Author Topic: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)  (Read 4206 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2017, 01:57:40 AM »


Really knockout performance of Freu Dich Sehr here from Günther Fetz, great instrument and the rest of the recital is excellent too (an Aria Sebaldina for example). Gunther Fetz is the real deal I think, judging by this. There are some other organ and harpsichord recordings by him, compilations, which I'm tempted to buy.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 02:12:06 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2018, 01:18:45 AM »


Mikkelsen vol 1. The Logumkloster Marcussen seems to me absolutely fine, better than fine in fact. I mean, it’s not as characterful as an old organ, but it’ll do the job. The sound take is a bit distant sometimes, but it’s not a great problem, the music making is involving enough. The registrations tend to be sweet and soft. The overall feeling is song-like and celebratory, but I wouldn’t want to suggest that Mikkelsen makes the music sound too naive. It’s a spiritual celebration.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #22 on: September 09, 2018, 02:33:27 AM »



Foccroulle plays Böhm with tremendous reticence. Registrations never gaudy, always sweet and never hectoring, phrasing in almost extreme cantabile. The result is, I think, a revelation in terms of affects. We have a Bohm who is infused with a weighty, pensive melancholy.

The Alkmaar organ is presently tuned meantone, and I think you can hear it. It looks to me as though Bohm was writing precisely at the time that there was a trend to tune organs equally. The history of the organ is well explained here

https://www.alkmaarorgelstad.nl/en/orgels-en/van-hagerbeer-schnitgerorgan
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #23 on: September 09, 2018, 03:43:15 AM »



Foccroulle plays Böhm with tremendous reticence. Registrations never gaudy, always sweet and never hectoring, phrasing in almost extreme cantabile. The result is, I think, a revelation in terms of affects. We have a Bohm who is infused with a weighty, pensive melancholy.

The Alkmaar organ is presently tuned meantone, and I think you can hear it. It looks to me as though Bohm was writing precisely at the time that there was a trend to tune organs equally. The history of the organ is well explained here

https://www.alkmaarorgelstad.nl/en/orgels-en/van-hagerbeer-schnitgerorgan


No, the organ was retuned to equal temperament by F C Schnitger 1723/25, and is still tuned in this way. This is also what the article, you posted, says:

The present specification:
 
An overview of the position of the stopknobs can be downloaded here (pdf).
 
Compass Manuals: C-d'''
Compass Pedal: C-d'
Manual couplers: Rp+GM, Rp+Bw, GM+Bw
Pedal couplers: P+Rp, P+GM (added to the specification of 1725)
Four cut-out valves
Pitch: a'=415 Hz
Equal temperament
Wind pressure: 76 mm



I agree in your description of Foccroulles style, but I find the Mikkelsen CD sub par. The rather generic "assembly line" neo baroque organ is not well suited for the job, and Mikkelsen's insensitive and unimaginative style doesn't help.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2018, 03:51:34 AM by (: premont :) »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #24 on: September 09, 2018, 03:50:12 AM »
Oh sorry, that was a typo. Ie I meant to write “presently tuned equally” (and I think you can hear it.)
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #25 on: September 09, 2018, 03:53:24 AM »
Oh sorry, that was a typo. Ie I meant to write “presently tuned equally” (and I think you can hear it.)


DId you make the same mistake with the Rechsteiner CD? 

 :)
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #26 on: September 09, 2018, 03:57:12 AM »

DId you make the same mistake with the Rechsteiner CD? 

 :)

You think it’s equal?
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2018, 03:59:43 AM »
You think it’s equal?

I have not had the time to find it yet.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2018, 04:08:18 AM »
While your searching for it, you might care to listen to something interesting, special, that I just found. Bernard Winsemius playing BWV 720 on the North German Baroque Vol II CD.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georg Böhm (1661-1733)
« Reply #29 on: December 03, 2019, 02:43:58 PM »
First run:


Organ is big and a Schnitger-style reconstruction after the organ of the St. Jacobi in Hamburg, Georg Böhm's home for several years. The hypothesis of these recordings is that most pieces date from that period. My initial response to the "big sound" was reservation, but I was soon won over. Davidsson treats this giant like a baby and manages to create intimacy when needed.



Q

Maybe too big for Böhm's rather small scaled music.




Perhaps/probably the organ at Böhm's later post,  the St.Johannis at Lüneburg, would be the better option....

Q





According to Tuinstra's essay on Bohm, when he asked Schnitger to work on the organ in Luneburg, he wanted it big, like the one in Hamburg. He wanted an organ which was brilliant and sharp, which, Tuinstra suggests, reveals a preference for a loud extrovert sound. The organ he had built at Luneburg is no shrinking violet -- two 32' stops, independent pedals, three manuals.

Some things in Tuinstra's treatment come across very interestingly IMO -- Auf meinen lieben gott for example. Interesting from a conceptual point of view at least, if not from a sound point of view, or from the technique of getting  the beast under control. I'll try and write some more comments on Tuinstra's set soon.

« Last Edit: December 03, 2019, 02:57:35 PM by Mandryka »
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