Author Topic: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)  (Read 34347 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #60 on: February 09, 2012, 02:59:22 PM »
I like this performance of the Piano Concerto (Modo Misolidio). Church Windows is another favourite, especially in the Geoffrey Simon version on Chandos.



I wonder how this version of Concerto in Modo Misolidio compares with the Tozer/Downes recording on Chandos? Which do you prefer, Jeffrey?
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Offline Est.1965

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #61 on: February 09, 2012, 03:02:15 PM »
I like this performance of the Piano Concerto (Modo Misolidio). Church Windows is another favourite, especially in the Geoffrey Simon version on Chandos.



Jeffrey, you kindly sent me that Church Windows a few years ago.  :o  I sincerely hope you have your own copy again, or I will have to send it back to you!  Geoffrey Simon is excellent with it, he does not play to overblowing it, but has what can only be described as a well thought out delivery, no matter how dramatic the piece.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #62 on: February 09, 2012, 03:49:03 PM »
I wonder how this version of Concerto in Modo Misolidio compares with the Tozer/Downes recording on Chandos? Which do you prefer, Jeffrey?

I'd need to listen to the Tozer again. I think that I liked the Ondine and Naxos versions best.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #63 on: February 09, 2012, 03:50:55 PM »
Jeffrey, you kindly sent me that Church Windows a few years ago.  :o  I sincerely hope you have your own copy again, or I will have to send it back to you!  Geoffrey Simon is excellent with it, he does not play to overblowing it, but has what can only be described as a well thought out delivery, no matter how dramatic the piece.

I do have several ( :o) copies of Church Windows (am playing the Geoffrey Simon version now - my favourite) - but many thanks John.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #64 on: February 09, 2012, 03:54:34 PM »
I'd need to listen to the Tozer again. I think that I liked the Ondine and Naxos versions best.

Thanks for your feedback, Jeffrey. 8)
« Last Edit: February 09, 2012, 04:01:24 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #65 on: February 09, 2012, 03:56:08 PM »
Thanks for you feedback, Jeffrey. 8)
My pleasure  :D
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #66 on: February 09, 2012, 04:12:50 PM »
Are we finally finished discussing the "probably dullest piano concerto ever" (as I once heard it being called on the radio).  ;D

(I myself love it though, as I am especially fond of 'later Respighi', including most compositions from the 1920s and 1930s.)
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #67 on: January 17, 2013, 09:08:53 PM »
I really love this composer's music. Sure it may not be the most profound music and it may not tickle everyone's fancy, but, my goodness, does he know his way around the orchestra. Well when you study with Rimsky-Korsakov this is a prerequisite! ;) Anyway, some favorite works obviously the Roman Trilogy, Church Windows, Belkis: Queen of Sheba, Concerto gregoriano, Three Botticelli Pictures, and more recently the Six Pieces for Violin and Piano.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2013, 09:17:59 PM by Mirror Image »
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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #68 on: January 17, 2013, 09:23:14 PM »
I really love this composer's music. Sure it may not be the most profound music and it may not tickle everyone's fancy, but, my goodness, does he know his way around the orchestra. Well when you study with Rimsky-Korsakov this is a prerequisite! ;) Anyway, some favorite works obviously the Roman Trilogy, Church Windows, Belkis: Queen of Sheba, Concerto gregoriano, Three Botticelli Pictures, and more recently the Six Pieces for Violin and Piano.

Six smallish pieces? I think that's the only Respighi I have. The first String Quartet is a heaven storming hot house flower, the second did not live up to my expectations. Respighi, Enescu, Kodaly,... I dunno, I've seen too many movies maybe?...

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #69 on: January 17, 2013, 09:38:55 PM »
Six smallish pieces? I think that's the only Respighi I have. The first String Quartet is a heaven storming hot house flower, the second did not live up to my expectations. Respighi, Enescu, Kodaly,... I dunno, I've seen too many movies maybe?...

I like Enescu, but I'm lukewarm about Kodaly. I have a recording of some of Respighi chamber works on Chandos. Very nice recording. I need to revisit that at some point. That's where I heard Six Pieces for Violin and Piano.
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Offline ChamberNut

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #70 on: April 07, 2013, 04:15:47 PM »
The Birds (Gli Uccelli) is my favourite Respighi work.  Respighi shares the same birth date as me, albeit 95 years my senior.  :D
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Offline ChamberNut

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #71 on: April 07, 2013, 04:31:54 PM »
The Birds (Gli Uccelli) is my favourite Respighi work.  Respighi shares the same birth date as me, albeit 95 years my senior.  :D

Has anyone else heard this Respighi, or am I the only one?  ???  Doesn't seem like anyone else has mentioned it.  Perhaps I don't understand Respighi's 'idiom' if I like it.  :P
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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #72 on: April 07, 2013, 05:02:44 PM »
Has anyone else heard this Respighi, or am I the only one?  ???  Doesn't seem like anyone else has mentioned it.  Perhaps I don't understand Respighi's 'idiom' if I like it.  :P

I like this work a lot, Ray, but my favorite Respighi work is Church Windows.
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #73 on: April 07, 2013, 05:24:59 PM »
Has anyone else heard this Respighi, or am I the only one?  ???  Doesn't seem like anyone else has mentioned it.  Perhaps I don't understand Respighi's 'idiom' if I like it.  :P

I love The Birds, Ray.
Great composer, can't go wrong with any three from the Roman Trilogy (if you have the chance to ever see Pines, do it, the final Appian Way movement surrounded by offstage brass, even some showing up on the balcony, an amazing experience) and I'm a nut for his Ancient Airs and Dances.

But I've grown to really enjoy his Concerto Gregoriano for violin and orchestra immensely. Some truly lovely music.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2013, 02:00:56 AM by TheGSMoeller »

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #74 on: April 08, 2013, 11:46:47 PM »
I love The Birds, Ray.
Great composer, can't go wrong with any three form the Roman Trilogy (if you have the chance to ever see Pines, do it, the final Appian Way movement surrounded by offstage brass, even some showing up on the balcony, an amazing experience) and I'm a nut for his Ancient Airs and Dances.

But I've grown to really enjoy his Concerto Gregoriano for violin and orchestra immensely. Some truly lovely music.

Concerto Gregoriano is indeed a lovely work. I first heard it on the radio and thought 'this must be by Finzi or some similar British composer'! I was also captivated by the Botticelli Pictures on the radio without knowing what it was. I love the epic 'Church Windows' and there is some fine chamber music too.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #75 on: July 31, 2013, 06:30:22 AM »
respighi?????

Offline Scion7

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936) - the Violin Sonata in b-minor
« Reply #76 on: August 04, 2015, 03:48:02 AM »
This has been recorded many times, and is no doubt his most famous and most loved chamber piece (although the piano quintet is a better piece of music for those that have never heard it!) - Chung, Heifetz, Mutter, etc., have all recorded this piece.

Do any of you vinyl-huggers out there have this one?  ç1968, Vladimir Weisman-violin, Eleanor Hancock-piano

 

It's now out-of-print, of course.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2015, 05:32:33 AM by Scion7 »
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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #77 on: December 31, 2016, 10:44:59 PM »
I thought I was one of the few people who loved this "loud" composer. It is nice to see that there are people who enjoy these spectacular (really hyper colored) works as much or more than I do. I think that the end of "Church Windows" is one of the most majestic fragments ever created, it blows away my tears of ecstasy and overflowing pleasure. I also enjoy a lot of "Metamorphoseon" (owns another hallucinating ending), "Belkis' Suite", the Roman trilogy (obviously), Suite no. 3 of ancient dances and airs, Toccata for piano and orchestra, Ballata delle gnomidi, Suite in G major and recently I heard the Belfagor overture, also very entertaining. I must explore even more of his amazing output.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 05:23:26 PM by SymphonicAddict »

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #78 on: January 01, 2017, 03:30:29 AM »
I may be one of the few (I've combed through the posts here)......but I love his Sinfonia Drammatica. Colourful orchestration,huge noisy climaxes,great tunes (imo) and completely ott! The Chandos recording is fantastic. I can't resist some "air conducting" during the noisiest bits. The second movement has a wonderful tune. Bring it on,I say! ;D

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #79 on: January 01, 2017, 02:45:02 PM »
I may be one of the few (I've combed through the posts here)......but I love his Sinfonia Drammatica. Colourful orchestration,huge noisy climaxes,great tunes (imo) and completely ott! The Chandos recording is fantastic. I can't resist some "air conducting" during the noisiest bits. The second movement has a wonderful tune. Bring it on,I say! ;D

I listened to it a while ago and yes, it is superb and overwhelming symphony, showing the great power of its creator! I think I should listen to it again.