Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 118434 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #640 on: February 10, 2021, 05:50:49 AM »
https://en.sgaf.ru/vkz

Here are some more details about the (free) live-streamed concert next month. I hope to at least be able to tune in for the one featuring the SQ No.13, 'The Kremlin at Night' and Symphony No.17.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #641 on: April 02, 2021, 02:32:16 PM »
I fear that this will go offline soon. It is one of the recent concerts. This one featured the wonderful String Quartet No.13, the cantata 'The Kremlin at Night' and Symphony No.17. For those who don't know it 'The Kremlin at Night' is a must here (from about 1 hour and 8 minutes into the concert):
https://sgaf.ru/afisha/28089
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #642 on: April 04, 2021, 02:34:59 AM »
Idk why I'm feeling the need to post about this, but I didn't really realize until now that Symphony No. 16 has two slow movements in the middle. I'd say the 3rd is the "proper" slow movement, with the weight that that implies. But the 2nd movement is far from a scherzo or any conventional dance movement. It might be considered an intermezzo as it's rather light in mood.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #643 on: April 05, 2021, 12:56:12 PM »
Idk why I'm feeling the need to post about this, but I didn't really realize until now that Symphony No. 16 has two slow movements in the middle. I'd say the 3rd is the "proper" slow movement, with the weight that that implies. But the 2nd movement is far from a scherzo or any conventional dance movement. It might be considered an intermezzo as it's rather light in mood.
Yes, I listened to it today (Konstantin Ivanov's 1950 recording). I agree that the second movement has more of an 'intermezzo' feel to it and that the main emotional weight is carried in the funeral march (for the victims of an aircraft disaster) of the third movement. I think that it is one of the finest of Miaskovsky's slow movements (No.8 has another fine example). Ivanov takes the movement much faster than Svetlanov but it conveys just as much depth of feeling:
« Last Edit: April 05, 2021, 01:00:33 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).