Janis Ivanovs

Started by schweitzeralan, April 17, 2009, 09:19:40 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

relm1

Quote from: Roy Bland on June 30, 2022, 08:44:19 PM

real life isn't zhdanovian

I heard this recording just now and really enjoyed it.  Such a wonderful composer.  You can hear Prokofiev and Gliere - No. 17 is especially fine.  Both works are late 1970's and full of turmoil but lyrical.  This is a wonderful recording.   

vandermolen

For some reason I couldn't locate the Ivanovs thread, so I've recently been posting stuff about Ivanovs on the 'Latvian Composers' thread. apologies.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Roy Bland


Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Roy Bland on October 20, 2022, 07:51:23 PM
Choir works

So, what did you think about the choral works Roy?

I hadn't heard of Ivanovs before now.  I see that he also wrote a cello (and other) concerto?  How is that work?

PD
Pohjolas Daughter

Roy Bland

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on October 21, 2022, 03:07:34 AM
So, what did you think about the choral works Roy?

I hadn't heard of Ivanovs before now.  I see that he also wrote a cello (and other) concerto?  How is that work?

PD
I haven't listened choral works yet but i love immensely Violin Concerto IMHO best of latvian heritage
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwBUM0QBsk

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Roy Bland on October 21, 2022, 07:47:39 AM
I haven't listened choral works yet but i love immensely Violin Concerto IMHO best of latvian heritage
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwBUM0QBsk
Thanks, I'll check it out.  Any idea who the violinist and conductor are as they are not listed there?

PD
Pohjolas Daughter

vandermolen

This is a nice introduction to Ivanovs's orchestral music:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Roy Bland

#67
Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on October 21, 2022, 09:04:23 AM
Thanks, I'll check it out.  Any idea who the violinist and conductor are as they are not listed there?

PD
I have this version with Vineta Sareika
https://www.discogs.com/it/release/11555803-J%C4%81nis-Ivanovs-Instrument%C4%81lie-Koncerti-Instrumental-Concerts
another impressing piece i totally agree with C, Boisssier
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIXqoUfcokM
Regarding symphonies i prefer later works after 15 where he reached full expressive and dramatic maturity

relm1

I really enjoyed this! 


A composer I must follow closer!

vandermolen

#69
Quote from: relm1 on January 23, 2023, 04:41:43 PMI really enjoyed this! 


A composer I must follow closer!
That's one of my favourites as well. No.11 is another one (no CD release  :( )
This CD is a great introduction to Ivanovs. Also the Marco Polo release.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

calyptorhynchus

#70
I've just been listening to some Ivanovs symphonies and reminding myself how good they are. One thing I noticed this time round is how Ivanovs is the great virtuoso of the harp in the orchestra, whether providing the occasional splash of colour, or in more sustained passages where the harp helps the music to an almost water-like flow.
Pity Ivanovs didn't write a harp concerto.
'Many men are melancholy by hearing music, but it is a pleasing melancholy that it causeth.' Robert Burton

kyjo

Quote from: calyptorhynchus on June 18, 2024, 08:24:45 PMI've just been listening to some Ivanovs symphonies and reminding myself how good they are. One thing I noticed this time round is how Ivanovs is the great virtuoso of the harp in the orchestra, whether providing the occasional splash of colour, or in more sustained passages where the harp helps the music to an almost water-like flow.
Pity Ivanovs didn't write a harp concerto.

Any particular favorites? I'm generally not a huge Ivanovs fan and have been disappointed by several of his symphonies, finding them rather unmemorable. The one that I've enjoyed the most so far is the 8th (recorded on Naxos).
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Mirror Image

Quote from: kyjo on June 19, 2024, 07:22:36 PMAny particular favorites? I'm generally not a huge Ivanovs fan and have been disappointed by several of his symphonies, finding them rather unmemorable. The one that I've enjoyed the most so far is the 8th (recorded on Naxos).

Same question for me. I never could connect with this composer's music.
"You cannot set art off in a corner and hope for it to have vitality, reality, and substance." ― Charles Ives

calyptorhynchus

I note that in my (private) list of great symphonies I have listed Ivanovs greats as 1, 3, 4, 7-21. Which doesn't narrow it down that much. I just find them almost all good, although I understand what you mean not being able to connect and being disappointed. There are some composers where you have drop everything and just listen, thinking 'wow', but there are others, like Ivanovs, where you listen and nothing much stands out but towards the end you realise you have listened to a Symphony.

In my book No.2 is a youthful work that doesn't have enough energy, 5 and 6 are post-WW2 works which are bombastic official works written to prove what a good Latvian Soviet composer he was. Also No.13 is a paean to Lenin or something, but Ivanovs cunningly wrote the spoken bits as separate movements, so now we can just listen to the three orchestral movements!

Interestingly though I only like his orchestral music, symphonies + tone poems. I don't connect with his chamber, concerto or piano works.

Sorry, rambling here. I guess I think the very best of his symphonies are: 4, 17-19.
'Many men are melancholy by hearing music, but it is a pleasing melancholy that it causeth.' Robert Burton

kyjo

Quote from: calyptorhynchus on June 19, 2024, 08:28:06 PMI note that in my (private) list of great symphonies I have listed Ivanovs greats as 1, 3, 4, 7-21. Which doesn't narrow it down that much. I just find them almost all good, although I understand what you mean not being able to connect and being disappointed. There are some composers where you have drop everything and just listen, thinking 'wow', but there are others, like Ivanovs, where you listen and nothing much stands out but towards the end you realise you have listened to a Symphony.

In my book No.2 is a youthful work that doesn't have enough energy, 5 and 6 are post-WW2 works which are bombastic official works written to prove what a good Latvian Soviet composer he was. Also No.13 is a paean to Lenin or something, but Ivanovs cunningly wrote the spoken bits as separate movements, so now we can just listen to the three orchestral movements!

Interestingly though I only like his orchestral music, symphonies + tone poems. I don't connect with his chamber, concerto or piano works.

Sorry, rambling here. I guess I think the very best of his symphonies are: 4, 17-19.

Thanks for the detailed response! I tried Nos. 17 and 18 recently and couldn't connect with them, unfortunately. 4 and 19 up next...
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff