Davidsbundlertanze

Started by Mandryka, August 28, 2009, 04:42:11 AM

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Mandryka

#100
Quote from: amw on June 07, 2020, 04:46:30 AM
Also here's a short list of preferences from me

Top 5
Anda (either one, slight preference for DG)
Kempff/EMI (not DG)
Pollini (either one)
Ugorski
Zacharias

Other recommendations
Arrau
Biss/Wigmore Hall Live
Ciani
Collard
Cortot
Haefliger
Hough
Uchida
Zhu

Surprised not to see Gieseking in this list.  Did you ever hear Stephen Osborne?
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

vers la flamme

Quote from: Jo498 on June 10, 2020, 03:22:49 AM
The Romantic Generation is overall more difficult than The classical style, I'd say. But it is very different in such that it has almost nontechnical chapters that are closer to general cultural history (Mountains and Song cycles)  and some very technical ones (on Chopin etudes or so). So as a layman one can skip (most of) the latter ones and still profit from the earlier ones whereas in The classical style one tends to need scores and a pretty good familiarity with the respective pieces to follow the argument at all.

Thanks for the warning! I find The Classical Style a bit of a challenging read due to the density of technical and theoretical discussion, and I was suspecting no less from The Romantic Generation. I read through the "Mountains and Song Cycles" chapter this morning and found it fascinating. I hope to track down the book and read it in full eventually.

Ratliff

Quote from: vers la flamme on June 09, 2020, 04:17:05 PM
Maybe I just haven't heard the right recordings, but for some reason I don't put Davidsbündlertänze in anywhere near the same category as, say, Carnaval or Kreisleriana. It just doesn't seem to be as coherent, or as good, as those other two works. Does anyone want to show me the light with a recording that's so good, I won't be able to deny its greatness?  :D

For what it's worth, the ones I've heard include Perahia, Hewitt, and Zacharias.

For Schumann the foundation of my collection is Kempff and Pollini, although there are others I like a lot, such as Perhia and Egorov, who have been more recent discoveries.

vers la flamme

Quote from: Baron Scarpia on June 10, 2020, 02:40:40 PM
For Schumann the foundation of my collection is Kempff and Pollini, although there are others I like a lot, such as Perhia and Egorov, who have been more recent discoveries.

Pollini, eh? I have his C major Fantasy and don't much remember it, but the Schubert Wanderer it's coupled with is damn good. I'll have to give it another listen. So he did a pretty good Davidsbundlertänze, then?

I've been thinking of picking up that Kempff 4CD, as I love his pianism, but I'm not sure whether I would find it well-suited to my personal tastes in Schumann.

Ratliff

Quote from: vers la flamme on June 10, 2020, 03:23:36 PM
Pollini, eh? I have his C major Fantasy and don't much remember it, but the Schubert Wanderer it's coupled with is damn good. I'll have to give it another listen. So he did a pretty good Davidsbundlertänze, then?

I've been thinking of picking up that Kempff 4CD, as I love his pianism, but I'm not sure whether I would find it well-suited to my personal tastes in Schumann.

I feel like we've been down this road before, maybe on another web site. Kempff's Papillons was the recording that opened my eyes to Schumann. After that I've never heard a Kempff Schumann recording that didn't impress me.

After listening to a Richter recording of Papillons I spent 10 years thinking I hated Schumann. I later discovered I hate Richter.

amw

Quote from: vers la flamme on June 10, 2020, 02:17:42 AM
Wow, what a resource—thanks! I intend to buy this book sometime, it actually looks like somewhat of an easier read than Rosen's companion book The Classical Style, which I have but have not yet been able to make my way through it. I'll have to check out Anda, if I can find it. As for Kempff, how do you feel about his DG recording? I have been vaguely considering that Kempff/Schumann box set.
I remember not being especially impressed with Kempff on DG (used to have MP3s of that box) but no longer remember why. I'll revisit it and see what I think now.

Quote from: Mandryka on June 10, 2020, 06:29:16 AM
Surprised not to see Gieseking in this list.  Did you ever hear Stephen Osborne?
I do not remember what I thought of Gieseking (believe there's only the one recording...) although I have presumably listened to it at some point. I will also get back to you with my thoughts on the Osborne, which I believe you sent me a while back—have listened to it 3 times apparently, most recently in November, but did not take any notes.

Quote from: vers la flamme on June 10, 2020, 02:24:37 PM
Thanks for the warning! I find The Classical Style a bit of a challenging read due to the density of technical and theoretical discussion, and I was suspecting no less from The Romantic Generation. I read through the "Mountains and Song Cycles" chapter this morning and found it fascinating. I hope to track down the book and read it in full eventually.
If you have institutional access, you can read it online here: https://www.fulcrum.org/concern/monographs/cn69m447c

If you don't, it may be worth buying, or there may be a full PDF available from somewhere. Unfortunately I suspect sharing the entire book on my dropbox would get my account suspended.

