Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 99583 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 16250
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #480 on: March 24, 2020, 07:13:34 AM »
Symphony no.16 "Aviation Symphony".



The crash of "Maxim Gorky" aeroplane is an incredible story. Miaskovsky wrote a symphony which will in the fullness of time stop this tragic event being forgotten - I was unaware, but not now! Not a program symphony, in fact the only part of the symphony that depicts the actual plane/crash (far as I'm aware) is the finale coda. Miaskovsky is more subtle as he alludes to the event without depicting it.

The first movement alternates in typical Miaskovsky fashion between a vigorous Waltonesque march and a secondary noble theme. The march comes out tops.

The second movement has nothing to do with aeroplanes but instead a beautiful pastoral scene. I have always thought that Russian and English music can be alike. Never more so then here, the opening with an oboe's soft tone is RVW to a tee. Best movement of the symphony for me.

A funeral march makes up the third movement for, I would imagine, the 45 who perished on the fateful day of the crash.

Initially I was  flummoxed by the finale. The last thing expected after the previous grave procession was a celebration (based on a song)! But the penny eventually dropped. The national pride of a feat of aero-engineering and at the end of the symphony, the crash, and stunned realisation.
Nice analysis Lol.
I love the slow movement in particular. I must listen to this symphony again soon. It features in the Melodiya 3 CD set.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1564
  • Location: Surrey, UK
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #481 on: March 24, 2020, 08:29:50 AM »
Nice analysis Lol.
I love the slow movement in particular. I must listen to this symphony again soon. It features in the Melodiya 3 CD set.

I omitted to mention, Jeffrey that Ivanov's 1950 recording is on YT. The first movement is very good but I found the second rushed compared to Svetlanov.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 16250
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #482 on: March 24, 2020, 01:46:05 PM »
I omitted to mention, Jeffrey that Ivanov's 1950 recording is on YT. The first movement is very good but I found the second rushed compared to Svetlanov.
I agree Lol. Svetlanov's is better.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).