Author Topic: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)  (Read 51032 times)

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Baron Scarpia

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #120 on: January 16, 2018, 11:11:30 AM »
Lopez-Cobos really liked Respighi it seems. While I was working for the Cincinnati Orchestra during my conservatory days he also conducted Respighi's orchestration of some of Rachmaninoff's Etudes Tableaux. I don't know if they ever recorded them. The materials (Ricordi?) were full of errors and needed a thorough proof-reading before they were ready for prime time. Strange, I think Rachmaninoff himself made that complaint about the Respighi orchestrations.

Perhaps Lopez-Cobos was being true to the score, but the score needs finessing.

It is something which I find is common to Telarc recordings in Cincinnati, brass sound is too heavy and in your face. I had this impression of the Lopez-Cobos/Cincinnati Bruckner recordings as well. Perhaps an unfortunate feature of the acoustics of the hall and Telarc's puritanical recording technique. I do not find it to be a problem with Telarc recordings in other venues.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 11:15:16 AM by Baron Scarpia »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #121 on: January 16, 2018, 12:38:02 PM »
Just ordered this:

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #122 on: January 16, 2018, 03:33:56 PM »
Perhaps Lopez-Cobos was being true to the score, but the score needs finessing.

It is something which I find is common to Telarc recordings in Cincinnati, brass sound is too heavy and in your face. I had this impression of the Lopez-Cobos/Cincinnati Bruckner recordings as well. Perhaps an unfortunate feature of the acoustics of the hall and Telarc's puritanical recording technique. I do not find it to be a problem with Telarc recordings in other venues.

The score needed more than finessing. There were lots of wrong notes and other sloppy errors. Not to mention that the orchestration itself wasn't very good, but that's another issue.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #123 on: January 16, 2018, 06:28:14 PM »
Just ordered this:



How is Neschling’s Respighi series, Jeffrey? Worth buying?
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #124 on: January 16, 2018, 07:50:57 PM »
Never mind, Jeffrey. ;)

Cross-posted from the ‘Purchases’ thread -

Bought a good bit of Respighi:








"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #125 on: January 17, 2018, 12:16:33 AM »
Never mind, Jeffrey. ;)

Cross-posted from the ‘Purchases’ thread -

Excellent John! My copy hasn't arrived yet but look forward to receiving it. I like the programme on the disc.
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #126 on: January 17, 2018, 05:59:16 AM »
Excellent John! My copy hasn't arrived yet but look forward to receiving it. I like the programme on the disc.
 :)

Do you own the rest of Nechling’s Respighi recordings on BIS, Jeffrey? Would be curious to know what you think of the performances?
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Baron Scarpia

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #127 on: January 17, 2018, 07:22:06 AM »
The score needed more than finessing. There were lots of wrong notes and other sloppy errors. Not to mention that the orchestration itself wasn't very good, but that's another issue.

I guess you are referring to those transcriptions of Rachmaninoff, I was thinking of the Metamorphoseon.

Anyway, didn't have too much time available yesterday, but did listen to the first movement of the Piano Concerto in a-minor. (Maybe, strictly speaking it is not a distinct movement, it is played attacca. Beautiful writing for piano and more subtlety in handling the orchestra. Tozer is impressive, as usual. This piece has potential!  I look forward to listening to the whole thing soon.



Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #128 on: January 17, 2018, 07:37:07 AM »
Added these two recordings since my initial Respighi order:

"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #129 on: January 17, 2018, 12:10:14 PM »
The only one I know John is the last one you posted with Concerto in Modo Misolido on - a fine CD and that Concerto has a lovely memorable tune.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

pjme

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #130 on: January 18, 2018, 12:01:01 AM »
Lopez-Cobos really liked Respighi it seems. While I was working for the Cincinnati Orchestra during my conservatory days he also conducted Respighi's orchestration of some of Rachmaninoff's Etudes Tableaux. I don't know if they ever recorded them. The materials (Ricordi?) were full of errors and needed a thorough proof-reading before they were ready for prime time. Strange, I think Rachmaninoff himself made that complaint about the Respighi orchestrations.

