Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 148654 times)

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Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #800 on: November 18, 2021, 10:52:59 PM »
16 has a wonderful funeral-march slow movement (inspired by the air disaster of the 'Maxim Gorky' aircraft). No.24 (in memory of one of NYM's friends) is one of the most deeply felt - I agree. Gauk's performance of Symphony No.17 (which I think is dedicated to the conductor) is well worth hearing, although Svetlanov's recording is fine too.
This fine three CD set, with its extraordinary cover image, features recordings of symphonies 16,17,21,22,25 and 27 by different conductors:

« Last Edit: November 18, 2021, 10:58:13 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline kyjo

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #801 on: November 23, 2021, 07:46:07 AM »
My favorite works by him are definitely Symphonies 24 (mainly for the slow movement) and 25, Cello Sonata no. 2 (beautiful!), and String Quartet no. 13. I recall thinking rather highly of the 6th Symphony, so I must revisit that one. 
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Offline Irons

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #802 on: November 23, 2021, 09:10:27 AM »
My favorite works by him are definitely Symphonies 24 (mainly for the slow movement) and 25, Cello Sonata no. 2 (beautiful!), and String Quartet no. 13. I recall thinking rather highly of the 6th Symphony, so I must revisit that one.

Very much agree with the 2nd Cello Sonata. So many symphonies, I have trouble recalling which is which although they are all different and each has special qualities.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #803 on: November 23, 2021, 10:53:02 AM »
My favorite works by him are definitely Symphonies 24 (mainly for the slow movement) and 25, Cello Sonata no. 2 (beautiful!), and String Quartet no. 13. I recall thinking rather highly of the 6th Symphony, so I must revisit that one.

No love for the last symphony, the 27th? I'll have to give a listen to the SQ and Cello Sonata No. 2 you mention. I haven't heard them in quite some time.
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #804 on: November 25, 2021, 12:56:07 AM »
No love for the last symphony, the 27th? I'll have to give a listen to the SQ and Cello Sonata No. 2 you mention. I haven't heard them in quite some time.
The valedictory No.27 is very moving and definitely one of my favourites. I regret that Gauk's marvellous performance has never been released on CD.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #805 on: November 25, 2021, 06:58:26 AM »
The valedictory No.27 is very moving and definitely one of my favourites. I regret that Gauk's marvellous performance has never been released on CD.

It's an incredibly moving and poignant work. He was dying as he was writing it much like Finzi was with his Cello Concerto.
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #806 on: November 25, 2021, 11:08:07 AM »
It's an incredibly moving and poignant work. He was dying as he was writing it much like Finzi was with his Cello Concerto.
Yes, that's very true John. Rootham's Second Symphony is, I find, unbearably moving for the same reason.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #807 on: November 25, 2021, 12:02:24 PM »
Yes, that's very true John. Rootham's Second Symphony is, I find, unbearably moving for the same reason.

Indeed. I should revisit that Rootham symphony at some point. Too much music, so little time per usual. :)
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #808 on: November 27, 2021, 06:40:41 PM »
The other day I heard the 24th under Titov (Northern Flowers label) and I confirmed my admiration and liking for the first two movements. The 3rd has some nice moments, but in this performance I felt a lack of drive and excitement. It's one of my favorites along with 16-19, 21, 22, 24-27.

I need to hear a recording of the 6th that really convinces me of its qualities.
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #809 on: November 27, 2021, 10:03:54 PM »
No love for the last symphony, the 27th? I'll have to give a listen to the SQ and Cello Sonata No. 2 you mention. I haven't heard them in quite some time.

It's a fine work but hasn't quite sent me off to the "Pieces that blown you away recently" thread, at least not yet. I'm a bit pickier about my Miaskovsky than some folks. ;)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #810 on: November 27, 2021, 11:49:39 PM »
I need to hear a recording of the 6th that really convinces me of its qualities.
Do you know this one Cesar? (picture below). It has been very effectively remastered by Paul Arden-Taylor for Alto. The performance was always great IMO but the Russian Disc release was not great sound (from 1959). It's inexpensive (with informative notes  8)). My other recommendations are Jarvi's DGG recording (fine performance and great sound but possibly absurdly expensive now) and Stankovsky's old Marco Polo recording (not transferred to Naxos). It was  the first CD release and not that well reviewed, but I like it. Svetlanov's (Olympia/Alto) is great but unfortunately it excludes the (optional) choir at the end. The more recent Kondrashin release (on Melodiya) is very good but the crucial flute passage in the trio section of the scherzo (one of my favourite moments in all music) is IMO played much too fast, sounds rushed and loses its poignancy.
Here's an old comparative review of releases on Marco Polo, Russian Disc and Olympia which might be of interest:
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm
(Jarvi Review)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/nov06/Miaskovsky_6_4716552.htm

(Alto/Kondrashin)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/May/Myaskovsky_sy6_ALC1421.htm
Here's a review of the later Kondrashin recording (written by me  ;D) in which I attempt a comparative survey. It was written before the Alto release of the older Kondrashin recording.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/may06/Myaskovsky_6_MELCD1000841.htm
Sorry, I've gone a bit OTT on this post  ::):
« Last Edit: November 28, 2021, 12:12:20 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline aligreto

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #811 on: November 28, 2021, 03:04:40 AM »

Sorry, I've gone a bit OTT on this post  ::):

No-one here will complain on that score, Jeffrey  ;)
What we would like is more of the same!  ;D
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Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #812 on: November 28, 2021, 09:50:06 AM »
No-one here will complain on that score, Jeffrey  ;)
What we would like is more of the same!  ;D
:)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #813 on: November 28, 2021, 08:20:49 PM »
Do you know this one Cesar? (picture below). It has been very effectively remastered by Paul Arden-Taylor for Alto. The performance was always great IMO but the Russian Disc release was not great sound (from 1959). It's inexpensive (with informative notes  8)). My other recommendations are Jarvi's DGG recording (fine performance and great sound but possibly absurdly expensive now) and Stankovsky's old Marco Polo recording (not transferred to Naxos). It was  the first CD release and not that well reviewed, but I like it. Svetlanov's (Olympia/Alto) is great but unfortunately it excludes the (optional) choir at the end. The more recent Kondrashin release (on Melodiya) is very good but the crucial flute passage in the trio section of the scherzo (one of my favourite moments in all music) is IMO played much too fast, sounds rushed and loses its poignancy.
Here's an old comparative review of releases on Marco Polo, Russian Disc and Olympia which might be of interest:
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm
(Jarvi Review)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/nov06/Miaskovsky_6_4716552.htm

(Alto/Kondrashin)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/May/Myaskovsky_sy6_ALC1421.htm
Here's a review of the later Kondrashin recording (written by me  ;D) in which I attempt a comparative survey. It was written before the Alto release of the older Kondrashin recording.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/may06/Myaskovsky_6_MELCD1000841.htm
Sorry, I've gone a bit OTT on this post  ::):

Very helpful, Jeffrey. Thanks a lot. This information will allow me to decide better.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #814 on: November 29, 2021, 12:27:30 AM »
Very helpful, Jeffrey. Thanks a lot. This information will allow me to decide better.
My pleasure Cesar. This is a strong performance as well (great cover art from the painter Isaac Levitan: 'Eternal Rest')
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).