Author Topic: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)  (Read 37668 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2386
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #140 on: September 30, 2018, 09:00:57 PM »


What are your preferred recordings of Trittico Botticelliano? I'm very fond of López-Cobos on Telarc and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra on DG. I revisited the former, being bewitched once more by such a singular beauty. La Primavera and La Nascita di Venere strike me like creations of extreme and pure loveliness, the wealth of effects takes me to another dimension. Respighi at his best in chamber forms. L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.

I really enjoy John Neschling’s recent recording of this lovely work with the Orchestre Philharmonique Royal De Liege on BIS:

"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

SymphonicAddict

  • Guest
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #141 on: October 01, 2018, 03:10:06 PM »
The Neschling and the Marriner look tempting, it will be worth investigating.

Trittico is some of the most pristine music I have heard. There are a fair amount of brilliant recordings that show this piece in all its glory.

SymphonicAddict

  • Guest
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #142 on: February 02, 2019, 07:21:21 PM »


I fell in love with La Sensitiva from the above recording. Such magical music! Not only magical, but tender, mystical, lovely, lightweight, enchanting, subtle. Once more this composer gives a masterful lesson about orchestration. This is Respighi at his most distilled. One of his finest works as far as I can think.

SymphonicAddict

  • Guest
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #143 on: September 11, 2019, 04:02:11 PM »
Earlier it was my first acquaintance ever with a Respighi opera, more exactly Semirâma, his 2nd opera after Re Enzo:



How delighted to hear this!! I couldn't expect less from such a masterly composer. This is mind-blowing stuff! The best of the early Respighi is here, including some traces of Strauss and Puccini regarding the colourful orchestration and lyrical intensity respectively. Many atmospheric and exotic passages charged of sheer magic left me a strong impression, not to say the mighty voice of Eva Marton, just great. After the Strauss operas I will entirely continue with these ones.

Offline Roasted Swan

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 945
  • Location: UK
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #144 on: September 12, 2019, 09:23:58 AM »
Earlier it was my first acquaintance ever with a Respighi opera, more exactly Semirâma, his 2nd opera after Re Enzo:



How delighted to hear this!! I couldn't expect less from such a masterly composer. This is mind-blowing stuff! The best of the early Respighi is here, including some traces of Strauss and Puccini regarding the colourful orchestration and lyrical intensity respectively. Many atmospheric and exotic passages charged of sheer magic left me a strong impression, not to say the mighty voice of Eva Marton, just great. After the Strauss operas I will entirely continue with these ones.

Try La Fiamma next - in very much the same mould and performed by a similar cast as this



ouch to the current Amazon price mind........!

SymphonicAddict

  • Guest
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #145 on: September 12, 2019, 02:32:22 PM »
Try La Fiamma next - in very much the same mould and performed by a similar cast as this



ouch to the current Amazon price mind........!

The link doesn't work, but I did read some reviews of that opera and they look pretty optimistic. I'm eager to listen to this one and the rest.

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 51043
  • Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    ...Brume au-dessus de l'eau...
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #146 on: June 04, 2020, 05:17:31 AM »
Before the recent site crash, I had posted how much I admired Neschling’s Respighi on BIS:



But I also liked this recording on BIS as well:

“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 51043
  • Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    ...Brume au-dessus de l'eau...
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #147 on: June 04, 2020, 05:18:49 AM »
Another recording I was most impressed with was this one on Hyperion:

“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 51043
  • Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    ...Brume au-dessus de l'eau...
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #148 on: June 04, 2020, 05:24:28 AM »
Some of my other favorite Respighi recordings:

“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5143
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #149 on: June 04, 2020, 06:01:20 AM »
Some of my other favorite Respighi recordings:


Own them all and love them all, in between I listened to most of the new Neschling/BIS recordings and found them very good - but not better than Geoffey Simons, who remains my favourite in most of this repertoire. At least Neschling replaces most recordings by Jesús López-Cobos for Telarc which I found less convincing. Will be playing my favourite piece by Respighi tonight, the Trittico botticelliano, under Geoffrey Simons (had forgotten that I own this cd, because its by the CALA label, not Chandos).  :)
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 51043
  • Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    ...Brume au-dessus de l'eau...
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #150 on: June 04, 2020, 06:08:31 AM »
Own them all and love them all, in between I listened to most of the new Neschling/BIS recordings and found them very good - but not better than Geoffey Simons, who remains my favourite in most of this repertoire. At least Neschling replaces most recordings by Jesús López-Cobos for Telarc which I found less convincing. Will be playing my favourite piece by Respighi tonight, the Trittico botticelliano, under Geoffrey Simons (had forgotten that I own this cd, because its by the CALA label, not Chandos).  :)

Simon has recorded a good bit for the Cala label. I own of few of those recordings. He’s certainly an underrated conductor.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 12297
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #151 on: June 04, 2020, 07:46:53 AM »
Following this thread with interest, since I am one of those who has not heard much Respighi other than the trilogy, some chamber music, and his opera, La campana sommersa (The Sunken Bell).

A recording of Pines was my first-ever LP (Sargent/LSO), and though I still love it and Fountains, over the years Feste Romane has become my favorite. My go-to conductor is Muti, whose theatrically charged vision is like no other: when he and Chicago did a few years ago, it was a revelation.

