Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 123485 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #740 on: June 04, 2021, 09:44:43 AM »
https://www.ludwig-van.com/toronto/2021/05/14/lebrecht-listens-a-five-star-argument-for-prokofiev-over-stravinsky/

I am chilled steel to Lebrecht's perennial clickbait;  just wanted to remark that it is characeristically shallow of him to flog the dead Prokofiev > Stravinsky horse.
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Offline foxandpeng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #741 on: June 04, 2021, 11:41:48 AM »
I am chilled steel to Lebrecht's perennial clickbait;  just wanted to remark that it is characeristically shallow of him to flog the dead Prokofiev > Stravinsky horse.

Not a popular chap, then? As a novice to such things, I know no better  :)
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #742 on: June 04, 2021, 12:09:21 PM »
Not a popular chap, then? As a novice to such things, I know no better  :)

No worries. We're all learning.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #743 on: June 04, 2021, 09:38:28 PM »
I find the appreciation of different perspectives, fascinating. I'm no sort of expert on any area of orchestral music, and doubt I ever will be, so quite enjoyed this Prokofiev 6. I did read Lebrecht's review, who spoke of it as 'a game changer', but I need to hear a couple of comparators to gain a better grasp in light of your wisdom.

What I did find particularly lacking in his brief review, was his take on the Miaskovsky #27 as a piece influenced by political weariness rather than its place as a valedictory in the face of terminal illness. The fact that he places it close to peak RVW was also interesting. 

https://www.ludwig-van.com/toronto/2021/05/14/lebrecht-listens-a-five-star-argument-for-prokofiev-over-stravinsky/
I must listen to Prokofiev's 6th again, especially as others have spoken so highly of it. I was very moved, as I always am, by NYM's 27th Symphony. The booklet note writer sees the finale as a kind of satirical take on the expected soviet tub-thumping upbeat finale, but I don't see it that way at all.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #744 on: June 06, 2021, 06:08:13 AM »
The booklet for the Svetlanov complete set of Myaskovsky's symphonies was ineptly and sloppily thrown together, making it difficult to find which CD contains a particular symphony. For example, there is no entry for Symphony 18 but two for Symphony 8. Anyway, I got tired of it so I made a simple table of contents (just for the symphonies) to paste inside the box:


« Last Edit: June 06, 2021, 06:14:10 AM by BasilValentine »

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #745 on: June 06, 2021, 09:04:10 AM »
Must be the Warner/Erato one because the Alto/Olympia tracklisting is fine.

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #746 on: June 06, 2021, 01:18:26 PM »
Yeah, Warner France. Are there actual liner notes in the other edition?

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #747 on: June 06, 2021, 09:19:05 PM »
Yeah, Warner France. Are there actual liner notes in the other edition?
Yes, Alto has a 36 page booklet of notes and a downloadable feature on their website for the four symphonies inadvertently left out of the booklet (see below):
http://altocd.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/ALC-3141-Extra-4-Pages.pdf
« Last Edit: June 06, 2021, 09:50:30 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online kyjo

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #748 on: June 07, 2021, 06:42:41 AM »
Amongst the chorus of praise for Myaskovsky’s music here, I must admit that I have issues with his style of orchestration. :-\ I often find it to be rather “dour” and “grey” without the delicious dashes of color and flair that, say, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and Kabalevsky provide in their orchestration. In Myaskovsky’s music I find there to be a lot of emphasis on middle register instruments (clarinets, violas, etc.) and not enough contrast between the upper and lower registers of the orchestra. Of course, this is just a purely personal opinion and this may have been the intended expressive effect of M’s way of orchestrating. I won’t doubt that he was quite a fine melodist and had a talent for developing motives to create long-breathed symphonic statements.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #749 on: June 07, 2021, 08:47:53 AM »
Amongst the chorus of praise for Myaskovsky’s music here, I must admit that I have issues with his style of orchestration. :-\ I often find it to be rather “dour” and “grey” without the delicious dashes of color and flair that, say, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and Kabalevsky provide in their orchestration. In Myaskovsky’s music I find there to be a lot of emphasis on middle register instruments (clarinets, violas, etc.) and not enough contrast between the upper and lower registers of the orchestra. Of course, this is just a purely personal opinion and this may have been the intended expressive effect of M’s way of orchestrating. I won’t doubt that he was quite a fine melodist and had a talent for developing motives to create long-breathed symphonic statements.
I'm sure that the music critic David Nice would agree with you Kyle - as far as I can see he has nothing but negativity to express about NYM's music. Having said that, he told me that he thought highly of the opening of the 4th symphony and since my exchanges with him I have come to appreciate that work much more.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).