Author Topic: Davidsbundlertanze  (Read 17895 times)

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Offline Verena

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Re: Davidsbundlertanze
« Reply #80 on: April 07, 2019, 05:11:57 AM »
Oh yes, I also tried some Bach-Busoni, didn‘t like that all.

Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: Davidsbundlertanze
« Reply #81 on: April 09, 2019, 01:47:35 PM »
I have always been puzzled by the Schumann Was a Nutcase view.

Here is one of the most prolific composers in history who also managed to edit a music magazine and lead an orchestra.

In addition to this he had a large family.

I would have gone stark raving mad with all those responsibilities, but he kept on, until the sound in his head drove him crazy.

Mad men (or women  -  which were more common in that era) usually are largely unproductive members of society.

I thought the accepted narrative is that mental illness overtook him towards the lend of his life, when he had a breakdown that landed him an asylum.

Offline Herman

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Re: Davidsbundlertanze
« Reply #82 on: April 09, 2019, 10:12:08 PM »
I thought the accepted narrative is that mental illness overtook him towards the lend of his life, when he had a breakdown that landed him an asylum.

Indeed it is, but there are still shitloads of people who continue to say that it's obvious from the start, in his music, that Schumann was crazy.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Davidsbundlertanze
« Reply #83 on: April 09, 2019, 11:39:47 PM »
It's a little more subtle than that. There was a strain among romantics like Schumann that "cultivated" a little craziness, although probably in a subclinical sense. As a not necessarily dark side of creativity, I guess. This is already clear a generation earlier in ETA Hoffmann who drank until hallucinating and wrote several stories where (actually even clinical or criminal) madness is a major topic (and far more where dreams or drink-induced episodes occur) And he is using such language even in innocuous context, e.g. the audience should become ecstatic visionaries "verzückte Geisterseher" in the famous commentary on Beethoven'S 5th.
Cf. also the opium using British writers of that time.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Davidsbundlertanze
« Reply #84 on: April 10, 2019, 12:39:32 AM »
I don’t know that it’s fair to say that Schumann cultivated craziness, on the contrary, he was rather ashamed of his eccentric early music, writing in 1843 of DBT and the Fantasy

Quote from: Schumann to Kossmaly
They are mostly reflections of my turbulent earlier life; with me, man and musician always strove to express themselves simultaneously; it is probably still the same now, though I have admittedly learned to control myself and my art more. How many joys and sorrows lie buried together in these tiny little bundles of notes, your sympathetic heart will find out.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2019, 12:57:05 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: Davidsbundlertanze
« Reply #85 on: April 10, 2019, 07:21:50 AM »
Indeed it is, but there are still shitloads of people who continue to say that it's obvious from the start, in his music, that Schumann was crazy.

Seems like he was manic-depressive for most of his adult life. That not what people usually mean by "crazy."