Author Topic: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)  (Read 19177 times)

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2016, 01:32:42 PM »
Well, after my last post and the 6-year gap between my last post on this thread, I decided to see what might be 'new' for Josef on Amazon - could not find much, the few instrumental discs available were either poorly reviewed or duplicated what I already own - BUT, Myslivecek is known as an excellent vocal composer, both operas & scared works (and was admired by the young WA Mozart for this skill) - SO, I decided to obtain a 'vocal' recording and choose the one shown below - I have a lot of Passions and Requiems - this is a SACD 2-CD set on the Capriccio label - good review HERE - went w/ a used copy from 'across the pond' and w/ some credit, got the recording for $10 - worth a try!  Dave :)


Offline Scion7

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #21 on: May 06, 2016, 11:48:04 PM »
The womanizer had some good tunes!


The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2016, 08:37:42 AM »
The womanizer had some good tunes!


Yes, he did have a 'reputation' - ;)  The book that I read a while back (shown on the first page of the thread) has some 'juicy' details as I recall, especially the part about losing his nose - quote below from his Wiki Article, but certainly not unusual for his day nor for composers back then - :)  Dave

Quote
According to the same letter of Wolfgang Mozart written from Munich on 11 October 1777, an incompetent surgeon burned off Mysliveček's nose while trying to treat a mysterious illness.[6] A letter of Leopold Mozart to his son of 1 October 1777 refers to the illness as something shameful for which Mysliveček was deserving of social ostracism. Mysliveček's reputation for sexual promiscuity, Leopold's insinuations, and the reference to facial disfigurement in Wolfgang's letter hint unmistakenly at the symptoms of tertiary syphilis.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2016, 09:05:41 AM »
SO, what did Josef look like after his botched nose job for tertiary syphilis?   ::)

Well, going through 'google images', I could not find a pic of the composer sans nose - his honorary bust in Prague shows him w/ an intact nose - back in those pre-anitibotic centuries, the nose was a vulnerable appendage and syphilis was a primary culprit - see image below (right) from HERE - Dave :)

 

Offline Scion7

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781) : nose job
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2016, 09:12:24 AM »
The online articles I read stated he lost his nose in his later years, and it was due to botched surgery.  It would have had to have happened after his various . . . appointments . . . with the various women he indulged in.
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2016, 11:22:08 AM »
Yeah, I know a lot of commentators have said her looks have helped, but there are lots of beautiful players - Ofra has talent.



Josef Mysliveček: Concerto For Cello And Orchestra In C Major
I    Allegro Moderato    
II    Grave    
III    Tempo Di Minuetto
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2016, 01:55:07 PM »
Yeah, I know a lot of commentators have said her looks have helped, but there are lots of beautiful players - Ofra has talent.

 

Josef Mysliveček: Concerto For Cello And Orchestra In C Major

Hi Scion7 - I'd love to have that Myslivecek Cello Concerto, but the reviews by the Amazonians HERE are mediocre - what do you think of the recording/performance - have not done any cross-referencing (BUT, can't be the price!).

Also, found the recording inserted above w/ Wendy Warner, someone unknown to be - the disc is filled w/ Haydn's two concertos, which I already own on several discs, but both period performances? - assume Warner is 'modern' - any thoughts from those reading this thread would be appreciated - the Amazonian reviews are 4+/5* - Dave :)

Offline Scion7

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #27 on: May 07, 2016, 02:30:55 PM »
I never go by others' opinions unless there is some sort of mass-condemnation of the recording quality, etc.  I've got several things she has done, and on YT there used to be several concert videos of her - she did a fine job as far as I am concerned. She's also been a student of some gifted teachers.  I like the performance of the concerto, personally.  Also good to have some variety from the "complete set" stuff of CPO, et al.

I was nosing around and found that the Ishikawa Supraphon stuff had been issued on LP before - nice covers:





Off-topic - there is a nice live recording of her with this same accompaniment for Dvorak's concerto in a-minor, Tokyo, 1976, on YT.


The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2016, 05:15:53 PM »
I never go by others' opinions unless there is some sort of mass-condemnation of the recording quality, etc.  I've got several things she has done, and on YT there used to be several concert videos of her - she did a fine job as far as I am concerned. She's also been a student of some gifted teachers.  I like the performance of the concerto, personally.  Also good to have some variety from the "complete set" stuff of CPO, et al.

I was nosing around and found that the Ishikawa Supraphon stuff had been issued on LP before - nice covers:


Off-topic - there is a nice live recording of her with this same accompaniment for Dvorak's concerto in a-minor, Tokyo, 1976, on YT.

Well, I went ahead and ordered a 'used' CD of the cello concerto w/ Wendy Warner - found some good reviews (PDF attached for those who may be interested); as to Ofra Harnoy,  I do have her complete Vivaldi cello concertos which I do enjoy - thanks for your input to this thread!  Dave :)

 

Offline Scion7

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Re: Josef Myslivecek [1737-1781]
« Reply #29 on: May 08, 2016, 01:11:38 AM »






The C major violin concerto.
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #30 on: May 09, 2016, 01:16:44 AM »
Liz Wallfisch on the Violin Concerto Nr.4 in Bb

« Last Edit: March 19, 2021, 08:40:07 AM by Que »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #31 on: May 10, 2016, 01:07:47 AM »
These are very fine pieces. The Partitas (Octets) are also on CPO paired with Haydn,
but I like this Hungaroton set better.

The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #32 on: May 12, 2016, 07:24:47 AM »
Haydn & Myslivecek - Cello Concertos w/ Wendy Warner & Camerata Chicago conducted by Drostan Hall - will add a more extensive review in the Josef Myslivecek thread, the main reason for my purchase -  NOTE: Reposted from listening thread w/ additional information, pics, and reviews (PDF attachment) added - Dave :)

As already shown by Scion7, the remaining options for Myslivecek, especially by himself are few - so today, I received the Wendy Warner (maybe another 'cello babe'?) recording below; the Myslivecek work is a violin concerto arrangement for cello and is sandwiched between two Haydn concertos (C Major & D Major) - the transitions between the works of the two composers is seamless; the sound is superb (24-bit recording).

Warner plays a cello by Pietro Guarneri II, Venice c. 1739 nicknamed the "Beatrice Harrison" after the late British cellist (see the two lower pics); she also uses a period bow by Francois Xavier Tourte, c. 1815 called "De Lamare" (and on extended loan through the Stradivari Society of Chicago).  The recording took place over two days in November, 2012 in College Church, Wheaton, IL.

Attached is a PDF file of two reviews, including a 10/10 rating by David Vernier - cannot agree more w/ his comments - the orchestra consisted of 25 members (21 mixed strings), including 2 oboes & 2 horns.  Highly recommended!

 

 

Online Jo498

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #33 on: May 20, 2016, 10:39:42 AM »
I have the following disc which is a licensed re-issue (originally "Popron Classics" 1992). I has a cello concerto in C major and an extended soprano aria with solo horn "Quod est in igne calor" but the only artists mentioned are Virtuosi di Praga and conductor Oldrich Vlcek, no cellist or singer. Does anyone know/have seen an alternative issue with the names of the other artists? There is at least another issue as a double disc coupled with Reicha, see below:



http://www.amazon.de/Bl%C3%A4seroktett-Konzert-Violoncello-Dis-Dur-Sinfonie/dp/B00B0VR858

« Last Edit: March 19, 2021, 08:42:18 AM by Que »
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Online Jo498

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #34 on: May 20, 2016, 10:43:50 PM »
Yes, it's a pity that they these recordings were presented so unprofessionally. They seem pretty good as interpretations go and the twofer series "Prager Virtuosen" has a lot of Czech niche repertoire. Apparently they could be licensed for a pittance in the 1990s and Cantus Classics never bothered with a decent documentation (although they have recording years and venues, like Hussitenkirche or Domovina studios).
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #35 on: May 23, 2016, 08:44:46 AM »
The Passion of Christ - just finished listening to this 2-CD set which arrived today - left a brief description (quoted below) in the 'listening thread', and also attached several MusicWeb reviews.  Myslivecek wrote many vocal works, including 26 Opera Seria in the Italian style - his favorite librettist was Metastasio, who's writings were used in 16 of those operas (Source); his other vocal compositions are listed immediately below (Source) - some of these works are lost, and the ones 'extant' are little perform or recorded - in reviewing a dozen pages on Amazon of the composer's offerings, I could find just the ones pictured at the bottom, most seemed OOP and available as 'used' copies, sometimes at exorbitant prices.  SO, Josef's chamber works & symphonies seem to be the current best offerings!  Dave :)

Oratorios - 8
Secular Cantatas - 7
Secular dramatic works - 4
Other Sacred Works & Songs

Quote
Myslivecek, Josef - The Passion of Christ w/ Christoph Spering/Das Neue Rochester/Chorus Musicus Köln - no biblical passages are used, but based on a 1730 'libretto' by Pietro Metastasio (1698-1782) and put to music by a number of composers, including Salieri (and recorded by the same performers) - Myslivecek was best known in the 18th century as a composer of Italian opera seria - my first vocal work by him - a couple of MusicWeb comments also attached.

 

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #36 on: April 17, 2020, 11:09:30 AM »
TTT! Well, a 4-year hiatus for Il Boemo - listening today to my modest collection (9 CDs) of his instrumental works; actually, I've not added any discs in the interim, so decided to explore Amazon this afternoon looking for non-vocal recordings primarily if not solely dedicated to him rather than 'multi-composer performances' (of which many exist) - well not much seems to have appeared except for the two shown below - attached are rather mediocre reviews - thus will not be purchases for me.  Of course, Amazon USA may be missing some newer recordings so any comments welcomed.  Dave :)

P.S. Previously, I had read (and discussed in the thread earlier) the Myslivecek book at the bottom (Daniel Freeman, 2009 - responsible for the F. cataloguing) - WELL, obviously OOP and going for $900 USD for a used copy - my read was a library loan!

 


Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #37 on: March 19, 2021, 07:46:18 AM »
Yesterday, I listened to 6 of the 9 CDs owned by me of Il Boemo - took a look on Amazon to see 'what' might be new - not a whole lot and much OOP and/or overpriced.  SO, put together a Spotify playlist of the 4 recordings below which are not in my possession - looked for reviews but found only a couple discussing the 'piano works' disc (attached); to this point I've listened to the Quintetti per archi & the Oboe/String Quartets (the latter just released in October 2020, so musicians still recording Myslivecek!); both of these recordings are excellent and well done.  For those not into this composer and subscribers to a musical streaming service, then visit and take a listen.  Dave :)

 

 

Offline Rinaldo

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #38 on: March 19, 2021, 09:58:51 AM »
Thanks for persevering, SonicMan!

As some of you may know, a Mysliveček movie is in the works – in the editing room, to be precise. And there's a lot of promise it might turn out good: the director – Petr Václav – is one of Czech's best and his interest in the topic is genuine. His movies are gritty, immediate, with a strong social conscience. Definitely no crowd pleasers! He already made a documentary about Mysliveček and worked on the movie even before that, exchanging notes and meeting with Daniel Freeman. He also brought on board Václav Luks, the artistic director of Collegium 1704 and the orchestra itself participated in the shoot, so in the scenes of Mysliveček conducting, the musicians are playing live. I applaud this approach and can't wait for the premiere, which is scheduled for this fall, although the project underwent some covid-related delays.

Here are a few shots from the set at Teatro Sociale in Como, Italy. Yes, that's Jaroussky in the first one, playing one of the singers:



Offline Florestan

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Re: Josef Myslivecek (1737-1781)
« Reply #39 on: March 19, 2021, 10:30:59 AM »


This is a fantastic, Florestan-Stamp-of-Approval disc. Too bad Myslivecek wrote so little keyboard music, he really had a knack for it.
"Melody is the essence of music." - Mozart

"Believe nothing you hear, and only one-half that you see." - Edgar Allan Poe