Florestan

Quote from: amw on June 10, 2020, 06:26:09 PM
If you have institutional access, you can read it online here: https://www.fulcrum.org/concern/monographs/cn69m447c

If you don't, it may be worth buying, or there may be a full PDF available from somewhere. Unfortunately I suspect sharing the entire book on my dropbox would get my account suspended.

https://epdf.pub/the-romantic-generation-charles-eliot-norton-lectures.html
"Art is no excuse for boring people." - Jules Renard

"Melody is the essence of music." - Mozart

vers la flamme

Quote from: Ratliff on June 10, 2020, 03:27:19 PM
I feel like we've been down this road before, maybe on another web site. Kempff's Papillons was the recording that opened my eyes to Schumann. After that I've never heard a Kempff Schumann recording that didn't impress me.

After listening to a Richter recording of Papillons I spent 10 years thinking I hated Schumann. I later discovered I hate Richter.

Oh yes, I do remember talking to you about this, and being amazed at your hatred of Richter's Schumann, which I adore. I remember you preferring Argerich, no? Well, I adore her Schumann likewise, so we can agree there at least.

vers la flamme

Quote from: amw on June 10, 2020, 06:26:09 PM
I remember not being especially impressed with Kempff on DG (used to have MP3s of that box) but no longer remember why. I'll revisit it and see what I think now.
I do not remember what I thought of Gieseking (believe there's only the one recording...) although I have presumably listened to it at some point. I will also get back to you with my thoughts on the Osborne, which I believe you sent me a while back—have listened to it 3 times apparently, most recently in November, but did not take any notes.
If you have institutional access, you can read it online here: https://www.fulcrum.org/concern/monographs/cn69m447c

If you don't, it may be worth buying, or there may be a full PDF available from somewhere. Unfortunately I suspect sharing the entire book on my dropbox would get my account suspended.

I don't at all mind buying the book. I'd prefer to read it in print vs screen anyway.

Brian

Quote from: Brian on June 09, 2020, 06:27:13 AM
Thank you, amw - I just saved the big list file in case the forum crashes again soon...
And of course my computer died and won't turn on anymore  ;D ;D this thread is cursed

Jed Distler has a new rave review for a recording on your sheet, Marcin Fleszar on Rubicon: "Whatever led Marcin Fleszar to pair Rameau's A minor Suite with Schumann's Davidsbündlertanze, all I can say is that the idea is original and inspired."

amw

I have not listened to the Fleszar yet. I am going thru all the recordings of DBT that I personally have and assigning them a letter grade and one-sentence summary, but that will take a while (also in the middle of moving house) so don't hold your breath.

Mandryka

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Iota

Quote from: Mandryka on July 26, 2021, 06:20:46 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/iK_9EZ3uh-k&ab_channel=JohnClifford

Thanks for posting that. I'm not a big fan of non-modern ballet really, and found 10 or so minutes of that was enough for one session, but it was nonetheless interesting. An idea with great potential I think.

Mandryka

Quote from: Iota on July 26, 2021, 10:04:39 AM
Thanks for posting that. I'm not a big fan of non-modern ballet really, and found 10 or so minutes of that was enough for one session, but it was nonetheless interesting. An idea with great potential I think.

If you see the first page if this thread you'll see I said much the same thing about it in 2009, and was then told off by Herman!
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Mandryka

#114
Quote from: val on February 13, 2013, 01:01:08 AM
After all this years, Geza Anda still remains my favorite. But Karl Engel has here one of his most inspired performances. And there is Gieseking in his version of 1947 with an imagination unique but also a very bad sound.

What a pity Yves Nat didn't record this beautiful work.

Hi Val? Where are you?

Anyway, Karl Engel's recording is available in a lovely transfer on Spotify and I'm enjoying hearing it now - there's also a good Bunte Blätter, and lots of other things.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Mandryka



New release. Oppitz is possessed by the ghost of Kempff.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Todd

Quote from: Mandryka on January 09, 2023, 05:32:31 AM

New release. Oppitz is possessed by the ghost of Kempff.

That would require Oppitz to entirely change his playing style.  Interesting.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

People would rather believe than know - E.O. Wilson

Propaganda death ensemble - Tom Araya

Mandryka

Quote from: Todd on January 09, 2023, 05:46:07 AMThat would require Oppitz to entirely change his playing style.  Interesting.

Let me know what you think, it's streaming everywhere.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Mandryka

Quote from: Todd on January 09, 2023, 05:46:07 AMThat would require Oppitz to entirely change his playing style.  Interesting.

You were right, I just checked Kempff Besançon and it is much lighter.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen