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Peter Warlock (Philip Heseltine) 1894-1930

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vandermolen:
Warlock was the 'Satanic pseudonym' of Philip Heseltine, who gassed himself in 1930 (after having first put his cat outside the door). I have been listening to his masterpiece - 'The Curlew' a setting for tenor and chamber group of a poem by W B Yeats. In this work of great beauty Warlock 'explored creatively the melancholy and despair which lay at the roots`of his Jekyll and Hyde personality'' (Michael Kennedy). Well worth a listen if you don't know it. It is about to be reissued in a wonderful performance by Ian Partridge (tenor) and The Music Group of London on EMI (double album) with his fine Capriol Suite - a work in the great tradition of English string music (a bit like Holst's St Paul's Suite). Also on the CD is Ian Partridge's unrivalled performance of the chamber version of Vaughan Williams's 'On Wenlock Edge' etc.http://www.peterwarlock.org/

canninator:
Coincidentally, as I read this I am listening to my latest purchase for the first time. Too early really to formulate much of an opinion but as I am sitting at work the fact that The Curlew turned my head bodes well for the future.

Sergeant Rock:
As I wrote a few weeks ago in the listening thread, The Curlew is almost unique in conjuring up a mood of "a lost soul moving" to quote John Berryman, who wrote poetically of his experience hearing the music at Clare College Cambridge in the 30s:

Friendless in Clare, except Brian Boydell,
a Dubliner with no hair
an expressive tenor speaking voice
who introduced me to the music of Peter Warlock

who had just knocked himself off, fearing the return
of his other personality, Philip Heseltine.
Brian used to play The Curlew with the lights out,
voice of a lost soul moving...


To other worthy Curlews are sung by John Mark Ainsley and Martyn Hill. I prefer Hill because he doesn't have that typical English tenor sound.





Sarge

vandermolen:

--- Quote from: Il Furioso on August 24, 2009, 01:42:56 AM ---Coincidentally, as I read this I am listening to my latest purchase for the first time. Too early really to formulate much of an opinion but as I am sitting at work the fact that The Curlew turned my head bodes well for the future.



--- End quote ---

I'll be interested to hear what you think. Certainly, it's unlike any other work I know although 'The Trees so High' by Patrick Hadley (one of my favourite works) inhabits a similarly hauntingly gloomy sound world.

vandermolen:

--- Quote from: Sergeant Rock on August 24, 2009, 03:33:48 AM ---As I wrote a few weeks ago in the listening thread, The Curlew is almost unique in conjuring up a mood of "a lost soul moving" to quote John Berryman, who wrote poetically of his experience hearing the music at Clare College Cambridge in the 30s:

Friendless in Clare, except Brian Boydell,
a Dubliner with no hair
an expressive tenor speaking voice
who introduced me to the music of Peter Warlock

who had just knocked himself off, fearing the return
of his other personality, Philip Heseltine.
Brian used to play The Curlew with the lights out,
voice of a lost soul moving...


To other worthy Curlews are sung by John Mark Ainsley and Martyn Hill. I prefer Hill because he doesn't have that typical English tenor sound.





Sarge


--- End quote ---

Thanks Sarge - I didn't see your earlier post. Thanks for the poem too.

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