Now there's this version from the 2009 Proms -- the first-ever Proms performance -- with Vasily Petrenko and the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain. Gotta say, they are on fire here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9u1oT7QtQp4&t=1415s

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Symphonic Addict

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1479
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #152 on: June 04, 2020, 11:49:35 AM »
I've been thinking of something lately. It's about San Gregorio Magno (St. Gregory the Great) from Vetrate di Chiesa. Frankly speaking, it's some of the most impressive, majestic, apotheosic and overwhelming music I've ever heard, so I ask: should it be named like that catholic saint? Chandos booklet calls it "a kind of Papal coronation in sound", but for me this music goes beyond, it's much more transcendent, magical, mystical, universal, ineffable. What do you, Respighi fans, think?

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 51043
  • Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    ...Brume au-dessus de l'eau...
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #153 on: June 04, 2020, 12:05:01 PM »
I've been thinking of something lately. It's about San Gregorio Magno (St. Gregory the Great) from Vetrate di Chiesa. Frankly speaking, it's some of the most impressive, majestic, apotheosic and overwhelming music I've ever heard, so I ask: should it be named like that catholic saint? Chandos booklet calls it "a kind of Papal coronation in sound", but for me this music goes beyond, it's much more transcendent, magical, mystical, universal, ineffable. What do you, Respighi fans, think?

Honestly, they’re just titles to me. Music is such an abstract thing and even in works that explicitly point out their source(s) of inspiration, my mind goes somewhere else, but it is, after all, the listener who draws their own conclusions about a piece of music. Sorry to sound rather vague, but music is interpreted in so many different ways not only from the musicians but the listeners, that we’ll never truly know what is fact and what is fiction.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Symphonic Addict

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1479
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #154 on: June 04, 2020, 07:56:15 PM »
Honestly, they’re just titles to me. Music is such an abstract thing and even in works that explicitly point out their source(s) of inspiration, my mind goes somewhere else, but it is, after all, the listener who draws their own conclusions about a piece of music. Sorry to sound rather vague, but music is interpreted in so many different ways not only from the musicians but the listeners, that we’ll never truly know what is fact and what is fiction.

Actually, yes, the musical experience depends on how the listener gets it or wants to get it.

Offline Symphonic Addict

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1479
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #155 on: June 04, 2020, 08:07:05 PM »
Earlier today I listened to Belkis, Regina di Saba in what seems to be its complete recording. Really fantastic music. At the beginning I was doubtful since there is a narrator through several numbers (and she speaks in German, so I didn't understand anything), but fortunately  it's not too intrusive. There is much more interesting material apart from what is found in the famous suite, including some choral parts. Maybe the rendition could be a little better, but overall I liked it very much.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/YDSDWhZZxxc" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/YDSDWhZZxxc</a>

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 51043
  • Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    ...Brume au-dessus de l'eau...
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #156 on: June 04, 2020, 08:26:38 PM »
Earlier today I listened to Belkis, Regina di Saba in what seems to be its complete recording. Really fantastic music. At the beginning I was doubtful since there is a narrator through several numbers (and she speaks in German, so I didn't understand anything), but fortunately  it's not too intrusive. There is much more interesting material apart from what is found in the famous suite, including some choral parts. Maybe the rendition could be a little better, but overall I liked it very much.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/YDSDWhZZxxc" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/YDSDWhZZxxc</a>

Very nice, Cesar. I wasn’t aware that the complete recording existed. Hmmm..may have to investigate it. Thanks for bringing it to our attention.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 18011
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #157 on: June 04, 2020, 10:25:06 PM »
Own them all and love them all, in between I listened to most of the new Neschling/BIS recordings and found them very good - but not better than Geoffey Simons, who remains my favourite in most of this repertoire. At least Neschling replaces most recordings by Jesús López-Cobos for Telarc which I found less convincing. Will be playing my favourite piece by Respighi tonight, the Trittico botticelliano, under Geoffrey Simons (had forgotten that I own this cd, because its by the CALA label, not Chandos).  :)
Very much agree. I own them all other than the Muti disc. I remember driving to school one Saturday morning (in the early days when I had to go in on a Saturday morning) and really enjoying a piece on the radio and hoping that it would finish before I arrived at work, so that I could know what it  was (this must have been in c. 1988). Luckily it just finished in time and it was 'St Gregory the Great' from Church Windows conducted by Geoffrey Simon. In those days there was a record shop in the local town and amazingly they had the LP!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 51043
  • Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    ...Brume au-dessus de l'eau...
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #158 on: June 05, 2020, 08:20:19 AM »
Very much agree. I own them all other than the Muti disc. I remember driving to school one Saturday morning (in the early days when I had to go in on a Saturday morning) and really enjoying a piece on the radio and hoping that it would finish before I arrived at work, so that I could know what it  was (this must have been in c. 1988). Luckily it just finished in time and it was 'St Gregory the Great' from Church Windows conducted by Geoffrey Simon. In those days there was a record shop in the local town and amazingly they had the LP!

You don’t own Muti’s Roman Trilogy, Jeffrey? :o You definitely should remedy this! Muti’s is still my favorite performance after all of these years.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 18011
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #159 on: June 05, 2020, 11:27:54 AM »
You don’t own Muti’s Roman Trilogy, Jeffrey? :o You definitely should remedy this! Muti’s is still my favorite performance after all of these years.
Ok thanks John. Will look out for it. Having said that I wonder if I do have it on an EMI compilation.

PS I realise that I have it on this recently acquired double CD set here - silly me!
« Last Edit: June 05, 2020, 11:31:04 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).