Author Topic: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)  (Read 10780 times)

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cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2016, 05:50:14 AM »
Pettersson's the greatest one of them all?!! I haven't heard that! Oh dear,would that mean my ending up with every symphony and orchestral work he composed?!! It's happened before and Pettersson was prolific,wasn't he? The one reason I have always resisted Myaskovsky (is that with an 'i' or 'y'? Come on,you're the expert!! ;D )Incidentally,I'm sure that there was an emi Lp of the Fifth or Eleventh symphony in the library when I was a youngster. I may even have borrowed it once? Did I imagine this?!! I know emi did issue (at least I seem to recall they did?)  some Melodiya recordings on their label. I had their Spartacus ballet,on three Lps,for a while. A bit uneven that score,but there are good bits!!  Incidentally,the same goes for Malcolm Williamson! I was trying to think of another British opera I might add to my collection a while back. On a whim I bought the Lyrita set of Tippett's Midsummer Marriage. I thought I might find it 'interesting'! On the contrary,I was hooked! I ended up with all the major orchestral works and a few other things as well!!!

Anyway,back to Holbrooke! I do actually enjoy some of his music. In fact I have done ever since I heard the first of those Marco Polo cds. I even wrote a fan letter to Gwydion Brooke (his son & the famous bassoonist,as you know) and got a very nice letter and a free Holbrooke Lp,to my complete surprise,in return! I've still got them somewhere! That said,I do find his output uneven;and I have to be in the right mood. My favourite piece so far is the Dylan Prelude,and I would love to hear that with a really good orchestra (ie not the Plovdiv. Sorry chaps! ;D). That said,I find even the weaker pieces a bit like a curates egg. There are bits that seem a bit thin,and then there is some felicity of orchestration that catches my ear and I'll keep listening. From what I've heard to date,I'm inclined to agree with the critic in the late lamented IRR Magazine,that construction was not one of his good points. A gift for colourful orchestration and a succession of dramatic flourishes and show stopping climaxes does not necessarily a good composer make;and colourful as his orchestration is,Holbrooke does have a tendency to garrulousness. On the plus side;I also agree with that aforementioned critic,that Holbrooke had a stronge sense for atmosphere;and it's that feel for atmosphere,and a very gothic one at that,which does appeal to me. As to whether his chamber music is actually preferable or better? I think it probably is,really! Like Scott,chamber and instrumental forms seemed to focus his mind. Indeed I listened to Holbrooke's Violin Sonata No 3 in F 'Orientale' (1926) on the Dutton label yesterday (see below) and what a lovely piece it is.......and short! On the contrary. Not a moment too long! It is lyrical music with an astringent edge to it,and I actually feel confident enough to say I think it's very good. I also like the other music on the cd (more please along similar lines,Dutton and EM records,please!). I think the Grasshopper Concerto also sounds better in this form,really. I like the version on the EM label best (and it's couplings). It sounds very nice in it's orchestral guise,though;and I think that leaping 'grasshopper' motif is one of Holbrooke's best (of what I've been able to hear so far). One more point. Holbrooke lived in Wales for a while;which obviously makes him a little more interesting for me. The Cauldron of Annwn cycle is based on legends from the Mabinogion (via Howard de Walden!!) and I've always been fascinated by Welsh myths and legends. Finally (another point!) whatever one might think of his music,Holbrooke was undoubtedly a very eccentric figure with a most colourful lifestyle filled with all sorts of interesting people. He would make a very entertaining subject for a biography,if someone has the time,one day. If it was well written,it might even be a little more interesting than his music!



And the other one!



This one is very good too ( can't resist adding it! ::) ;D)



And finally,the orchestral version!


« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 09:02:14 AM by cilgwyn »

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2017, 03:07:35 PM »
Sounds very interesting. The only problem is Petersson was very prolfic,and I can see another landslide of cds through the letterbox!! ???

