The Music Room > Composer Discussion

Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)

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vandermolen:
Any other nutter fans of this great Russian composer? Am listening to Polyansky's fine recording of Symphony 27 (Chandos) with a fine coupling of the Cello Concerto (Alexander Ivashkin, soloist).

The 27th is a valedictory work, written when the composer was dying of cancer (he postponed an operation to complete the work) and , to add insult to injury, was under the displeasure of the soviet regime having had his music denounced (alongside that of Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Khachaturian, Shebalin and Popov) at the notorious 1948 denunciation of composers from party hack Zhdanov. Miaskovsky's creative reply was the 27th Symphony a work of great autumnal beauty and power which (ironically) received a posthumous Stalin prize for the composer.

The slow, movement in particular is terribly moving and the symphony (from 1949/50) is, I believe, the last great,belated flowering of the spirit of Russian Romanticism that had moved Glazunov and Rachmaninov to create some of their finest work.

Miaskovsky (or Myaskovsky) is the link between the Russian nationalist composers of the 19th Century and the great figures of the 20th Century like Shostakovich and Prokofiev.

Guido:
The cello concerto is a superb work. It has the same sort of world weary nostalgia as the Elgar cello concerto, and was written at the end of the second world war (rather than the first). It's been recorded a few times, but I only recently heard the Rostropovich version - don't know why I'm surprised but it's easily the best version out there - his first recording. There's a live version too that is also superb. I thought I already loved the piece, but Rostropovich reveals it to be great work that it is - his colouring of the solo part is just wonderful.

vandermolen:

--- Quote from: Guido on June 12, 2007, 01:50:21 PM ---The cello concerto is a superb work. It has the same sort of world weary nostalgia as the Elgar cello concerto, and was written at the end of the second world war (rather than the first). It's been recorded a few times, but I only recently heard the Rostropovich version - don't know why I'm surprised but it's easily the best version out there - his first recording. There's a live version too that is also superb. I thought I already loved the piece, but Rostropovich reveals it to be great work that it is - his colouring of the solo part is just wonderful.

--- End quote ---

I agree. EMI have just reissued the studio recording with Malcolm Sargent. The Chandos version is very good too.

Harry:
The only works I have are on Naxos, and what I have heard of it, its right in my alley, but to find good recordings is another matter. The Naxos is very good, but were to go from there.

tjguitar:
No idea if this is a new recording, but I just saw this review of Op. 9:


http://www.goldenscores.com/?a=classical&id=63

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