Author Topic: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)  (Read 45459 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Harry

  • Guest
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #40 on: July 13, 2009, 08:13:16 AM »
[Pasted from "What Are You Listening To?"]

Glière: Symphony No. 3 "Ilya Murometz"
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Harold Farberman, cond.
UNICORN-KANCHANA

This is an interminable, nearly 100-minute exercise in Late Romantic non-expression.  The first hour might make for good background music, but only if one can abide a persistent drone of near-Wagnerian swelling and ebbing of massed strings -- Dramamine is not included.  I realize the symphony has a program, but this might work better as a silent movie soundtrack; several grueling listens have failed to convince me otherwise.

Glière's "Ilya Murometz" has its fervent fans, but if one truly wishes to be introduced to this bloated gargantua, I'd feel comfortable in suggesting almost any other recording (though I've yet to hear any of them and am well-nigh loath to do so), apparently all of which are either appreciably amended or reinterpreted for "listening compactness".  Farberman's recording is probably best left for cognoscenti...or for someone's extended sessions of morbid self-imposed sleep deprivation.

I suggest you listen to the chandos recordings, they are by far superior.

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22669
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #41 on: July 13, 2009, 11:01:27 PM »
I have CD versions of Gliere's Ilya Muromets Symphony conducted by:

Harold Faberman (Regis/Unicorn)
Nathan Rakhlin (Russian Disc)
Igor Golovchin (Russian Disc)
Donald Johanos (Marco Polo/Naxos)
Leon Botstein (Telarc)
Lepold Stokowski (EMI and Andante)
Edward Downes (Chandos)
Jacques Rachmilovich (EMI)
+ an LP version with Eugene Ormandy (RCA)

Whilst this is clearly indicative of an obsessive-compulsive disorder, I do like the work very much - either you allow yourself to wallow in the wagnerian/sibelian self-indulgence of the piece - or you don't. The final section The Heroic Deeds and Petrification of Ilya Muromets I find genuinely moving - a kind of doomed struggle, which appeals to my sense of looming catastrophe.

As for the different versions, my favourites are Nathan Rakhlin's on Russian Disc (my No 1 choice) but also excellent are the Downes recording on Chandos and I rather like the truncated Jacques Rachmilovich version with the Orchestra Dell'Academia Di Santa Cecilia, Roma - a very interesting CD (with Kabalevsky's Second Symphony and Glinka's Russlan and Ludmilla) dubbed from 78s and recorded in 1949. I had not come across Jacques Rachmilovich before - he died at sea in 1956 and was buried in the Strait of Gibralter. Unfortunately the CD is quite rare (I got it as a US import).

Here is an article about some different recordings:

http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://classicalcdreview.com/gliere.jpg&imgrefurl=http://classicalcdreview.com/ilyafinal.html&usg=__Fz-6OL0Nk8II6KuqWn-dvI8qKV4=&h=240&w=179&sz=9&hl=en&start=6&um=1&tbnid=2kmiAyFwJvR-zM:&tbnh=110&tbnw=82&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dgliere%2Btalmi%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1T4ADBR_enGB327GB328%26sa%3DN%26um%3D1
« Last Edit: July 13, 2009, 11:06:58 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Moldyoldie

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 311
  • Location: Motown, USA
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #42 on: July 14, 2009, 04:08:01 AM »
I swear, not more than five minutes after clicking on "Order" for the Downes/BBCSO/Chandos recording of Ilya Murametz, I came across this on another message board: :(

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/georgepitcher/100003227/the-sad-sad-deaths-of-sir-edward-and-lady-downes/
"I think the problem with technology is that people use it because it’s around.  That is disgusting and stupid!  Please quote me."
 - Steve Reich

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22669
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #43 on: July 14, 2009, 09:33:19 AM »
I swear, not more than five minutes after clicking on "Order" for the Downes/BBCSO/Chandos recording of Ilya Murametz, I came across this on another message board: :(

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/georgepitcher/100003227/the-sad-sad-deaths-of-sir-edward-and-lady-downes/

Yes, I too had just that type of experience today. Downes's death at the Dignitas clinic is the headline of the London Evening Standard today. The CD you ordered is a worthy tribute to this fine conductor and I hope that you will enjoy the work more in this recording. I saw the work live a few years ago in London - a concert I shall never forget (first complete performance in UK since 1912!)
« Last Edit: July 14, 2009, 09:35:23 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline schweitzeralan

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 608
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #44 on: July 15, 2009, 03:11:47 AM »
Thanks. I largely agree. Symphony No 3 is Gliere's clain to posterity I think.

