Author Topic: Classical music that seem close to Satie in sound  (Read 320 times)

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Offline Wanderer

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Re: Classical music that seem close to Satie in sound
« Reply #20 on: Today at 01:23:33 AM »
Sounds as the ´normal, historical´way to me, including the simplistic (´folk´) etymological element. But since you never encountered it, it cannot have been more than an accidental curiosity, I guess.

Edit: found it (should have known of course): 'Gnossus' was the common 19th Century name archeologists and 'western' scholars used after the excavations, see e.g.

https://gallica.bnf.fr/services/engine/search/sru?operation=searchRetrieve&version=1.2&query=%28gallica%20all%20%22Gnossus%22%29&lang=fr&suggest=0

I read that "gnossus" was occasionally used in the west, along with a couple of other corrupted names; however, it is noted that it was never common or definitive and it was never used in Greece itself where the original name never ceased being used (for instance, the title Bishop of Knossos has uninterruptedly been used for the local bishopric from early Christian until modern times). I have never encountered "gnossus" personally, probably because my reading on the matter mostly consists of archaeological as well as original (ancient, medieval and modern) Greek sources and not the type of secondhand western sources that have mostly been discredited by subsequent archaeological research (down to the corrupted names they used) and only bear rudimentary historical or philological value today. As for the etymological route from Knossos to Gnossus, it is as broken and cringeworthy as the one from, say, Cambridge to Caprice.  ;D

"used after the excavations": this can't be accurate, as the archaeological site of Knossos was discovered in 1878 and excavations began in 1900. It has been a long time since I saw ἱερογαμία (hiérogamie) being mentioned anywhere, though, thank you for that. 8)

In unrelated serendipity: your search also gave erroneous results for "grossus", which is a coin ([denarius] grossus, Groschen) and totally unrelated with Knossos or its corrupted "gnossus" you searched for. The Greek form γρόσι (grossi) denotes a coin/denomination of Ottoman currency and can still be encountered in a couple of old sayings and proverbs.


Offline Wanderer

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Re: Classical music that seem close to Satie in sound
« Reply #21 on: Today at 01:27:49 AM »
I'm well prepared.



Good. Winter is coming!  8)