Author Topic: Lo Spazio Sciarrino  (Read 15958 times)

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Offline petrarch

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2010, 07:21:12 AM »
Since a number of styles emerged in the 60s as a reaction against serialism that does not seem like a very well defined meaning. Since you seem to know exactly what it means, could you please tell me where I can find more than the few things that are show up on Wikipedia. Thanks!

Klang Komposition is certainly not the only style that emerged as a reaction against serialism. Think e.g. Xenakis, the New Complexity, Minimalism, etc.

Klang Komposition is also not bruitisme nor noise music. It is more textural than "noisy pointillism", for lack of a better term. Klang Kompositionen usually have long, sustained "sound surfaces". If you listen to any of the works mentioned, you'll quickly get the difference.
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Offline petrarch

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #21 on: March 14, 2010, 08:19:24 AM »
Well, today it has been a delight listening to Storie di altre storie


which will be followed by Orchestral works


This, after being prompted by this thread to listen to the Scelsi 3 CD set of works for orchestra and choir on Accord, conducted by Wyttenbach, and Cerha's Spiegel cycle on the Komponistenportrait CD on Col Legno, conducted by Cerha himself. It's been a while since I listened to these CDs, but they really never disappoint, even after ~12 years.
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kentel

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2010, 08:24:49 AM »
Klang Komposition is also not bruitisme nor noise music. It is more textural than "noisy pointillism", for lack of a better term. Klang Kompositionen usually have long, sustained "sound surfaces".

As have most spectral works. That's why I asked you about the difference between spectral music and klang composition.

On the contrary Lachenmann's works has generally not sustained sound surface, as far as I can remember. And Feldman's music has, though he's not considered as a klang nor as a spectral composer.






Offline petrarch

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #23 on: March 14, 2010, 09:33:57 AM »
As have most spectral works. That's why I asked you about the difference between spectral music and klang composition.

On the contrary Lachenmann's works has generally not sustained sound surface, as far as I can remember. And Feldman's music has, though he's not considered as a klang nor as a spectral composer.

Did you read the wikipedia articles? That should give you some idea of the differences. It's all in the methodology. If I tell you here's a piece that does I-IV-II-V-I and another one that does P0-RI6-I7-R1, you would probably easily identify the methodology and not confuse the two, just because they both organize notes according to abstract rules.

Having long, sustained surfaces is not an exclusive characteristic of Klangkompositionen, that's why I said usually. In fact, what I like the most about Cerha's Spiegel, for instance, is the mix of long sustained surfaces (usually done with string instruments, lots of them), with serial-like (oh, the irony!) pointillistic pizzicati and staccati (done with strings, brass or percussion), and all variations in-between.

Klangkomposition is really a very small and specific, almost anecdotal, genre (like stochastic music). It's all music in the end, and composers knew how to expand the language and capture, mix and match the aspects of what they had at their disposal that better suited what they wanted to do.
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Offline Josquin des Prez

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2010, 09:47:18 AM »
Quote
Il Spazio Sciarrino

That's incorrect. Lo Spazio Sciarrino is what it should say.

snyprrr

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #25 on: March 16, 2010, 07:28:22 PM »
That's incorrect. Lo Spazio Sciarrino is what it should say.

I was wondering,... thanks.

snyprrr

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2010, 07:45:24 PM »
Well, today it has been a delight listening to Storie di altre storie


which will be followed by Orchestral works


This, after being prompted by this thread to listen to the Scelsi 3 CD set of works for orchestra and choir on Accord, conducted by Wyttenbach, and Cerha's Spiegel cycle on the Komponistenportrait CD on Col Legno, conducted by Cerha himself. It's been a while since I listened to these CDs, but they really never disappoint, even after ~12 years.

And I didn't know the Orchestral Disc/Kairos was a 3cd set also!!



I just wanted to chime in on the Klangy stuff. Sciarrino's piece La Malincolia (I think it's for two violins, viola plus, or something like that), and it definitely utilizes certain effects in a very tonal way. I can't think of too many examples of where this style of music is used to serve purely old fashioned ideas,... meaning....

let's say a tuba can make an extremely high "C" note, that ends up having a really plaintive sound. Why not use that as the minor third in "a minor" situation? Do I make sense? The best example is Kagel's SQ No.3, a perect mix of music and noises (though, it does tend towards the music). The very opening of that piece is what I'm talking about.

I've heard that Sciarrino and Lachenmann are not friends at all. How funny.

