Author Topic: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven  (Read 8436 times)

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George

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2007, 05:33:11 PM »
Yes, Bunny mailed them about the Haydn sonatas.

If we take the Mozart as an indication: recording of the sonatas was concluded in 1996 - complete sonatas set was issued in 2000, variations concluded in 1997 - separate variations set issued in 2001. The set with both the sonatas & the variations was only issued in 2006 - 5 years later.

My conclusion: they'll wait probably 4 years after the last LvB volume.
There are now 5 volumes, they'll need at least 8 for the sonatas and 2 for the rest.
They'll probably follow the same procedure: first an issue with the complete sonatas, followed several years later by a set with all the piano works...

I guess Todd's estimation is pretty accurate! :)

Q

Thanks Que (and Bunny)  :)

I can (and will) wait, I still have Goode's cycle to begin and some recently acquired Richter LvB.  8)

Offline Todd

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2009, 04:08:16 PM »
While perusing the classical section of a local used LP shop, I stumbled upon a recording of a young Ronald Brautigam playing some lesser Beethoven solo works on a modern piano on the Etcetera label.  The price tag of $3 and some change was hard to resist, so I bought the album. 

First things first: the young Brautigam wasn’t as interesting as the more mature Brautigam is.  Second things second: some of the same traits are there.  The tempi tend to be quick.  He favors crisp staccato over legato.  Tonal beauty isn’t the top priority. 

The LP has five Rondos on the first side, and an assortment of other works on the second, including the more substantive Op 77 Fantasie, the Andante WoO 57, and the potentially charming Rage over the Lost Penny.  All are ably played, but compared to more compelling recordings, like, say, Esteban Sanchez’s recordings of some of the same works, they just don’t come off very well.  The playing doesn’t seem as fully thought out as his more recent recordings, and some of the works sound almost sight-read, or at least purposefully uncolorful – the cover emphasized Für Elise among them.  The album is hardly top-shelf, at least for me, but it is interesting as a document of a how a now somewhat prominent artist used to sound.

Sound quality isn’t particularly good; its early digital sound can’t be masked even on vinyl.  Not only that, but the LP is one of the noisiest I’ve heard (and that includes all the LPs I listened to years ago).  I must confess that I find the Velcro high top and tube sock footwear nifty, though.  Brings back memories.

(HMV Hong Kong lists the recording on CD, if anyone wants to sample it.)
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Offline Bunny

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2009, 06:48:05 AM »
Someone here emailed BIS about this (Bunny maybe?) and they said that they probably weren't going to put them out in a box. It looks like Mozart is/was the only one to get the box treatment. :-\

8)
Yes, Bunny mailed them about the Haydn sonatas.

If we take the Mozart as an indication: recording of the sonatas was concluded in 1996 - complete sonatas set was issued in 2000, variations concluded in 1997 - separate variations set issued in 2001. The set with both the sonatas & the variations was only issued in 2006 - 5 years later.

My conclusion: they'll wait probably 4 years after the last LvB volume.
There are now 5 volumes, they'll need at least 8 for the sonatas and 2 for the rest.
They'll probably follow the same procedure: first an issue with the complete sonatas, followed several years later by a set with all the piano works...

I guess Todd's estimation is pretty accurate! :)

Q

As a footnote, the Haydn was finally released as a box set in Sept. 2008.  I don't know exactly how much time went between the original sonata releases and the box set, but it was quite a bit.  Also, the Haydn wasn't in SACD so I think we will be waiting quite a while for a box set of the Vänskä's Beethoven Symphonies, let alone Brautigam's Beethoven Sonatas, which are still ongoing.


Offline Todd

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2009, 06:53:19 AM »
As a footnote, the Haydn was finally released as a box set in Sept. 2008.



And a mighty fine box it is.  While his LvB isn't done, I find Brautigam's Haydn relatively more compelling than his Beethoven.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Bunny

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2009, 07:50:20 AM »
I also have the earlier Brautigam release as well as another double cd album of the Early Variations and Sonatas by Beethoven that he recorded for Globe.  While I have to agree that he's developed considerably since recording the Für Elise, he was still interesting as a "youngster."  The earlier releases don't have the great BIS sound quality, but Brautigam seemed to have a knack for getting very decent sounding fortepianos to record on.  I like this recording of the early sonatas better than the Für Elise, it demonstrates his tremendous energy in attack as well as delicacy of touch; in fact there's a real spontaneous feeling and joy in the play on this cd.   I'm not sure, but I believe it's a little later than the Für Elise.


Offline Holden

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2009, 01:47:36 PM »
While perusing the classical section of a local used LP shop, I stumbled upon a recording of a young Ronald Brautigam playing some lesser Beethoven solo works on a modern piano on the Etcetera label.  The price tag of $3 and some change was hard to resist, so I bought the album. 

First things first: the young Brautigam wasn’t as interesting as the more mature Brautigam is.  Second things second: some of the same traits are there.  The tempi tend to be quick.  He favors crisp staccato over legato.  Tonal beauty isn’t the top priority. 

The LP has five Rondos on the first side, and an assortment of other works on the second, including the more substantive Op 77 Fantasie, the Andante WoO 57, and the potentially charming Rage over the Lost Penny.  All are ably played, but compared to more compelling recordings, like, say, Esteban Sanchez’s recordings of some of the same works, they just don’t come off very well.  The playing doesn’t seem as fully thought out as his more recent recordings, and some of the works sound almost sight-read, or at least purposefully uncolorful – the cover emphasized Für Elise among them.  The album is hardly top-shelf, at least for me, but it is interesting as a document of a how a now somewhat prominent artist used to sound.

Sound quality isn’t particularly good; its early digital sound can’t be masked even on vinyl.  Not only that, but the LP is one of the noisiest I’ve heard (and that includes all the LPs I listened to years ago).  I must confess that I find the Velcro high top and tube sock footwear nifty, though.  Brings back memories.

(HMV Hong Kong lists the recording on CD, if anyone wants to sample it.)


I've had this on CD for many years now and I really like it. The crispness and briskness for some of these pieces works very well for me. I haven't heard the later Brautigam but then again I'm not enamoured with the sound of the fortepiano.
Cheers

Holden

Offline Shrunk

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2011, 03:07:47 AM »
It seems this cycle has now been completed.  I've got enough on my listening backlog to keep me busy while I wait for this to come out in a bargain box set.  But, if and when that happens, I wonder how likely it will be issued on SACD.  If that's not going to happen, I might as well start picking up the individual discs now.  Thoughts?

Offline Crudblud

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Re: Ronald Brautigam Plays Beethoven
« Reply #27 on: April 30, 2021, 02:10:33 AM »
Lately I have been enjoying Brautigam's recording of the Diabelli Variations. It is so easy to see fortepiano in terms of cliché, its being a mere stepping stone between the harpsichord and the modern piano, but under Brautigam's hands it impresses itself as something quite worthwhile in its own right. He is a fine ambassador for the instrument, because he seems to understand so well what it is that makes it unique among the keyboard family. I must admit I am not particularly fussed about HIP, but there is something in the fact of ancestry that is fascinating here.