Author Topic: Headphones  (Read 162650 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9255
  • Too late. Too little.
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
  • Currently Listening to:
    I am revisiting my CD collection.
Re: Headphones
« Reply #960 on: March 29, 2021, 08:01:54 AM »
No kidding.  That is fake detail.  But there are differences in headphones with detail resolution that have NOTHING to do with treble.  Saying that it is just placebo is straight up BS.  If you can hear specific microdetail (like a creaking chair or someone coughing) in one headphone and not another and they have the same frequency response then one is just more detailed than the other.

What does mean same frequency response? No two headphones, even when the same model and brand has identical frequency responses and one headphone doesn't have the exact same response for both left and right channel. Moving headphones in head changes the frequency response drastically at higher frequencies. So you don't get the exact same frequency response the measurer got measuring a different pair with his/her gear and you get different responses every time you put the cans on your head. Headphones just can't just remove creaking chair sounds without some clear dips on frequency response or some other things. Possible explanation is the way the headphones sits on YOUR head causing some specific pinna reflections with YOUR ears causing hearing some narrow frequency bands boosted or attenuated causing differencies in hearing things you mentioned. Or it can be something as trivial as the headphone model pre-conditioning you to pay more attention to certain things: You believe you hear more "detail" so you pay attention to chair creaks instead of the music thinking that's the detail other headphones "lack." Can you be even sure you have level-matched the headphones when you compare them?
« Last Edit: March 29, 2021, 08:06:15 AM by 71 dB »
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW track "Yin Yang"

Offline DavidW

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 764
  • Location: South Carolina, USA
Re: Headphones
« Reply #961 on: March 29, 2021, 09:07:44 AM »
I yet have to bring my Sennheiser 650 to the repair shop (no signal on the left side). In the past couple of months I’ve been listening with Grado SR125, cheaper but decent open air headphones. The sound is much different, airier, acoustically less blended. The treble response is quite high. That makes some recordings rather glaring and tiring to listen to. Typically I take the sound level one or two notches down, otherwise it’s blasty. I have better hearing on my left ear than the right - always have. That difference seems more noticeable on the Grados than the Sennheisers. These are not subjective impressions.

When I had Sennheiser repair my 580s back in the day it took them the better part of a month before I got them back.  You might want to get those in ASAP.  I like bright headphones but those Grados are known for being (and measuring) high on the treble, borderline sibilant.  So I'm with MI on that.  Don't tell a Grado headphone fan though, they'll go nuts!

Offline André

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10246
  • Location: Laval, QC
Re: Headphones
« Reply #962 on: March 29, 2021, 01:19:55 PM »
I’ve had Grados in the past, but a higher end product. Really liked them. I agree w your description (borderline sibilant), although this is more apparent on older recordings like that 1967 Melodiya I was listening to this morning. The Grados do this type of engineering no favour. I picked this one because it was cheapo (200$) and just for a short time. I’ll bring the Senns to the shop Friday  :).

Offline OrchestralNut

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4421
  • Cesar Franck, or Hugh Jackman as Wolverine
  • Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Re: Headphones
« Reply #963 on: April 14, 2021, 06:16:35 AM »
I know virtually nothing at all about headphones.I am looking for a pair of headphones with the following in order of importance.

1 - Comfort fit is of utmost importance.  I seem to have sensitive ears, whether it is earbuds, larger ear muff phones, ear plugs.  My ears can't seem to handle headphones for lengthy periods of time.  Something that is more clothlike, rather than leather, and not enclosing around the ears (not enveloping around the ears) would be ideal.  Of course, I think I will go into a store to check this out first hand.  Long and McQuade in Winnipeg, likely.

2 - I would say my budget is maximum around $300 CDN.  Ideally, a bit lower price than that, but I can a little bit more flexible on cost.

3 - Quality, of course.

Any recommendations based on my criteria before I go in store browsing are appreciated.  :)

Offline DavidW

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 764
  • Location: South Carolina, USA
Re: Headphones
« Reply #964 on: April 14, 2021, 09:18:43 AM »
Sennheiser 560s fit the bill for comfort and are fairly neutral but a little bit oddly colored.

AKG k612pro are the most neutral akg headphones and they are very comfortable excepting the headband which has bumps on the top.  I can't feel it but some really can.

Audio-Technica ad700x are bright, with exceptional soundstage and imagining but are bass anemic.  Depending on your head these are either the most comfortable headphones you could possibly own or completely unbearable.  It depends on how it sits on your head.  If they slide down and your ears have to take the weight (like they do for me) it is awful, but if it doesn't happen many find them to be AMAZINGLY comfortable.

These are the most comfortable audiophile quality headphones I know of in your price bracket.  Unfortunately either your dollar is weak or electronics are painfully overpriced in Canada because you should be able to get much better than that.

Offline OrchestralNut

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4421
  • Cesar Franck, or Hugh Jackman as Wolverine
  • Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Re: Headphones
« Reply #965 on: April 14, 2021, 09:29:49 AM »
Sennheiser 560s fit the bill for comfort and are fairly neutral but a little bit oddly colored.

AKG k612pro are the most neutral akg headphones and they are very comfortable excepting the headband which has bumps on the top.  I can't feel it but some really can.

Audio-Technica ad700x are bright, with exceptional soundstage and imagining but are bass anemic.  Depending on your head these are either the most comfortable headphones you could possibly own or completely unbearable.  It depends on how it sits on your head.  If they slide down and your ears have to take the weight (like they do for me) it is awful, but if it doesn't happen many find them to be AMAZINGLY comfortable.

These are the most comfortable audiophile quality headphones I know of in your price bracket.  Unfortunately either your dollar is weak or electronics are painfully overpriced in Canada because you should be able to get much better than that.

Thanks David.  Appreciate the feedback!