Offline Luke

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #27 on: March 17, 2010, 02:46:20 AM »
In light of the above conversation about terminology - bruitisme, Klang Komposition, noise music, whatever - and specifically the use of Penderecki's name in that context, the 'correct' classification (if it matters!) for (essentially Polish) music of this type is, IIRC, sonorist - yeah, here's the wiki page.

whilst I'm here....Anamorfosi only elicits zzzz? Humph! I love that piece, it's such a clever, funny little gem - who'd a thunk it was possible to merge (submerge?) a couple of Ravel water pieces like that at the same time as paraphrasing 'Singin' in the Rain'...? Never fails to lift my spirits, that one.

snyprrr

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2010, 07:43:01 AM »
Oh dear, I seem to have gotten myself into a tizzy watching Sciarrino piano pieces on YouTube. I'm totally in love! :-* :-*

ah, and with the Damerini album going for $60 on Amazon...

ok, Hamelin,...it's on you. Please record ALL of Sciarrino's piano music for Hyperion,...on ONE cd!! NOW!!!



btw- there's lots of cool YouTube stuff for Sciarrino.



Anyways, ciarrino's piano music is so,...so,... "physical",... I don't know, the "sound" of the piano really comes through. I wish I would have thought of this.

ok, I'm hyperventilating,...please,... help,...uh,....

snyprrr

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #29 on: April 07, 2010, 07:19:33 PM »
I had three choices for Sciarrino's magnum opus for solo violin, the Sei Capricci (1976). I remember the version tied to the Immagine, but, all of a sudden, there were two new versions, one, an all wild recital, and one, a more stand avant selection.

I chose Barbara Luneburg over Carolin Widmann (the composer's sister) because of the more spectrally based discmates, GF Haas, and Manfred Stahnke (Widmann chooses Boulez, Ysaye, and Widmann (she's also the one who has a recital on ECM with Schoenberg, Zimmermann, Feldman, and Xenakis)). When playing Sciarrino, you shouldn't really be conservative in pairing, I think.

The Stanhke piece is a wonderful, imagined folk music, with the strings tuned FCFC. t's like an expanded meditation on the first mvmt of Ligeti's Viola Sonata.

One Haas piece I liked, one I didn't. Here is a composer confusing my expectations.



BUT!!,... the Sciarrino is a masterpiece. I think he's my new favorite (sorry Xenakis). What can be said? They say it's just surface, but I hear the Ages in there, the Timeless. All that futile work for so little sound. It's just so beautiful. I can't imagine there being the need for any more solo violin music (but hey, what would you recommend?). If anyone has never heard these before...


BUT WAIT!! THERE'S MORE!!!

I also finally got the Fabbriciani recital on ColLegno, Fabbrica della Incantesimi. How can you not but help to just love this disc beyond belief? The dove sounds in Canzona di ringraziamento. The evocation of ancient ruined cultures in the icy L'orizzonte luminoso di Aton. The kitchen sink approach of the last, and most mature piece on the album, Fra i testi dedicati alle nubi. The second volume of the Strad disc picks up where this leaves off (with the last three pieces here), but, nevermind, this is all you'd ever need. And, with Sciarrino as sound engineer, you really get a custom recording for the pieces. All of a sudden, in Hermes, what you thought was an extrememly dry acoustic erupts into a cathedral when the flautist pierces the pianissimo noodlings with a sharp attack.

No one can deny what Sciarrino has done for the flute. These pieces have a symphonism that is quite unique. Bravo!



AND IF YOU ORDER NOW!!!

I have put the call in to try to get the Damerini piano disc from Europe. I'm acting like I already have it, and I'm basking in day long Sciarrino-a-thons.

And, I ordered the Aspern Suite just for good measure (the only Sciarrino for $5).

YES, I'M'A really a'likin' the unassuming Venetian.

Offline petrarch

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2010, 02:48:06 AM »
I also finally got the Fabbriciani recital on ColLegno, Fabbrica della Incantesimi. How can you not but help to just love this disc beyond belief? The dove sounds in Canzona di ringraziamento. The evocation of ancient ruined cultures in the icy L'orizzonte luminoso di Aton. The kitchen sink approach of the last, and most mature piece on the album, Fra i testi dedicati alle nubi. The second volume of the Strad disc picks up where this leaves off (with the last three pieces here), but, nevermind, this is all you'd ever need. And, with Sciarrino as sound engineer, you really get a custom recording for the pieces. All of a sudden, in Hermes, what you thought was an extrememly dry acoustic erupts into a cathedral when the flautist pierces the pianissimo noodlings with a sharp attack.

No one can deny what Sciarrino has done for the flute. These pieces have a symphonism that is quite unique. Bravo!

I just love that disc. You should try Vanitas (on Ricordi) next for something really different.

YES, I'M'A really a'likin' the unassuming Venetian.

You meant sicilian, right?
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snyprrr

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2010, 06:06:00 AM »
I just love that disc. You should try Vanitas (on Ricordi) next for something really different.

You meant sicilian, right?

Vanitas is currently unavailable, no used copies on Amazon. Should have got it when it came out, but you could have never gotten me to buy a forty min piece for voice, cello, and piano at that time, haha.

oh,...and,...yes.

karlhenning

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2010, 04:55:02 PM »
Decidedly piqued, is my curiosity.

snyprrr

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2010, 09:22:49 PM »
Decidedly piqued, is my curiosity.

He has one main solo clarinet work, Let Me Die Before I Wake. It's on the Alter Ego/Stradivarius disc, which happens to be probably the single best intro to SS, the similar Kairos disc notwithstanding. You might, however, catch the dreaded Pringles Syndrome!

snyprrr

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #34 on: June 29, 2013, 07:44:39 AM »
Sciarrino 'Complete String Quartets' on KAIROS.

Yea, that's great, but it's STILL under 50mins.!! >:D

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2013, 06:39:02 PM »


Italian composer Salvatore Sciarrino (sha-REE-no) is considered one of the leaders of advanced or avant-garde music in Europe. His music uses isolated sonorities such as harmonics, other unusual methods of tone production, and additional sounds that can be made with instruments such as tapping and key clicking. In addition, it is characterized by artful and frequent use of silence as part of the compositional structure, as well as frequent introduction, in a questioning or confrontational way, of pre-existing music, including classical American popular song.

He was a very bright, inquisitive, and talented child; interested in painting and other visual arts, he had moved to creating abstract works by the time he was ten. However, at about that age he was strongly attracted to music and began teaching himself music in 1959. He was guided in this by Antonino Titone, but aside from some studies with Turi Belfiore in 1964, had no formal academic training as a child.

Three years after starting his course of music self-teaching, a composition of his was accepted for the 1962 Third Palermo New Music Week Festival. In 1968 his Quartetto II was played in Rome and his work Aka aka to was premiered in Palermo.

In 1969, he moved to Rome. There he entered the electronic music course taught by Franco Evangelisti at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia. His music at this time was fairly much a torrent of unconventional instrumental sounds, as he was inspired by electronic music to seek the full sound potential of his instruments. However, through the decade of the '70s he tended to eliminate the profusion in favor of lean, isolated sounds separated by silences. He has said "there [is] one thing without which no delight in sound makes sense, and that is the intensity of silence."

His major compositional influence was Luigi Nono, the most radical composer among well-known Italian musical figures of the post-World War II generation. In 1976, Sciarrino left Rome for a teaching post in Milan, where he worked at the Conservatory until 1982. In that year his success as a composer allowed him to cut back on his teaching work and he moved to the remote Umbrian village of Città di Castello. Nevertheless, he continued to teach at Florence Conservatory, Palermo, and Bologna. In addition, from 1978 to 1980 he was the Artistic Director of the Bologna Opera Theater.

Laurent Feneyrou has characterized Sciarrino's music as evolving towards the borderland of sound, suggesting "vast uninhabited spaces, especially the ocean wastes, the confines of dream..."

One of the earliest pieces to show in a marked way his interest in sound versus silence is Un'immagine di Arpocrate for piano, orchestra, and chorus (1979). During the 1970s he produced a notable series of works for solo strings, including the 3 notturni brillanti for viola (1974 - 1975), and 6 capricci for violin (1975 - 1976).

But in 1977 he was impressed by the playing of flutist Roberto Fabbricciani and has written numerous works for him, exploring increasingly tiny nuances of expression possible with the instrument. On the other hand, his large series of piano music tends to get more aggressive in tone over time.

Sciarrino's music exploring American popular song began with Cailles en sarcophage (1979), Efebo con radio (1981), and Blue Dream (1980). High points of this stream of Sciarrino's music includes the Nove canzoni del XX secolo (1991) and the "one-act still-life" Vanitas (1981) for voice, cello, and piano, a huge treatment of Hoagy Carmichael's song "Stardust." He also has a series of stage works, such as Lohengrin (1984), that deconstruct well-known stories and myths.

[Article taken from All Music Guide]

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No thread for this guy? Hmmmm...well now is better than never. Any fans out there? What little I've heard of his music, I really enjoyed for the simple almost microscopic attention to detail found in his music. Almost a Feldman-like delicacy. I bought two orchestral sets on the Kairos label. Can't wait to hear more. What do you guys think of his music? Any other recommendations?

« Last Edit: November 11, 2013, 06:41:04 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline petrarch

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Offline Mirror Image

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #38 on: November 11, 2013, 06:48:28 PM »
This is so f****** cool! 8)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ZhoWzsq_SEs" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ZhoWzsq_SEs</a>

Such an intimate sound-world that I can't help but to be enveloped into. I'm definitely going to be listening to this work whenever I get that Kairos box set.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Lo Spazio Sciarrino
« Reply #39 on: November 11, 2013, 07:07:49 PM »
And I didn't know the Orchestral Disc/Kairos was a 3cd set also!!

Yep, and then there's this one too:



I bought both sets many nights ago. Can't wait to hear them!
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy