Author Topic: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)  (Read 101486 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #520 on: July 11, 2020, 08:20:49 AM »


I listened to the first one, op 25/5 - lovely instrument, well recorded and charming music. Some parts of the sonata sounded a bit like Haydn, others like Beethoven.  I just have no patience for this sort of thing at the moment.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2020, 08:22:39 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Todd

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #521 on: July 22, 2020, 09:46:02 AM »


Jed Distler praised Eylam Keshet's Scarlatti so highly that I had to hear it.  The praise is well earned.  Keshet is basically about rhythmic acuity married to exquisite touch.  K228 is a marvel under his fingers, and both K338 and K352 are not too far behind.  Not only do I want to hear him play more Scarlatti, but I want to hear him play everything else, starting with Mozart and Chabrier.
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Online k a rl h e nn i ng

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  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
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    Shostakovich, D. Scarlattii, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Martinů, Haydn, Henning
Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #522 on: January 21, 2021, 09:24:48 AM »
Que & Poul: Back in the deeps of Time, when there was a Borders on Washington Street in Boston, I picked up 3 volumes of the then-ongoing (I think) Pieter-Jan Belder series. While I do indeed enjoy the Scott Ross set, it was this taste via Belder which drew me down the Scarlatti rabbithole.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Online k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #523 on: January 21, 2021, 10:32:44 AM »
Al que quiere, pianist Sandro Ivo Bartoli uploads one or more sonatas each day on YouTube

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/yzLYuU97pD0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/yzLYuU97pD0</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/EWRSHcJ29SY" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/EWRSHcJ29SY</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/7EUCBWCMbDE" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/7EUCBWCMbDE</a>
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #524 on: January 21, 2021, 02:01:03 PM »
Que & Poul: Back in the deeps of Time, when there was a Borders on Washington Street in Boston, I picked up 3 volumes of the then-ongoing (I think) Pieter-Jan Belder series. While I do indeed enjoy the Scott Ross set, it was this taste via Belder which drew me down the Scarlatti rabbithole.

i can say, that Belders set was instrumental in increasing my interest in Scarlattis sonatas, much more so than the recordings by Scott Rush.
As soon as a word has left the lips, not even the fastest horse can catch up with it.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #525 on: January 21, 2021, 02:32:20 PM »
Scott Rush.

Good to see you're on form.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline amw

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #526 on: January 21, 2021, 02:39:23 PM »
Harpsichord sound plays a major role in my appreciation of a recording, but apparently not in the way it does for most people, since I found Scott Ross's harpsichord consistently out of tune (i.e. he uses a particularly unequal temperament), coarse sounding, and colourless. Most people seem to love it. (My reference for ideal harpsichord sound is Céline Frisch's WTC.) That makes Belder my favourite Scarlatti integral, but I'm not sure if it's because the performances are particularly good or simply because I like the instruments he plays on.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #527 on: January 21, 2021, 02:47:21 PM »
As soon as a word has left the lips, not even the fastest horse can catch up with it.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #528 on: January 21, 2021, 02:48:48 PM »
Harpsichord sound plays a major role in my appreciation of a recording, but apparently not in the way it does for most people, since I found Scott Ross's harpsichord consistently out of tune (i.e. he uses a particularly unequal temperament), coarse sounding, and colourless. Most people seem to love it. (My reference for ideal harpsichord sound is Céline Frisch's WTC.) That makes Belder my favourite Scarlatti integral, but I'm not sure if it's because the performances are particularly good or simply because I like the instruments he plays on.

A copy of the Nuremberg Vater (1738) in WTC, which Dantone uses for Vol 7 of the Stradivarius Scarlatti series, Dantone is rather better recorded in the bass notes - less cavernous.

Fuck, that’s just so nerdy. What have I become? I’m out of here.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2021, 02:55:22 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Online k a rl h e nn i ng

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    Shostakovich, D. Scarlattii, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Martinů, Haydn, Henning
Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #529 on: January 21, 2021, 03:31:12 PM »
i can say, that Belders set was instrumental in increasing my interest in Scarlattis sonatas, much more so than the recordings by Scott Rush.

I should revisit Belder. Fact is, I was interested in a full set by Belder, but couldn't find it.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #530 on: January 22, 2021, 03:32:02 AM »
A copy of the Nuremberg Vater (1738) in WTC, which Dantone uses for Vol 7 of the Stradivarius Scarlatti series, Dantone is rather better recorded in the bass notes - less cavernous.

Fuck, that’s just so nerdy. What have I become? I’m out of here.

Well despite my outburst last night I can confirm this morning that that Dantone is very good - on streaming platforms in the UK at least, and a great pleasure to dip into.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #531 on: January 22, 2021, 06:58:52 AM »
I should revisit Belder. Fact is, I was interested in a full set by Belder, but couldn't find it.

It's obviously OOP. The only option may be to look for a second hand item.
As soon as a word has left the lips, not even the fastest horse can catch up with it.

Offline milk

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #532 on: January 30, 2021, 04:17:53 AM »
I’m trying this on a whim:

I have to say I like this piano and the way it’s recorded.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2021, 04:19:41 AM by milk »