You liked the 1st. Symphony.  From what you wrote it sounds interesting.  Wonder whether I should order it.  Hpefully it isn't infused with 19th century influences. I am a profuse lover of early 20th century musical harmoniesl modes, etc.  Bax, Scriabin, Debussy, Sibelius, rank high on my list.  Perhaps I shall give Gliere's 1st. a try.  It's just one of my many gambles over the years.

Offline schweitzeralan

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 608
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #45 on: July 18, 2009, 02:59:11 AM »
I will join you in expressing my love for 'Ilya Murometz'(in the Chandos/Downes performance), the Second Symphony, the Harp Concerto etc but can I put in a word for the works which I don't think have been mentioned so far?

There is the Horn Concerto(coupled on Chandos with the Symphonic Suite from the Ballet "The Bronze Horseman"), the splendid Symphonic Poem "The Zaporozhy Cossacks"(the Chandos coupling for the Second Symphony), but most of all-and available on the Naxos disc of the Symphony No.1-the Symphonic Poem "The Sirens", a quite superb piece of nature portraiture whch sounds like Sibelius and Bax rolled together into an intoxicating whole :). If you haven't heard "The Sirens" then I strongly recommend it to you!

Just received the 1st Symphony and the "Sirens." Intriguing harmonies and chromatic structures conceived during the years he must have been exorcising his masterpiece, the beloved "Ilya." Superb.  Don't know how I could have missed that one.  His first two symphonies appear to be mere approaches  toward his ultimate fulfillment in the 3rd.  Other than"Sirens," and the "Ilya,' I don't know if there are any other significant works.  I personally think that the "Red Poppy" is a lightweight. Gliere, not unlike the plight of so many other Soviet era composers, had to survive during the Stalinesque nightmare.

Offline listener

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 6414
  • Location: 604
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #46 on: November 05, 2009, 09:56:25 PM »
An unofficial  transfer of a 2-disc Westminster LP set was not to be shipped to Canada.

Reinhold Glière       * Symphony #3 in B minor, Op. 42, "Ilya Murometz"

Vienna State Opera Orchestra/Hermann Scherchen
ReDiscovery RD025 ADD monaural 79:55

"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22669
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #47 on: November 06, 2009, 03:08:16 PM »
I was reading an internet article about the conductor Charles Gerhardt which mentioned that he'd always wanted to make a recording of Gliere's Ilya Mourometz. How sad that this was not to be - I have no doubt that it would have been a great performance.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline listener

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 6414
  • Location: 604
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #48 on: November 06, 2009, 03:47:13 PM »
If you've wondered if his output might have something smaller in it, there's the
12 Duets for 2 Violins, op.49
10 Duets for 2 Cellos op.3
8 Duets for Violin and Cello op. 39
on Discover 920 526  which won't wake the neighbors if used for late night listening
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22669
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #49 on: November 08, 2009, 01:12:22 AM »
If you've wondered if his output might have something smaller in it, there's the
12 Duets for 2 Violins, op.49
10 Duets for 2 Cellos op.3
8 Duets for Violin and Cello op. 39
on Discover 920 526  which won't wake the neighbors if used for late night listening

That looks like a very interesting CD - thank you. In fact my wife has just instructed me to 'TURN THE MUSIC DOWN AS IT IS UNFAIR TO THE NEIGHBOURS! Personally I do not see what is wrong with playing Braga Santos's Third Symphony at top volume at 7.30 am on a Sunday morning  ;D.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22669
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #50 on: August 02, 2010, 12:12:22 PM »
I find that the last movement of Symphony No 3 'Ilya Murometz' conveys one of the best examples of hopeless defiance or hopeless striving - something I always look out for in music. I really like this work although there is a generally fairly low critical opinion of it. I feel that Gliere deserves more attention.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline False_Dmitry

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 416
  • Location: Moscow, Russia
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #51 on: August 02, 2010, 12:32:03 PM »
Gliere gets a daily airing in St Petersburg...

... when the overnight Red Arrow Express train from Moscow arrives in St Petersburg next morning, it's greeted by Gliere's magnificently over-the-top Hymn To A Great City, belted-out over the station's loudspeakers.  It's usually still playing as the passengers are walking along the platforms to the main station building. 
____________________________________________________

"Of all the NOISES known to Man, OPERA is the most expensive" - Moliere

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 13071
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #52 on: August 02, 2010, 12:41:33 PM »
Gliere gets a daily airing in St Petersburg...

... when the overnight Red Arrow Express train from Moscow arrives in St Petersburg next morning, it's greeted by Gliere's magnificently over-the-top Hymn To A Great City, belted-out over the station's loudspeakers.  It's usually still playing as the passengers are walking along the platforms to the main station building.

I love that!  And trying to imagine a parallel situation in any American city, e.g., as people enter Grand Central Station in New York, they hear Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #53 on: August 02, 2010, 07:07:57 PM »

Whilst this is clearly indicative of an obsessive-compulsive disorder,  - a kind of doomed struggle, which appeals to my sense of looming catastrophe.

Tears,...coming out of my eyes, laughing :-*

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22669
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #54 on: August 02, 2010, 10:15:26 PM »
Gliere gets a daily airing in St Petersburg...

... when the overnight Red Arrow Express train from Moscow arrives in St Petersburg next morning, it's greeted by Gliere's magnificently over-the-top Hymn To A Great City, belted-out over the station's loudspeakers.  It's usually still playing as the passengers are walking along the platforms to the main station building.

Yes, I experienced this a couple of years ago. Shostakovich made fun of this in 'Testimony'. When my plane landed in Prague a few years ago they played an extract from Smetana (Ma Vlast) as the aircraft landed and taxid to a stop.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22669
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #55 on: August 02, 2010, 10:16:24 PM »
Tears,...coming out of my eyes, laughing :-*

Well, we aim to please  :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Brian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 22678
    • Brian's blog
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #56 on: September 06, 2012, 02:14:21 PM »
The Farberman recording is being reissued on Alto.


Offline madaboutmahler

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3842
  • MAHLER: THE GREATEST!!!!
    • Daniel Hogan - Composer
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Mahler, Elgar, Ravel, Chopin, Schnittke, Dvorak, Vaughan Williams, Schmitt, Karlowicz, R.Strauss, Prokofiev, Shostakovich....
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #57 on: March 28, 2013, 12:51:28 PM »
Coming to the end of my first listen to the epic 3rd symphony, "Ilya Muromets". What an incredibly epic work! Captivating throughout the gigantic duration, full of gorgeous orchestration, thrilling climaxes, awesome depictions and moving emotions. Amazing!!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/li0dr71wItc" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/li0dr71wItc</a>

Will be keen to get a copy of this performance from Downes very soon.

Did Gliere write anything else anywhere close to being as good as this? :)
"Music is ... A higher revelation than all Wisdom & Philosophy"
— Ludwig van Beethoven

Offline listener

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 6414
  • Location: 604
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #58 on: March 28, 2013, 01:56:11 PM »
Coming to the end of my first listen to the epic 3rd symphony, "Ilya Muromets".
Will be keen to get a copy of this performance from Downes very soon.

Did Gliere write anything else anywhere close to being as good as this? :)
The Red Poppy may not be great, but it's a good piece.    Avoid the Faberman 3rd, I agree it makes bad Bruckner sound good.     The concertos - for coloratura soprano (vocalising, no words) and horn are quite pleasant too.
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline madaboutmahler

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3842
  • MAHLER: THE GREATEST!!!!
    • Daniel Hogan - Composer
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Mahler, Elgar, Ravel, Chopin, Schnittke, Dvorak, Vaughan Williams, Schmitt, Karlowicz, R.Strauss, Prokofiev, Shostakovich....
Re: Reinhold Gliere (1875-1956)
« Reply #59 on: March 28, 2013, 02:37:28 PM »
The Red Poppy may not be great, but it's a good piece.    Avoid the Faberman 3rd, I agree it makes bad Bruckner sound good.     The concertos - for coloratura soprano (vocalising, no words) and horn are quite pleasant too.

Thanks for the feedback. Think I have heard most of the horn concerto before, I remember it being very enjoyable, and pleasant is certainly a good word to describe it! Less 'cutting edge' than the 3rd symphony though.... any other works where he is as adventurous?
"Music is ... A higher revelation than all Wisdom & Philosophy"
— Ludwig van Beethoven