I just put this on now. I like this cd,but Rutland Boughton hasn't got a thread,and it's a bit late so I'm posting this here for now!  I like quite allot of Rutland Boughton,for some wierd reason. In fact,the only music by him that I didn't think much of were his String quartets. I do like this one. I think it is nice,well crafted music. Just right for this time of night,too. Sometimes I even wish that he'd stuck more to orchestral music. I like The Immortal Hour and The Queen of Cornwall (even more,after I'd listened to it a few times) and his Bethlehem,is lovely! The trouble is they tend to be let down by the librettos. It's the music that makes them worth listening to. Although,I do like the subject matter,and I hope to hear one of his Arthurian music-dramas one day. Although,at present,it looks unlikely I ever will!! Holbrooke is often bracketed with Boughton,and vice versa,so I've got an excuse (not a very good one,really?! ;D)  to put this here for the time being (I think so,moderator?!! ::)) :



I will post some thoughts on the recent Holbrooke cd from Cpo,soon!
« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 08:54:57 AM by cilgwyn »

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #22 on: January 25, 2017, 03:16:16 PM »
Love the Flute Concerto. Definitely Pan piping away there in the woods! (It's Emily Beynon,actually!) The Concerto then! Hyperion were bang on with that photo. I love woods!! :)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2017, 03:32:09 PM »
Pettersson's the greatest one of them all?!! I haven't heard that! Oh dear,would that mean my ending up with every symphony and orchestral work he composed?!! It's happened before and Pettersson was prolific,wasn't he? The one reason I have always resisted Myaskovsky (is that with an 'i' or 'y'? Come on,you're the expert!! ;D )Incidentally,I'm sure that there was an emi Lp of the Fifth or Eleventh symphony in the library when I was a youngster. I may even have borrowed it once? Did I imagine this?!! I know emi did issue (at least I seem to recall they did?)  some Melodiya recordings on their label. I had their Spartacus ballet,on three Lps,for a while. A bit uneven that score,but there are good bits!!  Incidentally,the same goes for Malcolm Williamson! I was trying to think of another British opera I might add to my collection a while back. On a whim I bought the Lyrita set of Tippett's Midsummer Marriage. I thought I might find it 'interesting'! On the contrary,I was hooked! I ended up with all the major orchestral works and a few other things as well!!!

Anyway,back to Holbrooke! I do actually enjoy some of his music. In fact I have done ever since I heard the first of those Marco Polo cds. I even wrote a fan letter to Gwydion Brooke (his son & the famous bassoonist,as you know) and got a very nice letter and a free Holbrooke Lp,to my complete surprise,in return! I've still got them somewhere! That said,I do find his output uneven;and I have to be in the right mood. My favourite piece so far is the Dylan Prelude,and I would love to hear that with a really good orchestra (ie not the Plovdiv. Sorry chaps! ;D). That said,I find even the weaker pieces a bit like a curates egg. There are bits that seem a bit thin,and then there is some felicity of orchestration that catches my ear and I'll keep listening. From what I've heard to date,I'm inclined to agree with the critic in the late lamented IRR Magazine,that construction was not one of his good points. A gift for colourful orchestration and a succession of dramatic flourishes and show stopping climaxes does not necessarily a good composer make;and colourful as his orchestration is,Holbrooke does have a tendency to garrulousness. On the plus side;I also agree with that aforementioned critic,that Holbrooke had a stronge sense for atmosphere;and it's that feel for atmosphere,and a very gothic one at that,which does appeal to me. As to whether his chamber music is actually preferable or better? I think it probably is,really! Like Scott,chamber and instrumental forms seemed to focus his mind. Indeed I listened to Holbrooke's Violin Sonata No 3 in F 'Orientale' (1926) on the Dutton label yesterday (see below) and what a lovely piece it is.......and short! On the contrary. Not a moment too long! It is lyrical music with an astringent edge to it,and I actually feel confident enough to say I think it's very good. I also like the other music on the cd (more please along similar lines,Dutton and EM records,please!). I think the Grasshopper Concerto also sounds better in this form,really. I like the version on the EM label best (and it's couplings). It sounds very nice in it's orchestral guise,though;and I think that leaping 'grasshopper' motif is one of Holbrooke's best (of what I've been able to hear so far). One more point. Holbrooke lived in Wales for a while;which obviously makes him a little more interesting for me. The Cauldron of Annwn cycle is based on legends from the Mabinogion (via Howard de Walden!!) and I've always been fascinated by Welsh myths and legends. Finally (another point!) whatever one might think of his music,Holbrooke was undoubtedly a very eccentric figure with a most colourful lifestyle filled with all sorts of interesting people. He would make a very entertaining subject for a biography,if someone has the time,one day. If it was well written,it might even be a little more interesting than his music!



And the other one!