They did :



See evt.: https://www.allmusic.com/composition/%C3tudes-tableaux-5-for-orchestra-orchestrated-by-o-respighi-p-160-in-his-catalogue-mc0002570527
« Last Edit: January 18, 2018, 12:11:00 AM by pjme »

Baron Scarpia

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #131 on: January 18, 2018, 08:56:37 AM »
Had a chance to listen to Respighi's piano concerto in a-minor in its entirety. I really enjoyed the work. Beautiful piano writing, skillful use of the orchestra (individual instruments interacting with the soloist, tasteful accompaniment, impressive tutti's). The work is rhapsodic in character, but relatively succinct (doesn't overstay its welcome). Downes/Tozer with the BBC philharmonic does a great job. I will be looking for more recordings of Respighi Piano and Orchestra and more recordings of Respighi from Downes (I think I have 2 of 4 discs that were released).



SymphonicAddict

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #132 on: September 04, 2018, 12:04:01 PM »
I've revisited the other symphony by Respighi, I mean, the Suite for orchestra in E major, a symphony in all but name. I remember I liked it very much when played it some time ago, but this time the impression it gave me was even bigger. It's magnificent, so vivid, with memorable stuff throughout. I don't know or I'm not sure whether Braga Santos was inspired by this work, but it brought to my mind some reminiscences of pieces by that great Portuguese composer, it's in the sort of same spirit.

The work is early Respighi, but it already shows an astounding talent for orchestration and melody. Perhaps the performance is not from a top-notch orchestra, albeit I don't have important complaints about it.


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #133 on: September 04, 2018, 08:52:41 PM »
I've revisited the other symphony by Respighi, I mean, the Suite for orchestra in E major, a symphony in all but name. I remember I liked it very much when played it some time ago, but this time the impression it gave me was even bigger. It's magnificent, so vivid, with memorable stuff throughout. I don't know or I'm not sure whether Braga Santos was inspired by this work, but it brought to my mind some reminiscences of pieces by that great Portuguese composer, it's in the sort of same spirit.

The work is early Respighi, but it already shows an astounding talent for orchestration and melody. Perhaps the performance is not from a top-notch orchestra, albeit I don't have important complaints about it.


How very interesting Cesar (Braga Santos connection). Must revisit this one.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline pjme

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #134 on: September 04, 2018, 11:54:12 PM »
That's no excuse these days, when all sorts of non-standard-repertoire stuff is thankfully being recorded for us to hear and judge for ourselves. Does the complete score actually exist, in a performable state, I wonder? I'd love to hear the complete Belkis ballet.

Belkis, as performed by Julia Jentsch (narrator), Stella Doufexis (soprano) with the Czech Philharmonic Choir Brno and Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Gabriel Feltz is on YT now:

The video is no longer available on YT.
One can listen to this :
https://youtu.be/YDSDWhZZxxc


I find it a very good performance and even like the narration. There is some impressive music (even a wind machine!) in Respighi's grandest manner. It is like watching a Cecil B.DeMille movie with Claudette Colbert, Gloria Swanson or Lollobrigida, of course.


.

« Last Edit: June 06, 2020, 10:12:09 PM by pjme »

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #135 on: September 29, 2018, 08:32:33 PM »


What are your preferred recordings of Trittico Botticelliano? I'm very fond of López-Cobos on Telarc and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra on DG. I revisited the former, being bewitched once more by such a singular beauty. La Primavera and La Nascita di Venere strike me like creations of extreme and pure loveliness, the wealth of effects takes me to another dimension. Respighi at his best in chamber forms. L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 08:38:44 PM by SymphonicAddict »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #136 on: September 30, 2018, 01:28:11 AM »


What are your preferred recordings of Trittico Botticelliano? I'm very fond of López-Cobos on Telarc and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra on DG. I revisited the former, being bewitched once more by such a singular beauty. La Primavera and La Nascita di Venere strike me like creations of extreme and pure loveliness, the wealth of effects takes me to another dimension. Respighi at his best in chamber forms. L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.
I rather like the original version that I had on LP:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #137 on: September 30, 2018, 03:53:18 AM »
L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.
Funny to learn, because this central movement from the Trittico, with its haunting main theme, is perhaps the most beautiful piece by Respighi that I know - indeed in all music.  :)
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #138 on: September 30, 2018, 10:47:23 AM »
I rather like the original version that I had on LP:


I remember seeing it on CD somewhere too.


Funny to learn, because this central movement from the Trittico, with its haunting main theme, is perhaps the most beautiful piece by Respighi that I know - indeed in all music.  :)

How different we perceive music then  ;)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
« Reply #139 on: September 30, 2018, 11:52:22 AM »
I remember seeing it on CD somewhere too.

Here it is:

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).