Author Topic: John Ireland (1879-1962)  (Read 18601 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #100 on: January 03, 2020, 02:44:48 AM »
Thought I'd bump up this thread. The sad departure of cilgwyn means that there is likely to be less traffic on this thread as he often contributed to it. From WAYLT thread - am greatly enjoying this fine Lyrita release (possibly my favourite Ireland CD), especially the 'Legend' and 'These Things Shall Be' - my favourite performances of both works:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #101 on: January 03, 2020, 09:09:15 AM »
After Elgar and RVW, John Ireland must be part of a select group of England's most important composers. A Chandos double CD of Ireland's chamber works is I think my CD purchase of 2019. The performance of Ireland's most important chamber work, the first Violin Sonata, is outstanding and trumps two other recordings (one on Lyrita) I own on LP.

You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Ratliff

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #102 on: January 03, 2020, 09:43:57 AM »
After Elgar and RVW, John Ireland must be part of a select group of England's most important composers. A Chandos double CD of Ireland's chamber works is I think my CD purchase of 2019. The performance of Ireland's most important chamber work, the first Violin Sonata, is outstanding and trumps two other recordings (one on Lyrita) I own on LP.



That is indeed a gorgeous set, recommended to me by member Luke of olden times. Mordkovitch had such a beautiful, fluid tone, I treasure every recording of hers I have heard. I recall the cello sonata as my favorite composition in the set.

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #103 on: January 03, 2020, 09:53:27 AM »
Thought I'd bump up this thread. The sad departure of cilgwyn means that there is likely to be less traffic on this thread as he often contributed to it. From WAYLT thread - am greatly enjoying this fine Lyrita release (possibly my favourite Ireland CD), especially the 'Legend' and 'These Things Shall Be' - my favourite performances of both works:


+1 - a very fine and generous collection.  "These Things Shall Be" always seems such an improbable Ireland score - John Carol Case's voice is so embedded in my inner ear singing his loftily optimistic verse.  I'm still not sure I really buy into it at all - but this is a great version.  One of the collections Lyrita has released as part of their "Studio Master" hi-res series.  I haven't heard this one but to judge by those I have, this will be very fine - even if you are download intolerant....!

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #104 on: January 03, 2020, 10:14:38 AM »
Thank you Lol, Ratliff and RS for responding to my earlier post  :)
That Chandos CD of Ireland's chamber music looks most enticing. I've always had a soft spot for 'These Things Shall Be' ever since taking Boult's Lyrita LP out of the High Street Kensington Music Library (where I discovered do much interesting music) in my youth. Coincidentally I just received this CD and was most impressed by Ireland's Cello Sonata which I don't recall hearing before:
« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 10:18:19 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #105 on: January 03, 2020, 01:59:07 PM »
I must give the cello sonata a listen after such a strong advocacy from Ratliff and Jeffrey.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Irons

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #106 on: January 04, 2020, 05:52:26 AM »
Thank you Lol, Ratliff and RS for responding to my earlier post  :)
That Chandos CD of Ireland's chamber music looks most enticing. I've always had a soft spot for 'These Things Shall Be' ever since taking Boult's Lyrita LP out of the High Street Kensington Music Library (where I discovered do much interesting music) in my youth. Coincidentally I just received this CD and was most impressed by Ireland's Cello Sonata which I don't recall hearing before:


A good set of works on that CD, Jeffrey. I like both the Bridge and Delius sonatas. I did get a chance to listen to the Ireland, which is brooding and deep.

You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #107 on: July 31, 2021, 06:41:31 AM »
Well, just a bump after a year and a half, but currently looking at my modest (about 8 CDs) Ireland collection - yesterday, listening to some of his piano works, shown below - I was perusing a number of online sites (including Amazon USA) and looking at reviews - wondering if I need to add/cull my solo piano CDs, just own the two in the top row, which amazingly have no duplications.

Recordings currently available on solo piano date back to the late 1950s w/ two pianists having worked w/ Ireland personally, i.e. Alan Rowlands (1929-2012) and Eric Parkin (1925-Present?) - both have 3-CD collections on the Lyrita label (below); Rowlands in mono from late 50s-60s and Parkin from the 1970s.  Parkin has re-recorded for Chandos on 3 discs (2 shown below); John Lenehan on Naxos (3 solo); and Mark Bebbington on Somm x 4 CDs.  So, just a few questions: 1) Are the old Lyrita packages dated as to sound, esp. w/ Rowlands; and 2) What are some of the favorites of the more recent recordings and performers?  Dave :)

   

 

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #108 on: July 31, 2021, 07:35:45 AM »
Well, just a bump after a year and a half, but currently looking at my modest (about 8 CDs) Ireland collection - yesterday, listening to some of his piano works, shown below - I was perusing a number of online sites (including Amazon USA) and looking at reviews - wondering if I need to add/cull my solo piano CDs, just own the two in the top row, which amazingly have no duplications.

Recordings currently available on solo piano date back to the late 1950s w/ two pianists having worked w/ Ireland personally, i.e. Alan Rowlands (1929-2012) and Eric Parkin (1925-Present?) - both have 3-CD collections on the Lyrita label (below); Rowlands in mono from late 50s-60s and Parkin from the 1970s.  Parkin has re-recorded for Chandos on 3 discs (2 shown below); John Lenehan on Naxos (3 solo); and Mark Bebbington on Somm x 4 CDs.  So, just a few questions: 1) Are the old Lyrita packages dated as to sound, esp. w/ Rowlands; and 2) What are some of the favorites of the more recent recordings and performers?  Dave :)

   

 
Eric Parkin died last year at a very old age. In the link below there is a fine performance of E J Moeran's 'Berceuse' (1933) accompanied by images of places associated with the composer:
https://slippedisc.com/2020/10/death-of-favoured-bbc-pianist-96/
I don't know all of those Ireland recordings but I especially like the top left Chandos release of orchestral works and the Naxos CD of piano pieces, featuring the London pieces.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2021, 07:42:35 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #109 on: July 31, 2021, 10:51:47 PM »
Well, just a bump after a year and a half, but currently looking at my modest (about 8 CDs) Ireland collection - yesterday, listening to some of his piano works, shown below - I was perusing a number of online sites (including Amazon USA) and looking at reviews - wondering if I need to add/cull my solo piano CDs, just own the two in the top row, which amazingly have no duplications.

Recordings currently available on solo piano date back to the late 1950s w/ two pianists having worked w/ Ireland personally, i.e. Alan Rowlands (1929-2012) and Eric Parkin (1925-Present?) - both have 3-CD collections on the Lyrita label (below); Rowlands in mono from late 50s-60s and Parkin from the 1970s.  Parkin has re-recorded for Chandos on 3 discs (2 shown below); John Lenehan on Naxos (3 solo); and Mark Bebbington on Somm x 4 CDs.  So, just a few questions: 1) Are the old Lyrita packages dated as to sound, esp. w/ Rowlands; and 2) What are some of the favorites of the more recent recordings and performers?  Dave :)


To my mind you won't go wrong with any of those duscs as they all are well and sensitively played by pianists who have affinity with the genre and technique to spare.  I don't know the mono Lyrita - but I used to find the old Lyrita mono sound quite "boxy".  The Eric Parkin Lyrita set was my point of entry into Ireland's piano music so I do have "first love" syndrome there - I never felt the need to hear the Chandos remakes.  Lenehan is good but not my 1st choice.  I find Mark Bebbington to be absoultely excellent in all the 20th Century British piano music and that is certainly the case with his Ireland discs - from memory he also includes a couple of unpublished/rarities.

Once you've explored Ireland do hear Bebbington's Frank Bridge discs too.  Also, as Vandermolen alludes to - Moearn and Ireland share a very similar piano sound-world.  The excellent new Moeran biography details the extensive private lessons Moeran had with Ireland the result of which was a fastidiousness in his composing that lasted the rest of his life.  However, the point is also made that Moeran's musical style influenced Ireland too.  There are piano pieces by both composers that sound like the other's work!  For Moeran's piano music there are far fewer choices - but this old Parkin disc is a very reliable guide.....


Offline Irons

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #110 on: August 01, 2021, 12:25:25 AM »
Eric Parkin died last year at a very old age. In the link below there is a fine performance of E J Moeran's 'Berceuse' (1933) accompanied by images of places associated with the composer:
https://slippedisc.com/2020/10/death-of-favoured-bbc-pianist-96/
I don't know all of those Ireland recordings but I especially like the top left Chandos release of orchestral works and the Naxos CD of piano pieces, featuring the London pieces.

Link lovely, Jeffrey. Thanks for posting.

For a non-British view, which is no bad thing, I enjoy a John Ireland recital by the Israeli pianist, Daniel Adni.

The early Rowlands set recorded in Richard Itter's home studio are very dry but there is gain as well as loss. There is an authenticity as if Rowland, and others of the period, are performing between the speakers in my listening room. Not the greatest fidelity but real.

My favourite British piano pieces are Ireland's "Sarnia" and Moeran's "Stalham River".
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #111 on: August 01, 2021, 03:22:01 AM »
Link lovely, Jeffrey. Thanks for posting.

For a non-British view, which is no bad thing, I enjoy a John Ireland recital by the Israeli pianist, Daniel Adni.

The early Rowlands set recorded in Richard Itter's home studio are very dry but there is gain as well as loss. There is an authenticity as if Rowland, and others of the period, are performing between the speakers in my listening room. Not the greatest fidelity but real.

My favourite British piano pieces are Ireland's "Sarnia" and Moeran's "Stalham River".
Looks like a great LP Lol.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #112 on: August 02, 2021, 07:00:09 AM »
Well, since I already owned V. 1 of Ireland's Piano Works on Naxos, simply decided to stick w/ John Lenehan and the bargain pricing (bought both for 14 Euros from JPC) - and re-listened to the first volume and look at some reviews (attached), so happy w/ the purchase. Thanks for the helpful comments.  Dave :)

 

Offline aligreto

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #113 on: October 03, 2021, 04:31:14 AM »
Ireland: A London Overture [Barbirolli]





This is my first introduction to the orchestral music of Ireland. I find it to be both very engaging and exciting. I like both the composer's musical language and the orchestration in this work. It is music that I can easily relate to; it is quite lyrical and it has a grand sweep to it.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #114 on: October 03, 2021, 10:45:15 AM »
Ireland: A London Overture [Barbirolli]





This is my first introduction to the orchestral music of Ireland. I find it to be both very engaging and exciting. I like both the composer's musical language and the orchestration in this work. It is music that I can easily relate to; it is quite lyrical and it has a grand sweep to it.
That HMV own label CD is one of my favourites with, arguably, the finest performances of all three works.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline aligreto

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Re: John Ireland (1879-1962)
« Reply #115 on: October 03, 2021, 11:26:32 AM »
That HMV own label CD is one of my favourites with, arguably, the finest performances of all three works.

Cheers, Jeffrey. They all certainly felt very fine indeed.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.