This one is very good too ( can't resist adding it! ::) ;D)


I prefer Miaskovsky but the official website spells it Myaskovsky - there is no right answer, however I'm very flattered that you consider me an 'expert' others might say that 'CD nutter' is more accurate.
Oh yes, those great old EMI/ Melodiya LPs. I had Symphony 22 with some orchestral works by the conductor Svetlanov. Symphony 11 was certainly released on an EMI/Melodiya LP. It was coupled with Symphony 5 on an Olympia CD.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2017, 03:55:52 PM »
Yes,I only wish I'd bought more of them while I had the chance. The Melodiya cds haven't quite got that same quality about them. No frisson of getting things over enemy lines! The artwork is often inferior.....although,not always. I like their The Tale of Tsar Saltan set.....but no libretto! (When are we going to get a really good modern stereo recording of that?!!) And no wierd smelling glue!! Come on now Melodiya......the glue needs to knock you back when you open the set!! ??? ;D  Also,the great thing about old Lp Melodiya was the repertoire. The new Melodiya seem very reluctant to veer away from the more well known composers,with a few notable exceptions!! :(

No Holbrooke (or Boughton) on this post,but it makes the thread look longer!! ;D


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2017, 01:17:46 AM »
Yes,I only wish I'd bought more of them while I had the chance. The Melodiya cds haven't quite got that same quality about them. No frisson of getting things over enemy lines! The artwork is often inferior.....although,not always. I like their The Tale of Tsar Saltan set.....but no libretto! (When are we going to get a really good modern stereo recording of that?!!) And no wierd smelling glue!! Come on now Melodiya......the glue needs to knock you back when you open the set!! ??? ;D  Also,the great thing about old Lp Melodiya was the repertoire. The new Melodiya seem very reluctant to veer away from the more well known composers,with a few notable exceptions!! :(

No Holbrooke (or Boughton) on this post,but it makes the thread look longer!! ;D
Those EMI/Melodiya LPs did not stay for long in the catalogue and I regret not getting the one with Miaskovsky's 11th Symphony on (with Two Pieces for String Orchestra I think - an adaptation of the two movements of Symphony 19 for band - one of the movements is beautiful). I agree with your comments. One exception to the CDs with less interesting covers I think is the extraordinary one below (if it appears); 'Oak Tree Splintered by Lightning'. Allegory on the Artist's Wife's Death.' 1842 by M. Vorobiev:


Yes, back to Holbrooke! Miaskovsky's 'Silence' does have resonances of Holbrooke.

Another great CD image 'Peasant lighting cigarette':

« Last Edit: January 26, 2017, 01:23:09 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2017, 05:00:07 AM »
Yes,great artwork. The top one is particularly striking. The Peasant lighting cigarette. I like cds of Russian music with that sort of artwork or photographs,instead of a prima donna conductor! (Herbert von Karjan being the most ridiculous example!) I remember my Melodiya Lp of Balakirev's First had that cyrillic (have I got that right?)  script on the front. Beautifully ornate. It looked wonderful. I had an operetta set too;a Kalman operetta,in Russian,but performed with great gusto,that had the same ornate script on the front. I rather liked the way the box sets were constructed. The glue. Well,I don't miss it that much,but it was part of the experience!! ??? ;D  Cpo's recent releases of (or fairly recent) examples of Kabalevsky and Khatchaturian's Second have been particularly good.
This is nice ,too. A bit different,I know. No peasant with lit fag in foreground!! ??? ;D I wouldn't mind acquiring the earlier release without the Helios logo.



The Boughton cd I was plugging last night was rather let down by the longest item.The Concerto for String Orchestra. You really need a decent tune in a piece lasting 31:58! I enjoyed the other music,though!

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2017, 10:51:24 AM »
And since this is a Holbrooke thread;this is one that I enjoy,now and again. It seems to have had little attention,even from the few people who like this composer. I also like the more astringent Holbrooke you get in some of these works. I like the shadowy,gothic atmosphere of some of these pieces. Living in Wales I am also interested to see this on the back of the jewel case."This recording is supported by a Research Award from the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama". And in Welsh,"COLEG BRENHINOL CERDD A DRAMA CYMRU". (Their capital letters). His Welsh connections make him of some interest to me,as does the fact that his hugely ambitious operatic trilogy revolves around stories derived from the Mabinogion which I have read. I've always been interested in Welsh mytholgy and folklore and I think Holbrooke does get some of the darkly romantic atmosphere of those old stories in his best work. The playing on this cd is very good,as is the,as usual,excellent Cpo engineering.

« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 08:52:41 AM by cilgwyn »

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #28 on: April 14, 2017, 08:35:38 AM »
One things for sure,even if you don't like the music,the Cpo cd has a great cover design. It has a mysterious,gothic look about it,which somehow fits in very well with Holbrooke's muse. Although,it makes me think more of Lovecraft than Poe.
 Actually,bringing up Lovecraft,makes me wish Holbrooke had been as inspired by HPL. Tone poems & Concert overtures with titles like Dagon, Cthulhu & The Dunwich Horror,could have been fun! Or at least the titles would! ;D In fact,it just crossed my mind. Has any composer ever been inspired by Lovecraft? Does anyone here know? I'm sure someone has!  I know John Ireland found inspiration in my fellow countryman,Arthur Machen,who was inspired by Poe;and come to think of it,Lovecraft was inspired by Machen,and to bring things more up to date,Stephen King was inspired by (or found inspiration in) Lovecraft!
 
 About a week,or two ago,I had some job to do & to help me to concentrate on my work ;D,I put on my nice Sennheiser cordless headphones! :) To cut a long story :o short :),I chose to put on the recent Holbrooke orchestral cds from Cpo & Dutton (The Pit & the Pendulum,etc). I quite enjoyed the content of the cds;I think Holbrooke had a flair for colourful orchestration & and an,at times,gothick-y atmosphere;but I have had reservations about whether his ideas really add up. To quote Calum MacDonald,in his,December 2010 IRR Review,of the Dutton cd:

  "It's not that his ideas lack character-he is no mere clone of late Romantic betters-but that their effect is somehow inconsequential. Theme follows theme,follows episode,follows gesture,and from moment to moment the music is often impressive,but I have no strong sense of where it is going,or whether any element is more important than any other."

Anyway,this time around,being busy,I put the Cpo cd on repeat. Interestingly,instead of driving me up the wall or boring me to tears,or,on a more positive level,leading me to the same conclusions as before; ie interesting,maybe quite good fun,but........where's that Stanley Bate?!!! Listening over and over again seemed to help. After a while the good bits,did seem to outweigh the not so good. To my suprise & relief (the off button was downstairs! :o) somewhere beneath all that splurge of,at times,melodramatically gothic diarrhoea,there did appear to be some kind of structure;albeit a tad ramshackle at times (the Variations),but there WAS something holding it all together,after all,and,my g*d;after hearing the cd about half a dozen times,in a row,I actually replaced it with the Dutton cd!
  This,subsequently,led to a week long 'Holbrooke-Fest!',which took in the Dutton Violin Sonata No 3,the 'Ballet cd' (also Dutton),the Marco Polo orchestral cds,the new Naxos instrumental cd & off air recordings of 'The Bells' & excerpts from his opera,Bronwen! The latter,particularly excited me. Moving,passionate,exiting & dramatic in turns;it was probably the pick of the entire bunch! In fact,the worst thing about it was that it was only excerpts,very well performed ones at that;but as soon as you were really getting into any of it,the music would fade & you found yourself thrust,unceremoniously,into the next scene!

BOOOOOH! :( :o :)

Worst thing about this post. Having to check the spelling of 'diarrhoea'! :( :o (No jokes,please!!!)Google brought up some pretty revolting results! :( :o
Hope I've got it right,now! :(

Springrite (& Dundonnell) mention the Piano Concerto No 1'The Song of Gwyn ap Nudd'. Despite it's evocative title,I must say,this is the worst Holbrooke I've ever heard. It just sounds like an overblown & meandering Tchaikovsky/Rachmaninoff rip off,and that's being polite!!!  Maybe,the Second Piano Concerto 'L'Orient' is better? (I b***** hope so!!!)
Just spotted this long winded post! ::) ;D A thought just occurred to me. A number of composers have been inspired by Edgar Allan Poe;and John Ireland by Welsh boy,Arthur Machen. But have any composers been inspired by HP Lovecraft,a writer I do enjoy?!!

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #29 on: June 16, 2017, 09:39:05 AM »
After reading a quite enthusiastic review (not Musicweb) I decided to give this another spin. I didn't realise Holbrooke had taken a leaf out of Elgar's book. (Okay,I didn't read the booklet!)  Each Variation being a musical sketch  of a close friend or acquaintance. The Variation 14, HB Allegro marchia depicting Havergal Brian! Although Havergal Brian was later replaced by DG (Dan Godfrey)! I'm beginning to enjoy this now after a few listens. Holbrooke's variations are hardly a match for Elgar's;but maybe they aren't meant to be? This is more like well crafted light music. I find Holbrooke's scoring colourful and I like parts of it very much. I also find the ,so called,"Grasshopper" Violin Concerto growing on me,too. I find that leaping motif quite delightful. It really draws me in,and Holbrooke's scoring is at it's best here. I particularly like the lovely slow movement.
The cd finishes off with one of his Poe (Edgar Allan! ;D) inspired compositions. This is a very Gothic sounding piece. You can practically hear the rustling curtain and the Raven tapping on the window pane,croaking,"Nevermore"!


Offline Scion7

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke (1878-1958)
« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2017, 05:24:32 AM »
A composer who re-worked several of his ideas into other pieces.
His bio is an interesting read - a bit of a cantankerous old chap!
This is not a complete list of works-still gathering info:

  Chamber works
===============================================

 6 pieces for Violin & Piano, Op.3
 2 Poems for Violin & Piano, Op.5 (1896)
 Adagio and Rondo for clarinet and piano, Op.6b  1894
 5 pieces for mandolin, violin & piano, Op.8  (1900)
 Miniature Characteristic Suite, op.33b, wind quintet, 1897
 Sextet ‘Israfel’, op.33a, piano, wind/str insts, 1901
 9 pieces for Violin & Piano, Op.12
 piano Qt No.2 ‘Byron’, d, op.31, 1902
 Str Sextet ‘Henry Vaughan’, D, op.43, 1902
 Fantasie-Sonate, op.19, cello, piano, 1904
 String Quartet No.1, Op.17b  1904
 Trio for Violin, Horn & Piano, Op.25/28  1904
 piano quintet ‘Diabolique’, op.44, 1904
 piano Qt No.1, op.21, 1905
 6 pieces for Violin/Cello & Piano, Op.23
 Sextet for Piano/Strings Op33a ‘Israel’  1901
 Violin Sonata Nr.1, Op.6a (1906)
 Sextet ‘In Memoriam’, op.46, str qt, db, piano, 1905
 quintet ‘Apollo’, op.51b, 4 clarinet, piano, 1907
 Cl quintet no.2 ‘Ligeia’ (‘Fate’), g, op.27, 1910
 Trio for oboe, clarinet & piano, Op.57 ‘Fairyland’  1911
 Nocturne ‘Fairyland’, op.57, ob, clarinet/viola, piano, 1912
 String Qt Nr.2, Op.58a ‘War Impressions’  1915
 Serenade for oboe d'amore, clarinet, basset horn, 2 saxhorns, viola, 5 saxophones and harp, Op.61b.  1916
 Str Qt no.3 ‘Pickwick Club’, op.68, 1916
 Folksong Suite No.1 for String Qt., Op.71   1916
 Folksong Suite No.2 for String Qt., Op.72   1916
 Violin Sonata No.2, Op.59a ‘Romantic’  1917
 Celtic Suite, op.72, violin, piano, 1917
 Violin Sonata no.3 ‘Orientale’, op.83, 1926
 Phryne, op.89b, clarinet, piano, 1930s
 Arietta, for harp and flute, Op.120b (1930s)
 Irene, nonet for two violins, viola, cello, double bass, flute, oboe, clarinet and bassoon, Op.129
 bassoon quintet ‘Eleonora’, op.134, 1940s
 Octet, op.135, oboe, english horn, clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, db, horn, early 1940s

  Orchestral
========================================================

The Raven, sym. poem, after E.A. Poe, op.25, 1900
 Three Blind Mice Variations, op.37, 1900
 The Viking, sym. poem, after H.W. Longfellow: The Skeleton in Armour, op.32, 1901
 Queen Mab (W. Shakespeare), op.45, chorus ad lib, orch, 1902
 The Bells (Poe), sym. poem, op.50, chorus, orch, 1903
 Ulalume, sym. poem, op.35, 1903 [after Poe]
 Byron (J. Keats), sym. poem, op.39, chorus ad lib, orch, 1904
 Les hommages, suite, op.40, 1904
 Auld Lang Syne Variations, op.60, 1906
 Sym. no.1 ‘Homage to E.A. Poe – a Dramatic Choral Sym.’ (Poe), op.51, chorus, orch, 1907
 Sym. no.2 ‘Apollo and the Seaman – an Illuminated Sym.’ (F.H. Trench), op.48, chorus, orch, 1907
 piano Conc. no.1 ‘The Song of Gwyn-ap-Nudd’, after T.E. Ellis, f, op.52, 1908
 ViolinConc. ‘The Grasshopper’ (‘The Lyrical’), F, op.59, 1909, rev. 1916, 1928
 The Birds of Rhiannon, op.87, 1920
 Fantasy ‘The Wild Fowl’, op.56b, 1920s
 Sym. no.3 ‘Ships’, e, op.90, 1925
 Sax Conc. B, op.88, 1927
 piano Conc. no.2 ‘L’orient’, op.100, 1928
 Sym. no.5 ‘Wild Wales’, op.106, brass band, 1930s
 Amontillado, dramatic ov., op.123, 1935
 cello Conc. ‘The Cambrian’, E, op.103, 1936
 Double Conc. ‘Tamerlane’, after Poe, op.119, cl/sax/vn, bassoon/vc, small orch, 1939
 Quadruple Conc., op.133, fl, clarinet, eng hn, bassoon, orch, late 1940s
 Symphony No.6 in G major, Old England, Op.107 [see under Military band]
 Symphony No.7 in D major, Al Aaraaf, for strings, Op.109 (1929)
 Symphony No.8 in B flat, Dance Symphony, Op.112
 Symphony [No.9], Milton, Op.131

