Author Topic: Hector Berlioz  (Read 62476 times)

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Offline André

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Re: Hector Berlioz
« Reply #380 on: September 01, 2020, 03:24:15 PM »
Glad you liked it, Mike !

Greg, let us know what you make of it when you have a chance !

 :)

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Hector Berlioz
« Reply #381 on: September 01, 2020, 06:47:59 PM »
Glad you liked it, Mike !

Greg, let us know what you make of it when you have a chance !

 :)


A great performance of an amazing piece. And such a refreshing experience!
I feel as if there are very few Requiem recordings that truly stand out to me, the majority of them seem bland, rushed, or without offering, or adding, a unique experience compared to others. Even the past decade or so there have a good handful of new releases, but nothing has urged me to repeated listening, other than McCreesh, but even that has cooled down for me.
But Scherchen & Company have done it. Perhaps it's the more relaxed tempo through most of it, this for a work already filled with relaxed tempos, but I felt very at ease. This was also the slowest Quaerens me I've encountered, which felt more zen, it flowed at a less structured pace and I loved it.  Giraudeau's solo in the Sanctus was just the right tone, it was like a prayer rather than an aria. And the final Amen to close out the work was perfect, it truly ascended the work to it's final destination. This is the pinnacle moment of Berlioz' lyrical writing abilities, and it should treated as such, which Scherchen does.

Andre, you mentioned how the music stops at times,  especially during the Angus Dei several times throughout there are these pauses that add such depth to the overall atmosphere, and I love when conductors emphasis these pauses. Norrington does this with great effect in his recording, and the same applies here. The only real downside, as you also alluded to, was the lack of definition with the sound quality, which a movement like the Dies irae and its multiple brass ensembles heavily benefits from newer recording procedures, but Scherchen, the orchestra and choir perform with such heavy passion that any sound issues are placed in the background.

Thanks for the rec, Andre! I went ahead and bough the MP3 version but will keep my eye out for a hard copy, if that is possible.

Offline knight66

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Re: Hector Berlioz
« Reply #382 on: September 01, 2020, 10:02:32 PM »
The Amazon MP3 link shows 14:56 for the Agnus Dei, which is still about a minute slower than my slowest Requiem I own (Norrington/Stuggart at 13:55 without applause), and 3 minutes slower than my fastest at 11:46(Ozawa/BSO)

I am using Spotify and it shows 15.37 on one ‘edition’ of the performance and 12,34 under another cover. It seems to be the same performance, so, puzzling.

Mike
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