Author Topic: Brexit  (Read 156017 times)

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Online MusicTurner

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1580 on: March 04, 2021, 10:06:53 AM »
Yes, obviously your Dutch fee seems more reasonable; ours is way beyond the actual cost of handling my VAT payment. Sadly, I can't google an alternative local customs authority here  ???
« Last Edit: March 04, 2021, 10:25:52 AM by MusicTurner »

Offline steve ridgway

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1581 on: March 04, 2021, 10:08:13 AM »
I'm done with UK-based Presto from now on, sadly.

What are the download costs like? FLAC format is CD quality.

Online MusicTurner

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1582 on: March 04, 2021, 10:10:41 AM »
What are the download costs like? FLAC format is CD quality.

I don't do downloads at all any more, but Presto's prices for example can vary between countries.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2021, 10:21:34 AM by MusicTurner »

Offline steve ridgway

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1583 on: March 04, 2021, 10:23:09 AM »
I tried to order the book The Cambridge History of 19th Century Music from Amazon UK for my father’s birthday last month and what the website showed as “Sold and supplied by Amazon” with next day delivery turned out to be some third party that after three days hadn’t even sent an estimated delivery date. As they had an AG company name I suspected they were in Europe so cancelled and ordered a slightly more expensive copy from a UK seller. At least he received it with no extra charges even if it was a week late. I’ll watch out for that in future. >:(

Offline Iota

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1584 on: March 04, 2021, 01:10:04 PM »
Don’t lose sight of the fact, because I think it is a fact, that many many British people were seriously disaffected with the status  quo, they felt disenfranchised and unrepresented, that the country was run by people who weren’t interested in their welfare, by corrupt people who were feathering their own nest while they, the people, were living in a regime of austerity.

Agree completely. That was one of the big things that the referendum vote made clear. It was a chance for people who normally felt they had absolutely no say in what happened to suddenly make their voices heard, and many Remainers (including myself) said if one good thing was to come out of this it would be that the ever-widening gap between the haves and have-nots could finally be properly addressed. It of course hasn't been, but -
 
... also don’t forget that twelve months ago it looked as though they had done the right thing in a way: without Brexit would we have had a government which talked about levelling up?

Then Covid came, but Covid is getting under control. Let’s see if any levelling up starts to happen over the next couple of years. I own property in Manchester, when I drive through, for example, Oldham, I am horrified by the wasteland, the desolation and the despair. I’m not surprised that the residents needed to make their feelings known loud and clear.

What I’m saying is, there is a possibility that Brexit will, indirectly, result in a UK which is fairer. The country may well be poorer,  but the wealth may be distributed better. We shall see, but if they don't we could have turbulent times ahead - COVID has exacerbated the inequalities.

Miles Platting, near Oldham, Manchester. My heart sinks whenever I drive through it. Normally there is some litter stuck to the metal fence.



- they are making gestures of levelling up, which I'm sure almost everybody would support. Rishi Sunak announced a Towns Funds scheme in yesterday's Budget, which will mean £1bn for 45 towns, though heavily skewed towards the ones that voted Tory, which has provoked criticism not just from Starmer. But fair enough, it's a start.
Though the idea that this government will do much willingly to help the underclass, or that the reason the underclass are disenfranchised in the first place had anything substantial to do with our membership the EU, does not to me reflect any kind of reality.


Offline Que

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1585 on: March 07, 2021, 12:11:40 AM »
I think we might be heading for a crisis: Ulster loyalists are distancing themselves from the Good Friday Agreement, the UK government is taking unilateral actions on the NI Protocol and in response the European Parliament is delaying the ratification of the bilateral trade agreement.

More on prof. Chris Grey's "Brexit and Beyond":

Brexit unhinged

Offline Que

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1586 on: March 13, 2021, 02:36:15 AM »
The predictions of long lines of trucks along the roads to Dover haven't come true.
This is caused by goods destined for the Irish Republic being rerouted and... ..

Exports to EU plunge by 40% in first month since Brexit

Imports have gone down less, namely 28%. Which means an increase in the trade deficit with the EU.

This is the data from January. Brexiteers could claim that things will improve.
They might if trade adjusts, but the situation also could worsen even further when various "grace periods" expire in the coming months.

Q

Offline Que

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #1587 on: March 27, 2021, 12:20:42 AM »
Hopefully this will bring to end the post-Brexit vaccine spat between the UK and the EU...

The deal comes at the moment on which the UK needs extra supplies of AZ from existing and new production lines located in the EU, to ensure a timely 2nd shot for those already vaccinated in the UK. The UK decided to not keep the 2nd dose aside like some other countries and vaccinated as many of its citizens as possible.

According to EU sources 21 million doses have been exported to the UK sofar. Over the past few weeks the EU has been playing hard ball by treathening with export bans.

Quote
Britain nearing vaccine deal with European Union: The Times (Reuters)
Britain is close to striking a vaccine deal with the European Union as soon as this weekend that will remove the threat of the bloc cutting off supplies, The Times reported on Saturday.

Under the agreement the EU will remove its threat to ban the export of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines to Britain, it added.
In return, the UK government will agree to forgo some long-term supplies of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine that had been due to be exported from Holland, the newspaper reported.

On Friday, the European Medicines Agency approved Halix production site in the Netherlands that makes the AstraZeneca vaccine and a facility in Marburg in Germany producing BioNTech/Pfizer shots.

The EU’s clearing of the vaccine site comes as the union is banking on them to boost deliveries in the second quarter and accelerate the slow pace of inoculations in the bloc.

Europe’s troubled vaccine rollout has led to a quarrel with Britain, which has imported 21 million doses made in the EU, according to an EU official. Britain says it did a better job negotiating with manufacturers and arranging supply chains.

The EU says that Britain should share more, notably to help make up the shortfall in contracted deliveries of AstraZeneca shots.

Brussels and London sought to cool tensions on Wednesday, declaring they were working “to create a win-win situation and expand vaccine supply for all our citizens”.

The UK government, Pfizer-BioNTech, and AstraZeneca were not immediately available for comment after office hours.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2021, 01:13:32 AM by Que »