  Organ
=======================

Grand Prelude & Fuge, Op.63   1917
Suite No.1 in Bb, Op.111   
Suite No.2, Op.122
Suite No.3, Op.128a
Nocturne, Op.116c

  Piano music
============================

2 fantasie-sonatas
8 nocturnes
4 Cambrian Ballades

  Ballet
==========================

 Coromanthe, op.61, late 1910s
 The Moth and the Flame, op.62, late 1910s
 The Masque of the Red Death, op.65, 1913
 Pandora, 1919
 Aucassin and Nicolette, op.115, 1935
« Last Edit: October 29, 2017, 08:55:52 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke [1878-1958]
« Reply #31 on: October 29, 2017, 05:36:46 PM »

I've been quite happy with 90% of the Marco Polo releases,
and this one does not disappoint.

The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

cilgwyn

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #32 on: October 30, 2017, 08:49:50 AM »
A Holbrooke fan ,here. There don't seem to be many of us! I like quite allot of his music for some reason. Incidentally,Cpo will be releasing a third cd in their Holbrooke cd,before long. It will include his Symphony No 3 "Ships",among other orchestral works. I'm not sure quite when it will be released,though!

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #33 on: August 07, 2020, 01:59:22 AM »
Bumpity bump.

Finding this CD extremely enjoyable, with some very melodic String Quartets and a very decent Clarinet quintet too. Worth a listen.

Olivier

Offline Irons

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #34 on: August 07, 2020, 06:24:31 AM »
Bumpity bump.

Finding this CD extremely enjoyable, with some very melodic String Quartets and a very decent Clarinet quintet too. Worth a listen.



You have answered my question I put to you on the "Listening now" thread, Olivier. I am beginning to wonder if Jeffrey and yourself have had a secret bet who can empty my wallet first!
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #35 on: August 07, 2020, 06:34:11 AM »
You have answered my question I put to you on the "Listening now" thread, Olivier. I am beginning to wonder if Jeffrey and yourself have had a secret bet who can empty my wallet first!

See it as a valuable service being err...repaid :P
Olivier

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #36 on: August 09, 2020, 11:22:42 PM »
You have answered my question I put to you on the "Listening now" thread, Olivier. I am beginning to wonder if Jeffrey and yourself have had a secret bet who can empty my wallet first!
You'll be grateful in the end Lol  ;D
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #37 on: August 10, 2020, 05:06:14 AM »
You'll be grateful in the end Lol  ;D

Now let me see: Miaskovsky, Bate, Eller, Hadley, Sainton, Alwyn (VC), Wordsworth (Symphonies), Goossens (1st Symphony), Bantock (cello), Arnell and deep breath Chisholm. Enough I say! :o
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #38 on: August 10, 2020, 05:20:44 AM »
Now let me see: Miaskovsky, Bate, Eller, Hadley, Sainton, Alwyn (VC), Wordsworth (Symphonies), Goossens (1st Symphony), Bantock (cello), Arnell and deep breath Chisholm. Enough I say! :o

At first glance, that list is missing Benjamin, Joubert, Hurlstone, Sauguet, Ethel Smyth and Lilburn....

 :P
Olivier

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Joseph Holbrooke(1878-1958)
« Reply #39 on: August 10, 2020, 07:15:33 AM »
Now let me see: Miaskovsky, Bate, Eller, Hadley, Sainton, Alwyn (VC), Wordsworth (Symphonies), Goossens (1st Symphony), Bantock (cello), Arnell and deep breath Chisholm. Enough I say! :o
You forgot Goossens's 2nd Symphony!  :o :o
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).