Author Topic: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)  (Read 39270 times)

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Offline dhibbard

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #140 on: June 15, 2020, 05:15:49 PM »
I studied piano professionally and at the University years ago and was introduced to his piano works.   

Offline 71 dB

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #141 on: June 16, 2020, 12:12:10 AM »
I studied piano professionally and at the University years ago and was introduced to his piano works.

Talking about piano works, I thought I had nothing from this composer in my collection, but actually I have something: His transcription of J. S. Bach's Toccata and Fuque in D minor, BWV 538 on a Naxos disc played by Risto Lauriala.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #142 on: June 16, 2020, 12:35:57 AM »
Talking about piano works, I thought I had nothing from this composer in my collection, but actually I have something: His transcription of J. S. Bach's Toccata and Fuque in D minor, BWV 538 on a Naxos disc played by Risto Lauriala.
Interesting. I think that I need to investigate his piano sonatas, having tracked back through this thread and read the positive comments. Still feel sad that cilgwyn disappeared  :(
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #143 on: June 16, 2020, 12:36:52 AM »
I studied piano professionally and at the University years ago and was introduced to his piano works.
Did you like them and what were they like to play?
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #144 on: June 16, 2020, 12:37:17 AM »
A modern Piano version of his wonderful score for Areograd:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pzNP64jYz0
That was fun!  :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline 71 dB

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #145 on: June 16, 2020, 01:38:33 AM »
Interesting. I think that I need to investigate his piano sonatas, having tracked back through this thread and read the positive comments. Still feel sad that cilgwyn disappeared  :(

Well, I have hardly gotten into Scriabin's Piano Sonatas (I managed to get the Varduhi Yeritsyan set but need to listen to it more) and I don't think I have ever heard Prokofiev's Piano Sonatas which I assume I could enjoy since I like his Piano Concertos. I have so much to explore with the "big names." I'm afraid Kabalevsky's Solo Piano Music has to wait for now...  ;D
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW track "Jazzz"

Offline Irons

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #146 on: June 16, 2020, 05:33:08 AM »
I wonder if this LP has ever been released on CD?

Seems it has not. https://www.discogs.com/Dmitry-Kabalevsky-Piano-Concerto-No-3Overtue-PathetiqueViolin-ConcertoSpring-Symphonic-Poem/release/6357895

Knowing of your love of Debussy if you haven't already give "Spring" a listen. I think you will like it, maybe.

Edit: https://youtu.be/cymufhoxaf0
« Last Edit: June 16, 2020, 05:53:00 AM by Irons »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #147 on: June 16, 2020, 07:48:46 AM »
Well, I have hardly gotten into Scriabin's Piano Sonatas (I managed to get the Varduhi Yeritsyan set but need to listen to it more) and I don't think I have ever heard Prokofiev's Piano Sonatas which I assume I could enjoy since I like his Piano Concertos. I have so much to explore with the "big names." I'm afraid Kabalevsky's Solo Piano Music has to wait for now...  ;D
Well 71 dB, I'm sure he will be prepared to wait for you.
 ;D
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline 71 dB

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #148 on: June 16, 2020, 08:33:32 AM »
Well 71 dB, I'm sure he will be prepared to wait for you.
 ;D

Also, it's the Summer! The weather is good! When the winter comes I am more interested of staying home listening to music...  :P
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW track "Jazzz"

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #149 on: February 10, 2021, 02:11:04 PM »
Also, it's the Summer! The weather is good! When the winter comes I am more interested of staying home listening to music...  :P
Well, it certainly is Winter (in every sense) now and I'm listening to Kabalevsky again!  ;D
Piano Concerto No. 1 (Regis, with the wonderfully named 'Russian Cinematographic Symphony Orchestra' conducted by Walter Mnatsakanov with Anatoly Sheludiakov as the soloist). This inspiriting work never fails to cheer me up, although the slow movement has considerable depth. Tracking back through all the posts in this thread left me with a sense of sadness that so many of the early posts were from people who are no longer on the Forum. I've been listening to Kabalevsky over the last couple of days and agree with Roy Bland that Kabalevsky's own Leningrad performance of Symphony No.4 is superior to the recent CPO one (good as that is). I wouldn't be without either as the much more recent CPO recording allows so much more detail to be heard:
« Last Edit: February 10, 2021, 02:13:43 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #150 on: July 11, 2021, 05:34:02 PM »
Another n°2

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #151 on: July 12, 2021, 12:49:37 AM »
Another n°2

I have an interesting CD of Rachmilovich conducting Gliere's 3rd Symphony (abridged) with Kabalevsky 2nd Symphony (presumably the same performance as above):
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online kyjo

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #152 on: July 12, 2021, 05:55:13 AM »
Kabalevsky’s Cello Sonata is, IMO, one of his greatest works (I’d wager to say his very greatest) as well as one of the great cello sonatas of the repertoire. It possesses a similar depth of feeling to the 2nd Cello Concerto, and I may consider it even greater than that work! It is very virtuosically written for both cello and piano, full of superb themes, and has a compelling emotional trajectory and epic sweep. The second movement is a ghostly waltz with a particularly haunting main theme, and the third movement is a thrilling moto perpetuo that builds to a shattering climax before subsiding back into the gloom of the opening. Fortunately, the work has been gaining some currency lately due to Steven Isserlis’ advocacy of it.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2021, 06:04:49 AM by kyjo »
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Offline Irons

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #153 on: July 12, 2021, 06:23:11 AM »
Kabalevsky’s Cello Sonata is, IMO, one of his greatest works (I’d wager to say his very greatest) as well as one of the great cello sonatas of the repertoire. It possesses a similar depth of feeling to the 2nd Cello Concerto, and I may consider it even greater than that work! It is very virtuosically written for both cello and piano, full of superb themes, and has a compelling emotional trajectory and epic sweep. The second movement is a ghostly waltz with a particularly haunting main theme, and the third movement is a thrilling moto perpetuo that builds to a shattering climax before subsiding back into the gloom of the opening. Fortunately, the work has been gaining some currency lately due to Steven Isserlis’ advocacy of it.

I very much agree. A work that goes against the perceived perception of Kabalevsky. I would like to believe the Supraphon LP below has made it on the CD format but probably not, sadly.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #154 on: July 12, 2021, 07:00:18 AM »
I agree on the importance of this work. This CD has given me much pleasure:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #155 on: July 12, 2021, 08:17:43 AM »
I agree on the importance of this work. This CD has given me much pleasure:


Very cool name of the cellist, btw.
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Offline Irons

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #156 on: July 12, 2021, 09:09:54 AM »
I agree on the importance of this work. This CD has given me much pleasure:


I'm not surprised, Jeffrey! The Miaskovsky 2nd Cello Sonata is one of his most beautiful compositions. A self-recommending CD.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #157 on: July 12, 2021, 09:15:46 AM »
The best performance of the Cello Sonata that I’ve heard is from this marvelous recording:

"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline J

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #158 on: July 12, 2021, 10:11:39 AM »
The best performance of the Cello Sonata that I’ve heard is from this marvelous recording:



My own favorite is played by Tim Hugh, the 1st movement of which can be sampled here:

   http://youtu.be/ylFCdGyjfwU
« Last Edit: July 12, 2021, 10:28:46 AM by J »

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #159 on: July 12, 2021, 12:14:30 PM »
I am in no position to say better or best regarding the Cello Sonata - but this is the performance that I first heard and it won me over completely;



goodness me these folk can play - great couplings too.....