more modern playing techniques. At some point during the 19th century, grafts were used to increase the neck length and angle of older instruments. I believe every genuine Strad in existence underwent that process at some point.
Dave,

1+ PD - Dave 👍
Dave,

Pardon me please if I've asked this before, but do you play the clarinet yourself?  Just curious.  :)

Amazing that he has actually made his own instruments!  Quite multi-talented!

PD

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13779
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Old Musical Instruments & Modern Reproductions!
« Reply #328 on: May 03, 2021, 04:47:30 AM »
Dave,
Dave,

Pardon me please if I've asked this before, but do you play the clarinet yourself?  Just curious.  :)

Amazing that he has actually made his own instruments!  Quite multi-talented!

PD

Hi PD - sorry for the delay in responding; Susan & I are on our first vacation since early 2020 - a 4-nighter on Kiawah, Island, South Carolina - we had to see the ocean after nearly a year and a half!  :(

Eric Hoeprich is certainly interesting in many ways (short snippet below from his Indiana University bio - more in the link) - assume that he still has an association with the school in Bloomington, Indiana, where our son went to college (and met his future wife - they live in Indianapolis and we've not seen them since late 2019 - we've all had our vaccinations, so hopefully later this summer?).

As for me and the clarinet, I'm not a player but have enjoyed the instrument in both classical and jazz music for decades; also have a deep interest in the development of musical instruments and the woodwinds and keyboards seem to attract my attention the most over the years.  NOW, as a teenage, I did play the accordion but was not that good - bought a new modest one on my retirement and can still play some simple tunes -  :laugh:

However, Susan is the musician in the family, a beautiful soprano singing voice (she was in college choral groups in Providence, RI & Chicago, IL - and had some solos); also, grew up playing the piano and can sight read easily - since our marriage, she has accumulated a variety of other instruments which she 'dabbles in'; examples, Irish harps, recorders, guitars, ukeleles, dulcimer, and a few others.  Dave :)

Quote
Hoeprich's interest in historical clarinets has led to the publication of numerous articles and a general text on the clarinet published by Yale University Press (The Clarinet, 2008). He has amassed a collection of over 100 antique clarinets, including instruments from the eighteenth century, which has also led to restoration and construction of replicas of period originals. He maintains a workshop for instrument making at his home near London. (Source)